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tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  February 5, 2016 7:00am-9:01am EST

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♪ democratic dual with just days to go before the new hampshire primary and hillary clinton and bernie sanders facing the one on one debate. [gunfi [gunfire] battle for aleppo intensifies sending thousands fleeing for the turkish border. wikileaks founder and does it mean he will soon walk free? ♪ and remembering the life of earth, wind and fire cofounder maurice white. ♪
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head to head in new hampshire the democratic presidential hopefuls square off in the final debate before the crucial primary, welcome to your world this morning, i'm stephanie sy. >> i'm del walters and things heated on the campaign trail with four days before the first of the nation category and pulling out the stops to win over voters. bernie is leading hillary clinton by a wide margin in new hampshire and as we report clinton tried to close that gap last night saying she is the candidate who can get things done. >> a progressive is someone who makes progress, that is what i intend to do. >> reporter: in their first one on one debate, their last before the new hampshire primary democrats bernie sanders and hillary clinton battled over who is the real progressive. >> secretary clinton does represent the establishment. i represent i hope ordinary
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americans and by the way who are not all that inavid with the establishment. >> reporter: they squared off over healthcare. >> i'm not going to talk about big ideas like single payers and then on the level with people about how much it will cost. >> not acceptable belief the united states of america and our government can't stand up to the rip offices of the pharmaceutical industry. >> reporter: atrade blows over foreign policy. >> when we both look at the same evidence about the wisdom of the war in iraq one of us voted the right way and one of us didn't. >> reporter: it was more intense and more personal than past democratic debates but for all the sharp elbows there were also polled punches, on secretary clinton's e-mail controversy. >> how are you feeling about these darn e-mails now? >> feeling exactly the way i felt at the first debate, there is a process underway, i will
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not politicize it. >> reporter: whether he ran a misleading ad. >> do you want 30 seconds on this issue? >> no. >> reporter: sharpest attack of the night came from secretary clinton accusing sanders campaign of being dishonest and negative. >> so i think it's time to end the very artful smear that you and your campaign have been carrying out in resent weeks and let's talk about it. >> reporter: clinton expecting a loss in new hampshire next door to vermont sanders home state and she plays up to her electability come november. >> i can only tell you what i believe is that i'm the strongest candidate to take it to the republicans in november. >> reporter: after spending two hours highlighting their differences the rivals ended with something they can agree on. >> on our worst days i think it is fair to say we are 100 times better than any republican
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candidate. >> reporter: on tuesday new hampshire voters will decide which democrat they think can actually beat a republican candidate. paul with al jazeera, new york. the candidates are criss-crossing the state today, all over the weekend as well trying to win over the undecided voters, what are the voters telling you? >> good morning to you del and undecided voters are a big deal in new hampshire and a third are undecided and many of them going to an average of five events and a lot of them make their decision in the very final moments, right at the ballot and really they can choose any one that they want, they can go republican or democrat on primary day. we talked to one woman who intentionally goes to each candidate twice just to make sure their message is genuine, take a listen. >> i want to see if i'm
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listening to somebody who is just giving me a cannoted speech or somebody who is genuine and authentic. >> reporter: and the candidates know this. we went to a chris christie event yesterday afternoon and one of the things he said in his town hall was you new hampshire people you like to shop and that is certainly true. they definitely do and like i said these undeclared voters meaning they have not registered as a republican or democrat that is unique to new hampshire they really can choose anyone from either side of the aisle and when we talk to voters they are going from bernie to trump to casic to rubio and trying to find the right person for them. >> they will be debating in new hampshire as well and heard from the democrats last night, what do the voters want to hear from the candidates on the republican side of the aisle? >> reporter: i think it's the same situation, you have so many
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undecided, people want to hear you know that they are looking for a candidate who is real. i think that is part of the reason why they go to these events, a lot of people saying i want to see how genuine these people are. would i have them sit in my dinner table and have dinner with them and would that feel good so a lot of times that is why they want to see these people in person versus seeing them on t.v. with the debate but an interest thing about the debate last night we were at an fiorini event and people are upset because she has been excluded to m and from the abc debate because she finished 7th and didn't qualify, 7th in iowa and in resent polls not doing well and she is fighting that and not the only one excluded and virginia jim gilmor is as well and talking to undecided voters they say it's not fair, they want the media to make sure that everybody gets involved so that the voters have a fair shot
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at choosing who they want and we talked to one voter and this is what she had to say. >> all right so we are going to have that for you, yeah, we will bring that to you next hour but really some party big wigs like romney and newt gingrich are behind her saying get her on to that debate stage, that is the only fair thing to have happen here. >> erica is live in manchester, new hampshire and thank you very much, also dr. ben carson downsizing his campaign even though at one time he was the frontrunner and carson cutting more than 50 positions after his poor performance in iowa, that is about half of his campaign staff. campaign also reducing salaries and shrinking the size of the entourage and lead to commercial flight instead of private jets and hillary clinton is not the only person who received mails on a personal server and her two
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predecessor rice and powell receiving e-mails of information that is now deemed to be classified and ten to rice's senior aids when she was in office and powell two e-mails and he denies the information was sent to him at the time, neither of that information received was ever top secret at the time it was sent. this morning tens of thousands of refugees heading to turkey to flee heavy fighting near the city of aleppo and as many as 70,000 people are moving towards the border. the u.n. monitoring group put the number closer to 40,000 but aleppo exodus comes assad government offensive there and another break down of peace talks in geneva and zaina has the latest from turkey. >> reporter: what we are witnessing is the latest humanitarian crisis in see syria, tens of thousands of people on the move according to the syrian observatory for human rights 40,000 people have fled their homes in the northern countryside of aleppo as a result of the ongoing government
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offensive and the government offensive is being backed by russian air strikes and we can actually hear explosions in the distance and intense bombardment and the rebels are promising to fight back but whether or not they can confront this on the ground they managed to cut through rebel held territory and what they are trying to do now is encircle the city of aleppo and means the rebel controlled east of that city will become besieged and what is the fate of the 200-300,000 people inside that city. as of yet there is not a mass exodus from the city but the 40,000 people who fled their homes are from the countryside and towns and villages are now abandon and what is becoming clear is the government and their allies are doing their best to gain as much ground as possible because whoever has the upper hand on the ground has the upper hand on the negotiating table. >> zaina reporting and the peace
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talks in geneva are on hold until at least the end of the month and opposition will not return until the government offensive starts. saudi arabia says it's ready to send ground troops to fight i.s.i.l. inside syria but only if they are asked and it's the first time the kingdom has a willingness to have the soldiers take part in any i.s.i.l. combat operations and belonging to the u.s. led coalition conducting air strikes against i.s.i.l. and u.n. peace keeping mission in central african republic has 7 cases of alleged sex abuse and involve women and girls who were gang wrapped and u.n. peacekeepers deployed to the central african republic to restore order in 2013 after a spike in religious problems there and this is after 20 allegations last year of sex abuse by peace keeping forces. >> u.n. has decided to take immediate measures including the repatriation of 120 soldiers from the republic of congo deployed from the 17th of
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september to the 14th of december, 2014 and this re patriation and they will be confined to barracks. >> reporter: they sexually abused children as young as nine, often luring them away with food. u.n. panel says wikileaks founder julian assange is unfairly detained in britain and should be allowed to walk free and be compensated but britain says it's not legally binding and arrest warrant still in place and he is in the ecuador embassy since 2012 and trying to avoid extradition to sweden as part of a sex crime allegations and we have details. >> reporter: the findings are here and say the deprivation of his liberty is in contravention of the universal declaration of human rights that he should be
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given freedom of movement and should be compensated, undoubtedly this is call quote an embarrassing for the british and swedish government, they have both rejected the panel's findings in forthright terms and hammond the british foreign secretary said this was a ridiculous conclusion and the british intended to contest it. what has actually changed in practical terms perhaps not very much you can probably see the british police van at the foot of the ecuador emba ba si and says if he tries to leave he will be arrested and you would have thought, however that behind the scenes diplomatically there is more incentive for the swedish, ecuador and british government to have a resolution to this long running and farsical situation. >> from london. british authorities want to serve warrants here in the u.s.,
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negotiations underway on a plan to allow to serve taps on u.s. companies to give access from live communications to archived e-mails involving britt i suspects living here in the united states. f.b.i. is asking the last of those protesters at the wildlife refuge in oregon to turn themselves in and a federal grand jurily indicting bundy and 15 others and the standoff is in the 3 third day and arrested last week facing multiple charges including conspiracy to impede officers of the united states, the four people who are still inside the refuge now facing the same charges. outside here in new york city this morning it's a wet mess, will welcome the weekend with snow today and we will bring in nicole mitchell with more on this. >> reporter: the front moved through a couple days ago with severe weather in the south and as it pulled off the coastline and talking about this yesterday pressure on the southern end of
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that and crawling its way up the coastline and while the southeast mostly is cleared off but could see more impacts from this later on it is now really the mid-atlantic up through the northeast that is getting the second round from the same storm. a lot of this is snow. you get a little further south it's rain and some of the coasting areas it's just starting to convert over and the more the further north and closer to the coastline are some of the higher totals and a lot of cases this is a slushy wet snow. yesterday i mentioned more of a nuisance snow because new york 32 and philadelphia 36 with the snow and right at the freezing mark, the ground in a lot of cases is warmer than the last few days and not all of this is going to stick particularly well but if you get out places like i think we have a live from long island this morning and depends on what side of the island you are on and there goes someone in it but you can see visibility is
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accident here anything from just an inch or two on one side to as you get closer to the atlantic and kind of more on that side could be the 4-8 so we do have a couple of places and if you get into maine possibly 8-12 and closer to where the system is passing by so different winter weather advisories and storm warnings for the high total amounts and this clears off by new york kind of by about midday today for the northeast portion of the extreme new england it's later in today and look at this it redevelops today for the day tomorrow and we could have rain for places from florida to north carolina still the same front causing us all those problems. >> nicole thank you very much. >> well you could call it the silent treatment. >> on the advice of counsel i invoke the fifth amendment and respectfully decline to answer your question. >> refusing to testify before congress but with a smirk on his
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face. inside mental health courts and designed to help those with special needs but are the courts actually hurting them? ♪
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i really don't think these kinds of attacks by insinuation is worthy of you and enough is enough. if you've got something to say say it directly but you will not find that i ever changed a view or a vote because of any donation that i ever received. >> there were fireworks hillary clinton and bernie sanders during last night's debate and she called strategy on the situation of campaign financing
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and artful smear. >> and drew a lot of boos from that comment. it is just one of the many sharp barbs they traded on the stage and we have the senior reporter on integrity and dave thanks for being with us and a big clash of the night is when sanders attacked hillary clinton to big banks like goldman sacs and paid hundreds of thousands of dollars in speaker fees and this is what he had to say. >> in my view the business view of wall street is flawed and i believe that corruption is rampant. >> we both want to reign in the accesses of wall street. >> reporter: dave, did clinton adequately defend herself against what she called sanders artful smear on her record when it comes to bank regulation? >> we will know in a couple days when voters in new hampshire go to the polls but this was
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stephanie one of the most pointed exchanges of the entire campaign. hurricane hurricane for -- hillary clinton was floating above the fray and not attack or address bernie sanders necessarily and things are getting real because in new hampshire the polls are pointing in sanders direction and he is leading and possible he is going to win new hampshire and puts hillary clinton in a very different place going in the later states in south carolina and nevada where she will probably do a lot better. >> a lot of people say he sort of has a home court advantage in new hampshire and clinton interestingly was asked by one of the motivators if she would make public the speeches that she has made to people like the bankers at goldman sacs do you think she will be probed more about that in coming days and will we see the transcripts released and will that impact her campaign? >> sanders campaign will be pounding in like a drum in the sense that hillary clinton is standing up saying look i have
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not received any undo help or what not, i have not done any favors for anyone at goldman sacs or any of the other banks. bernie sanders is going to come back, throw it in her face and say you gave the speeches and got hundreds of thousands for doing so and maybe you were not a senator at the time it was happening but what do you have to hide and why don't you release the transcripts and why don't you tell us more about what is going on and should be important to note that bernie sanders is likely to talk about donations that hillary clinton he received from big banks in 2008 and received a lot of the money and the biggest named banks and is an issue whether it's something that hillary clinton likes or not. >> that of course is public record and follows the money on campaigns but is there any evidence that clinton's paid speeches or contributions from wall street donors have actually impacted her policy views?
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>> that is her point, she says look there is no quid proquo and nothing anyone can really point to to indicate i have done something differently as a result of giving a speech or getting a contribution, getting a donation but guilt by association is sort of the tag that the sanders campaign seems to take that while look you are giving access to people who otherwise wouldn't have it but contributions and giving money to speak before them this is something that i bernie sanders would never do and fighting against these banks and that plays very well with the kind of elaborate that bernie sanders is trying to target, people who are just sick of the way that wall street has worked and tired of the way that banks often times will operate and still remember 2008 when everything melted down so this is what bernie sanders is playing on right now and at least in new hampshire it's working pretty well stephanie. >> the other dirty word other than wall street may have been super pac and sanders is
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pointing out he is the only one without a super pack behind him and funded by 3 1/2 million contributions averaging $27, dave is that true and how does that perception help him compared to secretary clinton? >> bernie sanders likes to use that line a lot, i'm the only candidate who doesn't have a super pac and put an asterisk to that because there is a nurse's union that has a super pac that has been out supporting bernie sanders to the tune of more than a million dollars so you cannot compare that support to for example with hillary clinton what she has and a consolation of super packs that raised tens of millions of dollars and if sanders likes it they can support candidates without the candidates approval so it's disingenuous for bernie sanders to say that but one point that needs to be made about hillary clinton super pac is whether they will get involved in attacking bernie sanders or
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helping hillary clinton during the primary and want to keep their powder dry and sit on this money and don't want to use it against the democrat, they want to use it against a republican but if bernie sanders is going to pull off a couple victories and string together some wins it's a big question looming for hillary clinton and the super pacs as to whether they are going to get involved in the primary which could be having some major implications down the line for the general election. >> one other comment i want to get from you because you've also covered the coke brothers and huge contributions to political campaigns came up a few times and funding efforts to privatize the va are the coke brothers having as much influence in washington as the left is portraying them to have? >> well, they are -- or have a massive machine and at least in a political context they have a number of different organizations, many of them nonprofit organizations like super pacs can advocate for and
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against candidates to some extent and also don't have to ex close who the donors are. on the right you have a situation where they too the coke brother's network of organizations and funders don't want to get too involved in the primary and want to get involved in the general election and go after the democratic as opposed to going after other republicans and one group is the american future fund backed by the coke brothers and going after kasic the governor of ohio who is running and remains to be seen whether that is going to be an harbinger of things to come if the republican race is to drag on for not just days and weeks but even a few months and that is an entire possibility. >> dave levinthal and thank you for your insights and good to see you. >> my pleasant thank you. also in washington there is anchor and a little confusion this morning over the latest public appearance by martin the former drug company ceo famous for hiking the prices and drawing public anger and he went
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before congress but didn't really have much to say. al jazeera's libby casey reports. >> reporter: martin skreli facing federal fraud charges was summoned before congress to defend the defense that pharmaceuticals jacked up the price from 13.50 to 750 per pill and health members got no answers. >> what do you say to that old pregnant woman who might have aids, no income? she needs deraprin to survive and what do you say to her when she has to make the choice? >> on advice of council i invoke the 5th amendment and respectfully decline to answer your question. >> reporter: it's a reply he repeated over and over. >> do you think you have done anything wrong? >> on the advice of council i invoke my fifth amendment privilege against self incrimination and respectfully decline to answer your question.
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>> reporter: members of the house oversight committee pressed him only why he raised the price of deraprim and asked him to instead be an advocate for patients. >> the way i see it you can go down in history as the poster boy for greedy drug company executives or you can change the system. yeah, you. you have the knowledge about drug companies and the system we have today and i truly believe, i truly believe, are you listenin listening? >> yes. >> thank you. i truly believe you could become a force of tremendous good. >> we will pause for a moment as mr. skreli is escorted out. >> reporter: not to testify infuriated committee members and released him after just ten minutes. >> i don't think i have ever seen a committee treated with
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such contempt. >> reporter: skreli was quiet during the hearing and took to twitter afterwards to mock committee members writing hard to accept they represent the people in our government. his lawyer did the talking for him. >> but on balance at the end of the story mr. skreli will be in my view cleared of criminal charges that have nothing to do with deramrim and see he has saved many, many lives by his brilliance. >> reporter: his appearance on thursday didn't win him any fans in congress, libby casey in washington. guns on college campuses. >> florida moves closer to allow concealed firearms at colleges. the movie ban from being seen in the country where it was made and a film about neglected ethnic minorities.
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>> understanding the epidemic. >> it was terrifying. >> it's like navigating a minefield. >> go inside the new medical breakthrough. >> you had quite a reaction there. >> that's crazy. >> i really feel my life changing. >> the freedom is unbelievable. >> techknow's team of experts show you how the miracles of science... >> this is what innovation looks like. >> ...can affect and surpise us. >> i feel like we're making an impact. >> let's do it. >> techknow, where technology meets humanity... >> only on al jazeera america. welcome back to your world this morning. a look at today's top stories. no holding back in the debate last night. days go before the primary. hillary clinton and bernie sanders going after each other. clinton for what she called his artful smear of her past, taking
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fees from wall street informs >> then of thousands refugees are fleeing the city of aleppo. as many as 70,000 are moving towards the border. bashar al-assad launched a new offensive to force rebels out of the city. the leader of wikileaks has been determined as being held illy lee. britain is saying the u.n. decision is not legally binding guns on campus, colleges in florida are one step cleeser to becoming gun friendly some people are allowed to bring in guns but it is kon tremendous versal >> reporter: the bill approved by the florida house will allow permit holderss 231 and older to
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carry guns on campuses. at the university of kansas one student activist outlined what the policy allowing guns on kansas will be allowed there. >> students will be able to carry in all classrooms. >> reporter: the university of texas is working on rules to comply with the state law allow concealed carry. it takes effect august 1. gun rights activist john lot said concealed guns deter attacks on campus >> time after time where killers talk about picking a place where they don't believe people have guns because they know they can kill more people before they get stopped. they target these places time after time >> reporter: open carry of weapons is allowed on in texas but not on college campuses. some schools like the university of arizona have been polling
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students. 68% of students there oppose the bill being considered in the legislature to allow guns on campus. five states permit concealed weapons with some restrictions. at least 11 prohibit them all together and the rest require them to be in locked cars or leave it up to college decision a florida state representative, the only democrat to support the concealed bill is joining us. thanks for being with us again. each day we are seeing more and more of those videos of police who have specific training being accused of excessive force. for someone who is trying to protect themselves. are you confident that the student sitting next to your child will know the difference between justified and excessive force when they decide to pull the trigger? >> well, let me say this. these are 21-year-olds that have concealed weapons permission
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that would be allowed to have guns on campus. they're not a 18 to 21-year-old, not anyone. you can't have had an felony, a domestic misdemeanor, trouble with alcohol or drugs, and you can't have been in a mental institution. there are other things as well. concealed weapons permit holder, there is a good background check do you think they will exercise the right judgment when it comes to pulling a trigger when we're having so many difficult situations with law enforcement officers who are not making that right decision themselves? >> i do, actually. that's a great question because the universe of permit holders in florida is extremely law-abiding. we're six more times law-abiding than law enforcement officers aas was testified in a committee
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hearing and also stated on the house floor by the co-sponsor of the bill, representative greg stubie. i do trust that this will be fine. i am a college professor and have been on college campuses teaching since 1987 and i have my law degree and i've been on campuses. i've never seen a background check for a gun i have taught on the college level and from a personal standpoint, personal only, i'm not sure i would be that comfortable with the students i taught having guns. what about with a student coming in after a night's break-inning? >> i have taught controversial classes before and i would feel comfortable having a hand gun with me. i've had some difficulties in
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classes over the 30 years that i have taught, handled them, but it is concerning. i don't know who has a gun in their backpack illegally. that's very concerning. i have never seen a backpack checked on a campus or me check a student when they come into my office on my campus what about the right of the student who doesn't want sit next to someone who is packing? >> that's not in the constitution. what is in the constitution is a second amendment right. i also support first amendment rights and all of the rights. there is no right not to sit next to someone who may have a hand gun. i do think that we need to get away from gun-free zones. i think they make soft targets that terrorists and others take advantage of. i feel safer with concealed weapons permit holders having
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guns on campus you do speak from personal experience on this. i want to ask you about the state of emergency that has been declared in four counties in your state over the zika virus. are you concerned for your district? >> my district is in the northern part of florida and i'm not as concerned, but i am very concerned. i think we need to have all hands on deck on this one. this is very concerning. it is almost a nightmare scenario worldwide. i mean, if you look at the maps, it's really very concerning, but if we come together, all of us come together with the resources we have, i think we should get this under control. i have a great deal of compassion for the families who have already been affected and i would like to know how this got so virulent so fast and under our noses.
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this has spread like wild fire. it was relatively innocuous for years, it has never caused this much damage and trouble. i know people are working on it. i will speak to my colleagues so all hands on deck on this one thank you. a very controversial issue. thank you for coming back and explaining it. >> thank you very much a huge gas leak near l.a. could be capped by the end of next week. a relief well is expected to intercept the leak in porter rank. it has been leaking gas for months. the first longful death suit linked to the leak. the family of a 79-year-old woman say that she was suffering electric can cancer but the gas
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exacerbated her treatment as our correspondent reports now, they also face growing criticism. >> reporter: that's one of the tortoises. >> sometimes i would think that he liked reptiles better than people, but not so >> reporter: a few years ago he diagnosed as bipolar stole one like this from a wildlife center. months later he returned it. within days the police called to say he was under arrest >> they said that it was worth over $300. >> reporter: he ended up here at the mental health court. it was set up 13 years ago to treat mental illegally ill defendants while holding them accountable for their alleged crimes. instead of helping these defendants, the court is hurting them critics say.
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when courts psychologist find people mentally incompetent, they have to have classes until they're deemed competent. so it is piling up here. >> i understand how upset it is. >> reporter: this judge says it takes an average of three years for low-level cases to wind their way to court compared to about six months in a regular court >> we have many, many cases. it is a full day's work. >> reporter: the defendants prepare for trial and might be locked up >> jail is not the right setting for somebody who is mentally ill. unfortunately, the jail is the largest mental health provider in the county. >> reporter: there's not enough room outside the jails for that mental health treatment? >> there are not enough services
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for the mentally ill. >> reporter: public defender helped set up the court. he is now the most vocal critic. he blames prosecutors. >> they allow too many people into the system, they refuse to let anybody out of the system and what happens is the system becomes completely over loaded and over whelmed. >> reporter: state attorney declined an interview with us. he sent us this: he also said: >> reporter: this people say their son was under house arrest >> he couldn't go outside to feed the turtles >> reporter: his case was transferred to a regular court
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and the house arrest was lifted but he was scarred by the mental health court >> i saw the decline of my son's mental state. i saw him worrying constantly. >> reporter: one day just over a year ago they came home to find their 38-year-old son dead overdosed on pain-killers >> i went in and i saw my child lying flat on his face with blood coming out of miss mouth and he was dead. i wanted to die too. i really did. >> reporter: mich, do you think if he had not gone through this court, he would still be alive today? >> yes. this pushed him over. >> reporter: the state attorney's office told us his death was tragic, but the office handled his case appropriately. they say they want the court shut down. >> in loving memory of him.
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>> reporter: i think he would have liked that. >> yes today wallmart is closing the last of 9154 stores-- 154 stores that it will shut. >> reporter: less than 10 miles from here it is a city that has sheen hard luck. a quarter of the residents live in poverty and a steel plant laid off a thousand workers last year. >> this is terrible down town >> reporter: the mayor says no-one was expecting to hear wallwalmart would shot under the circumstances door. >> it is a blow. >> reporter: aside from 300 jobs and the tax base now gone, wall walmart's closing leaves a food
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desert. many don't own cars and about 20% of residents are seniors. >> fairfield no longer mass a grocery store. people have to have these stores. they have to eat >> wall walmart supply our pharmacy, clothing, food, all other little necessities that we needed. >> reporter: wall walmart recently closed more than 150 stores across the country. fairfield is one of three communities where it is left. the government considered a food desert a community where at least a fifth of the residents live in poverties and a third more than a mile from a supermarket. in rural areas the distance is more than 10 miles. without wall walmart is a few miles away but the problem is getting here for people without transportation. if you're walking, you have to cross this busy highway where there is no crosswalk.
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>> reporter: 89-year-old eleanor says she has to get someone to pick up their food. >> unless you have a family member that will bring your food >> reporter: wall walmart issued a statement saying: >> reporter: the mayor tells us he and other leaders pleaded with wall walmart officials not to close, but worries those efforts may have come too late >> we must go to the drawing board to find out how we can survive. >> reporter: jonathan martin the wall walmart closings are expected to cost 16,000 people their jobs. in our next hour we will take a closer look at the impact of that and the latest unemployment numbers that are due out around 8.30 the weather though, there is
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a clipper system. >> reporter: this is really, i would say, you know, again, nuisance snow. the more potential snow falls in this north-east system. you can also see we have a couple of little different areas into the mid west, another round for portions of the north-west. so snow totals are not here because a lot of places it is two inches or less, but we have to match more into the weekend, high winds with the next system could go over 50 mile an hour. that will be a problem. then after a little bit of a break you can see more of that rain starting to come into the pacific north-west. we will deal with more rounds of systems here as well as we head towards the weekend thank you a new film about minorities in bangladesh is getting good reviews overseas but no-one inside the country is being allowed to see it. >> reporter: our correspondent reports say they don't want it shown. >> reporter: film festivals here
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are a rare occasion to promote bangladeshi movies, not just for a global people but the local people. >> the old cinema malls are dying and the new film theatres has not been replaced in that way. this is one crisis that you cannot show to the larger audience >> reporter: at the same time, bloke movies have been receiving more recognition abroad. but the bangladeshi film with most international attention this year won't be screened at home any time soon. my bicycle, the first movie about bangladesh indigenous movies hasn't been cleared. >> translation: we financed the film by asking around. my wife and friends gave money. the crew worked for free, so
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that was a crowd funding model. >> reporter: he showed us a letter from the censors showing his movie wasn't getting clearance because of concerns that it portrayed the military in a negative way. the army presence is heavy in indigenous areas. >> reporter: it is pretty difficult for any kind of end film maker in bangladesh to get their movies screens p screened in theatres like this one, but the stakes are high with my bicycle. it is a rare glimpse into the lives of the country's indigenous minorities who are usually ignored in mainstream media. their culture is in danger of disappearing. >> translation: our language survived through its use. we can't afford to produce books
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in our language. >> reporter: it is a state of affairs this man hopes his film will change, but he needs a board of censors who are less sensitive counting down to show time. >> as long as lebron shows. we will be good the k9 competitors in a huge flood race.
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music world mourning a loss today, a major loss. maurice white, who was diagnosed with parkinson's disease 20 years ago. >> reporter: i thought they were amazing. i made it my goal. he was going to you will never work with earth wind and fire. so i finally got there. every single artist that you could name from usher to prince. >> reporter: he is on that tree. >> yeah. the gap band. it all came from earth, winds and fire.
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>> reporter: winning six gram mies. he was 74 one of the most successful b mx athletes ever has died. the 41-year-old was found dead in his home. police say it was an apparent suicide. he won many stunts. he had a video game based on his stunts and reality show one of the dog shred races in the country is coming to an end tomorrow, an end of a 300 mile trek more on the 21st annual competition. >> reporter: here many of the world's top athletes are competing. they have peculiarities. they drewl when they are happy. at the state stop shred dog race, the largest race in the
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lower 48. for most dog shred racing conjures many dogs traversing the wilderness. here it is about speed. over 300 miles navigated over eight days by 13 teams from around the world. for their human handleders this is more than a hobby, it is a way of love. competition is not cutthroat but friendly. it is open to the young and old, men and women, anyone who wants to compete. all you need is a dozen dogs and the ability to withstand bitter cold and extreme terrain. a new winner is crowned on saturday and a team of dedicated dogs this race goes on for 300 miles. the one in alaska covers nearly
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a thousand we are hours away from the super bowl. more women is to be hired in executive position. it requires all the n.f.l. teams to interview one minority candidate for each position open. there is a lot of attention ahead of the super bowl for the cold play. i'm talking about everything from the current elections to sharing the stage with beyonce. the band drawing laugh when they talk about american football. >> i think we're firmly split down the middle between those who know absolutely nothing and those who know almost absolutely nothing about football. as long as lebron has a good game he doesn't seem to know the difference between the nba and
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the n.f.l. yeah. i think they will know after sunday football to them i guess means soccer. ahead in our next hour fixing the gas leak that has sickened thousands in southern california. capping the well may not solve the long-term justice justice in a lawless land. we talk to the only foreigner to litigate in afghanistan about the dangers of working there. we will see you back here in two minutes. minutes. >> from rural midwest to war-torn mideast. she went for the money and found
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>> i really don't think these kinds of attacks by insinuation are worthy of you. enough is enough anger on the campaign trail. hillary clinton and bernie sanders deliver the most pointed attacks of the presidential race at each other unlawfully held a u.n. panel says assange should be free to go after three years in hiding. ut u.k. and sweden disagree. aleppo under attack, syrians
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trying to escape a government offensive the latest jobs report is out as big stores struggle to stay open leaving communities hurting good morning. welcome to your world this morning. the new hampshire primary is just four days away and the gloves off for the democrats after months of campaigning, hillary clinton and bernie sanders clashing on stage. bernie sanders smearing her past. clinton criticizing his the new hampshire support of clinton is double bernie sanders. >> a progressive is someone who makes progress. that's what i intend to do. >> reporter: in their first
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one-on-one debate, democrats bernie sanders and hillary clinton battled over who is the real progressive. >> secretary clinton does represent the establishment. i represent, i hope, ordinary americans and by the way who are not all that happy with the establishment. >> reporter: they squared off over health care >> i am not going to talk about big ideas like single pair and then that level with people about how much it will cost >> not accept a belief that the u.s. of america and government can't stands up to the rip-offs of the pharmaceutical industry >> reporter: they traded blows over foreign policy >> we both looked at the same evidence about the wisdom of the war in iraq. one of us voted the right way and one of us didn't. >> reporter: it was more intense and more personal than past democratic gates, but for all the sharp elbows, there were also pulled punches.
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on secretary clinton's email controversy >> how are you feeling about these emails now >> i'm feeling exactly how i felt at the first debate. there's a process under the way. >> reporter: on weather senator sanders ran a misleading newspaper ad >> do you want 30 seconds on this issue? >> no. >> reporter: the sharpest attack of the night came from secretary clinton accusing the sanders campaign of being dishonest and negative >> i think it's time to end the very artful smear that you and your campaign have been carrying out in recent weeks and let's talk about-- >> reporter: clinton is expecting a loss in new hampshire. the secretary played up what she sees as her electablity come november >> i can only tell you what i believe and that is i am the strongest canned daylight to take it to the republicans and win in november. >> reporter: but after spending two hours highlighting their
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differences, the rivals ended with something they can agree on. >> on our worst days i think it is fair to say we are a hundred times better than any republican candidates. >> reporter: on tuesday new hampshire voters will decide which democrat they think can beat another candidate dlt still pulls the likely leads in new hampshire. he is at 29% right now. marco rubio is second. ted cruz and john kasich. our correspondent is live in new hampshire. the voters will have their fill for the next few days. i'm sure they have been over the last few days. all of the candidates are trying to court their votes. are voters turning out in big numbers to hear the candidates in person?
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>> reporter: yeah, you bet. good morning to up. rain or snow like we've got today, voters are definitely turning out in droves. in fact, many voters we talked to are going to about five campaign events before primary day on tuesday. at several of the events that we have been to, we have been seeing at the very least about a hundred people packing into these places, a lot of folks saying they just want to hear and see them in person. necessity want to see them to see if they're real, genuine-- they want to see them if they're really, genuine. they take this process very seriously. it is unique in this state because they don't even have to pick a party until that very moment until they fill out the ballot on tuesday. that is why they are turning out. the candidates know it, which means that's why all of these many undecided voters and we're talking a lot about a third of
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the voters, they're all up for grabs so republicans are going to be debating tomorrow night. there is a field of seven but the controversy is who we will not be hearing from. >> reporter: yes. that's right. we will not be hearing from so far carly fiorina or jim gilmore. they did not qualify. we went to a carly fiorina event last night. supporters very upset, but not just supporters from her events. we have talked to undecided voters. one woman at a chris christie who was fired up and really mad saying that this is doing a disservice to the voters of new hampshire to not let, especially carly fiorina get on that debate stage. take a listen. >> one of the things that really concerns me is how the media is approaching this. i've seen carly fiorina and i think she is wonderful.
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i don't agree with all her entire platform, but i think she would do a really good job and abc just left her out in the cold for the next debate. we've had a lot of republican candidates drop out and seven out of eight are going to be there and carly fiorina right now is hanging in limbo. >> reporter: so carly fiorina is really having her supporters put pressure on abc to try to change its minds. that seemed to have worked for her back in concept to get her on the debate stage in california that's right. one can'ted date that will be on the stage and will be watching is ben carson because his campaign has made some big changes while in new hampshire. >> reporter: yes. big changes not so good. carson apparently running out of money and as yesterday cut 50 staffers and that's not all we're hearing. he is also reducing salaries and
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shrinking the size of the travelling people. he is begin to fly commercial instead of private jet, but he is still determined to stay in the race just with the leaner staff thank you for that hillary clinton is apparently not the only secretary of state who received emails on her personal account. the state department says her two predecessors also received emails with information that is now considered classified. ten messages were sent to r ice's senior aids while she was in office. powell got two emails. powell denies the information was sensitive. none of the information either received was top secret wikileaks founder calling on the british government to abide by a united nations ruling. he should be allowed to be walking free and compensated. he has been in the embassy since 2012. he is trying to avoid being
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extradited to sweden on a sex claim allegation. >> there has been a final decision. there is no ability to appeal the decision of the united nations. the lawfulness of my detention or otherwise is now a matter of settled law. their attempts, if they proceed to undermine the u.n. system, will see various enforcement measures that can be taken by the u.n. more from london. >> reporter: the u.n. panel's findings are here. they say that the deoperativation of his-- depravation of his liberty is in kon troe vention of his legal rights. he should be compensated. this is embarrassing for the british and swedish government.
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they have both rejected the panel's findings in forthright terms. one said it was a ridiculous conclusion and the british intended to contest it. what has actually changed in practical terms, perhaps not very much. you can probably see the british police van at the foot of the embassy. the police here in london say that if he tries to leave, he will be arrested. you would have thought, however, that behind the scenes diplomatically there is more incentive for the swedish and british governments to reach some sort of resolution to this long running and farcical situation that is our correspondent in london. there were five people on that u.n. panel, three finding in haste favor. one did not take part turkish officials say tens of thousands of syrian refugees are heading towards the border. they're trying to escape fighting in aleppo.
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the bashar al-assad military has tried to push out rebels in that area. >> reporter: what we are witnessing is the latest humanitarian crisis in syria. tens of thousands of people on the move. according to the syrian organization for human rights, 40,000 people have fled their homes in the northern countryside of aleppo as a result of the ongoing government offensive. the government offensive is being backed by russian air strikes and we can actually hear the explosions the in distance, intense bombardment, the rebels are promising to fight back, but it is not clear whether or not they can actually confront this assault on the ground. the government has managed to cut through rebel-held territory, but they're trying to encircle the city of aleppo which means that the rebel controlled east of that city will become besieged. what is the fate of the 200 or
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300,000 people of that city? as of yet there hasn't been a mass exodus from the city, but 40,000 people who fled their homes are from the countried side. towns and village s are abandoned. what is clear is that the government and the allies are doing their best to gain as much ground as possible because who has the upper hand on the ground has the upper hand on the negotiating table our correspondent there. the peace talks in geneva are on hold until at least the end of the month. the opposition says it won't return until the government offensive stops. russia and turkey are trading accusations over the situation in syria. russia claims turkey was preparing to invade while turkey accuses russia of trying to divert attention from its own actions in syria. a fighter jet was shot down along the turkish border as part of the russia's campaign over syria last year. saudi arabia says it is prepared to send ground troops into the
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country. the u.s. welcomed the offer saying it would accelerate the fight against i.s.i.l. this is the first time the kingdom has shown a willingness to have its soldiers taking part in anti i.s.i.l. operations the u.s. now sending a missile defense system ahead of a north korean rocket in the coming days. pentagon say it will work with the parties to track the rocket. north korea so kay the launch could happen as soon as monday. pyongyang says it is simply a satellite that they're putting into the atmosphere it is tough to get around the north-east this morning snow falling here. that is delaying school openings in the area and later today it is going to make things tough all the way to boss fon. -- boston. >> reporter: this is a system that we talked about, that same
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frontal boundary that extended through the coasts. it is moving its way up the coastline now. depending on where you are, there will be a morning versus an all day event. the southern end things will taper off when we get into new england where we have widespread snow. that will be through the day. here is a look at some temperatures. the closer you get to the coastline the more likely you are to see more measurable amounts of snow so you get away from that, then it would be less, but that's because of the coastal system and then out to the atlantic more to get there. if you do get the edges, portions of long island, especially near boston, that could be four to 8 inches, but interior a little bit and we're looking anything from a dusting to a couple of inches. it depends where you are. with the temperatures around the freezing mark, a lot of that
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isn't going to stick too long. we're not looking at too many problems through the course of the day, but we have all the different advisories. as this clears out, the boundary lingers, we could see more development on the southern end tomorrow, so watch for rain from florida up to north carolina. the more to the coastline you will see those problems i am ready for that. thank you that invisible gas leak out west could be soon over but the impact on the community may be too hard to reverse concealed weapons on college campuses and that has some students worried about their safety.
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a huge gas leak near l.a. could be capped by the end of next week. a relief well is expected to intercept a leaking pipe by monday the first wrongful death lawsuit in the case has been filed. the family of a woman says she was suffering from cancer and the gas caused her to die more quickly. our correspondent reports. >> reporter: at the sol an here empty chairs are the norm in what used to be a thriving business >> you would see every chair, someone is in there or all these
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front chairs right here completely filled up. phone calls would not stop ringing >> reporter: business has dropped nearly 60%. customers have moved away >> they really miss coming here. we catch up on everything. it is good to see them. >> reporter: the salon is one of several small businesses taking part in a class action class suit against california gas and the parent company. it aims to collect a billion dollars in damages >> i don't think it will be far-fetched to think they will be able to recover those damages when you tack about a community that has been evacuated. it is easily a billion dollars >> reporter: with several businesses here on the brink of shutting down, the economic development center is offering loans up to $250,000 to help keep them afloat
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>> every business we've talked to they have protested the notion of getting a business loan when they don't know when the foot traffic will be back. >> reporter: it's also affecting real estate. this has been on the market for more than four months. it is one of 57 current listings. >> they're staying on the market longer. last year it was a shorter time period. that has to do with perception of the gas leak. >> reporter: real estate broker says he is loss losing clients because two major banks have haltered lending. >> there's a couple of large banks that have not - that are not lending, but there are quite a few smaller banks that still do lend. the perception is that i can't get a loan. that's going to stop some people from actually buying >> reporter: with many buyers on the sideline, such as these,
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they're join the class action lawsuit. >> i started marketing here. people know he, so it is hard for me just to close my business here in real estate and go to another area sf >> reporter: with the well still leaking gas, the forecast remains uncertain at best new rev legislations in flint michigan over how much the authorities knew about the water crisis. emails show the office was awe made aware of legionnaires disease last ma. a spokesman for the governor is dismissing the report. he says he did not learn about the cases until january. a 30 million dollar aid package is advantaging in the legislature. the senate passed the aid bill on thursday. the money will go to credit
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residents to water bills dated back to 2014 when it was switched from the detroit water to the flint river colleges in florida now one step closer to becoming gun friendly people can bring guns to camp with yous on a bill >> reporter: the bill prood by the florida house would allow people 21 and over to carry concede guns. they university of kansas one student activist recently outlined what the policy allowing guns on campus would mean there >> guns will be allowed in the dormitories. students will be able to carry in all the classrooms >> reporter: the university of texas is working on rules to comply with a new state law allowing concealed carry. it takes effect august 1. at a recent campus debate activist said concealed handguns
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deter attacks on canvass >> time after time where people-- on camp pus. >> they know that they can kill more people before they get stopped. they talk about this time after time. >> reporter: open carry of weapons is allowed in texas but not on college campuses. some schools like the university of arizona have been poling students. 68% of students oppose the bill being considered to allow guns on campus. three states currently allow guns on camp pus, five allow some with restriction and others say it should be left in cars representative was the only democrat to support the can seal carry bill. she defended her vote saying she
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feels confident in the background checks. >> these are 21-year-olds that have concealed weapons permit that will allow them to have guns on campus. they are not just an 18 to 21-year-old. they're not just anyone. you can't have had an felony, had trouble with alcohol or drugs, and you can't have been in a mental institution. there are other thing as well. concealed weapons permit holder, there's a good background check despite that, do you think they will exercise the right thinking about before they full the trigger when law enforcement officers are struggle with the right time to pull it? >> yes.
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i do. apparently people are six more law-abiding than law enforcement officers which was stated on the house floor by the co sponsor of the bill, representative grek stubie. i do trust that this would be fine. frankly, i am a college professor and have been on the campuses teaching since 1987. i've had my law degree. i've never seen a-- i to have taught at the college level. from a personal standpoint i'm not sure i would be that comfortable with the students that i talking having guns. what about the rights of the professor that does not want to instruct a class, a very controversial class, with a student who might have been coming in on a saturday or sunday night binge?
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>> i have taught controversial classes before and i would feel comfortable having a handgun with me. i've had some difficulties in classes over the 30 years that i've taught, handled them, but it is concerning. i don't know who has a gun in their backpack illegally. that's very concerning. i have never seen a backpack checked on a campus or me check a student also a second bill allowing open carry of weapons on campus also passing the florida house. both facing heavy push back in the senate. presidential hopefuls not going it along volunteers in canvassing the state one woman's fight to get justice in afghanistan. how an outsider is working the city
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system
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welcome back to your world this morning. taking a look at today's top stories. tens of thousands of syrian refugees are heading to turkey. turkish officials say as many as
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70,000 are moving towards the border. the bashar al-assad government launched an offensive to force out rebels around the city. assange has a ruling in his favor to be let out the embassy. he is trying to avoid extradition to sweden as part of a sex crimes investigation no holding back in last night's democratic debate. days before the new hampshire primary hillary clinton went after bernie sanders for what she called an artful smear of her record. here is where they stand according to the poll taken after the iowa caucuses but before last night's debate. bernie sanders is almost double clintons. earlier on your world this morning i asked a spokesman if
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she defended herself >> reporter: this was definitely one of the most pointed exchanges of the entire campaign. hillary clinton for many, many months was trying to float above the fray and not really directly attack or even address bernie sanders necessarily. things are getting real, though, because in new hampshire are pointing in bernie sanders' direction. he is leading and it is likely that he will win new hampshire putting hillary clinton in a difficult place, going into some of the later states where she will do better but she doesn't want to be he has a home court advantage in new hampshire. clinton interesting was asked by a moderate whether she would make public the speeches that she has made to people. do you think she will be probed more on that in coming days? are we going to see those transcripts released and will it
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affect her campaign? >> expect the sanders campaign to be pounding this like a drum. she said she hasn't received any undue help or what not. i haven't done any favours for anyone anywhere. bernie sanders will say come back and say all right, you've made all these speeches, you've got hundreds of thousands of dollars for doing so. maybe you weren't a senator at the time when that was happening, but what do you have to hide? why don't you release the transcripts and tell us more according to the federal election commission, many have given more than 21 million dollars to clinton's 2016 run. that is more than 10% of the money she has taken in a it is not the candidates out there stumping for the votes, but supporters are. >> reporter: these are the
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campaign ground troops. the army of volunteers and paid staffers who have one mission. they're working the phones and going door to door to round up supporters. we want to the bernie sanders field office in manchester, one of 18 in the state, and hillary clinton's office in nashua, one of 16 campaign centers here, just days before the new hampshire primary. she has 10,000 volunteers here. including 150 who trekked up from the new work office >> i really want her to be president. >> reporter: 22-year-old lauren has put her life on hold to volunteer for hilary. she travelled from brooklyn with a friend who came on board just
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in time >> it is excite to go watch everyone coming topgt for a common-- together for a common goal. i am so excited for the primaries here. i'm so excited. it's like watching the center bowel for me. >> reporter: sanders ders has fewer, about 7,000, but one flew halfway around the world and he can't vote here. >> i'm from australia. >> reporter: he is heading back after a month here mostly paid out of his own pocket >> i think bernie sanders is a great candidate and i want to see him win the white house because u.s. politics influences australian politics. >> reporter: this is how most voters see the candidates. behind the scene efforts can make a difference. most effective knocking on doors but phone calls work too. if they ask, do you know where
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to go, do you have a ride? the voter feels objeligated to follow through. these college students from florida here on a class assignment are spending up to eight hours a day trying to convince those on the other end of the line first not to hang up and, second, to vote for bernie sanders. >> when you get that one happy mom saying she admitted, that makes everything work it. >> if we can influence one person. i feel like i've done my job. >> reporter: a vote in the bag for sanders, and in clinton's corner a 95-year-old who wants to attend her inauguration. >> that will be wonderful. i hope you get to see her, the first female president. >> reporter: she has been a long time hillary clinton super supporter. eight years ago during the general election she wrote in clinton's name rather than vote for obama. >> reporter: i had to vote my
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conscience and my conviction. she represented me and what i felt was important, more than any other candidate. >> reporter: you seem emotional right now >> politics is a big thing in my family >> reporter: to do this work takes passion and perseverance and in a few days they will know whether it all paid off. lisa starke democracy at work. the f.b.i. is asking the last of the protesters at a wildlife refuge in oregon to turn themselves in. ammon bundy and 15 others have been indicted by the grand jury. they were arrested last week and face multiple charges. the four people remaining at the refuge face the same charges this there is now information today in relation to the whooping cough in children. the vaccine fades over time.
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it was reduced in the 1990s. the shots protect 69% of 11 and 12 year olds but in four years only 9% are protected. the number of cases has risen and 48,000 cases in 2012. that's the most since 1955 we talked about the storms here, but other storms will make it a wet weekend elsewhere. >> reporter: storms are to hit the west. that east coast storm originally started off there and was the same one that caused the blizzard in the mid west, severe weather and still lingering. you can see some development on the southern end. we also have a disturbance through the mid west, not causing too much, some snow for the plains. then the next system in the west that will eventually cause some
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ripple impacts. we can see heavier banding just off the coastline after a break from some of that rain. over the next couple of days, one band pushing and then at the weekend another round could be coming through. in the meantime the first one - a couple of rounds coming through the mid west. what i mentioned today will continue to bring light snow for places around here, but then behind that, the next system that is now impacting the west coast is going to have high winds later into this weekend. that is something we will watch for too. sunday is going to be a tough day. the temperatures for some, 40s and 50s up the coastline, 27 for minnapolis only 68 in miami. >> reporter: is that warm enough? no. it's not thanks. turning now to afghanistan, the
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country's justice system today is a mix of new laws and tribal customs and it is tough to gav gate since a lot of people are not-- november gate since a lot of people are not educated. a story of the only american litigator to ever practice law there. a woman who is still working to bring justice to afghanistan. >> so the court is relying on the signature and the illegal documents for their decision. is that what you're saying? >> ask minimum what money does he owe to people that didn't come to court as witnesses? how much did he talk to the invisible witnesses? how much money does she owes that didn't come to court to accuse him?
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to who does he owe money to? he should be explaining how much money he owes because he is being held illegally. >> we will give you a copy of the decision. >> one of the principles of the holy quaran, everyone is born innocent. no witnesses, no evidence, no sharing of court documents and the response we get today is that's our problem the hard charging attorney you see in that documentary joins us now.
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she joins us from charlotte, north carolina. you say in the documentary - thanks for joining us. you went to afghanistan for the money. it seems like an awfully remote place to go to practice law. what really drove you there? >> thanks for having me. that is actually what drove me there. it was a financial opportunity for myself as well as my family. i went in 2008 with a nice hefty bill of student loans as well as my husband and also the mother of three kids. it really was for the financial opportunity. now what has kept me in afghanistan is more than that. it's more than just money. it's basically understanding that the people in afghanistan and those that come to afghanistan, they deserve good legal representation you day say in the documentary that you are able to make money from the foreigners who get caught up in the justice
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system there, but you've taken on a lot of pro bono cases. o how do you work within a legal system that would jail a woman for adultery? >> i protect my clients with the laws that are provided for them. it doesn't necessarily mean that the laws have to make sense that i'm defending against, but within afghanistan unfortunately a person that is charged with adultery is often the victim of a crime which the justice system often overlooks. so it's my responsibility as a lawyer to those clients that are my paid clients also pro bono that i provide equally as the best representation as i possibly can to all my clients. it is a very different system than the u.s. what is it like for you as a
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western woman operating in that system and speaking truth about the law to these judges that you deal with? . i really enjoy my job because of my clients. it is an uphill battle for every case, but it is something that i've learned to deal with. frankly, the legal system, at least litigation, quite often is very male dominated. so i'm used to being in environments where there are more males than females there is an extraordinary story you tell in your talk about sitting down in a jurga and somehow you convinced a judge to reverse a decision. you basically got these elders to convene an appeals jurga. a case where a six year old girl had been committed to marriage to pay off her family's debt. you won, as you seem to do so often. how do you get through to these
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tribal elders and address their customs. >> basically, in that second jurga i was actually the judge. so i convinced the elders to come to the jurga and preside over it with me heading the jurga. i understand that law and the practice of it. no matter what country i'm practising it, it comes down to people and talking to people and getting people to understand the position that i'm in or that i'm advocating on behalf of my clients. so it took a lot of conversation $with the village elders as well as the religion i don'ts leaders-- religious leaders and they knew i had the correct decision, which was illegal to do that to a six year old girl. that's illegal on so many levels. with those tenets to support what i knew was the right way to go, we all came to the right decision. i'm very happy that we did
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working within the system, as you call it. kim berly motley. thank you for that. you can watch more of her story, including some of the dangers she has faced in her work was quite risky for her to do what she did indeed when we come back, looking to turn around the dip a hiring slowdown of the last month finding food in america. wall walmart closing a lot of stores leaving the community with few if any options. mass pa passjazeera america.
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the monthly jobs report was released. for the first month of the year the jobless rate has slowed was this expected? >> a lot of people were looking around 180,000 jobs created. it came in at 151 thousand jobs created last month. that was slower than expected, but the markets are going to like that. moving to the unemployment rate. it is down to 4.9%. it went down for the right reason because of people in work or actively looking for job. the labor force participation rate went up slightly. that is a very, very good sign. taking a look at the kinds of
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jobs that were created, it was in retail and food services but manufacturing added 29,000 jobs. that could explain why we in a nice bump in average hourly earnings up 12 sense to 25.39. that's 2.5 year over year, not gang busters but better than the previous month. we emphasize this is just one month, but we want to see manufacturing jobs, a great sign better paying jobs. how are the markets going to react. they would probably take it positively >> yes. one thing that has cheered the markets recently are all these signs that central banks are moving in with stimulus. the market has been very concerned that the federal reserve in december said it will raise rates four times this year. it has been tapering back those expectations. the market doesn't want to see
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interest rates up this year. if we had too strong a number, that could have been a signal that the federal reserve would pull the trigger. that's why even the jobs rate is slowing down, the markets who just love their cheap money are probably-- low interest rates. >> they really like this report thank you on the note of jobs, 10,000 people in the u.s. losing their job because wall walmart are closing many stores. most of the shut downs are in rural area. in one town it has created a sizeable vacuum. >> reporter: less than 10 miles outside here fairfield is a city that has seen its share of hard luck. a quarter of the 11,000 residents live in poverty and what was the area's biggest employer a steel plant laid off a thousand employees last year
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>> this is traditional down town. >> reporter: the mayor says no-one was expecting wall walmart to shut it's doors >> it was a devastating blow-by-blow. >> reporter: wall walmart's closing leaves a food desert. many in fair field don't own cars and about 20% of residents are seniors >> fairfield no longer has a grossry store in the city limits. a gross restore in a community is a hubs. people have to have food. >> wall walmart supplied supplied everything that we needed. >> reporter: wall walmart recently closed more than 150 stores across the country. fairfield is one of three communities where it left a food desert. the food dert is a community where at least a fifth of residents live in poverties and a third live more than a mile from a supermarket.
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in rural areas the distance is more than 10 miles. the nearest gross restore is a few miles miles away. there is a lack of transit in this area. if you're walking you have to cross this busy highway. >> reporter: 89-year-old says the added distance means she will have to hire someone to pick up her groceries. >> it is sad for us. we have to do without or if you have a family member. >> reporter: wall walmart says: >> reporter: the mayor tells us he and other leaders pleaded with wall walmart officials not to close >> now we have to go to the drawing board to find out how we can survive.
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>> reporter: i can tell you that the mayor tells me that right now he and other leaders are on an effort to try and save this city. while wall walmart was the biggest blow, you can see that one out of every three or four businesses is boarded up. they have dealt with this for a while. right now there's no word on whether another retailer or gross rechain will be coming in here does walwalmart have any other plans to close any more? >> reporter: i am told that right now they don't have any plans to close any additional stores. there have been 154 that they've shupt down so far, but they're planning on opening 100 additional stores in 2016. many are not necessarily going into some of these communities like fairfield where there have
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been food deserts as a result thank you for that. a big topic on the campaign trail you kind of hope that smul business owners in those communities are able to spring up places where people can get fresh food when we come back a race to the frozen finish the dogs in a shred race in yyoming saying goodbye to this man.
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maur ice white has died at the age of 74. >> i just thought they were aamazing. they was kind of like in my head all the time you will never work with earth, wind and fire. i finally got there. all came from earth wind and fire the band winning six gram
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mies one of the largest dog shred races in the country is nearing an end. tomorrow the dogs and handlers will end a 300 mile trek. >> reporter: here many of the world's top athletes are competing, but they've got some peculiarities. they love a good ear scratch. this week canine compete fors battle for top honors and over $200,000 of prize money. it is the largest shred down race in the lower 478. for most dog shred racing conjures images of hus kushgs ies. it is about speed. 13 teams from around the world. for their human handlers this is more than just a hope.
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it is a way of life. competition is not cutthroat. dog sled racing can for the young and old. you need ten dogs and can overcome strong terrain. saturday is when a new one is crowned this race goes on for 300 miles another in alaska covers nearly a thousand look at these images coming out of a volcano in japan. it is considered average compared to others that's it for us here in new york your world this morning back on monday morning. we will see you then have a great weekend.
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t weekend. tens of thousands of syrian flee the aleppo countryside where government forces breaking through rebel defenses. hello, this is the word news from al jazeera from doha. fearful burundian refugees shelter in camps speak of kill i guess and abductions allegedly by government militia. we have a really significant victory that has brought a smile to my face. jewel january assange said he has b

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