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tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  February 8, 2016 7:00am-9:01am EST

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pounding the granite dehli hopefuls campaigning hard. border crisis, syrians fleeing aleppo, waiting in makeshift camps at the border. >> no one is fooled. space launch vehicles are the same technology as ballistic missiles. sanctions on north korea after a rocket launch that may be cover for a missile test broncos take the super bowl 50, putting peyton manning's legacy in the spotlight
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welcome to "your world this morning", i'm stephanie sy. >> i'm lori jane gliha. with a day to go before the first dehli poll, the politicians will be overnamp. >> many areas are up for gloves. donald trump has a commanding lead in the republican race, and there's a crowded field trailling him, with a surprising name. ohio governor kassig in second place. half of g.o.p. voters are decided on their choice. as for the democrats, bernie sanders holds an advantage over hillary clinton, but it's tighter than it has been in recent weeks. al jazeera's libby casey is live in manchester. tonight is the last full day for candidates to sway the undecided voters, at this point what do
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the candidates have to do. >> they are criss-crossing the state trying to cram in as many event as possible. snow is expected in the forecast. it may slow down the campaign. better today than tomorrow people say. you can turn on your tv and be stature aid. they want to make the last big press. >> second place is up for grabs. did everything change. >> it may have made an impact. one thing that may have changed is the debate and going to the poles. it's about whether it was celebrity or supporting him as a
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candidate. number two is up for grabs. and marco rubio was dinged saturday night. chris christie went after him hard, showing him that he was relying on talking points. marco rubio was not counting on this state as much as the three governors, chris christie, jed bush or kassig. this is a make it or break it moment. chris christie was on attack. we'll see if it translates into votes for him. one person people are watching is john kassig. a governor who is not as splashy, but has been on the ground in namp. people like his moderate views and positive approach to campaigning, what and see how he does tomorrow. >> clinton was in michigan. has she given up hope of winning new hampshire. >> an interesting strategy
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choice. sunday is a huge day before the primary to be on the campaign stral. she spent part of the day here, making an appearance to get food for a super bowl event. she was largely in flint michigan. south carolina is one of the next states coming up for democrats. african-american voters important there. hillary clinton wanted to stand in front of a diverse audience in flint. the problem of the water crisis affected is lot of afghan americans, and wanted to stay a leader. she was gone from here, her husband bill clinton was in new hampshire, and he was on the attack a different tone for the clinton, he criticized bernie sanders by name. talked about the health care plan and talked about the allegations of sexism saying that sanders supporters demonstrated sexism.
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he brought up the story of a blog are, and she is threatened by the tone of feedback she has gotten. >> simply she said in the the democratic primary is over, i have to use a pseudo name. because all of us that stick up for hilary are promulgated with attacks. marlin aldefeat and others critical of women not supporting hillary clinton. you get a sense of frustrations. namp is a state that has been good for them. it may not de so good tomorrow. >> al jazeera's libby casey in manchester new hampshire. hillary clinton spent the week in flint, michigan.
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many welcomed her, despite criticism she was using the crisis for political gain hillary clinton got a rockstar welcome at one of flint's largest churches, the house of prayer. she wasted no time in criticizing how long it took for action to be taken on the city's water, when residents were told was safe when cities switched the supply to the polluted flint river. >> i'm here because for nearly two years mothers and fathers were voicing concerns about the water's colour, about the smell, about the rashes that it gave to those who were bathing in it. >> reporter: she got the loudest applause giving voice to what a lot suspected, that they were ignored because of race and poverty. >> i said weeks ago what if it happened in flint if it hopped in rows pointed or bloomfield hills - i think we all know we
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would have had a solution yesterday. >> hillary is showing that she cares about the community. >> a cynic might say a political candidate may be politicizing this, what do you say? >> hillary didn't have to come. as long as the job is done, doesn't matter if it's used for political gain, which i feel she's not. >> clinton scored good when talking about finding a way to put the residents to work on fixing the water infrastructure. >> she wants our own people to make some of that entry coming in. >> all my antennas went up. you know, it's kind of do it yourself. >> as clinton acknowledged fixing the pipes is the beginning. the long-term impact on residents, and children is severe, and may not be fully known for years. >> let's make sure that we take
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care of the people of glint and give every child a chance to live up to his or her god-given potential. thank you all and god bless you growing concern over where north korea could be developing its nuclear weapons program. north korea claims a rocket launch this weekend was part of a peaceful space programme. diplomats thing it was a secret missile test. u.s., japan and australia are leading the charge to quickly impose sanctions. al jazeera's harry fawcett has more. >> less than 24 hours after the north korea's rocket launch, a reminder that the south korean side is on alert for further provocations from north korea. the south korean defence ministry reporting that a north korean patrol boat came south of the maritime border. the disputed maritime border, the northern limit time at
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6:55am local time. the defence ministry saying that five warning shots were fired by vessels of the south korean navy, and that that north korean patrol boat retreated north of line, within about 20 minutes. the incident was over. the dehli office saying that a heightened alert status would be maintained. there's no schedule for the president on this new year holiday day. across asia, a big holiday in south korea. south korea said it would expand its loud speaker broadcasting propaganda gross the demilitarized zone, in response to the rocket launch. a lot of focus here is in other countries concerned with this, on the u.n. security council, after the emergency meeting on sunday. a lot of pressure trying to be brought to bear on china, to support new sanctions against north korea in response to january the 6th nuclear test and
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sunday's rocket launch harry fawcett reporting. >> the united nations says the launch put the entire world at risk. u.s. ambassador to u.n. called the launch hostile, brazen and reckless. angela merkel is in turkey today discussing the syrian refugee crisis, turkey kept a border crossing with syria closed as thousands flee a government bombardment of syria's largest si aleppo as many as 35,000 people gathered along the border waiting to get inside turkey, officials say 70,000 may head there if the bashar al-assad government conditions its offensive in aleppo. in sunday, a turkish aid group delivered food to syrians living there in tent cities. the officials say the country is caring for thousands of refugees on the syrian side of the border. it has no plans to let them in. turkey is hosting 2.5 million
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refugees. stephanie dekker is along the border. >> reporter: the decker may be closed to people, but we have seen trucks. there is steel material, it may be scaffolding people. we spoke to the disaster management agency. they believe 10,000 are on the border. they are registering because of the security situation. they say they are well prepared to deal with them there as here, when it comes to dealing with supplies, blankets, but it is cold at night. there's no plans to open the border, we heard from the turkish president. he said he expected a potential of 70,000 to come over the next few days or weeks if the offensive continues. that shows no signs of letting up. if need be turkey would open the
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borders. at the moment they are closed. >> stephanie dekker with the latest from turkey. >> turkish state media reported 22 refugees drowned whilst trying to reach greece by boat. more than 300 died this year, trying to make the crossing the iraqi military says it's making gains against i.s.i.l. forces are evacuating civilians from a strong hold near ramadi. they retook the area. officials say that victory allowed them to close in on fallujah, and close off i.s.i.l. supply routes from syria. several air strikes helped the iraqi military make the gains. there's hope that in taiwan, where dozens are believed to be trapped. four more survivors have been pulled from the rubble. it collapsed when a 6.4 quake struck. the death toll standing at 38. rob mcbride reports from
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thailand, the city worst hit. >> lunar new year's day and the whole of taiwan is closed as people take off work and go to temples, this temple over 100 meters from the main rescue site is busier than most. it's a vocal point for the charities and volunteer groups that came along to lend support to the rescue effort, and also ordinary people coming here to make their offering. in some ways, this chinese lunar new year had a chateau cast over it by the -- shadow cast over it by the tragedy, you have a sense that people have been stirred into action, giving whatever help they can while there's a chance of people being rescued from the rubble. >> most people are still trapped. >> i pray to god that hopefully there'll be more survivors. >> rescuers are wrestling with a difficult decision on whether to bring in heavy lifting gear to
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move the upper parts of the structure to get to people buried lower down in the rubble. they resisted doing so, because it may cause a collapse, losing the people they are trying to save. they come to a critical point. we are into day three of the rescue operation. the calculation is if people are trapped they can't survive without food and water. if there are people buried in the rubble. they deserve a chance of being freed. rob mcbride reporting. 35 of the 38 people confirmed dead from the quake were killed in the one collapsed apartment building in the u.s. parts of country are bracing for blizzard like conditions, let's bring in nicole mitchell on that. >> with light snow we see the white out conditions. looking across the country, there's two systems, one crawling up the coastline - we'll talk about that coming up. a widespread is moving through
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the mid west and the great lakes over the next couple of days, because of that we have seen wind gusts, nebraska, a lot of this region over 30 miles per hour, because of that, some getting an inch or two of snow, what is on the ground is blowing. watching that in southern portions of minnesota, and across the border to north dakota. some places that could see the worst in terms of white out. over the next 24 hours, this is where this spreads. this continues to spread interior, we can have heavier snow, 2-4 inches, up to six inches, so for winter, that is not a heavy snowfall. wind and disability will be a problem. this is how this moved over the next couple of days. there could be a mix of freezing precipitation, watch for the slick roads, but this takes a couple of days to get through.
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looking at the north-east, the chance of the coastal system today and the next system, some places have chances for snow. the other thing with the system is cold air starting to sink in. the temperatures in the teen, already in some cases, could go into the single digits in the next couple of days. thank you zika virus is reviving a decades old debate. should the toxic pesticide be used to stop the mosquitos. and a new way to welcome in the new year, china uses technology to celebrate the year of the monkey.
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i've never felt so alive. make your business phone mobile with voice mobility. comcast business. built for business. u.n. security council is threatening deeper sanctions against north korea after launching a long-range rocket into space. international leaders, including
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the u.n. secretary-general condemned the mood. calling it a threat to international peace and security. the satellite launch is a cover for testing a long range ballistic missile others worry. despite north korea's claims it is for peaceful reasons. >> they are not nearly provocations. with each action. it is one step closer to the declared goal of developing nuclear tipped missiles. >> the rocket launch violated security council revolutions. it's not sure if china agreed to sanctions. jim walsh is a research associate at the m it studies programme. and joins us from water tonne massa chews et cetera. china - much of the leverage and influence what should the u.s.
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do to influence china to take action: we are doing the same old same old to china saying why don't you do more. i don't think it's the way to do it. it may be effective behind the scenes. china is dealing with anally they don't like, that is causing them problems. the more we scream at china do more. if they do what we want. it will look to the north koreans like a friend is in cohoots with the enemy. we have to be more subtle. >> the rocket launch comes on the he would say of what north korea said what is a test last month. are sanctions effective?
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>> then we want continue to be effective, we wouldn't have tests. they seem to be getting better at it. the policy is not working. north korea is such a lucky country, where is it located. what is the geography - it's next to china, sharing a border. north korea is not iran. iran sold oil over the world. north korea doesn't. if you are next to the world's biggest economy it will be easy to evade sanctions. >> do you agree that the president's trad eejic approach may not be the pest. -- best approach. >> i agree with strategic
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patience, which is kickle can down the road. but it is marked with ballistic tests. we need a different strategy. thinking lecturing china or threatening force, it will not solve the problem. we had the problem for a decade. we'll need new thinking and tacti tactics. what i hear from the white house and critics is the same stuff that boiled over we hear about the working together on interception of missiles, south korea and u.s. is that something that is a reality. >> they hoped talks. south korea. south korea were reluct able to, they did not want to -- reluctant. they didn't want to upset china. it may move forward slowly.
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it's part of a trend where south korea is acquiring. if you are sitting in north korea it may not worry you: i worry about a small incident growing, north korea fearing if they wait they'll lose it all because south korea is stronger militarily. that's an instability that is unwelcome. i worry about that. >> thank you jim walsh more u.s. troops will arrive in philippines as a deal to return the american military to the islands in and hold off china's influence in the region. residents say there's too much of a u.s. presence in the country. >> reporter: demonstrations such as this are not unusual outside the u.s. embassy, although a
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long-time ally, many say more u.s. troops are not welcome. more than 100 soldiers are here. it rises with an enhanced cooperation agreement, or edca. . >> it will make the whole facility, it's a huge u.s. military base, and edca will take them into the war of the united states. >> the u.s. military has been in the philippines for more than a century. first as colonizers, and then guardians of peace. two of the biggest bases outside the united states were here. those bases closed around 20 years ago. since then, u.s. soldiers have been returning as so-called visiting troops, and get special access. >> it's not aimed at china or anyone, it's part of our effort to be present in the region, to build our alliances, to secure our economic future. >> a major part of the economic
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future is to ensure freedom of economic trade. the government is raising regional concerns by building artificial islands in to strengthen claims over disputed territory. the philippines does not have the military might to face up to china, it has taken this to an international tribunal. despite the controversy, polls say the majority see them as a welcome counterbalance to rising china. u.s. forces patrol the south china sea. that doesn't mean they are ready to go to war because of overlapping territorial claims of its allies. >> we are trying to make sure international law is respected, freedom of navigation is repected. rules-based solutions. >> it's not easy to allow a former colonizer in, it's fears that the u.s. is too involved in
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filipino security affairs. both governments insist it's a beneficial relationship, and in the best interest to have the u.s. remain the stabilizing force they are the most want people in new hampshire, coming up the undecided voters, and how they pick a side the half time twist, beyonce takes to the field and makes a statement.
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>> images matter. >> innovative filmmaker, spike lee - on his controversial new movie. >> the southwest side of chicago is a war zone. >> taking on the critics. >> and another thing... a lot of the people have not seen the film. >> and spurring change through his art. >> we want this film to save lives.
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>> i lived that character. >> we will be able to see change. you'll have -- you'll have -- let me talk, quiet. [ booing ] donald trump drawing boos at saturday's republican debate after that exchange with jeb bush. one of many highlights i would say today, all the candidates will crisscross in new hampshire trying to persuade voters to vote for them. on the democratic side, bernie sanders leads hillary clinton by 10 points in the latest poll.
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i want to go to robert shlessinger right now. thanks for being with us. bill clinton came out swinging against sanders and supporters over the weekend. >> we are, all of us who stick up for hillary, having vicious sexist attacks. what do you make of bill clinton's comments? >> i think that the key -- a key for hillary clinton is new hampshire is that she needs to run up margins among female voters and there's question as to how well she's going to be able to do that, and so this is certainly a way to get their attention and hopefully make headway there. >> at the same time as you know, two feminist leaders over the weekend criticized women supporting bernie sanders and in new hampshire, he has sizeable support among young women, i want to play a conversation i had with gloria stein em.
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she supported clinton when she ran against obama in 2008. >> when she lost the nomination in 2008, you said later you didn't expect she was going to win. >> no, i didn't. >> what are your expectations for 2016. >> i think if she chooses to run, she might well win. i thought at the time that it was just too soon for any woman or feminist woman at least to win. >> for a certain generation of feminists, they say hillary clinton is the best shot for a woman president in their lifetime. why do you think clinton has not gotten the overwhelming support of feministed and the criticism offal bright my backfire? >> i think hillary clinton suffers from a couple of different issues in this area. one is that for a younger generation of women, they
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haven't grown up assuming that there would never be a female president. they believe there will be, so the fact that hillary clinton has a chance here doesn't have the same gravity as it does for older women. i think also more broadly, we as a populace are so used to hillary clinton as a public figure, the fact that she would be the first major party female presidential nominee and first female president gets kind of lost in the book ground noise and we kind of forget that. on the issue of the criticizing women who don't vote for hillary, there is a former backlash for madelineal bright saying there's a special place in hell for women who don't help women. i think that language can be kind of harsh on the campaign trail. >> let's go to the gop side and look at highlight that is happen at the debate on saturday.
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a point of criticism of marco rubio by chris christie. >> that's what washington, d.c. does, the drive by shot at the beginning with incorrect and incomplete information and then the memorized 25 second speech that is exactly what -- [ applause ] >> was this a game changing moment and are you seeing any signs of recovery from the rubio campaign today or yesterday on the campaign trail? >> you know, i think it's pretty brutal to walk into an attack the way that rubio did. i think we can dispel the myth that rubio was an unstoppable political figure. he not only walked into it, but it's a criticism that goes to the heart of his appeal as a candidacy as being a well spoken
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speaker. as they say, the more momentum you have, the harder you are going to hit your face if you stumble. it is a game-changer? i guess we'll find out tomorrow, rubio had already if you look at the poll track already started to plateau and soften a little bit in new hampshire coming out of iowa, but there's a real possibility this will go along in history with the deep scream. >> the dean moment came after iowa. the reason rubio was in the spotlight was because he came in third in iowa. a lot of people saw him as the alternative establishment candidate. do you see anyone emerging near the bottom that might be the establishment alternative? >> there are four people basically vying for the establishment lane as it were. rubio's one of them, three
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others were the three governors, all who had good nights saturday night at the debate. any of them could emerge. if i had to bet, i would bet on john kasich simply because chris christie was effective inch taking out marco rubio, but seems more like vice presidential attack dog than president and jeb bush moved from being listless zombie to zombie who smells a little blood and is moving along faster. kasich was above it all and doing his optimistic i'm an effective governor thing. >> might be a good guess, because kasich is second in new hampshire in one poll. thank you so much for joining us. the undecideds will wield a lot of power in new hampshire. the latest poll finds half of likely republican voters have
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not decided on a candidate. erica pitzi spoke with voters who are being courted hard. >> 44% of voters are undeclared, people who have not yet picked a party, likely independent and many are undecided. >> i'm still going back and forth in my mind. >> the candidates know it and are trying to capitalize on it. >> in these last few days, there are still a large number of undecided voters. you have to ask how do we make the choice. >> many voters are going to as many town halls and meet and greets as they can. >> how many have you you been to? >> four or five. >> this is my fifth. >> this is my 81st. >> some of checking out certain candidates twice. >> i want to see if i'm listening to somebody who's just giving me a canned speech or somebody genuine. >> she's seen everyone from fiorina to sanders to kasich.
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>> you are not along party lines. >> no, i'm listening to everybody so i can make an informed decision. >> beck takes copious notes on her phone. for voters here, seeing and hearing from these candidates in person goes beyond policy, like with marco rubio. >> i wanted to see how real he was. >> we caught up with her later at a town hall with carly fiorina. >> i'm still undecided. >> new hampshire voters are notorious for waiting until the last minute to choose a candidate. that's because the process lends itself to that kind of procrastination. undecided voters here do not even have to pick a party until the moment they cast their ballots on tuesday. >> i know new hampshire voters love to shop. you guys are great shoppers. >> are you definitely choosing between bernie sanders and hillary clinton or is it possible you could film to the
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republican side? >> i could always flip over. you never know. >> for undecided voters, polls don't matter. her husband leads to trump, but he is giving carly fiorina a shot at changing his mind. >> when donald trump gets to be a billionaire by buying off poll advertises, that's what he's done. >> beckwith knows what she wants. >> i am looking for somebody thoughtful, somebody i would be comfortable having dinner with at my kitchen table. if a candidate passes that criteria, they would be able to work on the issues that are divisive in our country. >> few americans say they'll travel to latin america and the caribbean now that the threat of the zika virus is widespread, as the vice spreads, some public
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health experts have suggested bringing back d.d.t. it is highly affective but banned in the united states because of its toxic side effects. >> this is the story of a miraculous white powder. its name is d.d.t. >> no 1945 propaganda film produced by the u.s. war department hailed the benefits of d.d.t. during world war ii. >> today, d.d.t. is necessarily a military weapon. we're turning it out by the thousands of tons. >> it had been around since the 1870's. in 1939, it was recognized as a stunningly effective pesticide. the army used it to fight malaria, and other insect borne diseases around the world. it causes violent convulsions that paralyze and kill insects. >> the homecoming of the
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healthiest army in military history will be in no small matter due to d.d.t., our great new weapon for war today and peace tomorrow. >> after the war, d.d.t. gained widespread civilian and industrial use. millions of tons were sprayed in farms, gardens, forests and homes. in 1946, the paint company sherwin williams marketed it as a powder, spray and also a liquid coating sold in paint cans applied with a brush. >> there must be a catch to it. >> for decades, the industry assured the public it was safe. >> no sir, it harms only us, the citizens. used right, it is absolutely harmless to humans and animals. >> mounting evidence revealed that was not true. in 1962, scientists rachel carson published "silent spring" arguing pesticides were also deadly to birds, fish and
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humans. silent spring became a national best seller. >> cbs reports the silent spring of rachel carson. >> quarterbacks news aired a documentary on carson. >> can anyone believe it is possible to lay down such a barrage of poisons on the surface of the earth without making it unfit for all life? >> vials pushed for tougher regulation of d.d.t. joni mitchell's big yellow taxi helped to make the issue part of our international culture. >> hey farmer farmer, put away the d.d.t. now. >> the e.p.a. banned widespread use of d.d.t. in the united states with you over the next two decades, the u.s. continued to export hundreds of tons of d.d.t. to the developing world. john terrett, al jazeera. there's a new link between
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adhd and health problems later in life. researchers at the mayo clinic say girls may be twice as likely to be obese as children or adults. they believe the weight gain can be caused by brain abnormalities and sleep issues that go hand-in-hand with the disorder. they don't believe prescription drugs play a role. for many, the issue of immigration is personal. our regarder traveled to tijuana, mexico separated from their families. >> i hope you are doing good. i just want you to know that i love you very much as i have always said to you. >> for years, sofia wrote letters to her daughter. >> you are my pride and joy and it really hurts me to see you are there. >> her written words the only way to keep in touch with samantha. >> i will give my life for you. i will do whatever it takes so that you can be ok.
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>> after living in the u.s. for 25 years, sofia was deported to her home country of mexico, but her only child samantha was forced to stay in the u.s. both asked we not use their real names or show their faces. >> it was like a bad dream, like it didn't stay in my mind that he was actually in mexico. i just knew that i couldn't cross and couldn't get ahold of nobody, and i just cried all the time. >> sofia is one of thousands of single parents who have been separated from their american born children in removal proceedings. specific numbers are hard to come by. immigration and customs enforcement tells al jazeera they don't keep track of how many families are separated upon deportation. >> when they are deported, it's a hurried process and there's no real meaningful screening of who's getting left behind. i have one client the victim of
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domestic violence and she was deported and her two teenage sons ended up homeless. that's not what humidity owe over humanity is about. >> they should think about the future of our kids. what future will they have when they don't have their parent in a p.t.a. meeting? >> we'll take to you a shoulderrer just over the border in mexico originally founded to help migrants headed north, it houses deported moms with nowhere else to go.
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al jazeera, tijuana, mexico. bad news for a group of drivers who thought they had a safe place to park. their cars fell through the ice into like geneva. they were attending a winter festival. emergency crews tried to save the cars. ten were a total loss. thankfully, no one was injured. >> that is awful. >> the cold is coming again, another blanket of snow is expected across the region. >> those likes will be a little more frozen later this week. the next system through the great likes will eventually hit the northeast but now is a system that's been crawling its way up the coastline. you can see this switching over to snow. the closer you are and the places that jut out into the atlantic a little more, long island, one side versus the other getting a lot more snow, could be up for six inches.
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jutting out, that could be our core that we've seen a little higher. that's what it looks like when you get more interior, maybe a couple of inches today not so bad. the places that are more problematic and i said the higher amounts, we even have the blizzard warning up for that coast of massachusetts. watch for that. this crawls northward during the course of the day. we talked about those temperatures. already behind the nextistic that has cooled, minneapolis, 1. that feels a little more than just cool, i would say down right cold, these temperatures slide across. more becomes entrenched over the next couple of days and by the time we get to wednesday, those temperatures go down possibly even some of those into the single digits, but that's when the overnight temperatures could easiry go below zero for the midwest. these temperatures in the 30's up and down the east coastline could drop into the 20's by the weekend, as all of that really
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settles in. in the meantime, the west coast stays above average while other places are that possibly in some cases 20 degrees below average. >> thank you. for millions around the world, today is a day of celebration of the lunar new year. the philippines held a big parade to mark the monkey, the ninth animal on the chinese jedback calendar. the chinese community celebrate shortly after midnight with a colorful festival through the streets. we have more on the celebration in beijing. >> beijing's annual explosive illumination, still a dazzling spectacle, but perhaps not quite what it was. fireworks sales are down by half this year. the reasons, pollution concerns, or possibly just fading interest in a country that prides itself on having invented gunpowder. >> the economy isn't good.
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it's more difficult to make money nowadays. only business people can make bigger money selling fireworks. ordinary people can only afford fire crackers. it's too expensive. >> other new year traditions are also changing, like the giving of red nfls filled with cash that are exchanged between friends and relatives. an ancient ritual that technology is transformle. smart phone apps now allow users to send each other virtual money, money that's deposited into their mobile phone payment accounts. this is also a time to spend, at least the government hopes so. a beijing wholesale market popular with newer shoppers. where there's an air of desperation to the spending pitch. >> of course i'm more cautious now. i have to look around and
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compare the price to get the best value for money. >> retailers say turnover remains strong, but that's down to discounting, leading to narrower profit margins. >> retail sales up until now have been the one bright spot. and economists say that consumption has to be sustained to prevent the downturn worsening. >> superstitious chinese are flocking to the temples to pray for good luck. after a year of natural disasters and financial turmoil. the predictions are for more of the same in the year ahead. don't despair, though, depending on your zodiac sign, the year of the monkey is also a good year to give birth or to look for love. adrien brown, al jazeera, beijing. the year of the monkey not particularly lucky for a lot of folks. keep your 15ers crossed. the broncos pull off the upset at the superbowl. >> will it be peyton manning's
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last game ever. we'll hear what he had to say about it. >> the half time show with a very political message about race from beyonce.
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al jazeera america.
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denver is on cloud nine this morning, the broncos are superbowl champions, upsetting the carolina panthers. >> the league investigation into whether he used h.g.h. prompted by an al jazeera report. after the game, the five time m.v.p. would not commit to anything. >> i think i'll make a good decision and be at peace with it whichever way it goes. i'm looking forward tonight being with my family and my friends and some teammates and celebrating a special victory and a special win. >> manning became the oldest quarterback to win a superbowl. he's also the only man to take two different teams to superbowls and win, indianapolis
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in 2007 and now denver. for what it's worth, payton's mom wants him to retire. manning is noel only person getting a lot of attention today. >> beyonce's half time message raised some eyebrows. ♪ >> the half time show started with happy reminders of the 1960's when the first superbowl took place. after performances by cold play and bruno mars. ♪ beyonce took over. they referenced the black power salute. after the performance, her mother posted this picture of
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the backup dancers with a similar salute. on twitter, dancers paid tribute to mario woods, a black man shot dead by police last year. police say he wouldn't drop the knife. the killer sparked protests in san francisco and the justice department is now investigating the police department. her performance came a day after the star released her most political work yet. ♪ >> the music video for the song formation highlights police brutality and destruction in black neighborhoods after hurricane katrina. some have criticized it as anti cop. one woman wrote as the wife of a police officer, i am offended by this entire video. another tweeted i stand with police, boycott beyonce. >> the overwhelming comments on twitter, though, were in support of beyonce and her performance. out of all the artists performed last night, beyonce received the most attention with 1.3 million
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tweets beyond her. >> i can't think of another artist who could release new music at the superbowl. she made an announcement to donate money to flint, michigan. >> she is partnering with united way, her tour is partnering with the united way to create a fund for the people of flint, michigan. superbowl is known for outland issue commercials. some companies took advantage of the air time to make a global impact. [ water running ] [ counted of brushing teeth ] >> that ad was by colgate. it was the toothpaste's company first ad. it ran in latin america last year. it's part of colgate's world water campaign.
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it was a theme that sort of global citizenship in the superbowl. an attempt as an unusual world record fell short in germany. sunday, more than 2,000 people showed up dreads as smurfs, but actually had 361 few too people to set the record. it was set in 2009 in wales. interesting record. didn't know that exited. ahead, stranded along the border -- rare diseases. >> as scientists we'd be fighting a losing battle against mosquitos. >> they'd kill one person every 12 seconds. >> just like that, i might have genetically modified a mosquito. >> it's like a video game with genes. >> this is what innovation looks like. >> i feel like we're making an impact. >> let's do it. >> techknow, where technology meets humanity. only on al jazeera america.
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>> the nation's first primary, and a critical next step on the road to the white house. >> republicans, democrats... >> stay with al jazeera america for comprehensive coverage that's... global condemnation after north korea launches a long-range rocket. the united nations considers new sanctions in response. taiwan searches for survivors days after an earthquake rattles the island nation. a chase in new hampshire, a surprise second operation in the latest republican polls while former president bill clinton launches a scathing attack on bernie sanders.
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the denver broncos for the nfl champions. peyton manning won't say what his future holds. there's growing concern this morning over what's called north korea's latest provocation. >> the government said the rocket launch was part of a peaceful program. countries worry it could be the latest step in north korea's nuclear program. there is a charge to impose new sanctions at the united nations. we have this report. >> ambassadors and diplomatics had this to say. >> weakness is not an option.
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>> the security council afford strong condemnation. the u.s. ambassador to the u.n. said it was more than a provocation but also a direct threat that advanced north korea's nuclear ambitions. >> pyongyang claims it lanched what it called a peaceful earth observes satellite. nobody is fooled. we are looking forward to expeditiously consulting with our colleagues in the coming days and we will be looking to all council members to unite around a swift and aggressive response to the dprk's repeated
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violations that constitute a direct threat to global security. >> the rocket carrying a satellite lifted off. now, the west is hoping for an equally quick response, but the u.s. and china were still at work on a resolution in response to north korea's nuclear test last month, but progress was slow the session now is whether china will agree to stiff new sanction. the rocket launch violated four different security council resolutions and now with another resolution being worked on and pyongyang threatens more rocket launches, the pressure is on diplomats here to finally try to figure out what if anything will finally convince north carolina to stop, because up until now,
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all threats have fallen on deaf ears. gabriel elizondo, al jazeera at the unit nations. >> on your world this morning, i spoke with mitt researcher jim walsh. he said the u.s. will have a hard time convincing china to sanction north korea. >> we are publicly saying to china why aren't you doing more. we're more likely to be effective in quiet talks behind the scenes, because every time we shout at china, it actually reduces their freedom of movement. china is dealing with an ally, an ally though don't like, that causes them problems, but an ally nonetheless, so the more we scream at china do more, if the chinese actually do what we want, it will look to the
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north koreans as their friends. >> there were threats of sanctions, but are sanctions really effective? >> if they were really effective, then we wouldn't continue to have a sanction test and missile test. they seem to be getting better at it not by leaps and bounds but they're getting better, so clearly the sanctions policy is not working. china's foreign minister says they have called on all sides to show restrains. it condemns what it calls the u.s. and south koreagression against north korea. >> the launch may come up on the campaign trail today. a new university survey shows donald trump has a commanding lead in the republican race.
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ohio governor john kasich in second place, ted cruz has slid to fifth after winning in iowa. bernie sanders holds an advantage over hillary clinton but it is tighter than in recent weeks. libby casey is live in manchester. new hampshire voters, they're known to make up their minds at the last moment. will that make for a frenzied day of campaigning where usual today? >> it's definitely going to be a busy day across the state of new hampshire. it is bitterly cold here this morning and snow is expected in just a couple of hours, so that may slow the pace of the campaign. we'll see if candidates are able to get to all of their events. you can be here and stay indoors and still be saturated by the campaign, local media, national media. because of the debate saturday night, people are processing that. there's a lot in flux, so candidates want to make their final sale today. >> are you able to tell us who
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could benefit the most from so many undecided especially on the gop side? >> you know, this is the excitement of being in new hampshire. we really won't know until tomorrow. the question here is how will donald trump do. i talked to a lot of voters when i was here in december and we're hearing from people today who still support donald trump, they like that he was not beholden to financial interests and his brash style. do they see him as a celebrity or think he is a viable candidate? we'll find out tomorrow. there is the question of the second place finish. on saturday night's debate, the last chance for the republicans to all be on stage better, minus carly fiorina, who is campaigning pretty hard here, the republican governors, john kasich, chris christie, jeb bush really went after marco rubio
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and marco rubio by a lot of people's accounts here didn't defend himself quite as well as they expected. he sort of played into the nearative that he's not as experienced. chris christie went at him hard. will christie benefit or will he be used as an attack dog? john kasich is someone to watch. ohio governor, moderate, someone who hasn't been as pizzazzy on the campaign trail but voters like what he has to say. this is a real make it or break it moment for these republican governs on second tier to move on. >> could see a real shakeup in new hampshire. hillary clinton is still trailing bernie sanders there in new hampshire on the democratic side. will clinton campaign in new hampshire today or is she moving on? >> she's absolutely sticking around today. she'll be here tomorrow. the clintons say they are in it to win it, but she is trailing and new hampshire's been kind to the clintons in the past. they had hoped to make a real
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difference here. the question may be how wide of a margin does bernie sanders defeat her. nothing is written in stone. voters have to weigh in. we saw hillary clinton leave the new hampshire trail yesterday to go to flint michigan and talk about the water crisis there, the lead in the water crisis. bill clinton stuck around here. he was coming out in force and not just for his wife but against bernie sanders. stephanie, that is a very different tone. he criticized sanders campaign ideas and supporters for what he said is sexism, bill clinton talking about a blogger, a liberal who is actually feeling a bit daunt or afraid on line because of all the attacks she's getting from sanders supporters. >> sadly, she said until the democratic primary is over, i have to use a pseudonym, because we are all of us who stick up
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for hillary facing vicious sexist attacks. >> something else to watch, gloria steinem and had lynnal bright criticizing women for not backing hillary clinton. floor are a stein emapologizein. hillary clinton pledged her support in flint. that's drawing questions over whether she is politicizing the crisis. >> hillary clinton got a rock star welcome at one of flint's largest churches, the house of prayer. she wasted no time in criticizing how long it took before any action was taken on the city's water, rich residents
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were told was safe when the city switched its water supply to the polluted flint river in 2014. >> i'm here because for nearly two years, mothers and fathers were voicing concerns about the water's color, about the smell, about the rashes that it gave to those who were bathing in it. >> she got her loudest applause when she gave voice to what a lot of people here suspect, that they were ignored because of race and poverty. >> i said weeks ago if what had been happening in flint had happened in grosse pointe or bloom field hills, i think we all know we would have haled a solution yesterday. >> hillary has shown that she really cares about this community. >> a cynic might say that a formidable candidate coming here might go politicizing this. >> hillary didn't have to come,
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because she got a thing she is doing over there in that other state. >> as long as the job gets done, it doesn't matter if she's using it for political gain, which i feel she is not. >> clinton scored big when she talked about finding a way to put flint's own residents to work on fixing the water infrastructure. >> she wants people inside our city to make some of that money coming in. all my antennas went up when she said that, i'm kind of like a do do-it-yourselfer too, you know. >> the long term impact on flint residents especially children is likely to be severe and may not be fully known for years. >> let's make sure we take care of the people of flint and give every child a chance to live up to his or her god-given potential. thank you all and god bless you. >> al jazeera, flint, measure. the former owner of a company involved in a big chemical spill in west virginia
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will be sentenced today. the spill two years ago tainted the water supply for 300,000 people. former freedom industries owner william tiz faces one year in prison. he is one of six men who pleaded guilty with charges related to the spill. chemicals that cleaned coal spilled into the elk river. parts of the u.s. are bracing for blizzard like conditions this morning. let's bring in meteorologist nicole mitchell for more. >> it's not a lot of snow. you would think that's not a problem. it's the high winds blowing it around. this is where we have our next system coming through the midwest starting to move more into the great lakes now. another one suiting up the coastline. i'll have more on the details of that coming up in the next half hour, as this moves forward, there is also, you can see the radar giving those mixes from the ohio river valley into the appalachians, a little ice in some places, not an ice storm. that's the worst condition when up get the ice first and snow over it, because you don't know
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it's slick underneath. a lot of this is only going to be a couple of inges, that's not too bad. look at this core of high winds. traveling interstate 29 between the dakotas and minnesota getting into nebraska picking up high wind gusts, you can see omaha, winds gusting to 35 miles an hour but i've easily seen gusts over 40 miles an hour, causing problems. the areas highlighted in red is where we have the different blizzard warnings and advisories around all that this is spreading eastward. the core are where we could get the heaviest snow is where i said also watch for that ice and that would be two to other inches, isolated spots six inches, portions of appalachians, but definitely troublesome snow blowing around in the whiteout conditions. this lasts for a few days and slowly crawls between the east coast. there is chances for snow almost
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every day this week. in search of safety, tens of thousands of syrian refugees stranded at the border while germany and turkey talk about stopping the flow. >> rising from the rubble, a child pulled alive from under the debris days after taiwan's earthquake. rthquake.
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>> german chancellor angela merkel is pledging more support for refugees in turkey. the country shut you a main border crossing with syria. >> thousands are geared there after fleeing the syrian government offensive near
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aleppo. turkey said it cannot support more refugees coming into the country. >> on sunday, a turkish aid group delivered food to thousands of syrians living along the border. turkish officials say the country is currently care for thousands on the syrian side of the border but has no immediate plans to let them in. turkey is hosting 2.5 million syrian refugees. stephanie decker is along the border. >> the border may be closed for people but we've seen a steady line of trucks coming in and out all day. what we have also seen is steel structures on back of trucks which appear to be able to be scaffolding material to continue building the tents inside. we spoke with turkey's disaster management agency. they believe 10,000 people are on the other side of that border. they are registering them, because and it is security concern. they want to manage the situation. they say they're perfectly well prepared to deal with them there as they are here when it comes
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to dealing with supplies, relief, plank debts, but it is incredibly cold at night. there are no plans at the moment to open this border. we did hear from the turkish president today. he did say that he expected a potential of 70,000 people to come over the next few days or weeks. if this offensive continues, of course, that showing no sign was letting up and that if need be, turkey would be opening its borders, but at the moment, they remain closed. >> turkish state media just reported that 22 refugees drowned trying to reach greece by boat. more than 300 of died so far this year trying to make that crossing. what is your organization doing to respond to the latest refugee crisis we've reported on at that time syrian turkish border right now? >> we have members in turkey, but we've also been responding
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throughout the european confederation, we have members in 49 different -- we have 49 members in 46 countries throughout europe and many are active in responding to humanitarian needs directly, as well as doing advocacy work in the fields of migration and humanitarian aid. >> europe had about a million syrian and other migrants enter the e.u. last year. when you talk about turkey, they already have 2.5 million syrians there. they have now shut their borders. they had an open door policy until now. what awaits syrian refugees when they get to the at yourish border. what are the conditions like and are they any better than in syria? >> the conditions are quite severe. you've got thousands of people lined up waiting for protection. they don't have housing accommodation. they're lacking food and water,
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basic hygiene packs. there's issues of toiletries, and other basic needs, not to mention the situation of children that are also with people waiting along the border. beyond that, you have people within turkey who are in refugee camps that are quite dire, that are also lacking some of the make that essential necessities that are important for basic survival and of course, one of the major concerns for families with children is the failure completely to support further education or training options for children who have been out of school for years and are desperate to continue to grow. >> that is why a lot of these refugees make that dangerous journey across the mediterranean to try to get to europe where they might have the possibility of getting an education of working. where is the e.u. on resettling some of the 1 million refugees and migrants they have already
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received? >> there was a time at least 160,000 by the end of last year and so far, the numbers of resettlement have been quite meager nearing less and thousands continue already since january 1 this year, 56,000 people have newly arrived to the e.u., and so the situation for member states in responding has been very immediate to respond as best they can, but that unfortunately is not quite enough. >> what is your message. you are a humanitarian organization. first and foremost, you want these people to be treated who you money but with just the sheer numbers in turkey and
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europe, where should they go and is there an argument now that they should remain in syria, because i know there was also a report from the u.n. that tens of thousands of syrian refugees that fled iraq are now going back to syria. >> i'm not sure where people should be going. that dependency on each person's individual situation. one thing we demand or really encourage is that the individual asylum request and process are being accurately implemented, so that case by case decisions are being made, not select kind of discriminatory process based on countries of or begin which seems to be you the case because systems of so-called safe third countries. >> i want to go back to these pictures we're seeing of tent cities that have basically sprung up again along the border right now between syria and
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turkey, because turkey for now has closed a main border crossing that would normally receive these syrians. are these tent cities the best resolution for those fleeing aleppo right now or is there a more humane immediate solution? >> indeed there are more humane solutions available. one thing we've advocated for is the implementation of humanitarian visas, a colleague of mine is currently in the parliament right now meeting with political groups to push this forward. in addition, the resettlement, as you've already discussed, relocation, but also in ensuring more stable and secure ways of accessing the e.u. territory. right now, there are still limited ways to enter europe legally that it forces people to rely on smugglers and risk their life in hope of saving themselves. >> and again, 22 refugees
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drowning just today because they took that dangerous journey across the mediterranean. thank you so much, shannon. >> thank you. >> the iraqi military is making more gains against isil in anbar province. forces are evacuating civilians from a stronghold near rimadi. they retook the area over the weekend. iraqi officials say that victory allowed them to close in on fallujah and cut off crucial isil supply routes from syria. several coalition airstrikes over the weekend helped the iraqi military make those gains. it's a somber new year's in taiwan with hundreds trapped under rubble after and earthquake. rescuers pulled four survivors from a high rice building today, including an 8-year-old girl. the complex collapsed when a 6.4 magnitude quake struck over the weekend. the death toll stands at 38.
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rob mcbride reports from the city worst hit. >> lunar new year's day and the whole of taiwan is virtually closed as people take off work and go to temples. this temple over 100 meters from the main rescue site is probably busier than most, a focal point for many of the charities and volunteer groups that have come to lend support to this rescue effort and also ordinary people coming here to make their offering. in some ways, this chinese alone nor new year has had a shadow cast over it by this tragedy, but also, you get a sense that people have been stirred into action coming to join this communal effort giving hem while there's still a chance of people being rescued from the rubble. >> i pray for those people still trapped and their safety. >> i pray to god that hopefully there will be more survivors. >> rescuers are now wrestling with the difficult decision of
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whether to bring in heavy lifting gear to move some of the upper parts of this structure to get to people who may be buried lower in the rubble. they've resisted doing so so far, because of course it may cause a further collapse, lookedding the very people they are trying to save. we are coming to a critical point now. we're into day three of the rescue operation. the calculation is people can't survive longer than three days without food and water. people buried deep in the rubble deserve a chance to be freed. 35 of the 38 people confirmed dead were killed in that one collapsed apartment building. coming up, pain killers and the primaries. >> the presidential candidates put in the spotlight because of the drug epidemic. >> the voters are listening, but how big a say will independent
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voters have in new hampshire?
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>> images matter. >> innovative filmmaker, spike lee - on his controversial new movie. >> the southwest side of chicago is a war zone. >> taking on the critics. >> and another thing... a lot of the people have not seen the film. >> and spurring change through his art. >> we want this film to save lives. >> i lived that character. >> we will be able to see change. >> welcome back to your world this morning. the u.n. security council
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threatens more sanctions against north korea after passenger yang launched a long-range rocket over the weekend. the move was condemned, called a clear threat to international peace and security by the u.n. it's not clear if china will agree to new sanctions. german chancellor angela merkel is holding talks with turkish leaders about a growing refugee crisis there. thousands are stranded along the country's border with syria unable a cross. they are escaping a syrian government offensive near aleppo. the country cannot handle more refugees. new hampshire voters are courted today on the eve of the first primary. republican donald trump has a commanding lead in the gop race. on the democratic side, vermont senator bernie sanders leads clinton in the polls. one issue is a drug problem some there call an epidemic.
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the granite state tops the country in deaths from heroin and opioids. are they hearing what they want from the candidates with regards to the drug problem? >> it is certainly getting a lot of attention. one great thing about living in the state is all the presidential candidate come to your front yard and engage with you and listen to the issues you care most about. this is one a lot of people in new hampshire feel a sense of desperation about and they are talking to candidates. >> this picture, the smile, this kid, that's the kid that i, you know, i want back. >> she is dealing with something no parent expects, her son is in jail on drug charges. he's only 20. she says he got into drugs as a teenager, first marijuana then pain killers to deal with anxiety and adhd. >> did he self medicate with drugs? >> i think started, yeah, with to really try to find his own
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way of feeling better about him, you know, happier. >> she said new hampshire mental health system failed her son. just getting him a bed at a long term rehab center. >> it's like a lottery. what sort of insurance do you have, they ask or do you have the money to self pay. those beds are given to the 1%, basically. >> her son is part of a raging drug crisis and he's one of the lucky ones, because he's still alive. >> here in new hampshire, the number of people who have died from opioid overdoses shot up 70% and visits to hospital emergency rooms for heroin use more than tripled. state officials expect to break a new record this year for the number of people dying from drug overdoses. it's not just a problem here. nationally,le centers for disease control say more people die from drug abuse than car
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accidents. >> the boom in addiction and deaths prompted new hampshire's gone to calm the legislature into special session this winter. state senate majority leader jeb bradley chaired the task force for insurance reforms, drug courts and stronger drug enforcement. >> it's taken a while to get to the recognition we have now, but when you know people that have had these victim problems and have become a victim, it's staggering. it's probably the top issue on everybody's minds except for the presidential primary. >> in an october poll by wmur tv. voters named drug abuse as the top issue and presidential candidates are talking it on the stump. >> it is all over the place. it is extraordinary. it's heartbreaking. >> both republicans and dems are
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addressing the drug problem. donald trump saying new hampshire has a huge per win problem. hillary clinton weighing in, saying for too long, we have had a quiet epidemic on our hands, and bernie sanders saying we have a real real real crisis with opiates and with heroin. >> recovery advocates in new hampshire welcome the attention, but want to see actual changes. >> you can't talk much longer. the death toll is rising. >> she knows about addiction in her own struggle and at a recovery center in manchester. she hopes that the attention doesn't fade after the new hampshire primary is over. >> i guess candidates now are fixated on isis. leaders need to make sure we are protected, but need to make sure we're protected against domestic terrorism, right? that's what i feel like cartels are, cartels bringing heroin into this country are killing
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our children. >> leaving families feel they are fighting both the system and the drug epidemic tearing them apart. >> jail is a place where kids like your son end up? >> here they are. that's where they're ending up, you know, because they don't know what else to do. >> jail won't solve her son's problems or new hampshire's drug crisis, she says. >> so much focus here in new hampshire, of course advocates and families want to make sure this issue lasts and resonates beyond tomorrow's primary, that it continues to be a national debate. to that end, president obama requested more than a billion dollars in the next budget to try to deal with opioid and heroin addiction, so whoever wins the presidential race will certainly face this problem in the years to come. >> thank you. one group of voters who will get a big say in new hampshire
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tomorrow are independents. that's why candidates are trying so hard to win them over. it's a state which priced itself on its independent pie nearing spirit. it says so there on the license plate. new hampshire voters also pride themselves on vetting presidential candidates, the nice's first primary election who decides who goes on from here and hoop doesn't make the cut. >> they have to convince the party faithful to be true to their beliefs while recruiting others, the free spirits into the voting booth. >> it's estimated 40% of new hampshire voters describe themselves as independents. that means when it comes to the primary, they can choose which party to support, republican or democratic, and then which candidate gets their vote. jenny coleman is a former republican. she now judges candidates where they stand on issues important to her. >> most people in the other parties are predictable, because they follow party lines, they
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stay in the box and independent voters are really swayed by so many things that candidates have to be on top of their game to sway independent voters. the party line won't do it. >> the polls say there is a growing sense of frustration in both parties, leading to more calling themselves independent. one analyst believes many who switch allegiance like the idea of calling themselves independent. >> most people who say they are independents are actually pretty consistent voters for one party or the other over time but for some reason say i'm an independent, i just have voted republican in the last seven presidential elections. it still matters. i think the independent mindedness behind that sort of impulse matters to these voters. >> winning over independents is a crucial test for anyone who wants to be president. they can't bank on the parties
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base to carry them to victory. they don't always win their party's nomination, but it remains an important stop on the road to the white house. the family of a black teenager fatally shot by a white chicago police officer says it is planning a legal response after the officer sued the teen says estate. the officer seeks millions of dollars, saying he had to shoot in self defense because the 19-year-old was swinging a bat. he also says the actions called the death of a neighbor, betty jones, also shot by police. both families sued the officer. fixing the broken immigration system in america, for many, the issue is very personal. some people were deported and now separated from their families. >> there's samantha. i hope you are doing good.
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i love you very much as i have also said to you. >> for years, sofia wrote letters to her daughter. >> you are my pride and joy and it really hurts me to see you are there. >> her written words the only way to keep in touch with samantha. >> i will give my life for you. i will do whatever it takes so that you can be ok. >> after living in the u.s. for 25 years, sofia was deported to her home country of mexico, but her only child samantha was forced to stay in the u.s. both asked we not use their real names or show their faces. >> it was like a bad dream, like it didn't stay in my mind that he was actually in mexico. i just knew that i couldn't cross and couldn't get ahold of nobody, and i just cried all the time. >> sofia is one of thousands of single parents who have been
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separated from their american born children in removal proceedings. specific numbers are hard to come by. immigration and customs enforcement tells al jazeera they don't keep track of how many families are separated upon deportation. >> when they are deported, it's a hurried process and there's no real meaningful screening of who's getting left behind. i have one client the victim of domestic violence and she was deported and her two teenage sons ended up homeless. is about. about. >> they know their children are just beyond the fence. >> tonight, hear what sofia and other deported moms want the u.s. to consider before separating families. >> you know, they should think about the future of our kids.
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what kind of future will a kid have when they don't have their parent in a p.t.a. meeting? >> we'll take you inside a shelter just over the border in mexico. originally founded to help migrants heading north, it now primarily houses deported moms with nowhere else to go. jennifer london, al jazeera, tijuana, mexico. this morning, a reminder once again, it's probably a bad idea to park on a frozen lake. these drivers saw their cars fall through the ice into wisconsin's like geneva. emergency workers crowd on to the size to try to save the cars. i don't know what they were thinking. nobody was injured. another blanket of snow is expected across the region. let's bring in nicole. >> there's a couple rounds. some places could see chances for snow through the work week. there's one system crawling up the coastline today, and then
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remember, i was talking about that system in the midwest pulling into the great lakes, the leading edge of that. there's another system behind this. the coastal system is the bigger problem today and bigger snow amounts in the country. the farther east you get, the more you see the heavier snow. new york city, maybe only a couple of inches, but you get to long island and eastern side of that could be six inches. i would say the massachusetts coastline, the most 12 inches. a lot of people ask me about new hampshire, closer to the coast could get six inches, interior two or three. it depends where you are. that's why we have the different advisories. most go until tomorrow morning. it's the next system that can bring light snow. the next system can also drink dramatic temperature changes. by wednesday, temperatures for the midwest running over 20 degrees below average. that spreads eastward by this weekend, temperatures will drop
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more into the 20's for the east coast. >> thank you very much, nicole. >> stopping zika with a toxic pesticide. some are considering bringing back d.d.t. to fight the mosquitoes. a half time show with a message, beyonce steals the spotlight, superbowl 50 with a political twist.
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president obama is urging americans not to panic over the zika virus.
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he is asking congress for $2 billion in emergency funding. he talked the risks of the virus. >> this is not like ebola. people don't die of zika. a lot of people get it and don't even know they had it. what we now know is there appears to be some significant risk for pregnant women or women who are thinking about getting pregnant. we're going to put up a legislative proposal to congress to resource the research on vaccines and helping the public health testimonies. there shouldn't be panic on this. this is not something people are going to be dying from it. but is something we have to take seriously. >> congress will be briefed about the virus and its effects. fewer americans will travel to latin america and the caribbean over fears of the zika virus. a reuters survey finds 41% of people questioned are less likely to travel to puerto rico,
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mexico or south america. six out of 10 americans aware of zika virus are concerned. as the virus spreads, some public health experts suggest bringing back ddt. it is band in the united states sings the 1970's because of toxic side effects. >> this is the story of a miraculous white powder. its name is d.d.t. >> this 1945 propaganda film produced by the u.s. war department hailed the benefits of d.d.t. during world war ii. >> yes, today, d.d.t. is necessarily a military weapon. we're turning it out by the thousands of tons. >> it had been around since the 1870's. in 1939, it was recognized as a stunningly effective pesticide. the army used it to fight
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malaria, typhus and other insect borne diseases around the world. it causes violent convulsions that paralyze and kill insects. >> the homecoming of the healthiest army in military history will be in no small pat due to d.d.t., our great new weapon for war today and peace tomorrow. >> after the war, d.d.t. gained widespread civilian and industrial use. millions of tons were sprayed in farms, gardens, forests and homes. in 1946, the paint company sherwin williams marketed it as a powder, spray and also a liquid coating sold in paint cans and applied with a brush. >> there must be a catch to it. >> for decades, the industry reassured the public it was completely safe.
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>> no sir, it harms only us, the citizens of bugdom. used right, it is absolutely harmless to humans and animals. >> mounting evidence revealed that was not true. in 1962, scientists rachel carson published "silent spring" arguing pesticides like ddt were also deadly to birds, fish and humans. "silent spring" became a national best seller. >> cbs reports the silent spring of rachel carson. >> cbs news aired a documentary on carson. >> can anyone believe it is possible to lay down such a barrage of poisons on the surface of the earth without making it unfit for all life? >> environmentalists pushed for tougher regulation of d.d.t. joni mitchell's big yellow taxi helped to make the issue part of our international culture. >> hey farmer farmer, put away the d.d.t. now. >> the e.p.a. banned widespread use of d.d.t. in the united
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states but over the next two decades, the u.s. continued to export hundreds of tons of d.d.t. to the developing world. john terrett, al jazeera. scientists are working on bio engineered mosquitoes that can address the zika mosquitoes instead of have gone to go back and using d.d.t. beyonce's show stopper that tack would the racial divide. celebrating the year of the monkey, beijing ushers in the chinese new year.
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>> the nation's first primary, and a critical next step on the
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road to the white house. >> republicans, democrats... >> stay with al jazeera america for comprehensive coverage that's... it's it is a very good day to be a denver broncos fan, now the attention turns to peyton manning's future. he's dealing with an nfl investigation prompted by an al jazeera report into whether he used h.g.h. after the game, the five to him m.v.p. said he would take some time to reflect. >> i think i'll make a good decision, and i think i'll be at peace with it, whichever way it goes, but i'm looking forward to tonight, being with my family and my friends and some teammates and celebrating this special victory acknowledge special win. >> manning is the only man to take two different teams to two
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superbowls and win. indianapolis in 2007 and now denver. for what it's worth, payton's mom told espn she wants him to retire. beyonce's half time performance raised eyebrows with a political message. >> the half time show started with happy reminders of the 1960's when the first superbowl took place. after performances by cold play and bruno mars. ♪ beyonce took over. back up dancers dressed at black panthers with signature blackberry ray's reference be the black power salute.
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after the performance, her mother posted this picture of the backup dancers with a similar salute. on twitter, dancers paid tribute to mario woods, a black man shot dead by police last year. woods was accused of stabbig someone and police say he wouldn't drop the knife. the killer sparked protests in san francisco and the justice department is now investigating the police department. her performance came a day after the star released her most political work yet. ♪ >> the music video for the song "formation" highlights police brutality and destruction in black neighborhoods after hurricane katrina. some have criticized it as anti cop. one woman wrote, as the wife of a police officer, i am offended by this entire video. another tweeted, i stand with police, boycott beyonce. >> the overwhelming comments on twitter, though, were in support of beyonce and her performance. out of all the artists performed last night, beyonce received the most attention with 1.3 million
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tweets. ings for millions, today is y of celebration for the alone new year. we have this report from beijing. >> beijing's annual explosive illumination, still a dazzling spectacle but perhaps not quite what it was. fire work sales are down by half this year. the reasons, pollution concerns, or possibly just fading interest in a country that prides itself on having invented gun powder. >> the economy isn't good. it's more difficult to make money. only business people can spend money buying bigger fireworks. ordinary people can only afford small fire crackers. it's too expensive. >> the giving of red envelopes
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filled with cash are exchanged between friends and relatives, an ancient ritual that technology is transforming. smart phone apps now allow users to send each other virtual money, money deposited into their mobile phone payment accounts. this is also a time to spend. at least the government hopes so. a beijing wholesale market popular with new year shoppers. where there's an air of desperation to the sales pitch, people are spending, but very carefully. i'm more cautious now. i have to look around and compare the price. >> turnover remains strong, but that's mainly down to discounting. leading to narrower profit
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margins. >> superstitious chinese are flocking to the temples to pay for good luck. after a year of natural disaster to help the turmoil. want predictions are for more of the same in the year ahead. june the year of the monkey is also a good year to give birth or look for love. according to my horoscope, it's not going to be a good year. >> manage your expectations, that's the message. your word this morning is back tomorrow beginning at 7:00 a.m. eastern. we're going to talk about reforming the police department in ferguson, missouri and whether the city council will agree to changes of the d.m.j. nearly two years after michael
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brown was killed. thanks for watching. the refugee crisis is said to be a burden the world must share. i'm nick clark live from al jazeera headquarters in doha. also ahead, lifting hopes, more survivors found in the rubble two days after taiwan's earthquake. bursting into song, the departure have the president, but now there's a vacuum to fill

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