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tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  February 22, 2016 7:00am-9:01am EST

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random individual decides to be evil i don't know how you stop that. >> random rampage the uber driver accused of going on a killing spree in kalamazoo, michigan going before a judge today. campaign crunch and republicans prepare for tomorrow's nevada caucus as they set their sights on the south carolina premium air. syria and attacks linked to i.s.i.l. and u.s. and russia pressing for a truce. plus the centinarian whose white house wish came true. ♪
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welcome to your world i'm stephanie sy. >> piecing together the clues and trying to find a motive between the killing in kalamazoo, washington and jason dalton shot eight people and first at an apartment complex and dealership and restaurant parking lot and killed six people and right now two others are in critical condition and andy is following to story for us and believe he chose the shooting victims at random, where does the investigation stand this morning? >> well, stephanie that suspect 45-year-old jason dalton will make his first court appearance today in kalamazoo county court charged with multiple counts of murder and attempted murder and authorities still don't know what led to the seemingly ran done, unprovoked series of attacks saturday night and meantime the same kind of
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bewilderment was felt at a prayer vigil last night for the eight victims in kalamazoo and sang amazing grace and they too just tried to make sense out of something so senseless. >> shots fired and one victim right now. >> reporter: police trying to figure out what was behind a mass shooting in kalamazoo, michigan. >> it was so random. if this was gang violence, there is ways and interventions and things to work on there. when a random individual decides to be evil i don't know how you stop that. >> reporter: at least six people were killed, two others seriously hurt. >> this is your worst nightmare where you have somebody just driving around randomly killing people. >> reporter: suspect 45-year-old jason dalton was eventually arrested early on sunday. >> he didn't struggle, there was not a fight and he seemed unaffected by what was going on and they found that pretty
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surprising based on what they knew or believed he had done at the time. >> reporter: he drove around town opening fire from in his car at three different locations and dalton a uber driver kept picking up fares and they are investigating and one man told a local television station that dalton picked him up and driving erratically and blowing stop signs and going through lawns and the terrified passenger out out and ran and dalton passed a background check to become a driver and says the company is horrified and heart broken and will do whatever is needed to help investigators. the shooting spree spanned seven hours and encompassed 15 miles around kalamazoo, the first victim a woman was shot and injured outside an apartment complex on the northeast side of the city, her terrified children watched just steps away. neighbors ran to help her. >> i first checked out the back window and i saw a car was speeding off so i came out and
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saw like a woman right in between her truck and the curb and she was calling for like 911. >> reporter: that mother is expected to survive. a father and his 18-year-old son were gunned down while they were looking at cars at a kia car dealership on the south side of the city and the scene with the most victims a cracker barrel parking lot, four women were killed sitting in their cars and a 14-year-old girl in one of those cars was shot and rushed to the hospital and the governor of michigan says now she is fighting just to stay alive. >> a lot of those prayers going out to the 14-year-old girl last night and she was pronounced dead at the hospital on saturday night, doctors were telling her family, getting ready for organ donation of her organs but then she squeezed her mother's hand indicating she was alive and that is when doctors now call it a miracle really. she is in critical condition still stephanie at this hour. >> andy any more details about
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the suspect? >> well, neighbors tell local media he is an insurance adjuster by day. neighbors tell media that he and his wife and two kids are a quiet family and friendly enough and really don't know much about him and he has no known criminal background, the mayor of kalamazoo calls him a very sad, sad man. >> al jazeera andy and thanks andy. politics and the race for the white house entering a critical stage this week and republicans are focused on tomorrow's caucuses in nevada and around the corner super tuesday march 1st when 12 states will hold their nominating contest and one state is massachusetts and a new poll out and emerson college saying 50% of those favor donald trump and rubio second at 16% followed by john kasich and ted cruz with ten and saying they are better candidates than trump.
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>> a lot of republicans who think donald trump is not the right guy to go head to head with hillary clinton and lose the match 70% of republicans believe that we are seeing people come together behind our campaign because we are the only campaign that has beaten donald trump and that can beat donald trump. >> anyone can use tough words and go over the top and say things that sound strong but it's not enough and have to know how to do it and looking at policies he talked about they would not make america stronger. >> randall pinkston in south carolina and let's quickly about this weekend's results and trump the gop frontrunner and clear path to nomination and his opponents are trying to stop him, how are they going to do it? >> well, i tell you, del he has a path but a lot of work to do and there is a thing called momentum, remember the word and once it starts it's hard to stop and right now trump has the
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momentum and let's take a look at a poll conducted by nbc journal back in march of 2015, at that time the question was could you see yourself supporting trump for president, this poll for republican voters, at that time 20% said yes. by january before the first vote was cast in the iowa caucuses by january that number was up to 70% and that is stunning and the actual votes take place since then showing indeed trump does have a lot of appeal so his opponents have some work to do del. >> randall on that note how crucial is tomorrow's caucus in nevada for ted cruz and marco rubio? >> trump proved he has support in the midwest and iowa and new hampshire and in the religious south where trump comes up with a victory proved he can move in the south too and can he grow west? obviously cruz who is a senator from texas is counting on the west to save him to boost his
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campaign and rubio is looking for support there and he has not won anything and cruz at least one one contest in iowa and we are talking nevada. >> finally before i let you go super tuesday, march 1st, donald trump could he thee r -- run th board and wrap up the nomination? >> 595 delegates and takes 1236 and the he won 595 a lot more to go to 1236 and keep in mind too on the super tuesday states most of them it's proportional awarting of delegates so even those who don't come in number one will get some delegates so trump may do well, may get some more momentum but he can't wrap it up by super tuesday. >> there is a trump casino in nevada as you point out and randall in south carolina and thank you very much.
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meanwhile ohio's governor john kay -- kasich and not named in the legislation but stop a million in funding going to any organization that performs or supports abortions. south carolina is crucial for democrats there and the primary there is saturday and al jazeera washington correspondent mike has more. >> reporter: hillary clinton won the nevada caucuses and low turn out in convincing fashion and many supporters are pointing to a key democratic constituency and african/american voters and 15% of nevada was african/american here in south carolina that number is much larger more than half of democratic primary voters are expected to be black voters and hillary clinton is winning them by a wide margin and bernie sanders for his part is not writing off south carolina and expects to compete here and, in fact, late on sunday evening he did have a very large rally
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where he hit familiar themes in greenville, south carolina and hillary clinton for her part stopped in texas, a super tuesday state 11, some 11 states are going to be having primaries or caucuses and texas among them and while there and speaking in houston hillary clinton talked about racial issues. >> it is state after state they are doing everything they can this to stop black people, latinos, poor people, young people, people with disabilities from voting. it's a blast from the jim crow past and we are going to fight it. >> reporter: and as we say bernie sanders by no means conceding either here in south carolina or among the african/american democratic voters, in his speech this evening in greenville he talked about the issues confronting african/americans. >> no american black, latino or white should be fearful of walking down the street and
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getting shot by a police officer. [cheers and applause] and again these votes are going to be coming in rapid succession on saturday the south carolina democratic primary after republican voters turned out for donald trump giving him a resounding victory on saturday night, just last night but three dayings after the democratic primary on saturday comes super tuesday, some 11 states and territories are going to be voting having primaries or caucuses and among them many southern states are calling it the southeast conference primary after alabama, arkansas, virginia, texas and georgia all of those involved in voting all of them having high african/american voting populations within the democratic elaborate, many of them favoring hillary clinton on paper, bernie sanders is going to be putting up a fight but the vote could turn and could revert to the mean where hillary clinton was favored all along, back to you. al jazeera eeks mike vicara in south carolina and south carolina congressman the highest ranking african/american in
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congress endorsed hillary clinton. in a few hours the supreme court will hear arguments for the first time since the death of justice scalia and only eight justices will take the bench this morning and scalia's chair is trapped in black wool and in the usual place until next month when they will switch seats in line with their seniority and president obama could name his nominee to replace scalia as early as this week and republicans vowed to block any nomination. officials this morning warning the death toll likely to rise after a series of i.s.i.l. related attacks in syria and at least 129 people dying in the bombings on sunday, the first a soubl suicide bomb in homs shaktar getting an alawite neighborhood and the white minority of bashar al-assad and hitting a shrine in da maus cuss and the same day u.s. and russia say they reached another provisional truce. >> in fact, we are closer to a ceasefire today than we have
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been and i take nothing for granted about this, a cessation of hostilities, and it's possible over the course of these next hours. >> reporter: neither kerry nor his russian counterparts sergei fedorov releasing any details about that agreement, it is the second time in as many weeks that the u.s. and russia have said they reached a short term truce, al jazeera, zaina has more. >> reporter: well kerry seemed to be very confident when he said that we are closer than ever to bring about a cessation of hostilities on the ground, what we understand is that u.s. and russian officials really have been holding intensive consultations, bilateral consultations and supposed to be a u.n. meeting involving part of the syria support group and that is postponed as u.s. and russia try to iron out modalities of a ceasefire and according to carry
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they reached a provisional agreement and expects a phone call between the russian and american presidents soon and reaching out to the regional and international stakeholders involved in the conflict, this is not going to be easy but what is very clear is that the international community is pushing forward, trying to find a way at least to paws the fighting while they try to talk peace and reach some sort of political settlement. so we have to remember to i.s.i.l. that claimed responsibility for the attacks in damascus and homs a group that the international community considers a terrorist organization, a group the international community wants to fight, wants the priority to be to defeat this group and they cannot defeat this group unless there is a political settlement in syria. they believe that i.s.i.l. is able to you know operate and to grow even stronger because of the security vacuum and this has been the priority of the west and this is why the opposition is very angry and frustrated,
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they feel that the u.s. really has abandon them and now trying to work on finding any deal which would involve in one way or the other partnering with the syrian government because its priority is i.s.i.l. >> that is our zaina on the turkey-syrian border and gaza step opening in telling us there is fierce fighting in aleppo between government and allied forces and the opposition. officials in iraq say they have found a radioactive material that went missing months ago and dumped near a gas station in the southern part of country and not clear who took it but it's intact and no concerns about radiation, at a base in baghdad on sunday for the operation and more troops are expected in coming days, prime minister abadi said the operation would begin sometime in the first half of the year and iraqi forces supported by u.s. air strikes reclaimed the
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city of ramadi from i.s.i.l. in december. it was 70 degrees on saturday in washington d.c. but that being said there is a storm system in the south that could bring with it some severe weather, good morning nicole, i'm smiling. >> it won't be 70 today and clearly you enjoyed it, glad for the people who were able to get outside this weekend and do that but definitely as we continue out through the day today some changes and a front will start dropping temperatures more into normal ranges and you can see the trailing boundary and otherwise snow flakes in the northern tier and in the rockies and the big player in the next couple days of what will happen in the south and back along the line we will have a developing area of low pressure and cause us a number of problems through the course of the day because we already have the line showers and storms to pop up and portions of texas near where the low will be developing we could have stronger storms today so watch for that potential and then just widespread source --
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showers and could be widespread rain and watch for potential flash flooding and by tomorrow you can see this starting to develop more impressively and we will have some heat in the south, some uplift through this region so that will be a bigger risk for the severe weather and by the time we get into wednesday this pulls further to the north and pretty much widespread rain up through the east coast and on the backside of all of this there could be some snow as well. so in terms of that severe weather risk tomorrow is the bigger day. today a slight risk for texas but tomorrow much more enhanced from louisiana towards alabama and maybe into georgia we will have to watch for that very closely and then otherwise it's going to be those broad areas of rain, this is through tomorrow, some of this already starts to make it through the northeast although for the northeast it's more wednesday and thursday so looking an about the heavy rain and del you talked about the temperatures not quite as mild today about 20 degree drop from what you were looking at a
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temperature in the 50s. these are much more typical for this time of year but you can see some of the heat and houston to fuel the stronger storm. f.b.i. fires back at apple. >> director insisting that safety should not be left in the hands he says of tech companies. and a student standoff and freedom of expression at a university in india. ♪
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the indian army has taken control of the main water supply in new deli after it was damaged in a protest. >> this is north of the capitol and that state supplying 70% of the water in new deli but protests over fair benefits for
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farming community now threatening that water supply and 12 people have been killed as part of the protest so far. protesters are spreading across india after police arrested a student accused of rebelling against the government and increased security at the courthouse in new deli where he is being tried and beaten by a group of lawyers last week and al jazeera reports. >> reporter: police showed up on this campus early this morning after five students accused of sedition of india came on the campus late last night and the five accused of yelling antinational slogans at a protest here on february 9 which was against the execution of a man who was convicted of attacking india's parliament and a student in judicial custody since that time but the five students over there say they went to hiding after receiving death threats against them and families and despite in the evidence could be false and the allegations sparked outrage across the country particularly
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among right wing and nationalist groups who accuse the students here at jnu of being antinational and even let led to some physical fighting now the whole issue though, those on the other side say the whole thing is being blown out of proportion and cracking down on criticism against it and says freedom of speech in india is being threatened and students holding a vigil since last night and meeting with faculty and the vice chancellor if whether bless should be let on the campus to make arrest and five students say they want to surrender to face charges against them but their fellow students here saying they will continue protesting those charges. reporting from new deli. the case of having widespread effects and activists and journalists tell al jazeera it's sparking fierce debate in india over democratic rights and free speech. >> on charges of inciting
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sentiments on the business of a forged video and the world's largest democracy and everything, everything slapped against him are undemocratic in nature and we share with saudi arabia and sudan and this is a travesty of justice and this constitution of india gives us the right to free speech but unfortunately over the last couple of months we have seen increasing intelligence to anybody who has been critical of the present day disposition. as prime minister of the country mr. modi should have spoken out against a student who has been trashed in public by allegedly his party members so the fact they refused to speak on this issue especially at a time when this is increasing tolerance the buck stops at his door.
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>> reporter: criticizing prime minister modi for not weighing in on this case. this morning bolivi, an and whether to amend the constitution so he can return in 2015 and exit poll says he is trailing by 2% and the government not conceding and last night it called for patience saying the vote is still too close to call. under oath on the record. bill cosby loses bid to postpone a deposition of sexual allegations against her husband. a massive cleanup in fiji after it is hit with the most powerful cyclone ever. ♪
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>> hunted to the brink of extinction. >> we need an urgent method that
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stops the killing. >> now fighting back with a revolutionary new science. >> this radiocarbon dating method can tell us if trade of ivory is legal. >> it could save a species. >> i feel like we're making an impact. >> techknows team of experts show you how the miracles of science... >> i'm standing in a tropical windstorm. >>...can affect and surprise us. >> wow, these are amazing. >> techknow, where technology meets humanity. >> only on al jazeera america. welcome back to your world this morning and take agree look at top stories and the man who launched the deadly spree in kalamazoo, michigan is due in court today, he is 45-year-old jason dalton and he will be arraigned and officials saying he shot eight people on saturday, six of those victims dying, police are still trying to determine a motive. the supreme court will hear arguments this morning for the first time since the death of scalia, only eight justices will take the bench and scalia's
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chair will be draped in black wool and may announce a replacement as early as today. running for president have their eyes on the next contest after donald trump's big win this weekend this south carolina and nevada caucus happen tomorrow and one week later march 1st 12 states holding the nominating contest on super tuesday and latest polls giving trump a large margin nationwide and studies politics at winthrop and is live from charlotte, north carolina and thanks for being with us and it's a tough question and i have to tell you about this article that was in the washington post and danielle writing like any number of us raised in the late 20th century i spent my life perplexed how hitler could have come to power in germany and goes on to say watching donald trump's rise i now understand is it time to ask the question whether donald trump is dangerous or just a
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politically astute politician? >> well it's a little hyperbole but he is playing on a lot of attitudes that kind of bring out the worst in people and i know in south carolina we found that among likely republican primary and they are 98% white and those who believe that whites were discriminated against and whites were discriminated against as much or more than blacks were more likely to vote for donald trump and discriminated people are more likely to vote for donald trump and he is playing on xenophobic people and race infused. >> is it hyperbole on his part on just bigotry and this is a resent exit poll of south carolina voters saying 74% of them agree with donald trump and think muslims should be ban from coming into the united states, is that a political position or
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bigotry? >> i think it's fear more than anything and it's playing upon bigotry and that has been true of not just supporters in south carolina but as supporters elsewhere as well. he really is kind of playing upon fears not just of i.s.i.s. and other terrorist groups but also the fear that the people who voted for him who have had power in america and south carolina forever are beginning to lose that and that is a lack of efficacy so it's not just xenophobic fear and it's losing power and influence as well >> what does it say about the evangelical vote going to done -- donald trump, is this banning muslims coming in the country and the pope says build walls and keep people out and says that is not christian, is it evangelical? >> not in a strict sense, no.
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[switching captioners]
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>> spend a lot of time talking about jeb bush. >> the truth is, donald trump is just a thing unto himself. he gets this so-called earned media, free media. he gets a master of trolling twitter. part of it is the backlash against the g.o.p. establishment. in 2012 south carolina for the first time didn't vote for the person who went on to get the nomination. they voted nor newt gingrich. many thought they got it wrong. i think they were voicing anger at the establishment with that vote. the g.o.p. did not pick that up, and now the whole nation is do
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it again. who better represents the establishment than a candidate with bush as his last night. he never had time to use that money to rise up. his time has past, and donald trump was able to personify that anti-establishment attitude, and bush do not spend enough noun overcome it. >> i want to make sure that i got the answer to my first question right. in your opinion, donald trump, is he dangerous? >> i don't know that he's dangerous. i know the policy that some of his policies embrace could tamper down on first amendment freedom, and that concerns. if some of these ideas turn into legislation, that could definitely be concerning. >> mr. hubbard, thanks. >> thank you. >> just a few days for apple to respond to a court ordinary to unlock the phone of one of the san bernardino shooters.
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we're hearing from the fbi about cracking into that phone. people should take a deep breath and stop saying the world is ending. >> the fbi directer is calling for calm and defending the agency, and apple said the request is an overreach and so far it says it will not comply. former nsa director michael hayden tells "usa today" saying that he agrees on this case but not the broader issue of a back door. >> jim would like a back door available to all devices globally. i think on balance i think that
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harms america's safety and security. it might make jim's job easier in some specific circumstances. >> the fbi needs apple's help because the security settings lock the phone if the password is wrong too many times. the fbi would like the analysts to get around the security features. but with 24 million iphones in use around the world, privacy activists say millions of earlier models may also be affected. >> it's about democracy activists in china. it's about human rights in syria. it's about lgbt activists here, you name it. privacy is not just a human right but it's a social good. >> the white house supports the fbi and insists there is no privacy the. >> they're not asking apple to
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redesign its product or to create a new back door to one of its products. they're simply asking for something that would have an impact on this one device. >> apple's scheme has no back door, meaning that it would be harder for the fbi to crack newer devices. >> the company has until this thursday to reply to the court order. amy said it would not comply saying that any tools would not be used just this one but repeatedly. >> what argument will they use going into court? >> they'll use the free speech argument. this will be a tough case because the iphone belongs to the local government, and they've consented to breaking into it. >> in connecticut lawyers representing a gun company and a gun shop will go to court as
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they try to have a wrongful death dismissed. the families argue that the ar-15 is too dangerous to sell to the public because it was made for the military. but the gun shops say they're shielded from law. >> bill cosby's wife sat down for a disposition. al jazeera has more. >> camille cosby was hoping to skip today's hearing and avoid answering questions about her husband all together. late saturday her lawyers asked to postpone the hearing citing marital laws, the judge said she had to show up to answer the questions. she would have relevant information and she was her husband's business manager for years. she said she is had no involvement with the facts or allegations under lying this
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case. and her public testimony would create an unnecessary media circus that would serve no purpose but to harass and embarrass her. >> no wife wants to testify about her personal relationship with her husband. definitely not testify about his relationships with other women. >> more than 50 women have come forward claiming that bill cosby sexually assaulted, drugged or raped them. he consistently denied those claims even as he faces charges in pennsylvania on sexual charges. his wife has stuck by his side. in 2014 she called the comedian a wonderful husband, father and friend. she said allegations against her husband has been biased. that's the only time she has spoken publicly about these claims and this deposit is supposed to be her first. >> i understand that she doesn't
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want to testify against her husband, but what is her legal standing. >> the judge said she does not have the right to avoid the disposition all together. they'll see the lawyers arguing over each question stating she does not need to answer. >> the public record law in washington is some of the most open in the country. but as al jazeera's alan schauffler reports, there are still bearers. >> think of all the public information accumulating in seattle. things like building permits. city council meeting transcripts. citations, court proceedings, video by police dash cameras and
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body cameras and more. in washington state a lot of that information is a matter of public record, and getting it to the public when asked for can be a time-consuming and expensive process. but there is a move afoot here. to make public information more public, more accessible to bring that whole process into the modern day. >> this is a global main strain movement. we see the shift to digital government as something quite irreversible because it's tick dated by reality. we can't solve problems the same way we tried to solve them 20 years ago. >> and business is very good. the seattle company that pioneered the try creating open source data solutions for government, finding ways to put all that information out there for the public to access as easily as they accessed so many other kinds of information these days online. hopefully making government that
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much more transparent. adam schauffler, al jazeera, seattle. >> fiji is trying to recover from the most powerful cyclone to hit the islands. 18 people were killed in the storm. al jazeera's caroline reports, authorities are trying to assess the damage. >> a glimpse of the damage in fiji after the strongest cyclone there. the town on the main island escaped a direct hit but the storm still left its mark. cyclone winston brought rain and winds that left homes, trees, and electricity cables. the damage in the other parts of the main island, even though it's infrastructure is the strongest to with stand such winds and rain. >> the government is asking everyone to remain at home as. there is restoring of our
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infrastructure. power lines are down all over the country. roofing iron, glass, electric wires and other hazardous materials pose threats. >> phone and power lines are down so it's been difficult to contact people living on other islands. some deaths and injuries have been confirmed. relief workers find it difficult to get around because trees are strewn across the roads. >> we have support, and we have in place pre-position supplies that are available. i also offered the adf to send a p3, orion to send materials to the outer islands and do assessments. >> there are 200 australians register there had and other nationalities affected.
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getting home will be difficult because airports have been closed. many of the low-lying islands are flooded and more flash floods and mudslides are feared. rescuers are trying to supply drinking water. the fijian government has declared a 30-day state of emergency because many of the islands are remote, it may be some time before the full extent of the damage is known. caroline malone, al jazeera. >> well, it was warm over much of this country this weekend but many are talking about how this video, ice stacking, that's what it is called, scientists happens when ice breaks and water underneath causes the pieces to slide and tack. it looks like something out of the movie frozen. >> i've seen these in real life happy. it was a creek that froze over. it was a sizable creek, and it
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sounds like an explosion happening. >> i agree with stephanie. something out of "frozen or" or a sci-fi movie. as you know, water, heats and cools much more slowly. lake superior is 42 degrees but even in the summer there are parts of the lake that never gets out of the 30s. it's a very cold lake. temperatures in minneapolis, 37 degrees. this is cooler temperatures for this time of year. we don't have the highs and lows that we normally have but we have some changes. thido you remember wichita, a few days ago was in the 80s. today closer to 60 degrees, and by tomorrow a lot of these temperatures fall to 60s which bring dallas to 53.
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the east coast is not as mild as it was over the course of the weekend. but look at this, los angeles, 82. we'll have high winds over the next couple of days that could cause problems in terms of high-profile vehicles. there's that developing system i was talking about. now we have the story on that cyclone. look at the loopy loop this has made in its track before it finally hit fiji. right now it's what they call a category 4 storm. winds are up to 110 mph. their scale is different than here in the united states. we would call this a category 2 storm. >> it looks like it was devastating for them. >> oil prices getting a past this morning. there is a new forecast that says that the production in the u.s. is going to drop, and that could drive prices up. we have more on the widespread effects. >> low prices for petrol or gas in the u.s. it's consumer heaven. prices have not been this low since the economic crash
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of 2009. people are driving farther, filling up more often and buying bigger cars and enjoying plane travel. why are prices so low? a tepid global economy, an economic slow down with countries like china and brazil, and there is an oil glut on the market. producers are trying to fix that. opec the organization of petroleum exporting countries, but many countries can't afford stop pumping. that can hurt economies that depend on oil like houston, that can hurt an economy. here at the committee board of trade it has fluctuated from $27 a barrel to $36.
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how low is that? well, prices peaked at $138 a barrel. now it's not expected to rise above the $40 to $50 range. houston is looking at a long-term plan, not a short-term fix. >> that is our john hedron reporting. they expect oil prices to even out sometime next year. >> if you didn't get enough sleep last night. you're not alone. one in three americans do not get enough sleep. and that pattern ranging by age, race and geography. those over 65 are able to get a good night sleep. non-hispanic whites have the healthiest ratio of sleep than ape group, and south dakota is the most rested sleep. >> what about when you work this
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shift. >> i don't know if that is included. >> we'll look at san francisco's housing crisis. we'll also tell you just who is stepping in to help them out. >> she's gotten sleep. a dream fulfilled. the energyist 106-year-old who got the president and first lady to cut a rub. cut a rug.
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>> marking the end of lunar celebrations with this. hundreds of people have released paper lanterns into the night sky. it is the kick off to the taiwan lantern festival. >> cool. well, lots of people are looking into getting into space for their next career. more than 18,000 applying to be nasa's next generation of astronauts. there are only 14 slots available. the lucky few will either go to
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the international space station or nasa's orion spacecraft or two other ships in development but first they would undergo years of training. >> one of the u.s.' biggest banks are trying to get around bank restrictions. >> bank of america will allow borrows to put down 3%, and in 2014 you may recall bank of america agreed to pay $800 million to settle claims it made errors on fha-backed loans. >> a group of california nuns have devoted their lives to help the homeless, and now they can't afford their rising rent. >> for years the homeless and hungry in san francisco's toughest neighborhood, the tenderloin, has depends on a hot meal by the nuns of notre dame. >> it is the joy we get back from what we do here.
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>> but the women who serve the homeless may soon be without a home themselves. the landlord plans to raids their rent from $3,465 a month to $5,500. >> i'm not sure how we're going to do it. we don't have that much money. all these people need to be fed. what will happen, you know? >> even in san francisco's most dilapidated neighborhood it's tough to rent. but the problem extends beyond the poorest to even the middle class. in the last few years housing has become the top issue for residents and a headache for city officials. one initiative started is a non-profit. city hall helps to buy property. this month they acquired five argument buildings, and they set them aside for oh affordable housing. >> this woman now can stay home.
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she and her family faced eviction. >> we got help from everybody. and we're eternally grateful. we couldn't believe it. >> the city spent $19 million on the program so far. these are some of the homes bought and set aside for renters. san francisco accesses a lender with non-profit groups taking charge of the purchase. >> san francisco, probably because we're one of the highest cost of living in the nation has been innovative in creating this. they're doing other things. but to actually take taxpayer dollars and say we're using that to subsidize these buildings is something. >> ices question whethe critics anwonder if government and non-profits should get involved this way. >> we're happy to do it.
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to have the different agencies come together to help us. >> but achievements are incremental. the latest purchase saved 19 units in a city facing thousands of evictions and rent hikes. >> if you're wealthy you have a lot of options. if you're a senior on a fixed income or disabilities your it's just a matter of time before your building is bought and you're pushed further and further out. it's a terrible time. hopefully this helps a little bit, but there is a lot more we should be doing as a city as well. >> as for the sisters, they say their attorney is trying to cut a deal with the landlord, give them one year to find their next location. they now have the time, but they still might not have the money. melissa chan, al jazeera, san francisco. >> the nuns are getting help from motivational speaker tony robbins. he was so impressed with their charity work that he gave them $25,000 to afford their rent for
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a year and he gave another $25,000 to help the nuns find another place to live. >> we'll find out if two names in soccer remain suspended. sepp blatter and michel platini in a hearing last week. the charge are that h that they will be suspend: >> a fraction of a second. look at this, a photo finish in the truest sense of the word. that's the tightest margin since 1959. hamblin calling the win the pinnacle of his year. >> this was a dream come true.
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>> yes, president obama invited 106-year-old virginia mclauren to the white house for black history month. she laughed, she talked and danced with the president and the first lady. michelle told mclauren that she wants to be like her when she grows up. she sent a video on youtube asking for the invitation. >> she remembers when blacks couldn't vote. her big goal in life is to be there and sing for the president. >> what a big day for her. very sweet. >> when we come back we'll talk about the supreme court, the highest court in the nation, back to work today. that can be rotten to the core. >> anas risked his life to report the truth.
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>> to save his people. >> doesn't matter who you are, i come with my cameras. >> only on al jazeera america.
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>> this is your worst nightmare where you have someone driving around, ram donnelly killing people. >> kalamazoo killings, the uber driver accused of killing six people in michigan going before a judge this morning. [ protesting ] >> ready for nevada, donald trump runs high after a big win in south carolina. >> isil launching dea deadly bombings in damascus. secretary of state john kerry promised to pull together a
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promised truce. >> a desperate recovery, the most powerful storm to hit fiji tears through th the island nation. >> good morning, and welcome to your world this morning. i'm del walters. >> and i'm stephanie sy. the man accused of a deadly rampage in kalamazoo, michigan, is in court this morning. charges say that he shot and killed six people and others were seriously hurt. >> he seemed to target people at random. we're following the story, andy, what do we know this morning? >> well, del, the 17-year-old boy and his father and four women celebrating a night out on the town at a restaurant all gunned down, and two other victims badly hurt in all this. they were remembered at a prayer service in kalamazoo.
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this was an emotional scene. amazing grace was played. remember that 17-year-old boy tyler smith and his dad who were gunned down, and then four women aged 60 to 74, who were all shot. and the 14-year-old girl who was shot along with the older women. she was in such bad shape the doctors pronounced her dead at the hospital an hour later when she squeezed her mother's hand they realized she was alive but still in criminallen. >> this whole thing is disturbing. but there are reports that the suspect was still picking up passengers in between the shooting. >> yes, it's crazy. apparently he shot the first woman in the argument complex just in random, unprovoked attacks. then he picked up fears at some point in the night as an uber driver. one of his fears said that he drove recklessly, and he ran
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from the car. and then the two from the auto dealership, the man and his 17-year-old boy were shot there. and then james dalton would pick up more fears and then four women were shot. and the authorities picked you will dalton in downtown kalamazoo. one of the passengers was joking request dalton saying, you're not the driver. and then the uber passenger described that interaction. >> it's crazy to think that this person could have gone out and done all these horrible things and then come in with a straight face like's going to work and didn't say much at all. >> uber released a statement saying it was horrified and heartbroken over the shootings saying that dalton did pass whatever background checks they did give to drivers, and they'll try to help in the investigation to figure out why he did this.
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>> andy, so many people were saying that somebody had to see this coming. what more do we know about the suspect? >> well, that's the strangest thing as well, authorities simply don't know the answer to right now. neighbors to 45-year-old jason dalton say that he and his wife and two kids lived a quiet life. they were friendly, neighbors say that he's actually an insurance adjustor by day. they would hear gunshots outside of his home. that's not unusual. it's a rural area where people have guns. they did find a semiautomatic gun in the uber car that seem to match the bullets used in the shootings. they found guns in his home but that's the big question, why did he do all this? that's something that maybe we'll get more answers possibly today. >> andy for us in chicago. thank you very much. >> in just a few hours the supreme court will hear arguments for the first time since the death of justice
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antonin scalia. only eight judges will take the chair this morning. scalia's chair will be draped in block wool until next month, that's when judges will switch seats in line with authority. senate if republicans have vowed to block any nominations now to presidential politics. the republicans have their eyes on the next contest. the caucuses in nevada, the next prize after donald trump's big win in south carolina. the latest polls give trump a wide margin nationally. this weekend two of his competitors argue that they are better candidates than he is. >> there are a lot of republicans who think that donald trump is not the right guy to go head to head with hillary clinton. we would lose that match and 70% of republicans believe that. we're seeing people come together behind our campaign because we're the only campaign that has beaten donald trump and can beat donald trump. >> anyone can use tough words. anyone can go over the top and
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say things that sound strong. but that's not enough. you have to know how you're going to do it. if you look at some of the policies that he talks about, they would not make america stronger. >> al jazeera's randall pinkston is in columbia, south carolina, this morning. good to see you. how crucial is nevada caucus given how big trump won in south carolina over the weekend? >> well, it is certainly important for marco rubio, the florida senator, so far he has not won any of the three contests that have taken place in iowa, new hampshire, and south carolina. of course, he needs a victory somewhere to prove that he has the possibility of potentially winning the nomination. ted cruz is important. he did win in new hampshire. he would like to show that he's strong in the west. he's hoping and expecting to do well showing he is the person to take on donald trump. and of course the donald, who
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has come to south carolina, up ending every prediction and conventional wisdom about a northern candidate who has a history of divorce. he's going move west moving towards the conviction. >> if history is any guidance, south carolina almost always has chosen the eventual g.o.p. nominee. i think there is only one time in recent history that that has not happened. trump has momentum looking forward to have tuesday. could he wrap up the g.o.p. nomination? >> the 595 delegates at stake on super tuesday from 12 states. in recent times no one candidate from either candidate has swept super tuesday. you might get up to six states, maybe up to nine but not all of them. number two, you need 1,236 del
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gets, trump will not get them all because there is a portion of the delegates. that means that those people who come in second and third will also get some of them. he'll do well, probably, but he'll still have a lot of work to do ahead as he himself said yesterday. >> randall pinkston for us, in columbia, south carolina, thank you. >> the african-american vote expected to make a big difference in the prime minister there on saturday for the democrats. right now the polls giving hillary clinton a large lead but bernie sanders said he's not giving up. mike viqueira has more. >> hillary clinton has won the nevada caucuses in convincing fashion. she brought out a key con sit went--constituency, the african-american voters.
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hillary clinton is winning them by a wide margin. now bernie sanders for his part said he's not writing off south carolina. in fact, late on sunday evening he did have a very large rally where he hit on some familiar themes in greenville, south carolina. hillary clinton stopped in texas, a super tuesday state. some 11 states will be having primaries or caucuses, and texas among them. >> day after day they're doing everything they can to stop black people, latinos, poor people, young people, people with disabilities from voting. it's a blast from the jim crow past, and we're going to fight it. >> as we say, bernie sanders by no means conceding here in south carolina or among the african-american democratic voters. in his speech this evening in
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greenville he also talked about the issues confronting african-americans. >> no american, black, latino, or white, should be fearful of walking down the street and getting shot by a police officers. [applause] >> again, these votes are going to be coming in rapid succession now. on saturday it's the south carolina democratic primary after the republican voters turned out for donald trump giving him a resounding victory on saturday night. just last night. three days after the democratic primary here on saturday comes super tuesday some 11 states and territories are going to be voting, having primaries and caucuses. among them many southern states calling the southeast conference primary after alabama, arkansas, virginia, texas, and georgia all of those involved in voting, all of them having high african-american voting populations within the democratic electorate. many favoring hillary clinton on
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paper. but bernie sanders could put up a fight. >> that is our mike viqueira. thank you very much in south carolina on the ground. south carolina congressman jim clyburn, the highest ranking african-american in congress are already endorsing hillary clinton. >> officials are warning that the death toll likely to rise after a series of isil attacks in syria. 129 people died in the bombings on sunday. the first was a double suicide-bomb in homs, which targeted an alawite neighborhood, that's the minority secretary of bashar al-assad. hours later another explosion hit a shiite shrine in damascus. >> in fact, we are closer to a cease-fire today than we have been. and i take nothing for granted about this. a cessation of hostilities, is possible over the course of these next hours. >> neither kerry nor his russian
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current part sergei lavrov have released any details about the agreement. it's the second time in as many weeks that the u.s. and russia have said they have reached a short-term truce. russia said it will continue targeting isil despite any stop in fighting. we're live in turkey on the border with syria. in my understanding all along with this truce is that isil was not included, and that the u.s. and russia could continue their attacks. the latest attacks by isil on sunday change the negotiations going on at all about the truce? >> no, what we understand is that the united states and russia really have been involved intensive conversations to finalize the agreement on a cease-fire. we heard kerry say that provisional agreement has been reached, and he was optimistic saying we're closer than ever to agree on a cease-fire in syria. isil is a group, the international community considers a terrorist
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organization. but this really has been the problem, identifying who is who in syria. you're going to need an international agreement north to implement any cease-fire on the ground. we do not know if that list has been agreed upon as of yet. for example, there are two groups on the ground who are part of the opposition, and who are taking part in the political process. but the russians consider them terrorist organizations. this really is a highly con tenuous issue, and until they solve it it will be difficult to implement the truce. another question is what type of monitoring mechanism is going to be put in place. a lot of details still need to be worked out, with the secretary of state john kerry saying they're closer than ever. >> that's the russians and the americans negotiating. what about the syrians, because we're also hearing, and i'm talking about assad government, we hear there is fighting under way in aleppo province between the government and rebels, is
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assad going to agree to a truce? >> as you mentioned, the war rages on. we heard the syrian president say just hours before kerry made the statement saying that we would agree to a cease-fire in syria, but on conditions that the rebels won't exploit it by regrouping and rearming. and really a very different statement coming from the syrian president just days he said there could be no cease-fire in syria until all terrorists are defeated. he did qualify all terrorists is everyone who carries a weapon. the russian u.n. envoy said that those statements were out of line with russia's policy. that is to push forward a diplomatic and to the conflict, russia and the syrian government both being accused of pursuing a military solution to the conflict. we saw the change in position, we heard the opposition say that they would be for a truce, but they're attaching conditions as well. what is clear the two main
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players are pushing forward, and they're holding talks with regional stakes holders in order to try to get them t on board. this will points out that a pause in the fighting in no way means there is an end to the conflict. >> thank you. >> officials in iraq saying they've found radioactive materials that went missing months ago. it was found dump near a gas station in the southern part of the country. still not sure who took it, but the material was found intact and there is no concerns of radiation iraqi troops are also getting ready to attempt to retake mosul from isil fighters. hundreds of troops gathered on sunday for the operation. even more are expected to arrive in the coming days. the prime minister there is hyder al abadi said that the operation will begin some time
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in the first half of the year. er they are supported by u.s. airstrikes, and they have already claimed ramadi back in december where isil was in charge. >> back here texas is getting ready for a severe winter storm this morning. we want to get to that with nicole mitchell. >> meteorologist: to qualify, we're still in winter, and these are severe storms in terms of hail and possible toned. this is a storm system moving across the southern tier of the country. we have a little snow and pulling through the rockies, mostly minor spots of that. but what we've had is this front that clears through the east coast as well, changing some of those temperatures back behind that there is definitely a boundary hanging through the south. that already to pull off these showers anywhere in portions of georgia all the way to texas. and some of that will be heavier rain through the course of the day. as all of this continues to develop on the backside of the stronger area of low pressure will develop and pull its way through the south and up the
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east. already looking at heavy rain with this through the day today as i mentioned. we're going to increase that storm threat. today it's in the eastern corner of texas. by tomorrow this continues developing and starts to pull out and the risk really intensifies. we'll get to a lot of that moist flow, temperatures warm enough to support that severe weather, and this will all pull northward. this could bring precipitation to new england. a lot of this will be rain until we have colder air on the backside. the severe weather tomorrow is even larger area and higher risk. anywhere from louisiana possibly into georgia, and definitely alabama, watch for that. we'll watch for that over the next couple of days. we're not to spring yet, but we're getting to the time of year where we get that weather for the spring. >> we were talking about 60 degrees in boston last
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winter. >> yes, there is still time. >> squeezing apple to help unlock a phone. >> the director of the fbi said it was a matter of justice. >> a water threat in india. how protest moments could cut off the capital's water supply.
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comcast business. built for business. >> just a few days left for apple to respond to a court order to unlock the phone of the one of the san bernardino,cal, shooters. >> the fbi said that folks should take a deep breath and stop saying the world is ending. we have the latest.
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>> the fbi director is calling for calm and defending his agency's demand that apple help investigators break into one of the san bernardino attackers phones. in a statement he writes this isn't about trying to set a precedent or send a message. it's about the victims and justice. 14 people were slaughtered and many more have their lives and bodies ruined. we owe them a thorough investigation under law. apple said that the request is an overreach and said so far it will not comply. former nsa director michael hayden said that he agrees with the government on this specific case but not on the broader issue of a so-called back door. >> jim would like a back door available to american law enforcement in all devices globally. frankly, i think on balance that actually harms american safety and security. even though it might make jim's job a bit easier in some specific circumstances. >> the fbi needs apple's help
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because the security settings on the phone lock the device if a pass work is entered incorrectly too many times and it may erase all the data on the phone. the fbi wants apple to up load software that let's its analysts get around the security fiercer features and take as many shots at the password as necessary. but with millions of iphones in use around the world, activists say that earlier models may be affected. >> it's about democracy activists in china. it's about human rights workers in syria. it's about lgbt activists here in the middle east, you name it. privacy is not just human rights, but it's a social good. >> the white house supports the fbi and insist there is no privacy threat. >> they're not asking apple to redesign its product or to create a new back door to one of their products. they're simply asking for something that would have an impact on this one device.
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>> apple's encryption scheme on newer iphones has no back door meaning it would be impossible for the fbi to crack newer devices. >> apple has put out an statement about the government request. they said the case is about much more than a single phone or single investigation. and he calls the request a dangerous precedent that threatens everyone's civil liberties. >> it talks about the justice to the victims in the san bernardino attacks and some of the families in san bernardino are speaking up. >> they plan to file a brief speaking to the fbi. they'll have a pro bono lawyer on their behalf who says they have an interest in this data. we don't know how many of these families will be in that brief. >> even though you have something that you don't want people to know about, there has to be some role the government
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has to protect the people. >> that's the heart of the debate. thank you very much. >> it is obvious this could be the defining case in that ongoing debate between the government and tech companies. how do you keep americans safe while at the same time protecting our privacy? al jazeera's jacob ward has that part of the story. >> it may seem that this is an one-off. a simple case in which the fbi wants to just see into the phone of a mass murderer and the corporation is trying to defend its stand of privacy by refusing to help. but beneath all the talk there is a secret war going on and it's building to a very clear outcome. let's start with the battle. fbi officials including james comey has made repeated references over the past year to what it calls the growing dark problem. the even with search warrant encryptions built into the phones used by hundreds of millions of people are
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impenetrable by hackers, and also by law enforcement. they simply cannot get into every day phones and communications. and that must be tremendously frustrating when our phones contain information about where we've been, communication with other people and the list of every friend we have. of course, law enforcement wants a way in. on the other hand, apple and others say that it has to make that information bulletproof, impenetrable where tens of thousands of people are victims of cyber crime and identity theft each year. they have gone after apple in other cases of this kind of help. in this one, an emotionally charged mass murderer it chose to shine a light on. apple has cooperated with law enforcement in the past and this time it asked the software to get into the phone be made out of seal, out of the public eye. apple might have complied if they could have kept it secret, but the fbi chose to make the
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request public, now this fight, which was a matter of hidden meetings and sealed court filings is now an open brawl. here what is likely to happen going forward. even if the government compels apple tomorro to open this particular phone, the government is coming to apple for help on this phone because it could not break into this phone on its own. that's just going to be more encased. in the future apple could create encryption schemes that make it impossible to do what the fbi is asking in this case. not to thwart the fbi. i don't think that's apple's plan, at least, not only to thwart, but because millions of apple users expect that from the company. they base their reputation on it. if farouk had used a newer iphone not even apple could have helped to get into it. this whole court case would be moot.
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apple's company and others are increasingly built that even it's creators cannot unlock them. that's the new standard. the code, not the court, is going to determine who gets inside our private lives. >> that is our jacob ward reporting. it bears repeating fbi director james comey saying that no precedent would be set if apple were to comply with the court order. >> the supreme court meets for the first time since justice scalia's death. >> and the future of oil, lower prices has oil giants debating major changes.
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>> these people have decided
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that today they will be arrested. >> i know that i'm being surveilled. >> people are not getting the care that they need. >> this is a crime against humanity. >> hands up... >> don't shoot. >> hands up... >> don't shoot. >> what do we want? >> justice. >> when do we want it? >> now. >> explosions going on... we're not quite sure - >> is that an i.e.d.? >> welcome back to your world this morning. it is 8:30 eastern taking a look at today's top stories. the man police say launched a shooting spree in kalamazoo, michigan, is due in court today. 45-year-old jason dalton is expected to be arraigned. officials say he shot eight people. six of the victims died. the police are trying to determine a motive. >> the republicans running for president now have their eyes on the next contest after donald trump's big win in south carolina.
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the nevada's caucus begins tomorrow and then 12 states will be holding their nominating contest march 1st. it is super tuesday giving donald trump a huge margin nationwide. >> and the supreme court will hear arguments this morning for the first time since the death of antonin scalia. eight justice also take the bench. scalia's chair will be draped in black wool. the absence of that ninth justice could significantly impact a number of high profile cases. mike, thank you so much for your time and good morning. on the docket for the supreme court session, cases about abortion, affirmative action and public sector union dues out of these in which does the death of justice scalia lead to a different outcome than if he were sitting on the bench? >> the public sector come due
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fees is likely to come to a deadlock. what this might mean could mean perhaps the setting for r reargument next term when there is a full compliment of justices on the bench. or it could mean equal vote. and leaves to precedent in play nationwide. >> other than a split decision the justices will have the option to basically not make a decision on any given case, and that case my understanding the lower court's ruling hold. how significant will that be given the cases again in the docket in this session? >> for most of the cases it's not too significant other than recently it might make a difference. it could mean a patchwork of precedence across the country is the obama birth controllen mandate. that's coming from six, seven different jurisdictions. all of them but one, the 11th circuit has ruled for the
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administration. only one that one case that ruled against the administration i believe it was the tenth circuit said that the challengers, the religious non-profits hoping to get around the obama administration opt out for the contraception mandate, they won in one case. around the country the opt-out form sign here on the dotted line, then you're opting out and then the government will take over to get contraception to your employees. that will be the law of the land except one company, and that will make the government shoulder more of the burden. >> we saw the photo of proble president obama carrying a big binder of potential nominees. >> this is a very different time as we are reminded this is an election year and almost every republican is saying we should wait until after the election for the american people to speak
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before we put forward a nominee. there is judge of the d.c. circuit when, when he got through 98-0, but this is a different time. it didn't matter that he clerked for two republican judges. that doesn't matter now. so we can see what happens, we can pretty much be sure unless there is massive pressure and class on the republican primaries. >> you have to wonder whether normally being nominated to the supreme court is the most prestigious honor for a jurist. but whoever is nominated. in some ways whoever that nominee is, are they a sacrificial pawn, knowing that
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the republicans would not vote for them? >> yes, and does obama want to do that to an injurist who could serve on the supreme court if the nominee is democratic? does he want to reject them making that person tainted goods for the next president. that is a choice obama faces, he faces many, many choices that's why he has that giant binder walking through the rose garden on friday. he has many to choose from now and the scariest question is who will be the sacrificial lamb. >> is blocking the nominee the equivalent of forcing the shutdown of branch of government as the democrats have tried to paint it? >> no. the court has eight members. the court before had eight members and it once before had seven members going back to five members. this is not a shutdown of a branch of government. it does mean that hotly contested prais cases could go
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forward nationwide. but there will an justice mostly in the next year most likely. >> mike sacks, thank you for joining us this morning. >> there will be arguments in the gun used in the sandy hook massacre. the lawyers representing the gun manufacturers and the shops say it should be thrown out. the companies argue they're shielded from liability under federal law. and in seattle there is an effort under way to make the government there more transparent. the public records law in washington state are some of the most open in the country. adam schauffler tells us there are still barriers. >> just think of all the public information, all the data that is accumulating in a city like seattle. accumulating of every second of every day. things like building permits. city council meeting transcripts, parking citations,
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court proceedings, video from police dash cameras and body cameras and more. it's a matter of public record and getting it to the public when asked for it can be a time-consuming and expensive process. but there is a move afoot here and the governments at all levels around the country are making public information more public, more accessible to bring that process into the modern day. >> this is--this is a global mainstream movement to see the shift to tunnel dal can government to something that is quite irreversible. it is dictated by reality. we can't solve problems like we tried to solve them 20 years ago. >> and business is very good. a seattle company that pioneered the industry of creating open source data solution for government, finding ways to put all that information out there for the public to access as easily as they access so many
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other kinds of information these days online. hopefully making government that much more transparent. adam schauffler, total. >> 10 million people in india's capital are still without water this morning despite the army taking control of the canal. it was damaged in protests that left 12 people dead. demonstrators are demanding more fun and fairer benefits for a farming community. >> protesters ar of the jat community before have been granted. the supreme court has stepped in and said that this cannot be so because of their status, and because it tips the numbers of the number of people or the percentage of the population who get reservation status. you can only have 50% of a community or states having
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resolutio reservation status to the jats will raise that ratio of the population. we're hearing there have been sporadic bursts of violence. and protest where is we've seen some of the biggest aggressions. that's where protesters have set fires to buildings and vehicles. this is despite thousands of army and thousands of pair military troops on the ground overnight trying to quell the violence. they said they had unblocked many of the roads, but we're hearing some of those blockades are coming back on. once again this is a very fluid situation, and pockets of protesters are saying that they will not believe the government until they have it in written form that they will be granted resolution status. >> schools in the city have been closed during the protests. there have been widespread protests in india after police arrested a student accused of rebelling the government. there is increased security at
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the courthouse where kumar is being tried. he was beaten by lawyers last week. students at his school have launched a protest asking for his release. kumar's family has criticized prime minister narendra modi for not weighing in on the case. >> for the first time in months the oil prices are above $30 a barrel today. the forecast says that production in the u.s. is going to fall in the next year and that will mean that you're going to pay more at the pump because it will drive prices up. al jazeera's john hedron has more on the widespread affect. >> low prices for petrol or gas here in the u.s. it is consumer heaven. prices have not been this low since the economic crash of 2009. people are driving farther, filling up more often, buying bigger cars and enjoying cheaper plane travel, and if this is all you're worried about, these are high times. why are prices so low? an at the point pedestrian economy, a slow down in china
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and brazil and there is a global glut on the market. producers are trying to fix that. opec, the organization of petroleum exporting companies is trying to limit production, and cash poor producers in the u.s. and elsewhere just cannot afford to continue pumping. that can hurt economies like in houston, and that could mean jobs. with all efforts to rein in supplies, the price of oil has plunged. it's fluctuated wildly in recent weeks from $27 a barrel to $36, how low is that? well, oil prices peaked in 2008 at $145 a barrel. analysts say it's not likely to rise above the $40 to $50 range through the end of 2016. for oil suppliers gathered in houston, that means they're likely looking at a long-term plan, not a short-term fix.
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>> that's al jazeera's john hedron reporting. the international energy organization saying that the oil market will even out sometime next year. >> new details to settle volkswagen emissions cheating case. a german newspaper said that the epa is asking vw to build electric cars and charging stations here in the u.s. the company has repeatedly apologized. it's been negotiating with the epa over a settlement for months. >> well, it was a pleasant weekend on the east coast. let's look at the temperatures across the country. are they going to change. >> meteorologist: it was really whiplash from the weekend before. temperatures in the 50s and 60s in some of the same locations. now things have settled out a little bit. we don't have anything drastic in one direction or another. the temperatures have dropped even a little bit from yesterday because of the front that has
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gone through areas of the east coast and we'll see the developing low some of the plains temperatures will go down tomorrow. here's a look at tomorrow's forecast. you can see a few more 40s in texas. temperatures in the 50s will move in. here is that broader system i was talking about. you can see a little bit of development starting out you can see stronger storms in texas. these are going to be rain along the boundaries through the south as this develops into the days tomorrow we have more of a chance of that severe weather risk. this could be an isolated tornadoes, wind, hail. while it's spring weather here as you go down under, the seasons are reversed. heading towards fall, which is the topical type of year. this was a track that winston took or i did that backwards. but definitely a loop deloop before hitting fiji as the strongest storm in this area on record. even now you can see a pretty impressive eye especially earlier in the frame.
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it's what we would call a category 2 storm. winds to 110 mph. here the categories are different. this is what they're considering a category 4 storm. but definitely this is not one of our active bases in the world in terms of tropical activity. they've had four different systems all season. this is impressive with winds over 180 mph. >> the eye of that storm so tight and leaving behind widespread damage in fiji. officials are trying to figure out how much damage was done. >> 18 people were left dead and hundreds of homes were damaged. >> fiji's government said that cyclone winston was the strongest to have ever hit fiji. the good news is that despite predictions that it would hit full on the capital and the main international airport, those two cities escaped the storm.
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and the damage is relatively slight. the concern is the northern part of the main island in fiji and outlying islands where information has not yet come through. and housing on those islands are known to be much more flimsy than on the main islands, and those places took the full brunt of this storm. it's very hard to say that fiji in any way has dodged a bullet. this could still be a horrific tragedy in those places. the team is restoring electricity. the priority is to get power restored right around this city. and then, the aid agency also assess the worst dangers and where the injuries are and get teams there. >> the government has declared a 30-day state of emergency. >> researchers are saying the
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hpv vaccine has brought down cases 40%. they also say that immunization rates are low only about 40% of girls have received the vaccine so far. compelled by the court. >> camille cosby goes under oath to answer questions about her husband's troubled past. >> why the arch bishop is now asking priests to cut ties with the girl scouts.
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>> bill cosby's wife will sit down to a deposition. >> it's the latest developments in the sexual allegations against her husband. >> you camille cosby was hoping to skip the hearing and avoid answering questions about her husband all together. they filed a motion to postpone the hearing citing marital privilege. the judge overruled that motion and said she had to show up to answer questions about her husband. they said that mrs. cosby would have relevant information since she has been her husband's business manager for years. and she said that her public testimony would create a media circus that would serve no purpose but to harass and
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embarrass her. >> no wife wants to go into a public forum and testify about her relationship with her husband. definitely not testify about his relationships with other women. >> more than 50 women have come forward claiming that bill cosby sexual assaulted, drugged or raped them. he consistently denied those claims even as he faces trials in pennsylvania on sexual assault charges. his wife has stuck by his side. the comments about the accusations back in 2014 when she called the comedian a wonderful husband, father and friend. >> camille cosby was critical of the media, saying coverage of the allegations o against her husband has been biased. this deposition is believed to be her first. >> what about the arguments that she should not have to testify? >> she said marital privilege gives her the right not to have
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to testify against her husband. >> thanks for being with us. >> thanks. the archdiocese of st. louis said that it wants to cut ties with the girl scouts over what it calls a loss of catholic values. amp bishop robert carlson writes: he said that he does not approve of the group's position on inclusions of leaders. the girlfriends of eastern missouri is a secular organization but it has partnered with the church for more than a century. >> denny hamblin winning by a
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fraction of the second. hamblin calling the victory the pinnacle of his career. still worried about the girl scouts in the catholic church. when we come back, a group of nuns face losing their home. >> and the visit to the white house, 106 years in the making a special guest who stopped by to see the president and the first lady.
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>> a group of nuns in california devote their entire lives to helping the homeless. but now they're facing their own housing problems because they can't afford their rent. melissa chan has more from san francisco. >> for years the homeless and hungry in san francisco's toughest neighborhood, the tenderloin, have depended on a hot meal from the nuns of notre dame. >> the joy we get back for what we do here. >> but the women who serve the homeless may soon be without a home themselves. the landlord plans to raise their rent from $3,465 a month to $5,500. >> i'm not sure how we're going to do it. it's not possible that we have that much money. we're worried about all these people who need to be fed. >> even in san francisco's most
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dilapidated neighborhood it's tough to rent. but the problem extends beyond the city's poorest to even the ordinary middle class. in the last few years housing has become the top issue for residents and a headache for city officials. one initiative the city started is a small sites program. city hall helps to buy property. they've wired five apartment buildings and they set them aside as affordable housing. the program means that this woman can now stay home. she and her family had faced eviction. >> we got help from everybody. we're eternally grateful, and at first it was--we couldn't believe it. >> the city spend $13.9 million on apartments. these are some of the homes bought and set aside for renters. san francisco basically accesses a lender with non-profit groups taking charge of the purchase. >> in san francisco probably because we are one of the
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highest cost of living in the nation has been innovative in creating this. there are other cities who are doing other things. but actually taking taxpayer dollars and say we're going to use that to subsidize these buildings. >> critics question whether government and non-profits ought to get involved in this way. but so far they support the new plan. >> we're glad to do it. we're fortunate that we have a strong enough economy to spend money and also to have the different agency that is have come together to help us. >> but achievements are incremental. the latest purchase saved 19 units in a city where thousands of people face eviction and rent hikes. >> if you're wealthy you have a lot of options. if you're a senior on a fixed income it's just a matter of time before your building may be bought, and you'll be pushed further and further out in the bay area. it is a terrible time.
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hopefully this fund helps a little bit, but there is a lot more we should be doing as a city as well. >> as for the sisters, they say their attorney is trying to cut a deal with the landlords, give them one year to find their next location. they now have the time but they still might not have the money. melissa chan, al jazeera, francisco. >> well, it seems now that they have the money. they're getting help from tony ro robins, he gave them $25 to $25,000 to pay their rent and another $25,000 to help find another place to live. >> it was a dream come true for a woman who has lived through both world wars. >> do you want to say hello to michelle? >> yes!
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>> she's not slowing down. president obama invited 106-year-old virginia mclauren to the white house for black history month. she busted a move with the president and the first lady. michelle obama telling mclauren she wanted to be like her when she grows up. >> we had a person in our church, virginia callaway 103, you think about all the history they've seen, the civil rights movement, the voting rights act. she said all she wants to do is sing for the president then she'll have seen it all. >> isn't it amazing to want to burst out in song and dance. >> a national treasure. >> that's it for us in new york. i'm del walters. >> i'm stephanie sy. your world is back tomorrow beginning at 7:00 a.m. eastern. we'll take a closer look over far bank of america's program
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with fees as low as 3% down payment. we'll see you tomorrow. afghan forces pull out of a second district in southern helmand province in the space of a week, ceding control to the taliban. you're watching al jazeera live from doha. also coming up, deal in india to end protests by a group that disrupted water supply to the capital. from house arrest to police custody, uganda's opposition leader is taken away at his supporters plan to protest. 21 confirmed dead after a ferocious cyclone in

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