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tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  March 2, 2016 7:00am-9:01am EST

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winning big on super tuesday as they begin sizing each other for a match up >> once we get all of this finished, i'm going to go after one person, that's hillary clinton. >> instead of building walls we're going to breakdown barriers. and build ladders of opportunity and empowerment that is the path of victory for the opponents.
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welcome to your world this morning hillary clinton and donald trump are already setting their sites on november this morning after those big wins on super tuesday donald trump won in alabama, arkansas, georgia, massachusetts, tennessee, vermont and virginia. he lost texas to cruz. cruz also took oklahoma. a short time ago was named the winner in alas ka. hillary clinton won in won in alabama, arkansas, georgia, massachusetts, tennessee, texas and virginia.. bernie sanders won in vermont, oklahoma, minnesota and colorado. john ter refreshings tt is tracking it, randall pinkson,
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but first to david shutter. if this has been an amazing even. >> what a super tuesday >> reporter: hillary clinton and donald trump are barrelling ahead on the path to nomination. the two emerged as the front runners after super tuesday solidifying huge leads >> it is clear tonight that the stakes in this election have never been higher. the rhetoric we're hearing on the other side has never been lower. trying to divide america between us and them is wrong and we're not going to let it work. >> reporter: clinton swept the south in a democratic primaries, minorities broke for her four to one fuelling her southern domination. for bernie sanders the delegate math is becoming more difficult. sanders is not giving up.
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he won four more states on tuesday. >> we have come a very long way in ten months. at the end of tonight 15 states will have voted 35 states remain and let me assure you, that we are going to take our fight for economic justice, for social justice, for environmental sanity, for a world of peace to every one of those states. >> reporter: super tuesday was also a wake-up call for the republican establishment. donald trump widened his margins across nearly every demographic and captured six states >> we've done something that almost nobody thought could be done and i'm very proud of it. i just want to leave you with this. i am a unifier. i would love to see the republican party and everybody
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get together and unify. >> reporter: ted cruz is campaigning as the only republican that can beat trump if they are the final two. cruz defeated donald trump in texas and oklahoma and he is urging the other candidates to drop out. so long as the field remains divided, donald trump's path to the nomination remains more likely. that would be a disaster for republicans. for conservatives and for the nation. >> reporter: marco rubio is hanging on. he won his first contest in minnesota and he is now focused on florida where, like all the other races starting in two weeks, the results will be winner take all. >> the punnedits say we're under dogs. i will accept that. this is a community of under dogs. this is a state and country of under dogs. we will win.
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when we do and when we do we will do what needs to be done. >> reporter: the presidential race is still far fra over the but the math is pointing towards an unusual choice in the general election. a brash and unconventional businessman versus a controversial former first lady. david shuster al jazeera so with the victories last night donald trump has widened his delegate lead and by a lot. he has 10 primary and caucus victory bringing his delegate koundz to 289. he needs 952 more to win the republican nomination. randall, good morning. he took aim at his challengers and the democratic front runner >> reporter: indeed he did. last night he also said that his candidacy has a span of the republican party bringing more
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voters to it than had voter previously and even some democratsing and independents not only down in the south but north-east and west of nevada. he is making his claim that he is the person who should get the nomination and who should be the one to face hillary clinton. of course, his victory is a problem for establishment wins, many of whom still do not want him to be the party's nominee. donald trump spoke to them saying that he could be a unifier and he also addressed some of his political rivals. >> i am a unifier. i am. once we get all of this finished, i'm going to go after one person and that's hillary clintonment on the assumption she is allowed to run which is a big assumption. i don't know that she is going to be allowed to run. i think that is frankly going to be an easy race. you see the polls. i beat her in many polls. i don't think marco will be able
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to beat her. i think tedz will have a hard time. he has a shot because at least he has won a little bit. >> reporter: of course, donald trump is being somewhat gracious with his remarks with ted cruz but not marco rubio. as cruz has pointed out, as long as all three of them remain in the race the path seeps to be increasingly clear for a donald trump nomination at the convention the comments you just played it seems that donald trump has his eye on the general election at this point. it's not like ted cruz is behind him chomping at his heels. he only has 161 delegates to trump's 285. he did win three states. marco rubio won one. what does it mean for these two candidates moving forward? >> reporter: we still have florida which is a big prize on 15 march. john kasich is also still in the race. we haven't mentioned him, but he still thinks that he has a
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chance somehow to win ohio. rubio is expected, at least he hopes, to win his home state of florida. if he doesn't it will look bad for him. then we have the big delegate stakes, new york, california, illinois going forward. so if donald trump can maintain his unusual coalition he keeps moving forward towards winning that nomination thank you let's look at democrats now. hillary clinton winning big last night taking all of the delegate rubbish southern states. that leaves bernie sanders far behind in the count. john terrett is live for us in vermont, the home town of bernie sanders. he managed to win four states, but his footpath to victory, is it even possible at this point? >> no. i don't think it is. it was a terrible night for him last night. it wasn't very good. they were looking for him to do five states. in the end he did four.
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he lost massachusetts. that has to work because his base is white working class people which is massachusetts. so it has to have stung. nonetheless, when the candidate came to the fairs here to receive this huge victory in the state of vermont, which was always expected, there was no hint whatsoever of giving up the campaign just yet. here is a little bit of what he had to say >> now, wall street may be against us, the super packs may be against us, but do you know why we're going to win? because our message is resonating and the people when we stand together will be victorious. >> reporter: he could afford to do it as well because he has millions in the bank. only on tuesday or monday did he raise around six to seven million dollars in one lay
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before the february deadline rain out. so he can be a thorn in the side of clinton campaign right through the convention in july which is what his wife hinted he would do yesterday. some hillary clinton appears to be on her way to the nomination. here is the question: is she being helped by the idea that donald trump will be the republican nominee and possible president? i understand that we just lost john terrett. he is living for us. we will pose that question to our guests let's just pick up from dell's question. it does seem like what we expected yesterday that the two front runners would solidify in some ways their leads. is hillary clinton being bolstered by this fear of a donald trump presidency? >> i would say absolutely.
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donald trump mobilizes certain republicans, who haven't shown up on the republican side, but also those who may not show up to vote on the democratic side too who will be more interested in voting because people are concerned about donald trump, particularly people who hold views that are more progressive and/or more aligned with the democratic party. donald trump is a very polarizing figure and although hillary clinton can be one too, donald trump is far more than her if anything came out of the exit polls it is that there is an angry electorate out there, especially on the republican side, but there's anger on the democratic side. donald trump maintains that he will be dragging those voters over those, bernie sanders voters over to the relationship side if hillary clinton picks up the nomination >> i think that is unlikely. if he loses the nomination and creates a story where it was rigged, it was super delegates,
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they cheated me, do what you want, which would be a heck of a what to ends his career, that might happen. if he says hillary clinton is an imperfect progressive, person, but she is much better than the alternative and he makes it clear where he stands, and the super packs put much money into convincing people, i think she can hold those supporters let's talk about the surprises. ted cruz did win texas but racked up oklahoma and alas ka. did he beat expectations is that going to help him going forward? >> it will help him because his argument that we did stay behind somebody, important marco rubio who won the minnesota caucus. walter mondo did in 1984. it is not a hot bed. the argument around rubio is
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collapsing. if anybody could stop donald trump cruz could be that guy. does the party come up with another strategy which is rubio in floor day john kasich in ohio jeb bush has been taking voters including in virginia where rubio's appeal said he had a chance in virginia. john kasich took 9%. if he dropped out would he have a viable one? >> if he goes out, this is going to be taken by donald trump. if those two can take those two states off the table for rubio, then we might get to a scenario. you need 50% plus one of the delegates. if one of them drops occupant. if marco rubio drops out, donald trump wins florida who has it wrong, the republican establishment that says that donald trump has highjacked their party or donald
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trump who says that he has given their base a voice? >> i think actually both are true because donald trump has, in fact-- that sounds political >> it does. the republican party is saying now they're condemning trump for not distancing himself or disavowing the kkk, but the same establishment has a house majority with steve scalese who spoke at a white supremist event. that has existed before donald trump. what he did was he came in and he highjacked the party that felt that their voices were not being heard, but that the extremism has existed before donald trump let's pay the vote from paul ryan that you're referring to. him saying that donald trump's
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response to david duke's endorsement, him basically denouncing that. let's listen. >> today i want to be clear about something. if a person wants to be the nominee of the republican party, there can be no evasion and no games. they must reject any group or cause that has built bigotry. we do not play po people's prejudices. we appeal to their highest ideals there has been one republican senator that said he will not vote for donald trump. paul ryan stopped short of that and mich mcconnell also. >> i think there is a strain of bigotry that exists within the republican party base. the republicans can try to say whatever they want at this point in time to sort of hurt donald trump, but the reality is if you look at jeff who did endorse
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him, most recently jeff sessions did not get confirmed as a federal judge because of comments he made that he was okay with the kkk if we were talking about a normal election cycle, donald trump would be the presumptive republicans front runner and potential nominee. we would be talk about how the trump campaign seems to be on a roll. with all this said, are we looking at a below kerred convention on the republican side? >> we have to get from here to there. somebody has to win some states besides donald trump. there is not enough favorite sons to really stop donald trump at this point. that's the problem with the strategy of a brokered convention. if you begin the conversation about race, about is somebody a racist, did they denounce the clan, it is a noway
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conversation. the kkk is a terrorist organization, one of the worst creations in american history, but they're not at the center of american politics. if you stopped the discussion of racism when you talk about things like police brutality, talking about laws against lgbt people, support for pastors who say jew s are going to hell, you're not having a conversation against racism. you're holding out kkk as the extreme you can you're having a conversation with a big part of the republican base >> if you really care about racism you don't step in when david duke endorses it it is well before. this is just a manifestation of a larger issue with the larger issue, i want to go to that donald trump rally where black lives matters were face-to-face with donald trump supporters, black faces, white faces with donald trump.
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is this genie now out of the bottle whether we're talking about tt or police brutality? >> yes. he has won votes and unifier. he has won votes by saying - watch another clip where she says are you from mexico? that is playing-- is he a unifier? >> ted cruz is a mainstream right winger >> that's the problem the republican party had. they had a choice between donald trump and ted cruz. they don't like ted cruz. much of the republican party does not like ted cruz and up until this point ted cruz is becoming more palatable because donald trump is so unpredictable there is a strong alternative to either cruz or trump >> we are getting a strong rap
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we will come back to this conversation. thank you. the supreme court hears a landmark abortion rights case when we come back we will talk about that texas law that could affect women's health nationwide. stay with us.
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the supreme court is hearing argument on abortion law. the rules help keep womens say but critics say it makes it impossible for a woman to get an abortion. >> reporter: i saw you at least
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temporarily yesterday via you will extra sound. >> reporter: this woman says she was thrilled when she found out she was pregnant last july. already the mother of two girls, she had been excited at the prospect of having a boy. >> i was even more excited because every time i would see the ultrasounds you would wave the me >> reporter: at 12 weeks a new one revealed a grave problem. the foetus's brain had not fully developed. the doctor had terrible news >> he told me it was 100% incompatible with live >> reporter: she was left with a terrible decision, material nature the pregnancy or have a still born baby. she told she would have an abortion but was told she would have to wait weeks. the remaining clinics that hadn't been shut down were over whelmed. she could not endure the way and bought a plane ticket to florida
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and had the abortion there the next day >> i had moments where it was hard, but you have to develop a coping mechanism to deal with the loss, but more so to still deal with the loss that i believe are just cruel for a women in the situation i i was put in. i think about the women who do not have the resources to travel interstate >> reporter: indeed. women with less resources face a more difficult challenge. nowhere in texas is that challenge greater than here where more than a third of the mostly latino population lives in poverty. access to health care here was already scarce, made worse when all but one abortion clinic closed. now, this clinic is the only one
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within 250 miles. >> there's waiting periods, there's multiple visits that women need to make and so they have to get child care more than once, time off work, there's travel for a lot of people that can be really complicated. >> reporter: if not impossible. advocates for the restrictions say they're meant to make the procedure safer. the reproductive rights argue one abortion clinic cannot possibly serve a population of two million women along the border. instead, some women are seeking another solution, a dangerous one in mexico. in a pharmacy just across the border we find the drug commonly used to induce medical abortion. it is available in mexico without a prescription. this pharmacist says women from texas come to him weekly asking
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for the medicine at $180 a box. he says he has seen a 60% increase in such customers since the texas rules went into effect >> people are self-inducing the abortion because they have no other choice. we've heard of stories where people are actually engaging in consensual kind of physical abuse trying to induce an abortion. >> reporter: the state of texas says its restrictions on abortion clinics improve women's health, but women who have been affected so no >> of course we want women to be safe. we want anybody that has to have any type of medical care to be safe. the emotional impact is what i think the court should really take into consideration. because that is very burr done some. that is a heavy - doctor burdensome. that is a heavy burden that you can't explain. it is a pain there jesse hill teaches law at a
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university. she filed a brief in this case and joins us now. thank you for your time. clearly as you can tell from our reporter's story, this is the result, the outcome of this texas law mean that fewer women will have access to abortion, but why shouldn't states be allowed legally to regulate abortion clinics and their access to these hospitals? >> well, the supreme court has said that the constitutional right to abortion in light of the constitutional right states can't put an undue about burden on that right. when a state the size of texas legislates in a way with unnecessary health regulations that leave the tat with the sighs of texas less than 10
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clinics to serve the entire population that is clearly an undue burden the major medical associations have said are not only populations based in scientific facts but the regulations jeopardize women's health. how much will the supreme court take account of scientific research and data on the issue? >> that's the big question here because there is a lot of evidence out there, and the lower court, court of appeals, looked at that evidence and basically said it wasn't important. they were not going to consider it, they were going to let the legislature decide what was and wasn't medically necessary. the plaintiffs who are challenging the texas law are trying to get the court to pay attention to the fact that this law imposes an enormous burden on abortion access while having very little health benefit as a trade-off the court with the deaths of justice vvment calia has been described as ideologically
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split. they hope that justice kennedy will swing to their side. what insight do we have what justice kennedy think about these? >> that is a big question mark in this case. he famously joined the other justices to kind of uphold and save the heart of rovey wade v casey. he has been hard to read on this issue. in 2007 he joined the conservative wing of the court in another abortion case, in a really big loss for abortion rights supporters. so it's really hard to read him right now. he has been very supportive recently of individual dignity and autonomy concerns in the same-sex marriage context and the plaintiffs, i think, are
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hoping and it's in my brief, talks is about dignity and autonomy are important concepts here too and that he should recognise the role that those place in the abortions even if he doesn't swing with the liberal vote on this, the court will end up split and that means that for now the decisions of the circuit level hold; right? imprisonment that's right. if it were a four four split that means the lower court's decision is affirmed by equally divided vote so the law stays in place so all but a handful of clinics in texas will close thank you ahead a security show down apple takes steps to fight f.b.i.'s requests to unlock an iphone.
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welcome back to your world
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this morning. the presidential race is now entering its next phase after super tuesday, donald trump and hillary clinton scoring a big win. john henry smith is here to walk us through the numbers. good morning. >> good morning to bolt of you. certainly was a big and interesting night, very big night for donald trump, he cut a swath across the south taking five states and scoring wins in massachusetts and vermont for seven wins in total. now he's turning his focus to hillary clinton. >> we've got to make america great again, folks. we're going to make it great again. i watched hillary's speech and she's talking about wages have been poor and everything's poor and everything's been doing badly. she's been there for so long. >> ted cruz showed his campaign has life, winning alaska, oklahoma and the biggest super tuesday prize, texas, as for marco rubio, he scored his first win with a victory in minnesota and while john kasich barely
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lost vermont, he and ben carson generally lagged the field. trump leads the delegate count. ted cruz suggested that other candidates drop out so one has the chance to capture all of those anti trump votes. rubio said after his first win, he's not going anywhere. >> no matter how many states it takes, no matter how many weeks and months it takes, i will campaign as long ago it takes and wherever it takes to ensure that i am the next president of the united states. >> on the democratic side, hillary clinton dominated the south en route to seven wins overall. she even won massachusetts, a state experts thought would belong to certain sand. bernie sanders won his home state, vermont, as well as three others, hillary clinton now holds a commanding but not yet insurmountable lead, nearly half
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way to the number for the nomination. >> instead of building walls, we're going to break down barriers and build. [ cheers and applause ] >> build ladders of opportunity and empowerment, so every american can live up to his or her potential. >> now the next big day for the candidates is this saturday, when five states vote. three caucuses on that day, republican and democratic contest in kansas, a democratic only contest in nebraska and a republican only contest in kentucky. also on saturday, two primaries, louisiana features democratic and republican can tests, maine is republican's only. 165 delegates up for grabs saturday for the republicans, as opposed to 126 for the democrats, steph and del. >> john henry smith, thanks for breaking down the math for us. >> let's go back to our political experts, tara mitchell
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and bob. you saw a person with a hijab, an african-american person, when you look at the republican side, you see the face of the party now that become the angry white male. is this a political battle or a battle for the heart and soul of america? >> all presidential elections are a battle for the heart and souls of america. barack obama certainly fits this description. having said that, this will come down to if it's trump and clinton a very interesting fine mick. there is a candidate saying the whole thing is in terrible shape. we have another candidate saying stay the course to borrow a phrase from reagan, we're going
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to keep doing what we're doing -- >> what does it mean when donald trump says make america great again. >> the key word in that sentence is again. what he means is make america the america it was when you, the folks who are supporting him now, who see changes they don't like, when you were more powerful, you were in the driver's seat, there weren't others saying i'm going to come across the border and work hard. >> you meaning who? >> white people and older white people who are not winners in the 21st century. >> i want to rewind this. right now we're having a conversation about a general election that is trump and clinton, let's just talk about last night for a second and tara, do you see a path, let's start with the gop field, based on the margins that we saw in cruz's victories and rubio's one win, do you see a path where either of those candidates coming occupant and challenging trump in any real way? >> if the field remains this
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crowded, no, the path is extremely narrow, because right now trump is and has consistently benefited from more people being in the race. if you look at polling, you delve deeper into that polling, some voters aligned with certain candidates don't necessarily go to trump. by virtue of having this many people in the race, it just continues to allow donald trump to dominate. now it's politics, fortunes rise and fall very quickly, so anything can happen. i must say that but right now, donald trump is in the position. even if the path is clear, he has so much momentum on his side right now. that's what super tuesday is about -- >> a lot of people said that marco rubio or somebody has had to take on donald trump. marco rubio has taken on donald trump. did he help or hurt himself. >> i think the problem is it was too little too late. i remember some of my strategist
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friends said we don't want to attack him, he's going to go away. people kept using the term summer fling and underestimated his staying power, clearly, they underestimated his appeal and they underestimated his commitment to actually running for president. a lot of people thought this, and i was one of those that thought it was about marketing. i do think in the beginning it was. i think once he saw he had a real shot, this became something he wanted. >> when we look at sanders and you said he wouldn't expect he is going to drop out of the race. he is pushing hillary to the left on issues such as t.p.p. and trade. is that his main goal right now because he knows he's not going to get the nomination? >> when we look at the history of american politics. >> and what they said even on the campaign trail. >> i think what it is doing is raising clinton's awareness that she needs to move left on economic issues. he's not pushing her. i don't think sanders drops out.
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>> is he helping or hurting her right now? >> i think frankly he's helping her. if hillary clinton can't beat bernie sanders, the democratic party has a big problem. if hillary clinton can't beat a person who didn't bother to brief himself on foreign policy before he ran, the party has a problem. sanders can keep telling the story. he won enough states to keep telling the story. he's falling behind in the delegate count that is in a way insurmountable but is moving northward where it will be friendlier to him. a lot can happen particularly on the side where there is no one like donald trump. he has a steep hill to climb, but it is do believe. i think the second biggest delegate rich day on the calendar is june 5, june 5, 3 months away. if bernie sanders can make it to june 5, anything can happen. that's why you see hillary
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pivoting to the general right now. she hasn't driven the stake through his heart yet. >> we are going to be with you now until june 5. >> if we're lucky. >> whoever the u.s. picks in november will have a huge impact on relationships with the world. many outside the u.s. have been watching this race closely. >> our al jazeera correspondents are tracking overseas reaction to the campaign here in the u.s. we begin with aidrian brown in beijing. >> china's state controlled immediately i can't appears to be even-handed in its coverage, not favoring one candidate over the other, but commentators and opinion makers are having a field say seeing what they see as the dysfunction and destruction in the republican party. donald trump is portrayed as a clown, an extremist, a symbol of distrust and disgust of the political system. bernie sanders is getting favorable coverage.
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one political analyst said that his candidacy fits in with the government's narrative of the united states being beset with racial and economic inequality. there's hillary clinton. if you go to social media sites, she is perceived as a china backer, even though her husband is seen as very popular here and seen as riding on the coattails of president obama. most chinese are adopting a wait and see attitude mixed with criticism of the u.s. political system. >> most people here in iraq don't really care about the u.s. elections. they have their own problems here, specifically when it comes to security, electricity shortage and getting paid on time but the u.s. selections are very important to the political landscape. little dominated by the shia, sunni and kurds. the shia are very suspicious of the americans, particularly the militias who say any combat
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troops on the ground here combat an enemy and they will need to be fought. the sunni's have a very good relationship with the u.s. and they remember a time when the u.s. helped them fight al-qaeda in iraq and want to get back to that strong relationship. the kurds have a good relationship with the u.s. but she suspicious. they would like the u.s. to help them because much mr. independent of baghdad than they already are. because of that three pronged approach, iraqis are frustrated because their politicians are giving mixed messages on what they say, that it doesn't matter who it is in the oval office, the policy toward iraq never changes. there was a poll done recently asking russians which of three political systems they prefer, the old soviet system, the current way or western democracy. there was western democracy that was the heat popular. add to that the current russian t.v. diet of currency crisis and russian affairs and russians are
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not particularly avoid watchers of the u.s. electorate cycle. only the names clinton and trump are familiar to mostly russians. clinton of course having been secretary of state and before that first lady. trumps russians know because he is the most high profile candidate. he seems to be the most appealing candidate for the kremlin, a brilliant and talented person without a doubt, said putin late last year. the feeling also seems to be mutual. trump said he'd get along with putin just fine and gives him an a. for leashed ship. putin in the kremlin, trump in the white house, a potentially very different russian-u.s. relationship with implications of course for much of the world. >> in an attempt to keep ted cruz off the ballot over his hit sendship has been thrown out. the suit filed by a chicago attorney argued cruz was in eligible to run for president because he was born in canada. a judge threw it out on a tech
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in the. cruz long insisted he can run because his mother is a u.s. sit 10 and he was born when she was in calgary. >> an appellate court rejected throwing out a case. trump's school shut down in 2010. the paper is putting out a joint editorial calling chris christie an embarrassment and other disgrace, pointing to christie's endorsement of donald trump and his absence from the state as he ran for president. president obama meeting with senators about the replacement on the supreme court. the outcome was not quite what the president wanted. >> the meeting lasted less than an hour and neither side showed
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signs of budging. along with vice president joe biden and two leading senate democrats, the president sat down with republican senators chuck grassley and mitch mcconnell. both have said the appointment should be made by the next president. after the meeting, senator mcconnell reality rate that had view. >> i would tell you if the shoe were on the foot, do any of you think the democratic majority in the senate would be confirming a republican penalty's nomination in the last year of his term? of course not. this is going to be decided by the american people and the next president, whoever that may be will fill this vacancy. >> white house spokesman said president obama asked the two republican senators for suggestions on a nominee, but democratic leader harry reid came out saying the republicans didn't bring up any names. >> never in the history of the country has anything like this happened, where they won't meet with a person, won't hold hearings, won't nominate. we're going to continue beating
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the drums and all we want them to do is fulfill their constitutional duty, and do their job and at this stage, they've decided not to do that. they think they're going to wait and see what president trump will do, i guess with the nomination. >> the work heats up with only eight justice. the court will hear arguments in what is called the most significant abortion case in a quarter century. >> no court watch irsay that abortion case in that case, the absence of a ninth justice on the supreme court would result in a 4-4 split, meaning the law will stay in effect as it is in the accident. a bill was vetoed that would require transgender students to use bathrooms matching their gender at births. school systems want to make their own decisions on the issue. the republican controlled
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legislature approved the bill last month. had it passed, it would have been the first such law in the nation. new developments in apple's battle with the f.b.i., the company is making legal moves the day after the government admitted making mistakes handling the san bernardino shooter's phone. >> apple has now filed a formal appeal of a judge's order that it help the f.b.i. unlock one of the san bernardino shooter's phones. al pell said it's out of an abundance of caution as a a judge reviews arguments in the case. the appeal came the same day both sides testified on capitol hill. f.b.i. director james comey retrained from painting apple as more concerned about profits than national security. >> the companies are not evil, the government is not evil, you have a whole lot of good people who see the world through difference lens says, all care about things. >> he admitted the f.b.i. and local officials made mistakes trying to get into the phone days after the shootings, putting in a password that made
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it more difficult to get in. comey insisted the f.b.i. is not looking to get a back door into all iphones. >> there's already a door on that iphone. we are asking apple take the vicious guard door away, let us try to pick the lock. >> the company said it cooperated with law enforcement on criminal and terror cases. he said what the government is asking now would set a precedent that threatens millions of phone users. >> the f.b.i. has asked the court to order us to give them something that we don't have, to create an operating system that does not exist. the recent it doesn't exist is because it would be too dangerous. >> members of congress from bolt parties say they understand why apple is resisting the order. some now call for a blue ribbon commission of experts to figure out a solution. >> a court in new york this week came down on the side of apple in a different case. the one thing that bolt company and the government agree on is that only congress can resolve this conflict. >> there are other phones that
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law enforcement wants to crack. >> a top prosecutor from new york testified yesterday also that they want apple to help dry crypt 175 iphones they obtained from criminals. essentially is calling for the company to roll back its encryption on the newer models, saying that this new encryption that they have is just too hard to crack. >> a lot of potential evidence on that phone, law enforcement thinks. thank you. new details this morning of the sex abuse cases in the catholic church, a grand jury finding two bishops in the pennsylvania diocese helped cover up abuse by dozens of priests there. that report names 35 priests, most now dead, who have been accused of molesting hundreds of children. the findings are based partially on evidence from a once secret church ash kind of. a court in pennsylvania now putting bill cosby's sex assault case on hold, a trial judge throwing out cosby's claim that he had immunity from prosecution, now an appeals court is hearing that particular case. cosby is accused of drugging and
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molesting a temple university employee at his home in 2004. he says the former district attorney promised that he would never be charged in that case. this morning, residents in birmingham, alabama are able to see the damage from a tornado that swept through the area last night. roofs were ripped off and trees knocked down power lines. four were injured and thousands of homes lost power. alabama one of the states that had a primary yesterday. some rain and snow are now moving into the northeast. let's bring in nicole mitchell for for an that. good morning. >> good morning. we had a series of storms coming out of the west. it's going to stay pretty active for us. yesterday that system that rolled through, it's the same one that now is into the northeast. there were a couple of tornado reports in alabama, otherwise kentucky southward, wind damaging, as well, but now most of this is in the northeast and you can see the next one already poised to come out into the midwest today and another system behind that keeping the northwest active.
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a lot of activity. really our big player in terms of trouble spots as you hit the roads, we still a lot of this rain is clearing the coastline but there are still spots of snow, a little lake enhancement behind that. through the morning hours, we'll have problems persisting. because of that, we have the winter storm warning that's for the very tip of maine and outside of that, you might hit a couple slick spots. by later this afternoon, another system starts to develop into the midwest. that one comes to the east coast by friday. we do have active weather behind all of this. the other thing we're watching is really warm temperature in the plains, that is lending to some fire hazards. >> they need it after what happened yesterday. nicole, thank you very much. words he had waited to hear for a year, welcome home. >> astronaut kelly returns home after a trim, a long trip in space.
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residents living near the capped natural gas facility in los angeles are able to go home. >> the leak spewed tens of thousands of methane into the air. some fear it is still not safe to return. >> months after being forced away, joni spears has returned to organize what's left in her home. >> how do you explain this to your kids? >> they're going through a lot. they know we have to make the right decisions for them and i think they've been preparation themselves to leave, but i think not knowing where we're going and what we're doing, it's frightening. >> spears is not convinced it's safe to live her anymore. the gas company has sealed the well and residents started returning last week, but her health had improved while away
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and now she says she feels ill again. >> since i've come back the last several days in this past week, i've begun getting real sick again. >> other residents have reported health issues since returning to the porter ranch area and county officials say they'd actually like more time for additional air testing, including inside homes. >> what's the residual? what is left over in the air? what is left over in the atmosphere, in people's homes. what's been trapped in the sediment rock for over four months. >> the most damaging natural gas leak took operation at one of the largest gas storage facilities in the country. most people had no idea there were fore hundred wells just over the hills from their homes. ment action sparked protest, a demand for accountability and lawsuits. >> you know, there are many ladies, i've heard up to 75. we've got our own that we filed on behalf of the people of the
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state of california working very closely with the city attorney's office. >> some residents will renew hampshire life in porter ranch, but spears plans to sell this house, despite her love for her neighborhood. >> i think it's probably in my opinion one of the most breath taking places in l.a. county. where i saw this view when we were ready to purchase this house, i couldn't believe i was going to get to look at this every day. it makes me sad that this can happen in our country. >> the consolation for people who plan to move, housing prices appear to be holding steady. in fact, construction continues on million dollar homes right below the gas storage site, the disaster not a big factor apparently for some buyers, though others may think twice. melissa chan, al jazeera, porter ranch, california. welcome home, nasa astronaut
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scott kelly back after nearly a year in space. >> congratulations for your year of service on i.s.s. >> kelly and his russian counterpart returning overnight after staying on the space station for 340 days. doctors say they'll look at both men to explore the long-term effects of that kind of stay in space. >> that's the equivalent of sea legs, space legs. >> yes. >> our super tuesday coverage continues in the next hour. donald trump's commanding win leaves republican at a crossroads. voters have spoken, but where does the so-called establishment stand. a texas abortion law heads to the supreme court but with a shorthanded bench, both sides looking to swing one justice their way. we'll be right back. see you then. >> pushing the boundaries of science. >> we are on the tipping point. >> we can save species. >> it's the biggest question out there. >> it's a revolutionary approach. >> we are pushing the boundaries.
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>> techknow is going to blow your mind. >> our experts go inside the innovations, impacting you. >> this is the first time anybody's done this. >> i really feel my life changing. >> techknow, where technology meets humanity. only on al jazeera america.
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winner took all, this thing is over, we're just having a celebration. you know, we're having a celebration. >> donald trump has the republican nomination now in his sights, his super tuesday victory leaving his opponents trying to find a path to the convention. >> what a super tuesday! >> in the driver's seat, hillary clinton surgeries to a commanding lead despite some bernie sanders wins. >> abortion at the high court,
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tying to sway the justice as they hear arguments over a controversial texas law. defending its decision, apple takes new step to say avoid uplocking an iphone. good morning. if you got any sleep and welcome to your world this morning, i'm del walters. i'm stephanie sy. the road to the white house is a little clearer today for hillary clinton and donald trump, both had big wins on super tuesday. >> donald trump winning seven states, virginia, arkansas, alabama, tennessee but lost texas. cruz taking oklahoma, alaska and senator marco rubio final legeting his first win in minnesota. hillary clinton also won
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seven states, georgia, virginia, the accident, alabama, tennessee, massachusetts and arkansas. she also won american samoa. better than won vermont, oklahoma, colorado and minnesota. al jazeera's january terrett is following the sanders campaign in vermont and randall pinkston is on the campaign trail in west palm beach. first, david shuster has a look at how the evening played out. >> this has been an amazing evening. >> what a super tuesday! >> hillary clinton and donald trump are now barreling ahead on the path to nomination. the two emerged as the front runners after super tuesday, slid filing huge leads. >> it's clear tonight that the states in this election have never been higher. the rhetoric we're hearing on the other side has never been lower, trying to divide america
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between us and them is wrong and we're not going to let it work. >> clinton swept the south in the democratic primaries, minority voters broke for her 4-1, fueling her southern domination. for bernie sanders, the delegate map is becoming more difficult, but sanders is not giving up. he won four more states on tuesday. >> we have come a very long way in 10 months. [ cheers and applause ] >> at the end of tonight, 15 states will have voted, 35 states remain. let me assure you that we are going to take our fight for economic justice, for social justice, for environmental sanity, for a world of peace to every one of those states.
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>> super tuesday was a wake-up call for the republican establishment. donald trump widened his margins across nearly every demographic and captured six states. >> we've done something that almost nobody thought could be done, and i'm very proud of it. i just want to leave you with this. i am a unifier. i would love to see the republican party and everybody get together and unify. >> texas senator ted cruz is campaigning as the only republican who can beat trump if they are the final two. cruz defeated trump in the accident and oklahoma and is urging the other candidates to drop out. >> so long as the field remains divided, donald trump's nomination remains more likely and that would be a disaster for republicans, for conservatives and for the nation. >> marco rubio is holding on.
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he won his first contest in minnesota and now is focused on his home state of florida where the results will be winner take all. >> the pundits say we're underdogs, i'll accept that. we've all been underdogs. this is a community of underdogs. this is a state of underdogs. this is a country of underdogs, but we will win and when we do, we will do what needs to be done. >> the presidential race is still far from over, but the math is pointing towards an unusual choice in the general election, a brash and unconventional businessman versus a controversial former first lady. david shuster, al jazeera. >> al jazeera's randall pinkston live in west palm beach, florida, trump addressing supporter there is last night. trump firmly establishing himself as the gop front runner, seven victories, the question
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has to be asked right now is there any way of slowing him down. >> certainly his opponents hope so. donald trump obviously took a giant step towards becoming the nominee for the republican presidential nomination, the standard bearer by leading the vote in most of the super tuesday states, but del, your question is, is the implication that there are some within the republican party who do not want him to get the nomination, the so called republican establishment. the headaches, how do you stop him? how do you make sure that he cannot move forward and get the nomination. that's a question that they have not been able to answer. last night in his victory speech at his estate here in palm beach, he addressed republicans who still oppose him. >> if i'm going to win all of these states with tremendous numbers and if i'm going to come
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into worst second in the two or three that i might not win, i think, you know, we're a democracy. i think it's awfully hard to say that's not the person we want to lead the party, right? it's very hard. >> trump is also saying that his candidacy has energized the republican party, in fact, that his candidacy is the reason why we're seeing many more people voting in the republican presidential primary than we have in recent years. that is trump's argument. his opponents are saying you cannot win the general election and we don't want you to be our party's nominee. it's a con none drum for the gop. >> a con none drum indeed. randall, what it next for ted cruz and marco rubio. is it possible at this point in time that they can mount a challenge moving forward? >> let's talk about marco rubio first. we hear in florida, this is his home state, marco rubio is hoping obviously to win florida,
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but donald trump last night was saying that he will probably do quite nicely here. he even mentioned the fact that he has a lot of properties and employees and people who support him. we were doing a very unscientific poll of people walking along the promenade this morning, rung about 50-50 for trump. trump points out last night that even in the states where he didn't win, he came in number two, so trump doesn't have to run the table, if you will, moving towards cleveland. he can just keep picking up that 30%, 40% vote and still win, as long as his opponent's say in the stays, it makes it easier for him to get the nomination. del. >> randall pinkston live in west palm beach, thank you very much. >> hillary clinton won big last night, taking the delegate rich southern states, leaving bernie sanders far behind in the delegate count. john, good morning, sanders only
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won four of the 11 states, one was his home state. how is his path to the nomination looking this morning? >> well, you know, it is not looking very strong. unless there is a big issue that blows up surrounding these emails, the controversial surrounding the secretary, the path is not there for bernie sanders. of course there is also a possibility. we'll have to wait and see. the pundits were talking about him winning at least five states in order to keep the momentum going forward and understand end, he won four and lost massachusetts. massachusetts really is his base, white working class people, young people, working students, and he lost them. that's got to sting for bernie sanders. when he came here to burlington last night, coming home, they love him here. he loves the people of vermont, as well. there were limited signs of perhaps he might not go all the
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way and he realizes that. generally, the message was the revolution as he calls it, goes on. >> secretary clinton and many of the establishment people think that i am looking around thinking too big. i don't think so. >> right, and he can afford to do it, as well. if you know, stephanie that the sanders campaign raised $6 million or $7 million just on monday alone before the february deadline crept in and they have in their back pocket just raising through february $1.4 million. he can right through the democratic convention in july if he wants to. >> some people are asking whether he'll just be a thorn in the side or whether he has a chance. we'll talk about that more. hillary clinton in her speech last night certainly seemed to be looking ahead at the general
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election. she doesn't seem to have a lot of data at this point that she has secured the nomination. >> well, i think that certainly the momentum is with her at the moment, and the issue is of course, is she helped by donald trump or not, and i think it's very difficult to say. i think when you look at hillary clinton's speech, she is very aware of the fact that she is being pushed to the left by the sanders campaign. she knows that she needs to carry his voters if she is to go on to be the nominee and she doesn't really mention bernie sanders too much in her speeches at the moment. rewarding trump, she and he are both polarizing figures, but she knows that she has to go ahead and campaign hard against him potential lip in the future if she is to win. let's take a listen to what she said last night when she was giving her victory speech. here's a bit of what she had to
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say. >> we have come too far to stop now. we've got to keep going, keep working, keep breaking down those barriers and manual what we can build together when each and every american has the chance to live up to his or her own god given potential. thank you all so very meche! thank you! >> the secretary travels to new york. >> thank you, john. >> we are rejoined by lincoln mitchell and tara daldel. tara, you said you are seeing a moderation in donald trump already, a trump pivot moving to the middle. aside from saying oops, my bad, i didn't mean what i said, can i pivot away from the positions
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that he's taken? >> i think we've already started to see him move. i wouldn't say he's moving to the middle, but i will say that he is moderating his tone. last night we very clearly heard him say african-americans, i'm going to be african-americans. before it was "the blacks." now it's african-americans. he's far more humble, saying this is a great honor of my life, i'm so o honored -- >> haven't we seen that before and he gets attacked and the battle is on again. the last time was a loss. his tone was still, he had that sort of nastiness. i think he'll still have that when he's attacked, because he's thin skinned. what i'm referring to is how he talks about people, relates to people. i think you'll see a softening of his tone. you'll see him make stronger,
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clearer distinctions about oh, no, no, no, i don't have a problem with mexicans, i have a problem with people coming here illegally. i think you'll see him make that distinction far more clearly moving forward. >> i think what you saw last night with both of the front runners, hillary clinton, as well, is bolt candidates with an eye toward the general election trying to look presidential at this point. >> i would agree with that. i think it comes more naturally for ms. clinton. the question is, is this somebody who has the discipline to do it, can sustain it. the evidence suggests perhaps he doesn't. >> does has help him in an election where maybe the outsider ends up having the -- >> the core of the trump appeal is i'm the guy that never apologizes, never gives in to that pressure. he's got to be very careful about it. he can use code worst and racial code worst a little more elegantly. >> if you're a voter, you my buy
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in that he's softening his stance, but if you're the gop establishment are you going to buy a more moderately kinder gentler donald trump, are you going to buy into the fact that this may be your nominee or are you going to fight him all the with a i to the convention? >> they're going to fight donald trump, but behind closed doors, they're saying they don't believe trump believes that he's saying. that is the dominant thinking of most people close to -- >> what will that do to the people who do believe what donald trump is saying? >> that's the great irony here. he claims not to be a politician, but everything that donald trump is doing is classic politician behavior. he supports universal health care, has been on record supporting universal health care. guns, gun safety laws. there's a myriad of things, he was very praising of both hillary clinton and south korea as well as president obama in his initial -- upon his initial be election, so donald trump is a flip-flopper.
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his supporters are so hardened that it does not matter, and for those who are aware of the things the polling shows, some of them are aware of all of these shortcomings, right? they're aware of i have the and they've said it doesn't matter. >> i want to take a second to talk about bernie sanders. what happened to bernie sanders, because coming out of new hampshire which was clinton territory and he won that by a while, it looked like he was going to have momentum. he is somebody who's been consistent with his mental but is floundering. >> i don't think he's floundering. i don't think it's over for bernie sanders yesterday, i think it's the eighth inning and he's down two runs. >> he's sort of the bastion of liberal -- >> if you're in the clinton headquarters, you're saying we ran into a great candidate that we weren't expected. that's wrong. i think it was winnable. the main reason is the primely electorate in the democratic
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party particularly white have moved into far left since bill clinton was nominated by the party that his message really resonates. similarly, his message of a less hawkish foreign policy resonates. the reason bernie sanders is not in a strong position and i would argue that he's made serious campaign mistakes, he's unable to make the tri teak of clinton's foreign policy because he didn't make himself fluent. >> he didn't do his homework. >> when you start talking about the c.i.a. overthrowing -- in a debate, that is a relevant point, however you sound like that crazy leftwing dude on the bus. >> and you're also calling yourself a democratic socialist -- >> i think actually, he spun that beautifully. now socialists after decades of red baiting is a good thing. sanders is not racist. he has an admirable reward on
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that civil rights. if he was serious about winning the democratic nomination in 2016, he should have been spending time in african-american communities in 2012, 2013 and 2014 and he wasn't. now he's saying it's the establishment. the problem is african-american leadership and he would know this if he spent enough time there feel they've worked very hard to become part of the establishment. >> not doing his work. >> and not broad enough. >> we'll see you again at the bottom of the hour. one of the reasons that is all so important is the courts. the supreme court is going to hear its first abortion case in almost a decade. it is looking at whether a texas law that puts strict new rules on clinics places an undue burden on women. pro abortion activists are live outs the supreme court. tell us about the case and what the protestors say they want. >> del, hundreds of protestors
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have gathered outside the supreme court. this is called the most significant abortion case in a quarter century, resolving around a 2013 texas law that put in place several restrictions on abortion providers in that state. two of those are at issue today before the court, one of those requires abortion doctors to have an official affiliation with a local hospital and the second requires abortion providers to meet a series of elaborate hospital grade standards. now that first restriction is in place already, in effect in the accident, the second is not. already, pro abortion rights activists say it has had a devastating effect on abortion providers in that state. we spoke to one activist early this morning. this is what she had to say. >> what it's really doing is just forcing providers to close their doors, and no longer
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provide services to women who need them. this isn't about increasing women's health and safety. it's about putting them in a precarious situation where they don't have access to care. >> the arguments begin in about an hour and a half. >> one of the reasons this case is important is the number eight, only eight justice now on the court because of the death of antonin scalia. what did this mean for the case moving forward? >> june all i'ms are on on the knee kennedy. abortion providers say if the law stands, that would lead to more closing of abortion clinics, leaving the state with only 10 abortion providers.
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i had could affect mississippi and louisiana could see more closures of abortion providers. if kennedy votes with the liberal justice in this case, that would be a 5-3 vote. that means the court could strike down part or all of the texas law. either way, it would send a message to many other states who have placed restrictions or planning to place restrictions on abortion providers in those states. >> thank you very much. >> a lot of people trying to read justice kennedy's mind these days. when we come back, a dilemma for the republican party. >> voters across 10 states picks donald trump but the party considers backing another candidate.
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it was definitely a super tuesday for donald trump. the gop front runner won seven states, virginia, arkansas, alabama, tennessee, vermont, massachusetts and georgia. he now has 10 primary and caucus victories, bringing his total delegate count to 285. he needs 952 more to win the republican nomination. >> lenny mccal city is a conservative political commentator and joins us in studio. if we were talking about anybody other than donald trump, republicans would be talking about on to the convention and the nomination. why not? >> well, they see the rhetoric that's coming from donald trump. they see that every negative stereotype, every negative instance that we've seen from the hundred party and the
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conservative base over the last 10 years, donald trump has taken to move his candidacy forward and now become the front runner. this is what they're afraid of, of it not only damaging the chances for 2016, but damaging the republican brand for a generation. >> whether we talk about that brand, look at the crowds that are behind donald trump whenever he speaks. there are thousands of people. which is more correct, that he represents the worst of the republican party or that donald trump represents the republican party itself? >> donald trump is almost the epitome of what transfired with the tea party movement. you had people serious about smaller government, government spending, upset with president obama and president bush and you had the people that used the movement to push racism, sexism, zone know phobia, the epitome has come to head with donald trump. >> is the republican party as we have seen from donald trump and
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his campaign racist, or no. >> much of it is yes. >> as i say lamb phonic? >> much of it is, yes. >> anti black, much of it is, yes. >> evangelical? >> no. >> you can't tell me that you're a christian and don't believe in god redeeming of grace and forgiveness and you never needed to go to that as a christian. for me, that is a northern starter. >> you have a party that says the republican establishment saying it does not want a donald trump nomination, a nominee but also has ted cruz trending number two who is not liked by any of his senate colleagues. which is the lesser or better of these two candidates. >> the lesser of two evils would be ted cruz. at least he was elected by the people in the accident and seen as a cann. he is somebody that can bring those principles from the beginning of his career to the
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present, unlike donald trump who has been across the board. >> if you were to have to vote for ted cruz, would you? >> definitely. i wouldn't vote for donald trump. >> one of the things that came out of all of the exit polls last night was that there seems to be anger out there. it has been described as the angry white male. the same anger that we saw during the reagan revolution, are there enough angry white males out there either on the democratic side and republican side if they coalesce to win an election? >> we know the answer, it's no. mitt romney almost won 60% of the white vote and got crushed in the general election in 2012. the answer to that is no. >> this is the demonstration during the trump campaign. black lives matters protestors came in and interrupted him. it was angry black faces on one side, i don't see the footage, so i'll describe it, angry trump supporters on the other side. are you concerned that this
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narrative is going to spill out? >> i am. there was a young african-american lady pushed out of a trump rally by older white guys who put their hands on this young lady and pushed her out of the rally. we've seen the worst of americans. we don't want to go back to the 1960's. people were shot and killed from the every day man to political and civic leaders. that's where we're going. this is why it's extremely important to have some type of sense coming from the republican party that we don't go back to those very turbulent times. >> good to have you with us. >> god bless. >> hanging on for a future win, marco rubio bets the house on his home state. we go to miami where the senator hopes to mount his come back. >> we'll talk about the global effects of this campaign as u.s. voters select their nominees.
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>> celebrity chef, marcus samuelsson. >> i've had the fortune to live out my passion. >> his journey from orphan to entrepreneur. >> sometimes in life, the worst that can ever happen to you can also be your savior. >> and serving change through his restaurants. >> we hired 200 people here in harlem... these jobs can't be outsourced. >> i lived that character. >> we will be able to see change. welcome back to your world this morning. taking a look at our top stories, of course it is the election. the presidential front runners
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celebrating their big wins on super tuesday, hillary clinton and donald trump are preparing for the next phase in the race for the presidency. >> trump took seven states, including most of the southern states and the two in the northeast. the democrats, hillary clinton also won seven states, including the delegate rich dates in the south. we are live this morning in miami. several candidates are setting their sights on florida, which votes in just two weeks, not the least of which is a senator marco rubio. he took home his first win last night, but mow important is florida for his campaign? >> it's critical, not just because he's the u.s. senator from florida and this is his home state, as well he needs those delegates. he had first win, but he needs to stay competitive. this is a winner take all state when this primary will be held march 19, 99 delegates up for
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grabs. marco rubio needs them if he wants to continue in this race. he has a challenge ahead of him. i have to tell you with polling numbers here seeing donald trump as ahead of marco rubio by double digits. >> what about the democrats, who is expected to take the sunshine state? >> if you look at the southern states and how they went on super tuesday, obviously that was a hillary clinton sweep, and why did she sweep those southern states? it came down largely to african-american voters, voters of color, latinos, women, older voters, the 44 and up age group. you're pretty much describing florida when you look at who voted for hillary clinton and that is bernie sanders's challenge. when he says he's going all the way to the convention, he's at a point where it's going to be difficult to overcome hillary clinton's lead. she hoped to lock him out.
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that didn't happen but right now, it really is a lead that's going to be hard to overcome. hillary clinton has three times the delegates, but she has a substantial lead when it comes to the ever important super delegates. >> not to mention in in florida, you have older voters and hillary clinton has been doing better than sanders when it comes to that constituency. thanks a lot, kimberly. we are joint again by lincoln mitchell, the national correspondent for the new york paper. who wins? >> who wins florida? if i were to bet, i'd bet on donald trump, but i don't bet. i've learned that over and over again this year. rubio has to pick up florida or
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the stop trump movement is over. if rubio loses florida, he has to run again in florida, this is his first term. his whole political future, this is a guy who should be looking at 2020 but he has to win florida first. if he's still down 20 in the polls. >> because the republican establishment is so angry as donald trump, does jeb bush campaign for marco rubio in florida? >> he has to campaign for marco rubio. i'm not sure how much influence he has anywhere these days. >> del keeps bringing up this word anger. i want to talk about stab plant wage greeting since the recession. there has been 2% growth, that anger is not unfounded among voters of trump and possibly in some cases the voters of sanders. they have that same sense of income inequality.
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are we over emphasizing the racial issues that have come up because of the crisis things donald trump has said and not focusing on the legitimate concerns causing people to back trump? >> on the trump side, they all spoke about the economy that you would have expected circa 1984. the government doesn't work for the people, we are going to turn the economy around, make wages better. as bernie sanders pushes hillary clinton to the left on economic issues, everyone has to talk about these issues in a different way, because people are aware that growth is not equal, that wages are not growing up and everyone has had to respond to that. i wouldn't say that the voters voting for trump and sanders are the only people concerned about these issues. >> right. >> an awful lot of people voted for hillary clinton or perhaps ted cruz feel that way, as well, but feel those candidates are going to represent them. maybe they are tell are ment aren't as angry, but the concerns are the same. >> we've seen income inequality
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grow for the last 35 to 40 years. i think the recession made it so acute for people in their lives and i think that people are now with the cost are college, with their kids coming out of college and not being able to find a job, with the jobs nat paying enough for their kids to make loan payments, i think those septemberments are so -- >> why elect a multi-billionaire then from new york city, he ends up being the front runner in the party. how does that make sense? >> people have felt for along time the grassroots of the republican party and the tea party has felt that they have been sold out. the poor working lower income people of the republican party feel like they've been sold out by government generally. >> and i would -- and i would argue that where race comes into this argument is that when a candidate says because there is an undercurrent out there that believes that my jobs went to china or my jobs went to mexico
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of a after affirmative actions, african-americans took my jobs. it is race baiting. that is the reason race and socioeconomics mix. correct me if i'm wrong on that. >> that has always been true in america. this i also one of the challenges bernie sanders hasn't overcome. his argument is if we address these economic issues, then. of race will go away, but the history of america says often we address these economic issues through racism -- >> many thought there would be a rising tide with barack obama and some ships did not float. >> for a lot of white working class people, the republican party has set out this narrative that government is bad and part of the problem with government is that it's taking your money and actually giving it to these
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minorities. that has been a dog whistle in american politics. trump is talking about actually expanding government in many ways, saying lets keep medicare and social security the same, let's rebuild our roads and infrastructure. that should be when other republicans said that was not considered conservative, trump is saying he's being applauded, by saying i'm going to give the government back to you. they feel the government is not for them. >> what we're also seeing is that the republican message of low taxes help the rich, it will trickle down, that has no currency anymore among republican primary voters. >> we're going to have to leave it there. >> thank you so much for your insights this morning, really appreciate it. whoever the u.s. chooses in november will have a huge effect on relationships with the rest of the world. the rest of the world is closely watching. >> our correspondents are tracking overseas reactions to
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the campaigns thus far and we'll start with adrien brown in beijing. >> china's state controlled media appears to be even handed in its coverage, not favoring one candidate over the other, but political commentators and opinion makers are having a field day, seizing on what they see as the dysfunction in the republican party. donald trump is portrayed as a clown, an extremist, a symbol of distrust and disgust of the political system. bernie sanders is getting favorable coverage. one political analyst said that his candidacy fits in with the government's narrative of the united states being beset with racial and economic inequality. there's hillary clinton. if you go to social media sites, she is perceived as a china backer, even though her husband
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is seen as very popular here and seen as riding on the coattails of president obama. to sum up, most chinese are adopting a wait and see attitude mixed with criticism of the u.s. political system. >> most people here in iraq don't really care about the u.s. elections. they have their own problems here, specifically when it comes to security, electricity shortage and getting paid on time, but the u.s. elections are very important to the political blogs here. the blogs are dominated by the shia, sunni and kurds. the shia are very suspicious of the americans, particularly the militias who say any combat troops on the ground here combat an enemy and they will need to be fought. the sunni's have a very good relationship with the u.s. and they remember a time when the u.s. helped them fight al-qaeda in iraq and they want to get back to that strong relationship. the kurds have a good relationship with the u.s. but they are slightly suspicious. they would like the u.s. to help
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them become more independent of baghdad than they already are. because of that three pronged approach, iraqis are frustrated because their politicians are giving mixed messages on what they say, that it doesn't matter who is in the oval office, the policy toward iraq never changes. there was a poll done recently asking russians which of three political systems they prefer, the current way of doing things, the old soviet system, or western democracy. there was western democracy that was the least popular. add to that the current russian t.v. diet of currency crisis and russian affairs and russians are not particularly avoid watchers of the u.s. electorate cycle. only the names clinton and trump are familiar to most russians. clinton of course having been secretary of state and before that first lady. trumps russians know because he is the most high profile candidate. he seems to be the most appealing candidate for the kremlin, a brilliant and talented person without a doubt, said putin late last year.
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the feeling also seems to be mutual. trump said he'd get along with putin just fine and gives him an a. for leadership. putin in the kremlin, trump in the white house, a potentially very different russian-u.s. relationship with implications of course for much of the world. a damaging tornado swept through last night, garage doors were cracked in half and trees knocked down power lines. thousands of homes lost power. let's bring in nicole mitchell for more on what to expect in the future. >> none of that severe weather today. that was isolated to alabama and including the wind reports, kentucky southward. today, that same front moved up into the northeast and even behind this, we have one system pulling out of the rockies today into the midwest, another system
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behind that that will impact the northwest now. we're setting up series of storms that we'll be dealing with. the one that's most troublesome this morning, a lot of rain is clearing the coastline. you could see temperatures drop over the course of the day as we get on the backside of this front and snow on the northern tier, especially northern parts of maine could see the heaviest stuff. we have winter storm warnings up, a lot of that is this morning, early afternoon. that clears out. another system developing through the midsection of the country, starting to pull south of the great lakes into today, bringing more moisture to the east coast as we get more likely into friday but some areas could already see that on thursday so a lot of activity. the one area of the country we are kind of watching for today is with all of this going on, there will be high winds picking up in the central plains. places into the 80s possibly for lubbock, texas, already a fire
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danger. we started seeing that early this season. otherwise temperatures for the east coast, some place will go down with that front going through. >> nicole, thank you very much. >> when we come back, more on that debate over security and privacy may go out on capitol hill. >> the f.b.i. admits mistakes in unlocking the san bernardino's phone as some lawmakers side with apple. >> disturbing details of sexual abuse, pennsylvanias top prosecutor revealing a troubling history for the catholic church.
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al jazeera america.
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new developments today in apple's battle with the f.b.i., the company is making legal moves a day after the government admitted making mistakes handling the san bernardino shooter's phone. we have this report. >> apple has now filed a formal appeal of a judge's order that it help the f.b.i. unlock one of the san bernardino shooter's phones. apple said it's out of an abundance of caution as a a judge reviews arguments in the case. the appeal came the same day both sides testified on capitol hill. f.b.i. director james comey refrained from painting apple as more concerned about profits than national security. >> the companies are not evil, the government is not evil, you have a whole lot of good people who see the world through difference lenses, all care about things. >> he admitted the f.b.i. and local officials made mistakes trying to get into the phone days after the shootings, putting in a password that made
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it more difficult to get in. comey insisted the f.b.i. is not looking to get a back door into all iphones. >> there's already a door on that iphone. essentially we are asking apple take the vicious guard door away, let us try to pick the lock. >> the company said it cooperated with law enforcement on both criminal and terrorism cases. he said what the government is asking now would set a precedent that threatens millions of phone users. >> the f.b.i. has asked the court to order us to give them something that we don't have, to create an operating system that does not exist. the reason it doesn't exist is because it would be too dangerous. >> members of congress from bolt parties say they understand why apple is resisting the order. some now call for a blue ribbon commission of experts to figure out a solution. >> a court in new york this week came down on the side of apple in a different case.
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the one thing that both the company and the government agree on is that only congress can resolve this conflict. >> the director backed away from the notion that it would be this one phone. he said this would set a precedent for other law enforcement and top prosecutor in new york testified that he wants apple to help them decrypt 175 iphones that they've seized from criminals. >> south dakota's governor vetoing a bill that would have required transgender students using bathrooms that matched their gender at birth. the republican controlled legislature approving that bill last month, saying it would protect student privacy. had it passed, it would have been the first such law of its kind in the nation. there are new details this morning of sex abuse in the catholic church. a grand jury finding two bishops in pennsylvania helped cover abuse by dozens of priests
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again. as al jazeera reports, critics say the findings are too little, too late. the abuse of hundreds of children covered up at the hands of dozens of priests, those were the findings of a grand jury convened by the attorney general. >> this abuse lasted four decades. four decades amounted not only was it covered up, not only were priests moved around, but bishops hogan and endemic placed their desire to avoid public scandal above the safety of children. >> hogan is no longer alive.
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the other post a conditions the charges. the story seems too in my. this past weekend, colored necessarily george pell of australia became the highest vatican official to testify in his country's investigation of sexual abuse in the church. >> i am not here to defend the indefensible. the church has made enormous mistakes, and is working to remedy those, but the church is in many places, certainly in australia has mucked things up. >> we need to focus on the institution, not the individual prested. >> the church's mishandling first came to light in a newspaper investigation in boston, which is shown in this film, spotlight. spotlight won the oscar for best film on sunday. >> this is entertainment, but sometimes it can make a difference in the world, and when you can do that, it brings
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you closer, i think to why you wanted to do it in the first place, and the more people come out, the greater chances we have of protecting more children. i think people are making that connection now. >> in the pennsylvania case, no criminal charges will be filed. the statute of limitations expired, some of the priests have died and some of the victims, according to the attorney general are just too traumatized to testify. a handful of priests have been suspended, but the report expresses concern that the "purge of predators" is taking too long. the long term impact of an invisible gas leak. >> residents returning to their homes still worry it is still just not safe.
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residents living near a now capped natural gas well near los angeles are finally allowed to go home. they were forced out for months as the leak spewed methane into the air. some fear it's still not safe to return. >> months after being forced away, joni spears has returned to organize what's left in her home. >> how do you explain this to your kids? >> they're going through a lot.
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they know that we have to make the right decisions for them and i think they've been preparing themselves to leave, but i think not knowing where we're going and what we're doing, it's frightening. >> spears is not convinced it's safe to live her anymore. the gas company has sealed the well and residents started returning last week, but her health had improved while away and now she says she feels ill again. >> since i've come back the last several days in this past week, i've begun getting really sick again. >> other residents have reported health issues since returning to the porter ranch area and county officials say they'd actually like more time for additional air testing, including inside homes. >> what's the residual? what is left over in the air? what is left over in the atmosphere, in people's homes? what's been trapped in the sediment rock for almost four
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months? >> the most damaging natural gas leak took operation at one of the largest gas storage facilities in the country. most people had no idea there were 400 wells just over the hills from their homes. it sparked protest, a demand for accountability and lawsuits. >> you know, there are many lawsuits, i've heard up to 75. we've got our own that we filed on behalf of the people of the state of california working very closely with the city attorney's office. >> some residents will move past this and renew life in porter ranch, but spears plans to sell
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this house, despite her love for her neighborhood. >> i think it's probably in my opinion one of the most breath taking places in l.a. county. where i saw this view when we were ready to purchase this house, i couldn't believe i was going to get to look at this every day. it makes me sad that this can happen in our country. >> the consolation for people who plan to move, housing prices appear to be holding steady. in fact, construction continues on million dollar homes right below the gas storage site, the disaster not a big factor apparently for some buyers, though others may think twice. melissa chan, al jazeera, porter ranch, california. nasa astronaut scott kelly back on that earth after spending a year in space. after staying on the space station for 340 days. doctors will study both men to explore the long-term effects of that lengthy stay in space. >> can you imagine the bebriefing he has to go through. >> can you imagine the craving for cheeseburgers that he has? >> i'm stephanie sy. i'm del walters, we are back tomorrow morning at 7:00 a.m. until then, enjoy a cheeseburger and have a great day. >> thanks for watching.
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>> donald trump and hillary clinton pull further ahead in the white house race, but their challengers aren't done yet. you're watching al jazeera live from our headquarters in doha. also coming up, jordanian security forces kill seven near the syrian border. >> gulf countries declare hezbollah a terrorist organization. i'm at the moscow museum of

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