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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 5, 2018 9:00am-10:01am GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm annita mcveigh. the headlines at 9am... growing criticism of the parole board's decision to release serial sex attacker john worboys, who's thought to have assaulted more than 100 women. one of my clients who is absolutely horrified and really, really distressed that nobody had the courtesy to inform her, so she's in the middle of cooking tea for her kids and she heard this on the radio. sales of new cars fall for the first time in six years, amid a drop in demand for diesels. a book containing damaging allegations about the trump presidency is released earlier than planned, after white house lawyers tried to stop its publication. tech giant apple says that the recently discovered flaws in some computer processor chips affect all iphones, ipads and mac computers. also in the next hour —
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a latte levy or a flat white tax? mps says drinkers using disposable cups should be charged an extra 25p to encourage them to switch to reusable versions. bringing strong winds and blizzards. it's the tenth day of record—breaking low temperatures, which have already claimed several lives. good morning, welcome to bbc news. there's mounting criticism this morning of the parole board's decision to release the serial sex attackerjohn worboys. the black cab driver was jailed in 2009 for offences against 12 women, but detectives believe he carried out more than 100 rapes and sexual assaults. the chair of the house of commons home affairs committee, yvette cooper, said she was "really shocked" that he was being freed,
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and she called on the board to set out the reasons for its decision. the chairman of the board, nick hardwick, says he recognises there's a lack of transparency in the system, and will be launching a public consultation. our home affairs correspondent, daniel sandford, has more. for six years, john worboys cruised smart areas of london in his black cab looking for women to drug and rape. when he was finally caught, thejudge said he'd serve a minimum of eight years in prison, and said he wouldn't be released until he was no longer a threat to women. worboys would show young women he picked up in his cab large wads of cash, saying he'd recently won big at the casino. then he'd offer them champagne, which he'd spiked with sedatives, and rape them. the judge gave him what's known as an indeterminate sentence, under which people are only freed once they're no longer considered dangerous. the parole board has decided worboys will be released this month under supervision after spending less than ten years in prison.
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i've spoken to one of my clients, who is absolutely horrified and really, really distressed that nobody had the courtesy to inform her, so she's in the middle of cooking tea for her kids and she hears this on the radio, and feels absolutely sick to her stomach. the organisation rape crisis said it was far too soon for worboys to be released. although police believejohn worboys attacked over 100 women, he was only convicted of attacking 12. and only one of those convictions was for rape. and that's why his sentence was so short. all the same, under the indeterminate sentence rules, the parole board will need to have assured themselves thatjohn worboys was no longer a risk as a sexual predator. daniel sandford, bbc news. let me give you a bit more detail on the statement from the chairman of
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the statement from the chairman of the parole board, nick hardwick, given that there have been many calls for the parole board to make clear its decision—making process in relation tojohn warboys. in his statement, he says, we currently have a statutory duty under the pa role have a statutory duty under the parole board have a statutory duty under the pa role boa rd rules have a statutory duty under the parole board rules that prevents disclosure of proceedings, but he says, we will shortly be launching a consultation about how we share our decision—making with the public. he says, i'm very concerned some victims were not told about the decision, this must have been very distressing. they're a robust arrangements in place for victims to be informed through depicting contact scheme, we were told that had been done as usual in this case and released the decision on that basis. very interesting that he is saying the parole board's understanding was that the victims ofjohn warboys had been contacted but, as we have heard, not all of them were, so we will be following this story throughout the morning, do stay with us throughout the morning, do stay with us for more on that. new car sales fell for the first
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time in six years last year, dragged down by a collapse in the demand for detail and the uk's motor industry warned it expects britain's car market to weaken further this year. the society of motor manufacturers and traders says there were 2.5 million new cars registered last year. that shows a 5.6% fall on the number of registrations in 2016. the sale of diesel cars fell 17% since 2016, as higher taxes and pollution fears hit demand. and demand could fall further this year. the smmt expects that car sales will drop by up to 7% this year. the industry body blames uncertainty over brexit and confusion about future policy on diesel cars. let's speak now to mike hawes, chief executive of the society of motor manufacturers and traders. thank you for talking to us this morning, not the best news but put it into context for us? the context
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is important, yes the market was down 5.5% last year but we still sold over 2.5 million vehicles. that is the third best year in the past decade and the sixth best year ever, so decade and the sixth best year ever, so hardly falling off a cliff. it is obviously a concern but certainly not all doom and gloom. but clearly a problem with the diesel sector, if you look at the electric car market there was a sharp increase from a small base, but a sharp increase nonetheless, and it does highlight the fact that diesel cars have a bad image at the moment so what can you do to get those older polluting models off the road and, if you like, convert the public back to diesel? you have put your finger on it there, it is about getting the older vehicles off the road, so we need policies to encourage the purchase of new vehicles. they deliver much improved c02 and fuel economy so for the average consumer,
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buying a diesel car versus the equivalent in petrol, they can save around £400 per year, the same as your annual gas bill. at that the fa ct your annual gas bill. at that the fact that with these new diesel vehicles you also get the other technology, and they can be a compelling prospect. what we need to do, and manufacturers are doing, is helping new customers into vehicles through incentives, additional support mechanisms, but we need government to make sure it is encouraging these vehicles because the danger... in other words get the government to tax these older vehicles off the road? not necessarily, people bought these vehicles in good faith. we need to recognise diesel is the right choice for many consumers. if you live in a city, and electric or small petrol might be the right choice for you. bobby people driving outside of the city, rural areas, bobby people driving outside of the city, ruralareas, longer mileage, thatis city, ruralareas, longer mileage, that is where you get the benefit of a diesel and that is where for many people it is the right choice, and in many ways for the environment, because what we have seen, the
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average c02 of the car is coming down, because of the way the market is changing 0verall c02 will be going up because of the move away from diesel and that is not good for the industry or the environment. talk to us in more detail about how much new diesel engines have improved compared to just a few yea rs improved compared to just a few years ago, and how they sit alongside a car with a petrol engine? the emissions for a diesel engine? the emissions for a diesel engine tends to be about 20% better in c02. engine tends to be about 20% better in co2. in the other emissions, that issue was dealt with five, seven yea rs issue was dealt with five, seven years ago, 99% of all particular are now removed from diesel cars. for knox, they are about 80, 90% better in performance and the way the test has changed means that not only when you test a card to certify to put it on the road, not only is it tested in the lab but also on the road so you can demonstrate that these vehicles will do exactly what they say both in a laboratory test and in
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the real world. that should provide reassurance to commuters. and when you talk about nox you are talking about nitrogen oxide, which is a concern for people who want clean air, as we all do? poor urban air quality is not just air, as we all do? poor urban air quality is notjust about road transport. take london, for instance, you could take every single diesel car off the road and just under 90% of the nox problem would still be there. there are other problems as well. but clearly every component of the problem has to come up with its own solutions foran to come up with its own solutions for an effective answer to that. let's talk about the other reasons behind the decline in car sales, obviously there is the diesel issue but you also mentioned in your report people's concerns over brexit and perhaps wanting to be careful with their spending. what concerns do you have in terms of sales this year, because you predicted sales will fall further in 2018? we have seen will fall further in 2018? we have seen economic growth chris lowe,
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people are concerned about that and it stops them from buying big—ticket items. we expect a decline of around 6%. what matters is trying to grow the economy and get that confidence back into the uk because that will be the driver of economic growth and hence that affect positively on the car market. what do you want to see the government do with regards to the government do with regards to the brexit negotiations, as far as you are concerned , the brexit negotiations, as far as you are concerned, from the motor manufacturers' perspective, to increase confidence? 8096 of the cars we make in the uk are sold, exported, by far the biggest market, 50% exported, by far the biggest market, 5096 -- exported, by far the biggest market, 50% -- 56% of exported, by far the biggest market, 50% —— 56% of those go to the eu. we need a continuation of as many of the benefits that we have at the moment to continue in the future so the more we cannot reassurance and clear understanding of what a
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conditional deal will be will give confidence to businesses to continue to invest. that is important for the industry, important for jobs and livelihoods as well. 0k, mike, chief executive of the society of motor manufacturers and traders, thank you very much. a controversial book which is a fly—on—the—wall account of donald trump's first year in power is being published today. the publisher opted for an earlier release date in response to attempts by the president's lawyers to block it. in a tweet overnight, donald trump said it was full of lies and criticised his former adviser, steve bannon. 0ur north america correspondent peter bowes reports. publish and be damned. the book that won't go away. the white house disputes its accuracy and the president's lawyers have threatened to sue for libel. they've demanded that the author, michael wolff, and the publisher immediately cease and desist from any further publication. instead, the release date has been brought forward, much to the apparent delight of mr wolff. "here we go, you can buy it
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and read it," he tweets. "thank you, mr president." the white house says the book is tabloid trash, false, and fraudulent. it portrays mr trump as being surprised at winning the presidency, and paints a picture of his administration as dysfunctional and divided. steve bannon, who's widely quoted in the extracts already published, has not disputed their content. his response, on a radio programme, to declare his unfailing support for the president. the president of the united states is a great man. you know, i support him day in and day out, whether going through the country giving the trump miracle speech or on the show or on the website. and mr trump's response to that... i don't know, he called me a great man last night. so, you know, he obviously changed his tune pretty quick. now, with the lawyers poised, there's an entire book to read for the next instalment in this extraordinary saga. peter bowes, bbc news. and, not surprisingly, the president couldn't resist commenting again on social media.
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in the last few hours, he tweeted... "i authorized zero access to white house for author of phony book. i never spoke to him for book. full of lies, misrepresentations and sources that don't exist. look at this guy's past and watch what happens to him and sloppy steve!" the republican commentator scottie nell—hughes has been giving more insights and a flavour of the reaction to the book. i have to tell you, the white house this morning is more twisted than charlie would be at yoga as this book has been released early, book stores are staying open to get this book out and the trivial part, the middle school aspect of the book, is probably what has been dominating headlines the past 48 hours. some of the things that you mentioned, you have to wonder, is it true or not? how are they going to back it up? were you there with president trump? those are the gossip site, the tabloid issues that i think were
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referred to in the press conference today. can you prove it? but it makes a good read. i think what is more concerning is what you are probably going to go to next, which are the issues of the people that surrounded the president and his actions and reactions to some of the things going on during the first six months of this administration. a south african tourist has been killed and seven others injured in a hot air balloon accident in egypt's southern city of luxor. local media say the balloon crashed into a mountainous area after it was blown off course by strong winds. in 2013, 19 tourists were killed when their balloon caught fire in luxor. in 2016, egypt temporarily halted balloon flights in the area after 22 tourists were injured in a crash landing. apple has confirmed that all iphones, ipads and mac computers are affected by two major flaws in computer chips. it emerged this week that tech companies have been working on a fix for the meltdown and spectre bugs, which could allow
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hackers to steal data. apple said there was no evidence that the vulnerability had been exploited. it says it will issue a patch for its safari web browser in the coming days. the headlines on bbc news... the chairman of the parole board says he is "very concerned" that victims of the serial rapist, john warboys, were not told that he was about to be released. a sharp drop in the number of new diesel cars sold last year — sales were down 17 percent, with overall car sales falling by five percent. a book containing damaging allegations about the trump presidency is released earlier than planned after white house lawyers tried to stop its publication. and ina tried to stop its publication. and in a moment, a severe winter storm hits the eastern united states with record—breaking low temperatures. we will be live in boston.
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and in sport, more frustration for england's bowlers in the final ashes test. australia are on top in sydney. west ham spoil tottenham's 100% record over the festive period. it finished 1—1 at wembley after a pairof it finished 1—1 at wembley after a pair of stunning long—range goals. and after the match, so sad he thought bob niang's goal was better than his own. reigning australian open champion serena williams will not defend her title this year. having given birth four months ago, she says she can compete but that is not good enough. i will be back with more on all those stories just after half past. more now on this at —— on the severe
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storm hitting the eastern united states, with more snow on the way in boston in the coming hours. up to 17 people are believed to have died from the severe weather. several inches of snow, blocked roads, black eyes and power cuts and a storm stretching hundreds of miles. new york city like a fairy tale for some. the snow though, a serious hazard to many more. we are enjoying it. we are from southern california that is the first time the kids have seen snow. it's cold, but it's fun. it's tough to be a long time outside because you have to get into the shopsjust to... to keep you warm. alive! one of new york's airports council 95% of its
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flights, jfk counselled them all. schools are closed up and down the atla ntic schools are closed up and down the atlantic coast. as a state of emergency was declared, more than ten deaths already attributed to the freezing conditions. it is clear this is a serious, serious storm between the very low temperature, the strong winds and driving snow, eve ryo ne the strong winds and driving snow, everyone should take this very seriously. take precautions. because of the fact that the storm has intensified in the last few hours, i am now declaring a winter weather emergency for new york city. the office of emergency management now standing by with equipment like generators, pumps and sandbags as well as food and water, blankets and emergency shelters. there has been blizzards in connecticut. atlantic city has seen traffic at a standstill. can you believe this is tallahassee, florida ? standstill. can you believe this is tallahassee, florida? even in florida, the sunshine state, there
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we re florida, the sunshine state, there were snowflakes falling. for the northern part, the very first in 30 yea rs. northern part, the very first in 30 years. it meant sledging and snowmen for some. in memphis, years. it meant sledging and snowmen forsome. in memphis, even years. it meant sledging and snowmen for some. in memphis, even a game of ice hockey under the setting sun. it's being called a bomb cyclone, from florida to maine, strong drops in pressure pulling in high winds, snow and low, low temperatures, wind chill making it feel —40 in places. relief could still be days away. the national weather service producing more misery through the weekend as the storm moves north woods towards canada. let's go to new york now where we can speak to hannah, who is there. you are well wrapped up. can you hear me, festival? i hope you can hear me, festival? i hope you can hear me. tell us what big additions are like that. yes, good morning
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from new york, anita. well, after the storm dumped several inches of snow across the northeast, now the east coast is bracing for a deep freeze. now, many residents in many states can expect temperatures in the single digits or the teens. the snowstorm yesterday brought historic coastal flooding to many areas along the coast. at least 18 deaths are being blamed on the cold temperatures. forecasters are predicting as the day goes on, some areas on the east coast, it may feel as low as —15 degrees. when you factor in the bitter cold and the high winds, that is. is it the fact that this cold snap is so sustained, lasting for ten days so far? how unusual is that? yes, we are used to cold snaps here and there, it's new york city, but for it to last for ten days is something i haven't seen
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before and i've been in this business for 20 years and i'm a native new yorker. again, more than a dozen deaths, at least 18 deaths are being blamed on the cold temperatures. yesterday, 500 national guard members were called to several states to help with rescue efforts. there are a lot of homeless people. a lot of people who died a homeless people who weren't able to make it to a shelter or get help in time. when is a break expected, when should things improve? you know, it's only going to get worse, at least until sunday. then they are saying next week hopefully it will feel a little bit more like normal which is 30s and 40s. think about it, that's another three days of bitter cold all along the east coast and again, in some states, it will feel like it is —15 degrees. that certainly is cold. thank you very much, live in new
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york, from cbs. mps are calling for a 25p tax to be added to disposable coffee cups to improve recycling rates. the environmental audit committee said 2.5 billion single—use coffee cups are thrown away each year in the uk, with half a million of those littered every day. a report from the committee suggests a so—called "latte levy" should be used to drive up recycling rates and improve reprocessing facilities, but if there isn't enough improvement, throwaway cups should be banned completely in five years. the government says it agrees plastic waste is a problem and will look into a single—use plastic tax. this morning, john maguire has been at a paper mill in cumbria that recycles disposable cups. just in case you have always wanted to know, this is what 50,000 compact it used copy cups looks like, bailed up, brought it to this paper mill in cumbria. this place has been going since 1840 but they have only been
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using this as a source for recycled paperfor the using this as a source for recycled paper for the last three or four yea rs. paper for the last three or four years. why is this of only two in the country to do so? the issue is the country to do so? the issue is the material is a coffee cup is made from. a plastic line on the inside to make it waterproof and then the cardboard, the pulp on the outside to give it that form, that rigidity. the trick is to try to separate those two materials. what they do here is they managed to do that, they recycle baby plastic and the paper. the paper is then turned into these massive bales, boxes they call them, two and a half tonnes of recycled paper on the spindle there. that will then be sent all over the world, used as packaging for luxury items, for jewellery world, used as packaging for luxury items, forjewellery boxes, but also for envelopes, things like that. phil, you are the chief executive here and we will speak to gavin from an environmental charity. you have a
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couple of examples of what you do here. the question is not necessarily why you do it but why doesn't everyone do it like this? we have been doing it for some time, over the past few years, and the challenge has been to take the plastic at the inside of the copy cups. we cracked that, the technology exists, we have been recycling copy cups for quite some time. we have the capacity to do half a billion copy cups a year but the reality is we are only doing a fraction of that. it is notjust about recycling the cups, it's about having them to recycle. so bringing the cups to us in order for us to bring them through our cup recycling process, they're having a process in retail or on the street in order to get those cups to us. that is where the challenge lies. we are hearing that any 1% of lee cups are recycled. this bag has been made from recycled coffee cup. and if you ta ke from recycled coffee cup. and if you take your phone out of there, you
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can show us this is a double win. a replacement for single use plastic. that is just cardboard. replacement for single use plastic. that isjust cardboard. this is a bag for quite a famous high street store. you can see they are using cup cycling. in every bag they are using is one coffee cup. what we're doing here, this is a replacement for single use plastic. it's re cycla ble, for single use plastic. it's recyclable, fully combustible and you can use it in direct replacement and again, manufactured from coffee cups as well. gavin, we talked a little bit about the logistics, the supply chain effectively to bring these guys the raw material. is that what we are getting so horribly wrong? the issue is that if you put a copy cups in mixed recycling with other cans, paper, it a copy cups in mixed recycling with othercans, paper, it is a copy cups in mixed recycling with other cans, paper, it is unlikely it will get recycled. you need to have it in will get recycled. you need to have itina will get recycled. you need to have it in a separate waste stream so it's possible to recycle it. as phil just mentioned, we run a couple of
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schemes, one in manchester, one in london, where we showed that if you give the public gaze facilities and communicated well, the public are willing to recycle their coffee cups. just last year between april and december, we recycled 8 million coffee cups. the willingness is there but at the moment the facilities are not. that is where the industry and government need to make a concerted effort to ensure that if the willingness is there to re cycle that if the willingness is there to recycle it, they have the opportunity to do so. we named that these days coffee comes in weird and wonderfulforms and these days coffee comes in weird and wonderful forms and you can spend a lot of money on it, but 25p on each cup wed go down well, i wouldn't |magine? cup wed go down well, i wouldn't imagine? no, i don't think it would go down that well and it does seem unfair customers are being burdened with this 25p tax when i think the onus should be on industry and the government to do more to make it easy for customers to recycle and do the right thing, because our
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evidence is that if you give them facilities, they will do so. gentlemen, thank you both very much indeed. as you can see, this box, as it is called, has just come off and is ready to be shipped somewhere else around the world. 2023, this committee, the environmental audit committee, the environmental audit committee, is saying they want this situation nailed, over and done with. either to have them banned or 100% recyclable cups. it is of course just a recommendation. 100% recyclable cups. it is of coursejust a recommendation. the government said it is looking at the mps are saying and it will report in the next few days or in a little while. john maguire. with me is mary creagh, chair of the environmental audit committee, which has suggested the levy. and i'm alsojoined by chef and anti—waste campaigner hugh fearnley—whittingstall, who has been raising awareness on the issue of disposable coffee cups. a very warm welcome to both of you. let's pick up on the .1 of the
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interviewees in john's let's pick up on the .1 of the interviewees injohn's reportjust made. is it really fair to expect consumers to pay an extra 25p on top of the price of their cup of coffee already and should be onus really be with the industry and with government? at the moment, if you go into any of the large copy chains, they will give you 25p off if you bring your own cup but the evidences that doesn't really work. 0nly1% of coffee is sold in reusable cups. we've respond better as people to a charge than we do to a discount. this is about educating people. the coffee up you are using has a brittle plastic lid, a cardboard outer and then this very thin plastic in our which makes it very difficult to recycle. it's about saying, you have a choice whether to pay this but if we are going to invest in the infrastructure to collect those copy cups separately and to create more facilities like james cropper where they can be
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processed, the polluter should pay. whew, what are your thoughts on the carrot or stick approach and where should the onus lie on trying to change behaviour? well, my thought really is that your report from the james cropper plant, great work than those guys are doing, is missing the point, because that will only ever deal with a tiny, tiny section of coffee deal with a tiny, tiny section of coffe e cu p deal with a tiny, tiny section of coffee cup waste. if we were to get any significant amount of coffee cups to plants like that, we would need dedicated bins only for coffee cups and we would need them everywhere and that's not a practical solution. the real solution is for the coffee cup giants to come up with a properly re cycla ble cu p giants to come up with a properly recyclable cup which can be recycled through the normal paper waste stream. the technology for that already exists but they already have already exists but they already have a huge amount existed in the status quo so they are reluctant to change. lam all for quo so they are reluctant to change. i am all for coffee cups being collected and recycled where they
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can be at the current time, but we have already heard that less than 196, have already heard that less than 1%, actually the figure is probably just one quarter of a percent, are being recycled. ithink just one quarter of a percent, are being recycled. i think the 25p levy will focus the minds of the copy giants who are selling us so much coffee at such great profit divide a proper solution, which is a truly re cycla ble cu p. proper solution, which is a truly recyclable cup. that is the holy grail here. ok, so what do you make of that, mary? in proving the —— improving the bin infrastructure or putting pressure on the industry? they have been selling this to us with a recyclable loop on it for 25 yea rs. with a recyclable loop on it for 25 years. they are not recyclable, not widely recycled. we also sign the government should pressure the manufacturer so that when they produce cups like this which are ha rd to produce cups like this which are hard to handle, the tax should be high up. when it is fully recyclable or compostable, it should be lower.
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we wa nt or compostable, it should be lower. we want the polluter to pay at the production end as well. we need to change the entire logistics and supply chain which is why we have set to five—year deadline. supply chain which is why we have set to five-year deadline. you can see a clear way to do this. will the government go for this introduction of this 25p levy? the government has set on their hands over the last seven yea rs. set on their hands over the last seven years. we have seen set on their hands over the last seven years. we have seen no announcement on waste in the last seven yea rs. announcement on waste in the last seven years. our household recycling waste has stalled and are starting to go backwards. what they have said as they do want a specific ambition on copy cups when they announce their waste strategy this summer. you will be pushing on this, obviously. what can the public do when they walk into a coffee shop, what can they do to help this cause? clearly consumer demand influences decision—making. for the time being, forthe time being, the for the time being, the greater the numberof for the time being, the greater the number of people who take in reusable cups, the better. almost all the coffee chains now sell those cups, you can pick them up at
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service stations, to have your own dedicated cop and reuse it is an effective way of avoiding the problem for the moment. but that will never be the whole solution, we have to get the focus on a truly re cycla ble cu p. have to get the focus on a truly recyclable cup. we have a system of recycling paper. one of the problems at the moment is almost everybody thinks coffee cups are re cycla ble everybody thinks coffee cups are recyclable so they put them in the paper recycling bins, well—intentioned people are, but it isa well—intentioned people are, but it is a double whammy because not only can they not be recycled but if they put them in those things they contaminate paper waste that can be re cycled, contaminate paper waste that can be recycled, so it is a particularly pernicious problem. so it is an information campaign, i know there needs to be a bigger solution but in the short—term, do you think a tax on consumers will nudge them in the right direction? ultimately i think it will nudge the coffee giants, starbucks, koster, nero. they will
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have disgruntled customers who want to know, why are you giving us and an to know, why are you giving us and a n re cycla ble to know, why are you giving us and an recyclable cup, why do we have to put up with the charge? the first big company to break the deadlock and go fora big company to break the deadlock and go for a truly recyclable cup will be rewarded, they won't have to pay the levy from their properly re cycla ble cu p, pay the levy from their properly recyclable cup, and it will motivate everybody else. it is a big shift required but it has to happen. there is the incentive. hugh and mary, thank you both for talking to me this morning. time to take a look at the weather forecast now, matt taylor has the latest for us. good morning, colder weather on the way, still blue blustery around the channel coasts and in between light winds and slow—moving showers. across scotland, sleet and snow across higher ground and for wales, south—west england, the midlands to parts of yorkshire, another focus for those showers. in between, drier
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weather, sunshine at times but temperatures staying in single figures for many, cooler than recent days. tonight, rain, speed, snow showers continuing, edging southwards. clear skies across south—west england, parts of ireland, ice could be an issue for many but temperatures will be above freezing for many and the breeze will pick up tomorrow, like to begin with in the south but it will strengthen to touch gale force at times through the day, though snow showers pushing further southwards, merging with rain in some southern counties and temperatures tomorrow will be, again, single digits and wind chill will make it feel closer to freezing in many parts. more details than half an hour, see you then. hello. this is bbc news with annita mcveigh. the headlines... the parole board has come under increasing criticism over its decision to release the serial sex attackerjohn worboys. it's believed the black cab driver
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carried out more than 100 rapes and sexual assaults on women in london. new car sales have fallen for the first time in six years. new registrations fell by 5% last year, with diesel cars making up the biggest drop. the society of it and if you as has blamed the decline on brexit and the confusion over future policy on diesel cars. a controversial book documenting president trump's first year in office has gone on sale earlier than it's planned release date. the move is in response to attempts by the president's lawyers to block it. tech giant apple has confirmed that all iphones, ipads and mac computers have been affected by two major flaws in computer chips. tech companies are working on patches to fix the problem. mps are calling for a 25p "latte levy" to be charged on disposable coffee cups. it's thought the extra charge will encourage coffee drinkers to switch to reusable options and fund improvements to recycling facilities. and a powerful blizzard has brought record low
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temperatures to the east coast of the united states and canada. the week—long cold snap has so far claimed 17 lives and cut power to tens of thousands of homes. time for the sport, let's catch up with what is happening, with jessica. we will start with cricket. it's been a frustrating day for england in the fifth ashes test in sydney, as australia put themselves in a good position to take control of the final match. england were all out for 346 in theirfirst innings, helped by this unbelievable dropped catch from josh hazlewood. england's bowlers made two early breakthroughs, including the important wicket of david warner. 20—year—old mason crane got his first taste of test action and came ever so close to taking the wicket of australia captain steve smith. but smith survived and is
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still at the crease, alongside usman khawaja, who edged towards a century by close of play. so, australia are 193—2, 153 runs behind — but what a day it was for england youngster mason crane. naturally a little bit nervous but i was also really excited. i had great fun out there and i can't wait for tomorrow. didn't quite get the short leg, a couple of edges didn't quite get the slip, but that happens, that is the game, you keep plugging away. west ham have ended tottenham's100% record over the festive period. it finished 1—1 at wembley, after a pair of stunning goals — pedro 0biang put west ham ahead, and seven minutes from time son heung—min put away an equally impressive long—range effort — although son said he thought 0biang's goal was better. two points dropped for spurs — they're still fifth in the premier league table.
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i think the team was fantastic, the effort, and yes sometimes things happen in football, you create, you dominate, you make every attempt to score as much as possible. i think we have to keep going and accept in football sometimes things happen. we doing some things right, the way we we re we doing some things right, the way we were defending, and if we keep defending like that, especially against the top teams, it will give us against the top teams, it will give usa against the top teams, it will give us a chance to take points. we are moving in the right direction, i wa nt moving in the right direction, i want the players to look up, i think we should do. hopefully we will get a couple of players back fit as well in the coming weeks and hopefully that will help us. the fa cup continues this weekend. it's at the third round stage, where the premier league teams enter the fray. the merseyside derby between liverpool and everton kick's off the bbc‘s coverage. it's been suggested that liverpool managerjurgen klopp doesn't take the fa cup seriously — something he's keen to disprove. the lineup will be a lineup which shows all the respect we have for the fa cup.
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umm... i know a few people have said that i don't respect the competition, stuff like that, enough. but that is obviously not the truth. so, maybe we have to make it a little bit more obvious. it's not a league game. there are no points available. it's win or bust, simple as that. it's different to the premier league, less pressure. it's a glory game. you go out and seek the glory and try and win it. if we are to get through, we have to beat liverpool. manchester united play derby county tonight, but the merseyside derby is the one you can watch live on bbc one — kick—off is at 7.55pm. manchester city women's latest signing nadia nadim has revealed her incredible journey into football. born in afghanistan, her mother paid traffickers to take her and herfamily to england after her father was murdered by the taliban.
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but they ended up in denmark, where she found her love of football in a refugee camp. we were a bunch of young kids from different countries, and we didn't really have anything to do besides just going around and trying to learn new stuff. beside the refugee camp there was this football club where kids used to play from 4pm to late night and there were teams practising, and we used to sit around and watch, and that's how i really got into it. it started as, like, you know, just fun and really fast became an obsession. serena williams has pulled out of this month's australian open. she gave birth to her daughter four months ago and was hoping to defend her title. she played an exhibition match last week and said that she can compete, but that's not good enough and she needs a little more time. and some breaking news, everton
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midfielder ross barkley is expected to have a medical at chelsea today. he turned down a move to stamford bridge on transfer deadline day in august but negotiations resumed at the start of this window and he is expected to complete a £15 million move. more on that in the next hour when i will have more sport for you. jessica, see you then, thank you very much. let's get the latest on the mounting criticism of the parole board decision to release the serial sex attackerjohn worboys. he was jailed in 2009 for offences against 12 women but detectives believe he carried out more than 100 rapes and sexual assaults. daniel sandford is with me. there is widespread astonishment at this decision, and the chair of the parole board, in a statement released a short while ago, says, i recognise there is a lack of transparency parole board processes , we lack of transparency parole board processes, we currently have a statutory duty which prevents
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disclosure of proceedings, so clearly there is a gap between what the parole board can say and what the parole board can say and what the public expected to say in cases like this? there are two areas of concern, one is how could a man police strongly believe committed more than 100 rapes and sexual assaults be released from prison after less tha n less than ten years and also when the decision was made, how it was that many victims don't appear to have been told before they heard it on the radio and saw it on the television? two areas of concern. around the parole board's decision, the truth is we don't know why they made the decision, we know what the ground rules are, because he was on an indeterminate sentence, they have to be sure that he no longer posed a danger to the public so presumably they have seen evidence that having gone through sex offender treatment programmes and evidence that he no longer is a risk to women, but we don't know that, and what nick hardwick, the chair of the parole board, is saying is that he would quite like to put a bit more
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information out there but under current rules he can't, he has been trying to get those rules changed, so trying to get those rules changed, so that is an interesting area. but about the victims not being told, that really ought to be possible to be done and simply hasn't been. some were told, some were not. in terms of the parole board decision making process, clearly they can only make a decision based on the cases on which warboys was convicted, but police believe there we re convicted, but police believe there were many more and there were more that came to light after the original sentencing that he was not brought to trial for, is that correct? that is correct, and one of the problems in this case is there has been a history of very, very poor investigation by the police, it has been subject to an ipcc, as they then were, investigation. police did not appear to be taking seriously enough the concerns raised by women who thought they had been drugged and possibly sexually assaulted or raped. they did take those cases to trial that they felt had enough evidence to go to trial, they got a
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successful conviction, but when all these other women came forward, we don't really know what happened then about the decision not to bring a new trial, so big questions today for the metropolitan police, full sussex police because some of the offences were in brighton, and also for the crown prosecution service. why did this not get to another trial? if warboys had been convicted on sufficient evidence in other cases, there is no way you would be released after less than ten years because there would be another sentence for him to serve, be another sentence for him to serve, so be another sentence for him to serve, so that is another big area of questions. as you say, big questions for policing and justice. is there a nyway policing and justice. is there anyway this parole board decision can be overturned? at this stage there probably is not a way it can be overturned, would the decision is made, the decision is made. i think what can be done is that quite a lot of care can be taken that quite a lot of care can be ta ken about that quite a lot of care can be taken about his supervision on release, because being released from prison when you are a serial sex offender does not mean you just walk out of the door, it is highly likely
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john warboys will go into a specialist hostel for the most high risk offenders and you can imagine the amount of care that is likely to be given, given the publicity around this decision, to make sure that john warboys is properly supervised on release, and it is made sure that, if there was any concern about any further risk to women, then he will then go back in prison because you are released on licence in these insta nces you are released on licence in these instances and his licence is likely to be around ten years, so any sign of him drifting back into old habits would mean he could be recalled to prison. daniel, thank you very much. the united states is to suspend almost all security aid to pakistan — saying it's failing to tackle terrorism networks operating within its borders. earlier this week, president trump accused pakistan of lying and harbouring terrorists while receiving billions of dollars from the us. what has been the lead up to this? when americans launched an operation in pakistan in 2001, to dislodge the taliban regime then, after that they needed support from pakistan and the
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different kinds of aid they started giving to pakistan over the last 15, 16 years, according to the american administration, they have given $15 billion in support. but as far as pakistan are concerned, they are saying most of this aid is what pakistan was doing, launching operations against militants in the tribal region, and these are the expenses the americans used to pay. that amounts to about $13 billion. the rest of the aid was beefing up pakistan ‘s security arena. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour but first, the headlines on bbc news. the chairman of the parole board says he is "very concerned" that victims of the serial rapist, john warboys, were not told that he was about to be released. a sharp drop in the number of new diesel cars sold last year —— sales were down 17 percent, with overall car sales falling by five percent.
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a book containing damaging allegations about the trump presidency is released earlier than planned, after white house lawyers tried to stop its publication. apple has confirmed that all iphones, ipads are computers are affected by a problem with chips which could allow hackers to steal data. apple says there is no evidence that the vulnerability has been exploited. it also says it will issue a patch for its safari web browser in the coming days. let's get more on this with our business correspondent, susannah streeter. we discovered in the last couple of days that the tech companies, they have been working for months, haven't they, trying to solve this
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problem? the industry was trying to keep this under wraps so they could come up with these patches to try to fix the problems yet it was exposed by an austrian it researcher who discovered the flaw whilst working with a friend on his computer and was able to access private e—mail addresses and other personal data. it is feared that hackers could do the same, that they could read information stored on a computer memory and steal information like passwords and credit cards. as you say, tech companies have been racing to fix this floor. it's all to do really with whether us as consumers should be given information sooner to try to protect ourselves or whether we should allow these tech companies to try to fix the problem. try to keep it under wraps are not disclose it to hackers. yes, as hackers can try to breach these flaws in the operation systems. how big a deal as it that these problems are affecting apple, which prides
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itself on its security and would argue in its advertising that its security is superior perhaps to other products and here we are with iphones, ipads affected? absolutely, but it's not just iphones, ipads affected? absolutely, but it's notjust apple, its across—the—board. particularly serious for intel, the computer chip maker, because intel chips are in 90% of pcs around the world. one and a half billion pcs in use, so you can see the scale of the problem. the uk's cyber security centre says there is no evidence this floor has been exposed as yet. apple, as you say, is rushing through a fix for its safari web browser. 0thers say, is rushing through a fix for its safari web browser. others are doing the same. and the chip—makers say they are trying to fix the problem. our holding, amd as well, other chip makers. investors say
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they could be reputational damage and also liabilities because big firms may sue the company for having to update their entire it systems. it does seem as though efforts are being concentrated in the tech industry to get those patches out as soon as industry to get those patches out as soon as possible. is there anything the regular person can do to protect themselves with this knowledge? 0bviously, update your computer with the patches that are sent out. intel says it won't slow down this patch, the operating systems. but also just general security advice, like just change your password regularly. that is what we are being advised to do a nyway is what we are being advised to do anyway and most people don't. they keep the same password for many yea rs. keep the same password for many years. so take those security steps but also don't panic, because as i say, there have been a breach is so far. ok, susannah streeter, thank
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you very much for that update. the number of people applying for teacher training courses has fallen by a third compared to this time last year. the latest figures from the admissions service, ucas, reveal applications to become english, maths and science teachers were amongst the most dramatic declines. school leaders and academics have warned of a potential crisis in the education system but the government has said hundreds of millions of pounds are being invested to improve recruitment. more than half of all short nosed dogs seen by a vet last year needed help because of breathing difficulties with their breed. and those low temperatures have been causing particular problems for these cold—blooded creatures in florida. videos uploaded to social media show frozen iguanas and others that had fallen from trees. a number of the reptiles were also found on the ground as you can see here.
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you'll be pleased to hear that these ones did warm back up though, after a few hours in the sun. clearly not used to those temperatures. ridley scott has spent four decades making some of the most successful films in cinema. his work on films like alien, blade runner, thelma and louise, gladiator, and the martian have brought in several billion dollars at the box office, and won dozens of awards. but his most recent project, all the money in the world, was overshadowed by the allegations of sexual misconduct against one of its stars, kevin spacey. he was replaced just six weeks before the film was due to be released. 0ur arts editor will gompertz has been talking to ridley scott, and began by asking him if replacing spacey was a commercial or moral decision. that's tricky. i think it's a little bit of both. but, you know, moral is
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a word we can talk about for the next two hours, 0k. a word we can talk about for the next two hours, ok. so i'd like to say initially it was a commercial decision which would be maybe a little hand in hand with a moral decision. you know, you can't take the artist, and actually whatever a person decides to do in their private life which doesn't harm others, you have to separate that from what they do as an artist or as a person, and the type of person. mr getty, your grandson, he's been kidnapped. i have seen the movie and it is completely seamless. what was running through my head was how would it have been different with kevin spacey? is there a noticeable difference is to mug you are one of the few people in the world to have seen the few people in the world to have seen both. is it a much different movie? kevin spacey did fa ntastically movie? kevin spacey did fantastically good job. it was cooler and julia. christopher comes
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with this inordinate charm. his smile and his twinkle. he has with had backed twinkle, so when in fact he's doing the same words, the same text as kevin, the twinkle and smile somehow make him that much more effective, i think. somehow make him that much more effective, ithink. it somehow make him that much more effective, i think. it makes him legal but in a way. i have no money to spare. what would it take for you to spare. what would it take for you to feel secure? more. christopher plummer and angela williams have both been nominated for golden globes and what we are hearing about the golden globes from the campaign within the industry, who are supporting a change in the industry in hollywood, will be wearing black dresses in support of that nation. are we looking at a moment in the hollywood where things will change, where sexism will subside and women will get a fair crack at the whip?
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0rdo you will get a fair crack at the whip? or do you think it will stay the same? i think a bit of each. i think there will be an immediate change, because there should be. it is long overdue. you know, i have never experienced any of those things that you describe in my life, in my companies. i frankly have women running my companies. i have always been a supporter of strong women without ever actually thinking about it, which i think is the best way. i have great respect for women generally. maybe it comes from my mum,i generally. maybe it comes from my mum, i had a very strong mother who brought up three produced all work sons and was always very independent and tough. you talk about it being long overdue, it is something you have witnessed in hollywood, women being mistreated? never. and if it ever came in front of me, i would immediately step on it. will gompertz was speaking to ridley
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scott. now let's see how the weather is shaping up for the weekend. well, one thing i can tell you, it is set to turn colder through this weekend across many parts of the uk. but we are going to eventually turn that bit drier and brighter. some of you will get away with a dryer day—to—day. this band is giving rain, sleet and snow in scotland and in between we have a scattering of showers, in yorkshire the midlands, wales and the south—west. away from those, some sunny breaks. temperatures slowly on the rise and nowhere near as windy as it has been. the showers keep on going even towards the end of the afternoon in south—west england and the channel islands and then the winds will ease down. some showers across the south—east which will dry out,
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leaving the date dry at the end. some dry weather continuing all day long across northern ireland and the far south—west of scotland. much of scotland, cloudy with some rain, sleet and snow. that will become a big feature for the weekend, including strong winds. we could see a frost and icy conditions where roads are wet overnight, particularly in western scotland. most will see cloud, longest bars of rain potentially in the very far south—east of england, rain turning to sleet and snow across northern england. 0n to sleet and snow across northern england. on saturday, the winds get stronger. widespread gales developing to southern and eastern areas. that is how it will feel out there whether you have got sunshine or showers. getting closer to freezing if not below. at least the
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west of wales and england, you will have sunshine. through the night, as the winds ease down, that is where we will most likely see a widespread frost. rural areas of scotland could get down to minus ten. notice a lack of blue colours in the south—east and east. that is where the breeze. the temperature dropping too much. potential for gales across the english channel. for many on sunday, not a bad day at all after the frosty start. it will be a funny one. unlike what is happening on the eastern side of the us. there is a big winter storm. these are the daytime highs, highs, yes, —15 in toronto and —10 in new york. for those without power who have been flooded over the last few days, that is not great news at all. this is bbc news.
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i'm annita mcveigh. the headlines at 10am... growing criticism of the parole board's decision to release serial sex attacker john worboys, who's thought to have assaulted more than 100 women. one of my clients who is absolutely horrified and really, really distressed that nobody had the courtesy to inform her, so she's in the middle of cooking tea for her kids and she hears this on the radio. sales of new cars fall for the first time in six years, amid a drop in demand for diesels. tech giant apple says the recently discovered flaws in some computer processor chips affect all iphones,
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ipads and mac computers. a book containing damaging allegations about the trump presidency is released earlier than planned, after white house lawyers tried to stop its publication.

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