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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  January 5, 2018 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11. the head of the parole board apologises to victims who weren't told about the decision to the serial sex attackerjohn worboys. one of my clients who is absolutely horrified and really, really distressed that nobody had the courtesy to inform her, so she's in the middle of cooking tea for her kids and she hears this on the radio. sales of new cars fall for the first time in six years, amid a drop in demand for diesels. a book containing damaging allegations about the trump presidency is released earlier than planned, after white house lawyers tried to stop its publication. tech giant apple says the recently discovered flaws in some computer processor chips affect all iphones, ipads and mac computers. also in the next hour — a latte levy or a flat white tax. mps says drinkers using disposable cups should be charged an extra 25p to encourage them to switch to reusable versions. and a severe winter storm hits
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the eastern united states, with record—breaking low temperatures that have already claimed several lives. good morning. it's friday 5th january. i'm annita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live. chairman of the parole board has apologised unreservedly for not telling of the release ofjohn worboys. he was jailed in 2009... the black cab driver was jailed in 2009 for offences against 12 women, but detectives believe he carried out more than a hundred rapes and sexual assaults. this morning a cross—party group of
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mps has written to thejustice secretary to call for an investigation as to whether the voices of victims were heard in the decision to release him on parole. the parole board chairman said he recognised there was a lack of transparency and would hold a public consultation. our home affairs correspondent, daniel sandford, has more. for six years, john worboys cruised smart areas of london in his black cab, looking for women to drug and rape. when he was finally caught, thejudge said he'd serve a minimum of eight years in prison, and said he wouldn't be released until he was no longer a threat to women. worboys would show young women he picked up in his cab large wads of cash, saying he'd recently won big at the casino. then he'd offer them champagne, which he'd spiked with sedatives, and rape them. the judge gave him what's known as an indeterminate sentence, under which people are only freed once they're no longer considered dangerous. the parole board has decided worboys will be released this month under supervision after spending less than ten years in prison.
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i've spoken to one of my clients, who is absolutely horrified and really, really distressed that nobody had the courtesy to inform her, so she's in the middle of cooking tea for her kids and she hears this on the radio, and feels absolutely sick to her stomach. the organisation rape crisis said it was far too soon for worboys to be released. although police believejohn worboys attacked over 100 women, he was only convicted of attacking 12. and only one of those convictions was for rape. and that's why his sentence was so short. all the same, under the indeterminate sentence rules, the parole board will need to have assured themselves thatjohn worboys was no longer a risk as a sexual predator. this morning the chair of the parole board, nick hardwick has responded to criticism of the release ofjohn worboys. he said... the former director of public
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prosecutions sir keir starmer has been criticised over his decision not to prosecutejohn worboys over dozens more sex attacks. speaking outside his home, mr keir starmer has said any alleged victims with concerns over their case was handled to contact the police. firstly, it is important that any allegations that anybody thinks have not been looked into as efficiently put to the police so they can be looked into. it is important that what is said is factually accurate. crown prosecution service have the case, they made the decision in the
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case, they made the decision in the case aren't is important you go to their to get accurate court readout of the decision made. you confident the right decisions were made?” think these decisions were nine yea rs think these decisions were nine years ago, it is important that you go to the crown prosecution service foran go to the crown prosecution service for an accurate readout of the decisions made, particularly further regulations possibly made now. several women did go. let's speak now to dame vera baird qc. she's a former solicitor general who is now the police and crime commissioner for northumbria. thank you for taking the time to talk to was macro. many questions about this case, policing questions, justice questions. let's deal with the immediate issue of the news that john worboys is being given parole, that some of his victims were contacted but some weren't. are you surprised by the decision to release him at this time?
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ifind him at this time? i find the him at this time? ifind the decision him at this time? i find the decision somewhere on a continuum between worrying and actually frightening. what is extremely difficult for the public is the chair of the board acknowledging —— they do not need to give reasons, not to sit in bubbly, not to tell the public why. you look at the things that this man did... drew them —— attempting to rape, sexually assaulting five, and the evidence was not great because they had been dropped. that is a campaign of rape that he continued with great skill, tenacity, he was arrested once on bail and it did not stop him, he carried on offending. this isa man him, he carried on offending. this is a man who convicted in 2009 tried to appeal in 2010, was showing no remorse than at all. it is very hard to know absolutely what has
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transformed him from a man still protesting his innocence seven years ago of all of art to a man who can now be said to be such a reformed character comedy can be let loose in the world again. how can anyone not be worried? i think you have hit the nail on the head outline telling how people cannot be convinced that he has been able to convince the parole board, but in terms of the parole board's decision and decision—making process , decision and decision—making process, due except it is operating within its remit and it cannot release any more information about it at this stage? of course. i heard nick hardwick this morning and he knows the rules very well and nothing more can be said and it is time that changed. but it does generate a dissatisfaction. let's look at the a few more facts. these cases were undervalued and have been by
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decriminalised is system by the start. two of the victims, probably one of them is one of the people who was not told he was being released, have sued the metropolitan police because of the poor way they investigated it. they believe with john worboys... various woman complained it was him. in addition, there are around 100 other women waiting in the wings whose cases we re waiting in the wings whose cases were not taken forward, there may be no evidence. keir starmer is right that we need to ask the cps about that. it is not impossible but the reason they were not taken forward is because this man appeared to be so dangerous with the deliberate strategy of campaigning of rape that they would never imagine he would be released at this time and did not feel it was in the public interest to put the victims through many more cases. it is hard to know if he
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would change, the sex offender programme which is the one that presumably he would go on was revoked in june presumably he would go on was revoked injune because of a fraction, people who had not gone on it were less likely to reoffend than people who had. in addition, the pa role people who had. in addition, the parole board has got pressure upon it to release people who are on exactly this kind of sentence, indeterminate sentence for public detection because many, i think about 4000, have been able to overrun their tariff. it is right to mention that prison inspector reports make it clear that a 900 of these prisoners who were released by these prisoners who were released by the parole board last year, 480 had to be recourse to custody because they had really offended or broken they had really offended or broken the terms of the parole.
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sorry to interrupt, i did want to try to get through a couple more questions. we heard what keir starmer said. do you think it would be helpful if he had been further with his words in terms of those cases that many people believe have been brought to court which potentially would have led tojohn worboys not being eligible for any sort of parole at this stage? ido sort of parole at this stage? i do not think it is realistic to expect an individual who has changed into a completely different career now to give an assessment as to why decisions were taken. it may not have been taken by him, it would be taken within the cps, and is as he said, for the details so long ago, it needs to be looked at with them. but there is a question ofjustice. that brings me to the next question, the cross—party letter from 58 mps writing to david lidington to ask
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foran writing to david lidington to ask for an investigation as to whether the de victims were heard in the decision to release him. do think there is some way potentially far this decision to be overturned? they ought to be heard and it is pa rt they ought to be heard and it is part and parcel of the board to ensure that and that is fairly inconsistent with no contact having been made with at least two of the complainants. the... if it is possible to do it, then i urge that that should be done because albeit the parole board sits in confidence, none the less the court will be entitled to review this and entitled to know on what basis it is being done. i think the cps do need to look again at all those complaints from the other women now because apart from the real concern about this individual with no explanation being put out into society, there is a question ofjust do myjustice. he
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dropped 12 women with the intention of raping, he has had an appalling impact on those women's lives. dame vera baird, qc, thank you for your time today. new car sales fell for the first time in six years last year, dragged down by a collapse in the demand for diesel, and the uk's motor industry warns it expects britain's car market to weaken further this year. the society of motor manufacturers and traders says there were 2.5 million cars registered last year. it shows a 5.6% fall on the number of registrations in 2016. the sale of diesel cars fell 17% since 2016, as higher taxes and pollution fears hit demand. and the situation could worsen this year. the smmt expects that car sales will drop by up to 7% this year. the industry body blames uncertainty over brexit and confusion about future policy on diesel cars.
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mike hawes is chief executive of the society for motor manufacturers and traders. he told me why he thought diesel cars still play an important role in the market. for the average consumer buying a diesel car versus the equivalent petrol, they can save around £400 a year, the same as your annual gas bill. add to the fact that with these new diesel vehicles you are also getting the other technology and they can be a compelling prospect. what we need to do, and what manufacturers are doing, is help new customers into vehicles through incentives, additional support mechanisms, but we need government to make sure it is encouraging these vehicles. in other words, get the government to tax older vehicles off the road, effectively? not necessarily, people bought these vehicles in good faith. we need to recognise diesel is the right choice for many consumers. if you live in a city, fine, electric or small petrol is probably the right vehicle for you.
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most people drive in and out of the city, rural areas, longer mileage, which is where you get the benefit of a diesel and that, for many people, is the right choice, and it is also the right choice in many ways for the environment because what we have seen is while the average c02 of a car is coming down, because of the way the market is changing, overall c02 will be going up because of the move away from diesel and that is not good for the industry or the environment. talk to is a about how much have improved compared to be a few years ago and how long they sit with a cow with a petrol engine? they tend to be 20% better in co2. in the other emissions in terms of particular is, that issue was dealt with years ago. 99% of all particulars and now removed. their 90% better in
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performance and the way the test is changed is that not only when you test a card to certify to put it on the road, not only is it testing that, it is tested on the road so you can demonstrate that the pickles will do what they say both in a laboratory will do what they say both in a la boratory test will do what they say both in a laboratory test and in the real world. that should provide the reassurance to consumers. a controversial book, which is a fly—on—the—wall account of trump's first year in power, is being published today. the publisher opted for an earlier release date in response to attempts by the president's lawyers to block it. in a tweet overnight, donald trump said it was full of lies and criticised his former adviser, steve bannon. 0ur north america correspondent peter bowes reports. publish and be damned. the book that won't go away. the white house dispute its accuracy and the president's lawyers have threatened to sue for libel. they've demanded that the author, michael wolff, and the publisher should immediately cease and desist from any further publication. instead, the release date has been brought forward, much to the apparent delight of mr
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wolff. "here we go, you can buy it and read it, thank you, mr president," he tweets. the white house says the book is tabloid trash, gossip, false and fraudulent. it portrays mr trump as being surprised at winning the presidency, and paints a picture of his administration as dysfunctional and divided. steve bannon, who's widely quoted in the extracts already published, has not disputed their content. his response on a radio programme, to declare his unfailing support for the president. the president of the united states is a great man. and mr trump's response to that... i don't know, he called me a great man last night. so, you know, he obviously changed his tune pretty quick. now, with the lawyers poised, there's an entire book to read for the next instalment in this extraordinary saga. peter bowes, bbc news.
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and — not surprisingly — the president couldn't resist commenting again on social media. in the last few hours he tweeted... the headlines on bbc newsroom live... the chairman of the parole board says he is "very concerned" that victims of the serial rapist, john warboys, were not told that he was about to be released. a sharp drop in the number of new diesel cars sold last year. sales were down 17%, with overall car sales, falling by 5%. ding a book containing damaging allegations about donald trump is released early. and in sport, more
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frustration for england's bowlers in the final passages test. australia are on top in day two in sydney. they are only two wickets down at the moment. chelsea look set to sign a new fielder. ross barclay is expected to have a medical at sta mford expected to have a medical at stamford bridge today. reigning australia opening —— reigning australian open champion has pulled out. she can compete, but that is not good enough and needs a little more time. a serious case review has recommended improvements be made to safeguarding in wolverhampton following the murder of a two—year—old in 2016. jeremiah regis—ngaujah was beaten to death by his mother's partner. he was the fifth child to be killed by an adult in wolverhampton the race but to our correspondent
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who has been following the case and he started by telling him needy background to the death. this happened in 2016 and this is the flat where jeremiah lived with happened in 2016 and this is the flat wherejeremiah lived with his mother and stepfather. the stepfather had strong christian beliefs which he thought meant that he could use physical punishment when ever a child was naughty and that meant the happy, smiley toddler was beaten with a rod and a belt and ultimately killed by chevaze mcgregor who was jailed last year. he is serving a minimum of 21 years in prison. the mother was the victim of domestic abuse in the relationship. she was jailed for allowing the death of a child, initially for more than three years. that was reduced on appeal to two
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yea rs that was reduced on appeal to two years and four months. they felt she was very much a victim in this case. today there was a serious case review which has been published into the death ofjeremiah and it makes a number of recommendations. it makes similar readings to too many i have read over the years that point a failure to really follow up signs that perhaps something wasn't going right in the life of young jeremiah. 0ne right in the life of young jeremiah. one of the things that is quite stack is there was a multi—agency referral just a few stack is there was a multi—agency referraljust a few months before his death that there would no safeguarding concerns despite complaints from sindyann regis who was very complaints from sindyann regis who was very much a victim of abuse herself saying she was subjected to domestic violence but those particular complaints not being followed up that is astonishing. but with the other children killed by an adult in wolverhampton in the previous decade one wonders were no
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lessons learned from those cases that may have prevented this death was mac and the sad thing is i have covered all of those stories, all of those trials, all of the serious case reviews, and yes, reading this you can see that lessons have been learned, there is a multi—agency approach, there is a multi—agency safeguarding hope. in the case of all the children, dozens in the case of all the children, d oze ns of in the case of all the children, dozens of agencies are involved and these were definitely no to children's services. thereat lessons learnt that it felt like a tick box exercise. they did the follow—up appointments, they did chase things up, but they did not really investigate, show the professional curiosity that may have led them to question the religious beliefs of chevaze mcgregor, look at him as a potential threat and look at the domestic situation and the terrible flat above. sindyann regis was
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interesting. she moved here from jamaica as a child, she never had beef to remain, she was seeking to stay in this country but she had no access to benefits at also she got a flat, she was in the health service but was living on hand—outs and charity from the local church. the authorities knew she was in that state, they did not really follow it up state, they did not really follow it up and there were signs... you can never blame a local authority for great child's death, chevaze mcgregor killed jeremiah, but there will have been moments in the moment before his death where if they had been more curious, carried out more investigations, they may have spotted the dangers tojeremiah before he was killed. apple has confirmed that all iphones, ipads and mac computers are affected by two major flaws in computer chips. it emerged this week that tech companies have been working on a fix for the meltdown and spectre bugs,
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which could allow hackers to steal data. apple said there was no evidence that the vulnerability had been exploited. it says it will issue a patch for its safari web browser in the coming days. rupert goodwin is a technology journalist. he's in edinburgh. it is true to say that the new cure isa it is true to say that the new cure is a new chips, but that would be a massive task. there are billions of these chips out there, every computer that we see on the planet is affected by it and before we get new chips and new designs, we will never get rid of this one. one of the ones, meltdown, can be fixed with soft wear, but the other one is going to be there for a long time to come. will any fixes or patches in the meantime be good enough? they will be good and you should
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a lwa ys they will be good and you should always download patches, especially for this one, make sure your phone or computer is up—to—date, and your browsers. do that separately. it will turn the virus into the sort of problem that other security problems are, to keep up—to—date, as people use it, there will be instances found and stamped out but there will be no way to get rid of it until the next generation of chips. we know apple products are affected. what will it do to their reputation? i think it should make it a lot better because apple has been the first company to stand up and say what is happening and it has already issued the software patches quietly before the disclosure of the problem. 0nly because the news was out. if you look at the others like samsung and google and android, that information has not come out as clearly. google has talked about in technical terms, so i think apple
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has been enlightening dustup in the long—term, apple being responsible. can uss soa res long—term, apple being responsible. can uss soares wrote the overall impact. we have been told that the hackers have not been able to access any sensitive data yet, they are trying now the news is out, presumably. the moment it came out, people have been trying to use it and perhaps a using it already, we do not know. i think those most worried will be those on big data centres which is high—value and very tempting to hackers. i think it will trickle down slowly to us and will not be so significant, but i think the big companies will be most concerned and taking the quicker steps to get rid of it. your thoughts on what the industry will learn from this, but the chips could have two flaws. how can it
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stop things like this happening ain? the roots of these things go to the midnight is, the techniques that the chips use can interact in a dangerous way but that was not known until recently, so the need to test the chips better, review the designs and have a more open approach to explaining how they work and share information. thank you very much indeed. a severe winter storm is hitting the eastern united states, bringing strong winds and blizzards. it's the tenth day of record—breaking low temperatures, which have already claimed several lives. greater boston is one of the areas forecast to receive heavy snow today. cbs correspondent hena doba is in new york and gave us the latest on the situation there this morning. now the east coast is bracing for a deep freeze. many residents in many states can expect temperatures in single digits or the teens. the snowstorm yesterday brought historic coastal flooding to many areas along the coast. at least 18 deaths are being blamed
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on the cold temperatures and forecasters are predicting as the day goes on some areas of the east coast, it may feel as low as —15 degrees when you factor in the bitter cold and the high winds. and is it the fact that this cold snap is so sustained, lasting for about ten days now? how unusual is that? yes, you know, usually we are used to cold snaps here and there, it's new york city, but for it to last for ten days is something i certainly haven't seen before and i've been in this business for 20 years, i'm a native new yorker. again, more than a dozen deaths, at least 18 deaths are being blamed on the cold temperatures. yesterday, 500 national guard members were called to several states to help with rescue efforts. a number of people who died, many of them were homeless who weren't able to make it to a shelter or weren't
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able to get up in time. and when is a break expected, when should things improved? you know, it's only going to get worse, at least until sunday, and then they are saying next week hopefully it will feel a little bit more like normal, which is 30s and 40s. think about that, that's another two days including today, that's three days of bitter cold all along the east coast and again, some states it will feel like it's —15 degrees. feeling so cold here. it is going to turn colder this weekend and some places will see snow showers, particular across the north and east. there is some snow over high ground of scotland, a little across wales and england, a clasp of
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showers, continuing across central more than scotland, fairly strong winds across southern parts of britain which will ease down. there will be some sunshine and it will feel cooler today than the last couple of today's. there are cold northerly winds blowing across scotland, introducing showers. a cold night, maybe some ice. an area of high—pressure and across the north and that will bring arctic air down. you can see strong winds, cold bitterly cold across the northern half of the uk bright with sunshine, wintry showers, further south a bit more cloud. sunday, all areas a bit brighter with sunshine, but very cold. rain, hello this is bbc news, our
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latest headlines. rain, hello this is bbc news, our latest headlines. the parole board has come under increasing criticism over its decision to release the serial sex attacker, john worboys. it's believed the black cab driver carried out more than a hundred rapes and sexual assaults on women in london. new car sales have fallen for the first time in six years. new registrations fell by five per cent last year, with diesel cars making up the biggest drop. the society of motor manufacturers has blamed the decline on brexit and confusion overfuture policy on diesel cars. tech giant apple has confirmed that all iphones, ipads and mac computers have been affected by two major flaws in computer chips. it's emerged tech companies are working on patches
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to fix the problem. a controversial book documenting president trump's first year in office has gone on sale — earlier than it's planned release date. the move is in response to attempts by the president's lawyers to block it. time for some sport. jessica is waiting for us. it's been another frustrating day for england in the final ashes test in sydney. australia put themselves in a position to take control of the match on day two — they closed on 193—2, so they're 153 runs behind england's first innings total but with eight wickets in hand — and one of them belongs to captain steve smith. patrick gearey reports from sydney. it's the most often—repeated sentence of the ashes, steve smith is there. alongside unman quasa,
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batting australia into a strong position in the match. earlier, england showed fight, losing mallan, ending bya england showed fight, losing mallan, ending by a spectacular catch but the rest of australia's catching was not in the same class. there were terrible mistakes in the field. the england lower order added useful contributions, england put on 130 before being bowled out. and made a perfect start in the field. stuart broad cleaning out ban croft and david ward making a customary 50, and england are on a roll. but it brought in steve smith, although he had to ride his luck, well, england we re had to ride his luck, well, england were comfortable as the day wore on. hoping to bat australia up to and
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beyond england's total, england must somehow work out how to get smith out. well it may not have been england's day but it was a momentus one for 20—year—old mason crane, who enjoyed his first bowling stint in test cricket. he's the youngest specialist spinner to play for england in 90 years. naturally, a little nervous but excited and you know, i had great fun out there. i can't wait for tomorrow now. there were a periods, where it didn't get to short leg or a couple of edges that didn't get to slip. but that's the game. keep plugging away. keep plugging away. chelsea look set to sign everton midfielder ross barkley. he's expected to have a medical today, ahead of a £15 million move. barkley is out of contract at the end of the season, and although he turned down a transfer to stamford bridge in august, negotiations resumed at the beginning of the week. he's yet to play this season after having hamstring surgery but he's now approaching match fitness and everton manager sam allardyce said yesterday he was resigned to losing him. hejoined everton as an 11—year—old in 2005.
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arsenal manager arsene wenger said today that he serves football with "honesty and integrity" and was shocked to charged by the fa over his behaviour after sunday's draw at west bromwich albion. wenger was furious with referee mike dean, who gave west brom a late penalty, which they scored to equalise. arsene wenger has until 6.00pm to respond. wenger has also been asked to explain his comments about referees before and after wednesday's you imagine that i'm 21 years in the game. what i have seen and heard in the corridors from people, you might, can be understanding that i'm surprised and shocked by having been charged. west ham have ended tottenham's 100 per cent record, over the festive period. it finished 1—all at wembley, after a pair of stunning goals — pedro 0biang put west ham ahead and seven minutes from time, son heung—min, put away an equally impressive long—range effort —
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although son said, he thought 0biang's goal was better than his own. two points dropped for spurs though — they're still fifth in the premier league table. manchester city women's latest signing nadia nadim has revealed her incredible journey into football. born in afghanistan, her mother paid traffickers to take her and herfamily to england after her father was murdered by the taliban. but they ended up in denmark — where she found her love of football, in a refugee camp. we were a bunch of young kids from a bunch of other countries. we didn't have anything to do besides going around and learning new stuff. in the refugee camp there was a football clu b the refugee camp there was a football club where kids would play from 4.00pm until late at night. there were teams practicing. we would sit around and watch. that's
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how we really got into it. i started as, like, you know, as fun, and really fast it became an obsession. serena williams has pulled out of this month's australian open. she gave birth to her daughterfour months ago and was hoping to defend her title. she played an exhibition match last week and said that she can compete — but that's not good enough and she needs a little more time. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. jessica, thank you very much. let's return to our top story — the mounting criticism of the parole board's decision to release the serial sex attacker, john worboys. the black cab driver was jailed in 2009 for offences against twelve women, but detectives believe he carried out more than a hundred rapes and sexual assaults. we heard this from the head of the par owl board.
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while i was very surprised and upset myself to hear that, we were certainly, we are still checking exactly what happened. but my understanding is that we were informed that the victims had been told about the decision. and then we released the decision on that basis. but still, this is a problem with our par owl system so i apologise unreservedly to them. it appears there is a lack of communication and failing with within the par owl board system? my understanding is that we were told that the victims had been informed of the decision so released it on that basis but today we're still checking exactly what happened. but either way, i don't want to pass the buck or the blame around, these women were failed by the system and i'm part of that system and i apologise for it. the damage has been done but what
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can be done now? the key positive thing to come out of this is that at the moment i'm not allowed by law to explain the reasons for our decision. i've said before i would like to get that changed. so this pushes the idea that the par owl board pushes the idea that the par owl boa rd processes pushes the idea that the par owl board processes need to be much more open and transparent and we get support for that. then i think some goodwill have come out of this and people in the future will be able to have more confidence in the system. can you explain the par owl board, the panel, the number on the panel, the panel, the number on the panel, the gender? there are three, the par owl boa rd the gender? there are three, the par owl board has 215 members that make a decision, each panel makes their decisions independently. in this case there was a panel of three, headed by a very experienced female par owl board member, they would not have made the decision lightly. they look at a huge dossier of information. they consider verbal evidence at a hearing from many
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professionals that work with worboys and they make that decision on that basis. but what is important to understand is that the pore owl board's duty is not to have another go at the trial but to assess his risks, what they will be going forward. that's what they did. john worboys is thought to be one of the uk's most prolific rapists, yet he serves a minimum of eight years, that seems staggering? that was the decision taken by the court at the time. there is an opportunity to appeal a lenient sentence. so the par owl board would like at the sentencing remarks and consider that coming to the decision. but it is not the par owl board's job and can't have another go at the trial to say that the sentence was lenient, we can keep him in longer, we have to make our decision simply on the basis of his risk going
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forward. should members of the par owl board come before mps and be questioned? i'm happy to. i have been before mps. i have been happy to go before mps. i have been happy to go before mps to talk about the work of the par owl board. i would like the support of the mps to open up the system more. but at the moment, by law, we cannot discuss the reasons for our decisions in the individual cases, and i think that needs to change. and finally, your message to the 100 or more women, who were victims ofjohn worboys, what do you have to say to them? i think that the women who were guilty of war boyce crimes, suffered appallingly. that is the case with pretty much everybody that comes before the par owl board. i am clear that the people we see have done great harm but the sentence, they have served the sentence that the courts imposed for that harm it is ourjob to
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assess their risk going forward. but of course, it's going to be a difficult thing for, a very difficult thing for, a very difficult thing for victims, and i make a point of trying to talk to as many victims as i can on a regular basis so that we do understand their concerns and they are in an important part of thinking about how we make our decisions. do you intend to speak personally to the victims ofjohn worboys? potentially, there are a lot of victims ofjohn worboys, i will certainly get in touch with them around this decision, the fact that they have not been told about the decision, to see what we can do about that. i want to find out exactly what happened there. when i heard it was as much a surprise to me as it was to anyone, i think. thank you. that was nick hardwick, the chair of the par owl board, apoll guiding
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unreservedly to the victims ofjohn worboys who had not been given the news of his release on par owl before it was made public. we can speak now to sarah greene, who's co—director of end violence against women coalition. thank you for taking the time to speak with us. can you imagine the scenario in some of the victims when we re scenario in some of the victims when were not informed ? scenario in some of the victims when were not informed? i can't. it is good nick issued an apology but it's an appalling fail. there are issues about why he has been released. it is, i think, are issues about why he has been released. it is, ithink, concerning to hear, to hear nick hardwick explain, that the decision making of the par owl board is masked in secrecy. when the par owl board is charged, not only with the rehabilitation and the protection of the rights of the offender and also public safety and public confidence,
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in the system, then we need more scrutiny of it and we must understand why the decision has been taken. it is really alarming. we know that nick hard which can recognises a lack of transparency. he is launching a public consultation about that. but it is not soon enough for you. you want to know about why the decision was made to release john know about why the decision was made to releasejohn worboys? know about why the decision was made to release john worboys? indeed. the case is exceptional. it's high—profile. the name is well known. the police, unusually, are on record saying that there believe there may be in excess of 100 other cases of women assaulted by this man it is really serious. i want to bring up the nature of the decision making by the parole board where we understand a small panel takes into account evidence gathered by prison workers or psychologists and psychiatrists and looks at for example, participation in sex offender programmes that take place
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in prison. those programmes have beenjunked by in prison. those programmes have been junked by the in prison. those programmes have beenjunked by the people in prison. those programmes have been junked by the people that run them and are responsible for them. the research on sex offenders is poon the research on sex offenders is poor. we don't know who is likely to re—offend. we don't understand the modus of sex offenders, what we know is that they offend again and again and they are very good liars. they are skilled in deception. so we have to look at our knowledge and understanding of sex attorneys in order to make good decisions and good judgments about risk. the judge in this trial said this man pose as serious risk to women's safety. and he said when giving an indeterminate pa rt he said when giving an indeterminate part of the sentence, that he should not be released until we are confident he does not pose a risk to women's safety. how can we know that? he has been detained to are a few years but how can the decision be well ta ken? if
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few years but how can the decision be well taken? if it has been taken in confidence, can we have discussion and scrutiny of it. and the letter from across—party group of 50 mps rying to thejustice secretary, calling for an investigation into the voices of victims ofjohn worboys were heard in the decision to release him. we don't know the detail of that. but if we find that due weight has not been given to those voices, is there a case for this decision to be reviewed? there must be. there is a case for it to be reviewed. it was surprising to me to read this morning that it seems that nobody who is elected or who holds real executive powers is allowed to interfere, so the secretary of state and the attorney general are currently somehow not able to intervene at all. it is unusual to have a system where you have a first level of decision—making like the pa role level of decision—making like the parole board and no possibility for
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any party to appeal or to question thejudgment. so any party to appeal or to question the judgment. so our organisation and women's organisations working in the field would like to understand that better and to hear more about it. this is a huge case now of public confidence and of women's safety. so the discussion must condition. and it is good to hear that our parliament aryans are raising questions and seeing what more can be done. sarah, thank you very much for your time. sarah greene. more now on mps proposals that a 25p tax should be added to disposable coffee cups in order to improve recycling rates. the environmental audit committee says a so—called ‘latte levy‘ should be introduced, and that disposable coffee cups should banned in five years if there isn't enough improvement. a report suggests that there should abso—called latte levy to drive up
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recycling rates and improve reprocessing facilities. but if there is no improvements throw away cups should be banned. the government agrees that plastic waste isa government agrees that plastic waste is a problem and will look into a single use plastic cup. is a problem and will look into a single use plastic cup. we're joined now by neil whittall, chair of the paper cup recovery and recycling group. the industry group includes disposable cup manufacturers and a number of large high street food and drink brands. neil, thank you very much for joining us on this talking point. here we have a selection of cups. some, one reusable, and some which have elements, many of them have elements that are not repsychable. this mixed material that the coffee cups this mixed material that the coffee cu ps are this mixed material that the coffee cups are composed of, it is a problem? the merely is a coated board. we know that the product is recycled in the uk in a number of facilities. but a small number of facilities,
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just two or three. there are about four facilities to handle the material but have been well established in terms of capability to recycle the material. if we can channel it into the right places we know that the product can be recycled. does the answer lie, earlier in the process in the terms of the sorts of cups that consumers are willing to use or to ask for or to demand, or does it lie with more action from the industry and government on encouraging people to use more environmentally friendly cups? this is where the industry have come together strongly, with a real commitment to make changes in the infrastructure. so what we have seen over the last period of time is that teams can have 4,000 points over the country to recycle cups in 201 and more being added. so it is about making recycling convenient for the consumers. that is what they want
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when we have asked them about it. some will say listening to this, that you would say that coming from an industry perspective. if what the committee says, if the suggestions we re committee says, if the suggestions were adopted in the next year, clearly not in the short time frame but for argument‘s sake, how many jobs does it affect? obviously these things must be addressed. it is a worry for the industry as a whole. the manufacturing industry employs about 1700 people, the retail, high streets have been dynamic and create by £9 billion worth of economy in the uk and about 100,000 jobs. it's a strong part of the high street. therefore as an industry we have come together to say we understand the concerns, let's see what we can do. is the only answer, as far as you are concerned from the industry perspective, the recycling one and
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introducing more recycling plants capable of handling the cups and more recycling bins for customers to drop the cups snow? there are a multitude of answers. consumers have the opportunity to use other products like the reusables but where they are using the convenience, security and the hygiene in the paper cup, we have to act on that. you don't want to see the 25 pence tax? no. it was acknowledged in the report, that the industry was acting in recovering and recycling paper cupsit in recovering and recycling paper cups it is happening in the uk. neil, thank you very much for giving us neil, thank you very much for giving us your thoughts on that story today. neil whittle. breaking us your thoughts on that story today. neilwhittle. breaking news on thejohn worboys case, the multiple racist former black cab driver. a statement from the ministry ofjustice saying that these were horrendous crimes and our
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thoughts are with the victims for the suffering they endured. in cases like this, it is right for the victims to decide whether and how they wish to be kept updated. some victims chose not to be updated, others to be informed by phone or e—mailand others to be informed by phone or e—mail and were contacted immediately, others chose to be informed by hers, sent straightaway but take longer. 0ur priority is to support the victims and it is right we respect their decisions about how they are contacted. that perhaps provides a part of the answer as to why no all of thejohn worboys victims were not contacted. it seems some may have opted not to be updated with the developments on his case, although it does appear there we re case, although it does appear there were some who wished to know more information but did not receive the information. the statement follows the letter from a cross—party group of 50 mps calling on thejustice secretary to investigate if due
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consideration was given to the comments of victims of worboys in the decision to grant him parole. ina the decision to grant him parole. in a moment a summary of the business news. first the head lines on bbc newsroom live. the parole board has come under increasing criticism over its decision to release the serial sex attacker, john worboys. it's believed the black cab driver carried out more than a hundred rapes and sexual assaults on women in london. a book containing damaging allegations about the trump presidency is released earlier than planned, after white house lawyers tried to stop its publication. mps says coffee drinkers using disposable cups should be charged an extra twenty—five—pence to encourage them to switch to reusable versions. in the business news. new car sales fell for the first time in six years last year, with demand for diesel cars plunging by almost a fifth. in total, there were about 2.5 million cars registered, according to industry body the society of motor manufacturers and traders. the figure was down 5.7% from 2016,
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while diesel sales fell 17.1% as higher taxes and pollution fears hit demand. apple has said that all iphones, ipads and mac computers are affected by two major flaws in computer chips — which emerged this week. tech companies have been racing to fix the meltdown and spectre bugs, that could allow hackers to steal data. but apple says there is no evidence that the vulnerability had been exploited. shop prices have fallen to 0.6%. food inflation has gathered steam, fuelled by climbing global prices. it's been confirmed that britain's economic productivity rose at its fastest rate in over six years during the three months to the end of september. 0utput per hour grew by 0.9 percent
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in the third quarter of 2017, its first rise since the fourth quarter of 2016 and the biggest increase since the second quarter of 2011, according to the office for national statistics. however in absolute terms it is still barely above its level of nearly a decade ago. for more on this we can speak to the economist vicky price. hello there. explain why you think there has been a rise in productivity? it is good news we are seeing a rise in productivity? it is good news we are seeing rebound and productivity taking place. and until now, the way that businesses have been meeting the increased demand in the economy, especially for exports because of the substantial growth in the world economy taking place, has been by hiring more people than investing, is partly because of the
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uncertainty around brexit and affected productivity. if you are hiring lots more people for a given output increase, you see a reduction in productivity growth. i think that has run its course. we have full employment, almost in the uk. there isa limit employment, almost in the uk. there is a limit to how many people you can bring in to meet the increased demand but the figures are improving as there is more investment taking place and we have seen there is a lot of automation, cutting down, huge numbers of jobs lot of automation, cutting down, huge numbers ofjobs in areas, such as in retail, where the margins, what is happening in the high street, it has encouraged firms to cut layers of employment in order to ensure that they can keep the costs down. do low interest rates come into play here? have they stopped so—called zombie firms from close, those not
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producing enough compared to other companies? it is true a lot of firms are kept going partly because of the lawyer interest rates and the fall in the pound. it means that the products are more competitive. those exposed to international trade. that has certainly assisted them. but the firms are not the ones that are investing. they are still keeping costs low. what we are seeing is the bigger firms, costs low. what we are seeing is the biggerfirms, the retail chains and manufacturing, which is experiencing lots of skilled shortages is beginning to invest more. that means that productivity improves. when you look at the details, what is happening is that the hours worked have gone down over a quarter but output has increased. so automatically there is improvement in productivity. but longer term and the ten years, if we had been going on having the same productivity growth over the period since 2007, than before, we would have been 15 or16 than before, we would have been 15
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or 16 points higher up in terms of where our gdp may have been than now. so we have been suffering from an overall decline in the trend of productivity growth. maybe that is beginning to be reversed. many thanks. the record rally continues on the financial markets. the ftse100 is up again. following on from gains in asia with tokyo's nikkei hitting the highest level in 26 years and wall street on a winning streak. stocks boosted, us, added 2 #50,000 jobs to the economy. all eyes on the official government figures out later. -- 250,000. you can see admiral group has dropped down. now it is time for a look at the
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weather. we have wintery weather in scotland, a little in wales and the higher ground of england. sunshine around in northern ireland, parts of northern england and southern scotla nd northern england and southern scotland once we lose the rain. windy in the south. the winds easing down as the day wears on. picking up in the north. these are cold north, north—easterly winds. feeding into showers in the early evening periods. and here a risk of ice as it will be cold. more cloud in the south. starting on a cloudy note in the southern areas. but the high pressure toppling into the north bring strong winds and colder drier airto push bring strong winds and colder drier air to push the cloud south as the day wears on. increasing sunshine, snow showers in the northern and the
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eastern areas, a very snow showers in the northern and the eastern areas, a very cold day, and colder on sunday after a cold and frosty start. this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 12. the head of the parole board apologises to victims who weren't told about the decision to the serial sex attackerjohn worboys. when we released the information about the decision, my understanding today is that we believed all the victims had been told about that decision, but we're checking today exactly exactly what did happen, because clearly something went wrong. a serious case review recommends improvements be made to safeguarding children in wolverhampton following the murder of two—year old jeremiah regis—ngaujah by his stepfather. a book containing damaging allegations about the trump presidency is released earlier than planned, after white house lawyers tried to stop its publication.
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tech giant apple says the recent discovered flaws in some computer processor chips affect all iphones, ipads and mac computers. also in the next hour — a latte levy or a flat white tax? mps says drinkers using disposable cups should be charged an extra 25p to encourage them to switch to reusable versions. and a severe winter storm hits the eastern united states, with record—breaking low temperatures that have already claimed several lives. good morning. it's friday 5th january. i'm annita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the chairman of the parole board has apologised "unreservedly" after some
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victims of sex attackerjohn worboys were not told about his release. the black cab driver was jailed in 2009 for offences against 12 women, but detectives believe he carried out more than a hundred sexual assaults. this morning a cross—party group of 58 mps has written to thejustice secretary, david lidington, to call for an investigation into whether the voices of victims were heard in the decision to release him on parole. the parole board chairman, nick hardwick, said he recognised there was a lack of transparency in the system — and would hold a public consultation. our home affairs correspondent, daniel sandford, reports. for six years, john worboys cruised smart areas of london in his black cab, looking for women to drug and rape. when he was finally caught, thejudge said he'd serve a minimum of eight years in prison, and said he wouldn't be released until he was no longer a threat to women. worboys would show young women he picked up in his cab large wads of cash, saying he'd recently won big at the casino.
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then he'd offer them champagne, which he'd spiked with sedatives, and rape them. the judge gave him what's known as an indeterminate sentence, under which people are only freed once they're no longer considered dangerous. the parole board has decided worboys will be released this month under supervision after spending less than ten years in prison. i've spoken to one of my clients, who is absolutely horrified and really, really distressed that nobody had the courtesy to inform her, so she's in the middle of cooking tea for her kids and she hears this on the radio, and feels absolutely sick to her stomach. the organisation rape crisis said it was far too soon for worboys to be released. although police believejohn worboys attacked over 100 women, he was only convicted of attacking 12. and only one of those convictions was for rape. and that's why his sentence was so short. all the same, under the indeterminate sentence rules,
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the parole board will need to have assured themselves thatjohn worboys was no longer a risk as a sexual predator. daniel sandford, bbc news. the chairman of the parole board for england and wales, professor nick hardwick explained how the decision was made: it is ——a it is —— a key positive out of this isi it is —— a key positive out of this is i cannot expend his decision by law. i would like to get that changed. this pushes the idea that the parole board processes would be much more open and transparent army get support for that then i think some good will have come out of this and people in the future will have more confidence in the system. what is important to understand is the pa role is important to understand is the parole board's duty is not to have another go at the trial but to
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assess what his risk will be going forward. that is what they did. let's speak now to richard scorer, a solicitor who represented 11 of worboys' victims in civil claims, three of which were also criminal cases against the rapist. he's spoken to some of those victims this afternoon. they are shocked and horrified of his release and the failure to tell victims in advance about the release is completely unacceptable and wrong. i think our concern is that this man is an extremely manipulative and devious individual. when we dealt with him in the civil cases, going back to 2013, he was co nsta ntly cases, going back to 2013, he was constantly playing games and are trying to manipulate the situation and he continued to deny his guilt, evenin and he continued to deny his guilt, even in respect of the offences he was convicted for. he is extremely
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minute punitive and we are concerned he has been gaming the board and how can the be confident that he no longer is a brisk? the victims you have spoken to, had they been told in advance of his release or not? the clients i spoke to had not been informed in advance, so the concerns that have been raised about that apply to my clients and that is unacceptable. had they wanted to be informed? the ministry ofjustice said that some victims had not to be kept up—to—date with what was happening, but had the people asked for that information in your case? it is my understanding that they had done so and had not received the information. i think what that reinforces is that the rights that victims have run supposed to have now need to be embedded in law. it is not a structure treat requirement. there is no legal right
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on the part of the victims under that needs to change so we do not have a reputation of this situation. is there a further action that the woman who you are representing, is there further action they can take at this stage? i think the key issue is if he admits guilt for the offences he was convicted far, because he was continuing denying it up until 2013 when we were dealing with him, so we need to understand. if he continues to deny, he clearly has no remorse, he must represent a threat. if he accepts his guilt, he is attempting to —— except that he... i think the police need to look at whether further and prosecutions are possible. so there could be pertinent to pursuing further prosecution. in your estimation, is there anything that can be done about the parole board's decision?
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we will look at what legal avenues we camp as you, but we need to understand if he admits his guilt, because he was continuing to deny that and i think that issue is very releva nt that and i think that issue is very relevant understanding whether he has remorse for what he did and what steps need to be taken in terms of further prosecution. thank you very much for your time today. a serious case review has recommended improvements be made to safeguarding in wolverhampton following the murder of a two—year—old in 2016. jeremiah regis—ngaujah was beaten to death by his mother's partner. he was the fifth child to be killed by an adult in wolverhampton in less than a decade. 0ur news correspondent phil mackie has been following the case and joins me now from wolverhampton. he told me about the background to the tragic death. this happened in 2016 and this is the flat where jeremiah lived
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with his mother and stepfather. the stepfather had very strong christian beliefs which he thought meant that he could use physical punishment whenever a child was naughty and that meant the happy, smiley toddler was beaten with a rod and a belt, and ultimately killed by chevaze mcgregor who was jailed last year. he is serving a minimum of 21 years in prison. the mother was the victim of domestic abuse in that relationship. she was jailed for allowing the death of a child, initially for more than three years. that was reduced on appeal to two years and four months. it was felt she was very much a victim in this case. today there was a serious case review which has been published into the death ofjeremiah and it makes a number of recommendations. it makes similar readings to too many i have read over the years that point to a failure to really follow up signs that perhaps
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something wasn't going right in the life of young jeremiah. one of the things that is quite stark is there was a multi—agency referraljust a few months before his death but there would no safeguarding conce, rns despite complaints would no safeguarding concerns despite complaints from sindyann regis, who was very much a victim of abuse herself saying she was subjected to domestic violence, but those particular complaints not being followed up. a controversial book, which is a fly—on—the—wall account of trump's first year in power, is being published today. the publisher opted for an earlier release date in response to attempts by the president's lawyers to block it. in a tweet overnight, donald trump said it was full of lies and criticised his former adviser, steve bannon. 0ur north america correspondent peter bowes reports. publish and be damned. the book that won't go away. the white house disputes
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its accuracy and the president's lawyers have threatened to sue for libel. they've demanded that the author, michael wolff, and the publisher should immediately cease and desist from any further publication. instead, the release date has been brought forward, much to the apparent delight of mr wolff. "here we go, you can buy it and read it, thank you, mr president," he tweets. the white house says the book is tabloid trash, gossip, false and fraudulent. it portrays mr trump as being surprised at winning the presidency, and paints a picture of his administration as dysfunctional and divided. steve bannon, who's widely quoted in the extracts already published, has not disputed their content. his response on a radio programme, to declare his unfailing support for the president. and mr trump's response to that... i don't know, he called me
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a great man last night. so, you know, he obviously changed his tune pretty quick. now, with the lawyers poised, there's an entire book to read for the next instalment in this extraordinary saga. peter bowes, bbc news. new car sales fell for the first time in six years last year, dragged down by a collapse in the demand for diesel, and the uk's motor industry warns it expects britain's car market to weaken further this year. the society of motor manufacturers and traders says there were 2.5 million cars registered last year. it shows a 5.7% fall on the number of registrations in 2016. the sale of diesel cars fell 17% since 2016, as higher taxes and pollution fears hit demand. and the situation could worsen this year. the smmt expects that car sales will drop by up to 7% this year. the industry body blames uncertainty over brexit and confusion about future policy on diesel cars.
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mike hawes is chief executive of the society for motor manufacturers and traders. he told me why he thought diesel cars still play an important role in the market. for the average consumer buying a diesel car versus the equivalent petrol, they can save around £400 a year, the same as your annual gas bill. add to the fact that with these new diesel vehicles you are also getting the other technology and they can be a compelling prospect. what we need to do, and what manufacturers are doing, is help new customers into vehicles through incentives, additional support mechanisms, but we need government to make sure it is encouraging these vehicles. in other words, get the government to tax older vehicles off the road, effectively? not necessarily, people bought these vehicles in good faith. we need to recognise diesel is the right choice for many consumers. if you live in a city, fine, electric or small petrol is probably the right vehicle for you.
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most people drive in and out of the city, rural areas, longer mileage, which is where you get the benefit of a diesel and that, for many people, is the right choice, and it is also the right choice in many ways for the environment because what we have seen is while the average c02 of a car is coming down, because of the way the market is changing, overall c02 will be going up because of the move away from diesel and that is not good for the industry or the environment. talk to us about how much new diesel improved compared to just a few have improved compared to just a few years ago and how long they sit alongside a car with a petrol engine? the emissions for a diesel engine tend to be 20% better in co2. in the other emissions, in terms of particulates, that issue was dealt with years ago. 99% of all particulates are now removed. they are about 80—90% better
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in performance and the way they test has changed it menas not only when you test a car to certify to put it on the road, not only is it testing that, it is tested on the road so you can demonstrate that the cars will do what they say both in a laboratory test and in the real world. that should provide the reassurance to consumers. the headlines on bbc newsroom live... the chairman of the parole board says he is "very concerned" that victims of the serial rapist, john warboys, were not told that he was about to be released. view a serious case review finds the murder ofjeremiah regis—ngaujah by his stepfather could not have been predicted. a book containing damaging allegations about the trump presidency is released earlier than planned after white house lawyers try to stop the publication. back for some more sport. it was a
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frustrating day for england in the fifth ashes test in sydney as australia put themselves in a good position to take control of the final match. . they were helped by this unbelievable dropped catch from josh hazlewood they did make to make early breakthroughs including an important wicket from david warner. mason crane got his first taste of test action. he survived and is still at the crease. australia close on 193—2, so they are some runs behind but with eight first innings wickets in hand. chelsea look set to signa wickets in hand. chelsea look set to sign a ross barclay. it is expected to have a medical ahead of a £50 million note. he is yet to play
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after having hamstring surgery, but is now approaching match fitness. the manager said he was resigned to losing him when the contract expires in the summer. he joined everton as an elegant —year—old. as an on manager arsene wenger said he does football with integrity and was shocked to be charged by the fa after his behaviour. he was fear is with the referee after a penalty decision allowed west brom to equalise late on. arsene wenger has until 6pm to respond. he has been asked to explain his comments about referees jarring the draw with chelsea. you imagine my years in the game and what i have seen and heard in the corridors from people. you can understand why an surprised and shocked about being surprised. serena williams. serena williams says she can compete
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— but she wants to do far better than that, and needs a bit more time before returning to the tennis circuit. she's pulled out of the australian open, which she won last year when she was eight weeks pregnant. williams gave birth to her daughter four months ago. there's another injury worry for a british tennis player... kyle edmund may not be fully fit going into the australian 0pen later this month. he was playing some great tennis in his quarter—final against grigor dimitrov in the brisbane international, taking the match into a deciding set. but he cried out in pain and collapsed to the floor after catching his right ankle and although he carried on with heavy strapping, he couldn't find a way past defending champion dimitrov. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. the planned release on parole of multiple sexual offenderjohn worboys known as the black cab rapist. there has been strong
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criticism of the decision and calls for the parole board to release more details for the reasoning. let's speak now to colin sutton , he's a former detective chief inspector at the metropolitan police, who led the team that caught the serial killer levi bellfield. thank you forjoining us. you have been listening to the story today and yesterday. what are forts? i think it is something which there seems to be unanimity amongst the public that this is not what we expect from our criminaljustice system. we want to know why. these decisions are difficult. you have to do negotiate and is the gauche asians —— negotiations. it makes the trial very difficult and making sure that thejudge has trial very difficult and making sure that the judge has the full criminality of the defendant before the court. i think we need to know
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why more offences weren't charged because when you get to the stage there are a small number of offences, thejudge there are a small number of offences, the judge can only sentence on that and that results in what i think most people are saying isa what i think most people are saying is a short recommendation of time to be spent before you can apply for parole. the parole board have decided he should be released. just about a year for each of the victims' cases that were brought, which on anyone's estimation is a very short time. absolutely. the judge is very short time. absolutely. thejudge is constrained in how tough a sentence he or she can pass. the parole board acts within guidelines. what it comes back to is saying have we got the full range of this man's criminality before the court? thereat evidential problems with sexual offences,
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especially with the drugs used and the victim's recall may not be good. the sorts of things are often prosecuted with lots of offences on the same indictment and you can end up the same indictment and you can end up with convictions for offences which art as strong. you say you remember what a danger john worboys wasn't how difficult it was for your colleagues to catch him. take us back to that. there was an investigation done on the local borough that was not the best, quite possibly. the case was given to the homicide directorate, a tea m given to the homicide directorate, a team took it on, they borrowed stuff from many other teams and there was a observation at night. it was difficult to catch him. there was knowledge that there were upwards of 25 victims. this was a man who was really dangerous and really causing problems. do you think about those of the
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police and the cps now have serious questions to answer, but they should pursue this had at the time? iam not pursue this had at the time? i am not sure in this case that the finger should be so pointed at the police. most police officers but i know and worked with, myself included, would want to prosecute every case that there is evidence. that is not practical because of resulting difficulties and the difficulties of case management. ultimately the people who decide whether or not cases are prosecuted at the cps and i think the cps should be looking for an explanation as to why so few of the dangerous man's crimes were prosecuted. thank you very much. apple has confirmed that all iphones, ipads and mac computers are affected by two major flaws in computer chips. it emerged this week that tech companies have been working on a fix for the meltdown and spectre bugs, which could allow
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hackers to steal data. apple said there was no evidence that the vulnerability had been exploited. it says it will issue a patch for its safari web browser in the coming days. i spoke to rupert goodwin. there are billions of these chips out there, every computer that we see on the planet is affected by it and before we get new chips and new designs, we will never get rid of this one. one of the ones, meltdown, can be fixed with software, but the other one is going to be there for a long time to come. will any fixes or patches in the meantime be good enough? they will be good and you should always download patches, especially for this one, make sure your phone or computer is up—to—date, and your browsers. do that separately. it will turn the spectre into the sort of problem that other security problems are, to keep up—to—date, as people use it, there will be instances
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found and stamped out but there will be no way to get rid of it until the next generation of chips. we know apple products are affected. what will it do to their reputation? i think it should make it a lot better because apple has been the first company to stand up and say what is happening and it has already issued the software patches quietly before the disclosure of the problem. 0nly because the news was out, really. if you look at the others like samsung and google and android, that information has not come out as clearly. google has talked about in technical terms, so i think apple has been enlightening. in the long—term, apple being responsible. we have been told that the hackers have not been able to access any sensitive data yet, they are trying now the news is out, presumably.
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the moment it came out, people have been trying to use it and perhaps using it already, we do not know. i think those most worried will be those on big data centres which is high—value and very tempting to hackers. i think it will trickle down slowly to us and will not be so significant, but i think the big companies will be most concerned and taking the quicker steps to get rid of it. your thoughts on what the industry will learn from this, that the chips could have two flaws. how can it stop things like this happening again? the roots of these things go to the ‘90s, the techniques that the chips use can interact in a dangerous way but that was not known until recently, so the need to test the chips better, review the designs and have a more open approach to
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explaining how they work and share information. giant waves and flooding have added to the severe weather in america. it is believed that the 17 people have died. many were flights have been cancelled and a rapid fall in pressure has led to blizzard and hurricane wins. this is a bone chilling wind gust of up this is a bone chilling wind gust of up to 50 miles an hour. with snow falling at a rate of two inches an hour, emergency management officials are bracing for a very long night. it has been cold, non—that has
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melted away and our biggest fear. south of portland, we watched the storm swallow up foundations. the wind and the waves are so strong that while we were out here filming, the ground underneath us collapsed. 32—year—old shaun walker has lived in this beach town his/her life and stop every year he says the neighbourhood get —— his life. he says it is something he now expects to happen with every impending storm. thank goodness the weather is not like that here. good afternoon, nothing like as bad as we see in north america. the storm is heading into eastern canada. it will be very
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treacherous for some time. in the uk, it will change, ourweatherwill get colder, but it pales in significance compared to what we see in north america. frost widely on saturday night, sony on sunday. this picture was taken today in somerset in between the showers that are coming in on a brisk wind. higher up, we coming in on a brisk wind. higher up, we see snow coming in on a brisk wind. higher up, we see snow in the peak district, also in the staffordshire hills. it will be mostly rain as it heads towards lincolnshire. some sunshine, seeing lots of showers, colder across the board. wintry mixture of rain, sleet and hill snow moving southwards, away from scotla nd moving southwards, away from scotland and northern ireland perhaps into northern england, wintry showers behind it and first signs of the colder air. mist and fog patches, showers around southern england, chilly night with the risk of some frost and icy patches,
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especially towards the north—east. the weekend in the south—west, sunshine, not many showers to begin the day, more cloud across england and wales. then there is a mixture of rain and hill snow in northern england, perhaps into north wales. northern ireland, bright sunny start, eastern scotland, north—east england could get some icy patches with the wintry showers feeding in off the north sea. that is a cold wind down the eastern side of the uk and we are left with damp, drizzly weather that struggles to clear away, still there through the day across southern england. a cloudy day, cold in the wind, temperature 6-7d. day, cold in the wind, temperature 6—7d. northwest, it is more sheltered and where it will be a sparkling, sunny day, but it will be cold. the temperatures will fall underneath the call the mac query size. the wind keeps blowing through the night, drizzly rain reluctant to clear away, so it will be a wide spread fast.
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imro areas we could see temperatures down to —9 minus ten. that is because we are near the area of high pressure and it is bringing down drierair, pressure and it is bringing down drier air, more sunshine, pressure and it is bringing down drierair, more sunshine, but pressure and it is bringing down drier air, more sunshine, but colder air. 0n drier air, more sunshine, but colder air. on sunday, more cloud at times. elsewhere it will be a sunnier picture, blender of sunshine. for all those macro called weekend. —— fall of us a cold we can. this is bbc newsroom live — our latest headlines. the head of the parole board has apologised to the victims of the seriously sex attacker, john worboys. it is believed thatjohn worboys
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carried out more than 100rrapes and sexual assaults on 100 women. a serious case review has found the brutal murder of two—year—old boyjeremiah regis—ngaujah could not have been predicted. jeremiah's stepfather was jailed for life in june, after beating the toddler to death in 2016. tech giant apple has confirmed that all iphones, ipads and mac computers have been affected by two major flaws in computer chips. it's emerged tech companies are working on patches to fix the problem. a controversial book documenting president trump's first year in office has gone on sale — earlier than it's planned release date. the move is in response to attempts by the president's lawyers to block it. and a powerful blizzard has brought record low temperatures to north—east coast of the united states and canada. the week—long cold snap has claimed several lives and cut power to tens minus 19 celsius. of thousands of homes. let's return now to our main news — the planned release on parole of multiple sexual offender
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john warboys, also known john worboys, also known as the black cab rapist. there's been strong criticism of the decision, and calls for the parole board to release more details behind its reasons. the man who was director of public prosecutions at the time, sir keir starmer, has also come in for criticism over decisions that were made about the number of chargesjohn worboys would face in court. he spoke this morning in response. first and foremost it is important if there are allegations that anybody thinks have in the been looked into efficiently, they go to the police to make the allegations so that they can be looked into. second it is important to say that what is said is accurate. the crown prosecutions made the file and the decisions on the case. it is important to go to them to get accurate readouts of the decisions made. are you confident that the right decisions were made while you were
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dpp? it is important to go to the crown prosecution service to get an accurate readout of the decisions made, especially if there are further allegationses to be made now. thank you very much. several women did go to... why? now we speak with harriet whitby. thank you forjoining us today. what did you make of what keir starmer had to say earlier? i missed part of what he said. i think he is saying that if anyone has not had their case investigated and they want to go forward... he also say, let me tell you what he said in summary, that he thinks that the decisions we re that he thinks that the decisions were nine years ago. it is important to go to the crown prosecution service to get an accurate readout of the decisions made, especially if further allegations are to be made.
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in summary that is what he said earlier? yes. well, a couple of things to say. one is that one of my clients who was one of his first victims, and unfortunately, due to a very poor police investigation did not succeed in having her case prosecuted, she was told by the police, who reinvest gaited it later, that it did not matter if her case didn't go forward as there were enough that were going forward. but the problem is that there were a lot of women who came forward who made complaints and she was one that made a complaint originally and the assurance that you only need to prosecute a sample, means that he was only sentenced for a sample of those cases. and the parole board were only able
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to assess his dangerousness in relation to the cases he was convicted of. so there is an issue there. obviously i think it is right that the crown prosecution service should account for their decision—making and we can measure that up. but there may well be learning arising from the case in that respect in particular. i spoke to a former met officer a short while ago, he said he felt it was the crown prosecution service who had the case to answer here. how important is it that the police and the crown prosecution service don't get involved in any blame game or avoidance of facing up to those sorts of lessons that you are talking about? well, basically, i mean my two clients have brought and succeeded in bringing a case against the police, not the crown prosecution service. that was because the police abjectly failed in their investigation. over ten women came forward at the time he as
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conducting his campaign of assaulting women to complain. they we re assaulting women to complain. they were not believed until eventually somebody put two and two together. so the police have something to a nswer so the police have something to answerfor, even so the police have something to answer for, even if so the police have something to answerfor, even if subsequently they reinvestigated, they got it right. but also i think for these women now they feel not only have they been failed by the police but potentially by the crown prosecution service and potentially by the pa role service and potentially by the parole board who failed to inform either of them of this decision. so they found out by listening to it on they found out by listening to it on the news yesterday. so sadly, this is perhaps a reflection of the way in which women who are victims of rape are treated generally, and until the criminaljustice agencies get this right, we have a crisis in this country around it. and so i think, ant don't deflect blame from one to the other, everyone can learn
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lessons and hopefully will learn lessons and hopefully will learn lessons from this case. there has been an outcry about the pa role there has been an outcry about the parole board's decision. is there anything in your opinion that can be done to lead to a review of that decision? i'm not sure whether that decision? i'm not sure whether that decision can be challenged. it is something that i will have a look at to see if there is a way. first of all, as i think yvette cooper has called for, it will be important to understand the reason for the decision but part of the problem is it goes a way back. so a failed police investigation, potentially not the right decision by the crown prosecution service as to the extent of thes were cueings and a circumstance which may make it technically legally difficult to challenge that decision. but i think that certainly, many, many women and
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people generally are extremely concerned that this man who basically, you know, who is an extremely prolific sex offender has served a relatively short time. it is certainly an insult for the women that came forward, that it amounts effectively to a month per woman. harriet thank you very much. a solicitor that represented some of john worboys's victims. more now on mps proposals that a 25p tax should be added to disposable coffee cups in order to improve recycling rates. the environmental audit committee says a so—called ‘latte levy‘ should be introduced, and that disposable coffee cups should banned in five years if there isn‘t enough improvement. a report suggests that there should abso—called latte levy to drive up recycling rates and improve reprocessing facilities. but if there is no improvements, throw away cups should be banned.
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the government agrees that plastic waste is a problem and will look into a single use plastic cup. —— plastic cup tax. i was speaking earlier to the anti—waste campaigner, hugh fearnley—whittingstall and to mary creagh. we have heard that people respond better to a charge than to a discount. this is about education. the coffee cup you are using has a brittle plastic lid. it has a cardboard outer and a therein plastic inner which make it is difficult to recycle. it is about saying whether or not you have a choice to pay for this but to invest in the britain infrastructure to collect the up coffee cups separately and to reprocess them, then the polluter should pay.
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hugh, what are your thoughts on the carrot and the stick approach, and where the owners and the responsibility should lie to change the behaviour? my thoughts is that your report from the james cropper plant, great work that they are doing but it is missing the point it only deals with a tiny section of coffee only deals with a tiny section of coffe e cu p only deals with a tiny section of coffee cup waste. if we were to get a significant amount of coffee cups to plants like that, we would need dedicated bins only for coffee cups and we would need them everywhere. that is not a practical solution. the real solution is for the coffee cup giants to come up with a properly recyclable cup to be re cycled properly recyclable cup to be recycled through the normal paper waste stream. the technology for the cup exist but they have a huge amount invested in the status quo, so amount invested in the status quo, so they are reluctant to change. i am all for the coffee cups to be collected and recycled but we have
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heard that less than 1%, the figure is probably only a quarter of a percent are recycled. i think that the levy will focus the minds on the coffee the levy will focus the minds on the coffe e cu p the levy will focus the minds on the coffee cup giants, selling us so much coffee at great profit, to find a proper solution, which is a truly re cycla ble cu p. a proper solution, which is a truly recyclable cup. that is the holy grail here. what do you make of that mary, improving the bin infrastructure but putting pressure on the industry, on the coffee cup giants? absolutely. they have been selling this stuff for the last 20 years. there is a recycla ble for the last 20 years. there is a recyclable loop on the top but they are not widely recycled and we are saying that the government should put charges on the packaging producers, the cup manufactures, so when producing this, that is hard to recycle, the tax should be higher and when fulling fully recyclable, it should be lower. so the polluter should pay at the production end and
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change the logist i cans chain which isa change the logist i cans chain which is a five year dead line. you cab see a clear way to do this, is the government to go for this introduction of the 25 pence levy? the government has sat on their hands. we have seen no waste strategy or announcements on waste. recycling waste has stalled and this are going backwards. but they have said they want ambition on coffee cups when they announce the waste strategy this summer. we reported earlier on that controversial ‘fly—on—the—wall account‘ of donald trump‘s first year in power, has been published. the publisher opted for an earlier release date in response to attempts by the us president‘s lawyers to block it. michael wolff, the author of the book has been talking on the today show on n bc news. he described what he heard about donald trump. i will tell you the one description
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that everyone gave, they all say he is like a child. and what they mean by that, is he has a need for immediate gratification. it is all about him. imean gratification. it is all about him. i mean this letter for the desist letter, there are sources in the white house. i know everyone was going "we should not be doing this. this is not smart" but he insists. hejust has to this is not smart" but he insists. he just has to be satisfied in the moment. well, the hype surrounding the book brought people out in their droves in the middle of the night to be the first to ones brought people out night to be the first to ones to read the whole story. we heard from some customers at a bookshop in washington about why they wanted to read the book. because this is like the thing to do. ifound because this is like the thing to do. i found out because this is like the thing to do. ifound out about it because this is like the thing to do. i found out about it on twitter less tha n do. i found out about it on twitter less than an hour ago. i walked over. for the past two days this book has been like all consuming.
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so, why not? and what do you expect to read from it? i am expecting a dumpsterfire. to read from it? i am expecting a dumpster fire. the white to read from it? i am expecting a dumpsterfire. the white house to read from it? i am expecting a dumpster fire. the white house to to read from it? i am expecting a dumpsterfire. the white house to be as absolutely dysfunctional as the lea ks make it as absolutely dysfunctional as the leaks make it seem. apparently there is much behind it. in the last two days there has been a lot of talk about it. it has been a while since anybody says so much about something. it will be great to have a piece of work that everyone is excited about. so you have to go dive into it! the nature of the stories coming out were just unreal, to the reaction from the white house, that all that confirmed the authenticity of it, and the fact that our neighbourhood book store was one of the first in the country to start selling it. i have not come
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out for a book at midnight for a book since harry potter. so let's do it. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: the chairman of the parole board says he is "very concerned" that victims of the serial rapist, john warboys, were not told that he was about to be released. a serious case review finds that the brutal murder of two—year—old boy jeremiah regis—ngaujah by his stepfather could not have been predicted. a book containing damaging allegations about the trump presidency is released earlier than planned, after white house lawyers tried to stop its publication. more than half of all flat—faced dogs seen by a vet last year needed treatment for health issues directly related to the way they‘ve been bred. british veterinary association warns breeds such as pugs and bulldogs sufferfrequently from breathing difficulties, skin problems and eye ulcers. earlier i spoke tojohn fishwick, the president of british veterinary association and asked him about their #breedtobreathe campaign
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that they have lunched it today. we are we a re really we are really concerned because they often have serious medical issues, as you have spoken about, throughout no fault of their own. and the obvious is not getting enough air into the lungs, because of their flat faces and noses, they have trouble getting air into the lungs to breathe properly, that can be distressing for them. owners don‘t recognise this as a problem, they think it isjust recognise this as a problem, they think it is just part of the breed. is it shortening life—spans? think it is just part of the breed. is it shortening life-spans? we don‘t have the evidence to show that but we are concerned that the life is not enjoyable as it should be. so the quality of life? yes, the quality of life. we know that the breeds are hugely popular. we have seen lots of celebrities with them, they are used in advertising, is it driving demands for the flat—faced dogs?
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yes, with have a campaign that has two prongs, to strop the drive in the celebrity and advertising endorsements for people to want the dogs. there is a huge interest in them, it is causing a massive number of dogs that were not seen before. the numbers of dogs of these breeds is increasing and it is driven by the media images. we are trying to make people aware of it to cool that whole thing down. are you saying to breeders, to talk about the breed‘s standard, to look at breeding dogs like this, like the pug, at breeding dogs like this, like the pug, like the bulldog for slightly different traits, with longer noses to breed more easily? -- to breathe more easily? we work closely with the kennel club and the breed societies, we know there is a desire amongst the breeding fraternity and the kennel club members to improve the kennel club members to improve the dogs that they are breeding. it
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isa the dogs that they are breeding. it is a slow process, to look at breed and show standards but we know there isa and show standards but we know there is a desire for to take place in the breeding sector. is it starting to happen? yes it is. we have worked closely with the kennel club to produce a letter with them together with other organisations, highlighting the problems. the kennel club are with us problems. the kennel club are with us working with us on the problem. and ultimately, you say to the dog owners, you have a great relationship with the dog, you love your pet, you want your pet to have the best quality of life and not to go for very flat—nosed dogs. when people acquire a dog, we are asking them to get advice from the vet before they start the process so that they are aware of the issues and go to responsible breeders to discuss the issues and if you are getting a puppy, you can get a puppy contract. that is freely available
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asa contract. that is freely available as a downlode online, there you can go through a number of issues to discuss with the breeders and others before you decide on the breed of the puppy. ridley scott has spent four decades making some of the most successful films in cinema. his work on films like alien, blade runner and thelma and louise and many more have brought in several billion dollars at the box office, and won dozens of awards. but his most recent project, all the money in the world, was overshadowed by the allegations of sexual misconduct against one of its stars, kevin spacey. he was replaced just six weeks before the film was due to be released. our arts editor will gompertz has been talking to ridley scott, and began by asking him if replacing spacey was a commercial or moral decision. that‘s tricky. i think it‘s a little bit of both. but, you know, moral is a word we can talk about for the next two hours, ok. so i‘d like to say initially it was a commercial decision which would be maybe
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a little hand in hand with a moral decision. you know, you can‘t take the artist, and actually whatever a person decides to do in their private life which doesn‘t harm others, you have to separate that from what they do as an artist or as a person, as a clever person. mr getty, your grandson, he's been kidnapped. i have seen the movie and it is completely seamless. what was running through my head was how would it have been different with spacey? is there a noticeable difference? is it a much different movie? kevin spacey did fantastically good job. fantastically a good job. it was cooler and chillier. christopher comes with this inordinate charm. his smile and his twinkle.
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he has always had that twinkle, so when in fact he‘s doing the same words, the same text as kevin, the twinkle and smile somehow make him that much more effective, i think. it makes him quite lethal but in a charming way. i have no money to spare. what would it take for you to feel secure? more. christopher plummer and michelle williams have both been nominated for golden globes and what we are hearing about the golden globes from the campaign within the industry, who are supporting a change in culture in hollywood, will be wearing black dresses in support of that notion. are we looking at a moment in the hollywood where things will change, where sexism will subside and women will get a fair crack at the whip? or do you think it‘s windowdressing? i think a bit of each. i think there will be an immediate change, because there should be.
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it is long overdue. you know, i have never experienced any of those things that you describe in my life, in my companies. i frankly have women running my companies. i have always been a supporter of strong women without ever actually thinking about it, which i think is the best way. i have great respect for women generally. maybe it comes from my mum. i had a very strong mother who brought up three pretty stalwart sons who were always very independent and tough. you talk about a problem, it being long overdue, it is something you have witnessed in hollywood, women being mistreated ? never. never, never. and if it ever came in front of me, i would immediately step on it. is it isita is it a cynical environment for an
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artist as yourself. is itjust about money, professional, celebrity, or is there an artistic soul in hollywood? very much, there is an artstic soul in hollywood. coming to hollywood was not easy. i did blade runner, my first one. that was tough. but had i been 20 years old, i would have been slaughtered. by being 43, i gave as good as i got. soi being 43, i gave as good as i got. so i survived the process. first and foremost, creative, the biggest problem is i‘m an artist, i tend to go for the art form rather than the obvious commercial form, which go for the art form rather than the obvious commercialform, which maybe the reason i am still here after all of these years, having done all of these films and stuff is pouring in, toa these films and stuff is pouring in, to a degree, you have to be original. if you get into repetition, you become the master of mediocrity, you cannot do that. now low temperatures have been causing particular problems
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for these cold—blooded creatures in florida. videos uploaded to social media show frozen iguanas and others that had fallen from trees. a number of the reptiles were also found on the ground as you can see here. you‘ll be pleased to hear that these ones did warm back up though, after a few hours in the sun. there you go, you can see itjust starting to come around. ina starting to come around. in a moment, the news the an —— at one. but first the weather with darren bett. there is a change coming about as
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low pressure is pushing to the near continent and high pressure is building from the north. that brings in the colder air, to break up the cloud and give more frost overnight. patchy frost tonight. there will be a lot of cloud in general. showers in the south of england. a wintry mix moving from northern ireland, to northern england. and the lowest temperatures in scotland. so a touch of frost here and there, eve no—one the midlands, the cloud maybe unreliable. frost that could lift in the morning. that is how we start in the morning. that is how we start in the morning. that is how we start in the morning. brighter skies in the south—west and south wales. cloudy in the south—east. then a zone of low cloud, rain, sleet and snow over the hills into the north of england and wales. icy patches in the north of scotland, a frosty start for
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western scotland and northern ireland. lots of sunshine and wintry inwinds. a drab day for much of wales and the midlandses, six or seven celsius, colder in the north but with the sunshine. temperatures falling in the evening. windy in a large part of england and wales. cloud in the south. that will clear. so not as cold here. with the clearer skies for longer in the north, the temperatures getting down to minus 9 or10. temperatures getting down to minus 9 or 10. here we are close to thester centre of the high pressure. to the south, a keen wind blowing in the south of england and wales. cloud coming and going. north more in the way of sunshine. cold on sunday. cold into the early next
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week but probably more cloud. there‘s mounting criticism of the decision to release serial six attackerjohn worboys. —— sex attacker. the former black cab driver has spent nine years in prison for attacking 12 women. the head of the parole board apologises that some of his victims weren‘t told he is to be released. when we released the information about the decision, my understanding today is that we believed all the victims had been told about that decision, but we are checking today exactly what did happen, because clearly something went wrong. police said in 2010 they believed worboys had assualted more than 100 women. we‘ll discuss what might happen now. also this lunchtime. the number of new cars sold fell last year for the first time in six years. diesel car sales were sharply down. a serious case review
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into the murder of two—year—old jeremiah regis—ngaujah wants improvements to
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