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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 6, 2018 6:00am-7:00am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, withjon kay and mega munchetty. a call for the victims of serial sex attackerjohn worboys to have the chance to give evidence against him, following the announcement he is to be released from jail. this programme has been told some of the women whose stories weren't heard in court now want their cases to be reviewed by the police. good morning, it is saturday 6 january. also this morning: online casino operators are accused by the industry's watchdog of failing to prevent money laundering and protect problem gamblers. in sport, england's all is continue to toil in the ashes test. it was a dream start for liverpool defender virgilvan dream start for liverpool defender virgil van dyck as he scores a winner over rivals everton. and what does it take to cut it as a ninja? i have been having a go at the sport
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that started injapan ten years ago, and is now taking a firm hold here in the uk. temperatures in parts of the us are predicted to fall to minus 29, as a record—breaking freeze follows heavy snow caused by the so—called bomb cyclone. not quite so cold here. stav has the details. thank you, good morning to you. well, it is turning much colder for all of us this weekend. not on the plus side we should see some sunshine, particularly tomorrow, but a return to overnight frost as well. i will have all the details for you very shortly. good morning. first, our main story: a lawyer who represented victims of the serial sex offender john worboys says some of her clients whose cases weren't taken to trial want to give evidence. the former black cab driver is being freed from jail after ten yea rs. he was convicted of 19 offences, although police believe he carried out more than 100 attacks. lawyers say that a number of women were told that their testimony wasn't required to put worboys behind bars for a longer period of time.
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tom burridge reports. the decision to release rapistjohn worboys has raised profound questions about the way sexual crimes against women are investigated, and whether the procedures for releasing criminals need changing. john worboys picked up need changing. john worboys picked up young women in his black cab, duped and drugged them, and then carried out his attacks. he was convicted of 19 offences in 2009, and given an indefinite sentence. but, in total, more than 100 women said worboys tried to drug and assault them. some allegations were investigated, but no further action was taken, on the advice of the crown prosecution service. what we can't know is why the parole board has decided he now no longer poses a risk to the public. i am not allowed by law to explain the reasons for oui’ by law to explain the reasons for our decision, and i have said before, i would like to get that changed. and so this pushes the idea
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that the parole board processes need to be much more open and transparent, and we get support for that, then i think some goodwill have come out of all of this. we need to understand whether has admitted guilt in relation to the offe nces admitted guilt in relation to the offences that he was convicted for, and the police need to look again at the possibility of prosecuting him for those many further offences for which he was also suspected. worboys‘s victims are said to be horrified release, and lawyers representing his other alleged victims say their evidence should 110w victims say their evidence should now be considered. and we will speak to lawyer kim harrison, who represented 11 of worboys‘s victims, just after 7:00am. five online gambling companies could have their licenses revoked over concern they are not doing enough to help problem gamblers or prevent money launderers from using their sites. the gambling commission has written to all 195 online casino operators, to tell them about the safeguards they should all have in place. our business correspondent jonty bloom reports. 0ne
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one third of all gambling in the uk is now online, and it is worth billions of pounds. the gambling commission has been reviewing the safeguards that all companies should have in place. they are designed to prevent problem gambling getting out of control, and to prevent money being laundered by criminals or terrorists. sarah harrison, chief executive of the gambling commission, said... but the commission found many signs that customers' gambling was becoming compulsive were not being followed up, and some staff had little idea of how to stop money laundering, or in some cases, even what it was. as a result, the gambling commission is warning all online casino operators to review their procedures, and has begun an investigation into 17 online companies. it is considering whether it should review the licences of five of them. losing its licence would mean a company would be unable
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to continue to operate in the uk. president trump has taken to twitter overnight to show his continued frustration over the release of a controversial book documenting his first year in the white house. calling the author of the book, michael wolff, a total loser, the president accuses him of making up stories. mr trump also calls his former chief strategist steve bannon ‘sloppy steve', claiming he cried when he was fired. the book, called fire and fury, has now gone on sale early, despite attempts by the white house to block its publication. the united states has been criticised by other members of the united nations security council for calling an emergency meeting to discuss anti—government protests in iran. china and france said the unrest did not threaten international security. the iranian ambassador called the meeting a farce, and repeated claims that the protests were directed from abroad. easyjet, ladbrokes and virgin money are among the major employers who have been revealed to pay women, on average, at least 15% less than men. organisations with more
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than 250 workers must publish their figures by april. more than 500 have done so. another 8,000 must do by april, or risk being fined, under a new law intended to tackle workplace discrimination. a plane has been evacuated after two jets collided on the tarmac at toronto airport, the second incident there in five months. 168 passengers and six crew on board one of the aircraft had to escape by emergency slides. the tail of the other plane, which was empty, caught fire. last year two planes, which were also on the ground, clipped their wings. weather forecasters in the united states have warned that the weekend could bring record—breaking low temperatures in some parts of the north—east. the national weather service predicts wind chills as low as minus a0 degrees celsius. let's find out more from meteorologist cheryl nelson, who is in virginia. had to have you with us. thank you
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very much forjoining us. we are hearing all sorts of new weather turns, a bomb cyclone and these amazing temperatures as well. yes, so amazing temperatures as well. yes, so the bomb cyclone, the actual name for that is bombogenesis, and that isa for that is bombogenesis, and that is a neurological term and that means you have a one millimetre fall in 2a hours, and we had double that. so this storm intensified at a rapid rate, and we had snow. 12 to 18 inches across parts of the north—eastern part of the country. i am in norfolk tom virginia, where we had ten inches of snow. and now we are dealing with part two. at two is that it cold weather you talked about, a good 20 fahrenheit below normal as we head into the day tomorrow and sunday, as well, for much of the eastern parts of the united states. you know, cheryl,
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often when we get poor weather and we have had some snow, nothing compared with what you guys are going through, we always complain it ta kes going through, we always complain it takes us a little bit by surprise, and we struggle to deal with it. how are people dealing with it in the united states, where they have been hit hardest? well, the good news about this storm is it was very well forecast so people knew what was coming. nonetheless, a lot of people think they are prepared and they go out on the icy roads because the secondary roads are a mess, the primary roads are ok but there have been numerous reports of people getting stuck in the snow, car accidents, and also there is nowhere to put the snow. cities like norfolk, virginia, we are not accustomed to getting close to a foot of snow. in an interesting fa ct, foot of snow. in an interesting fact, yesterday the city of norfolk had 91 truckloads of snow which they actually took to the parking lot of oui’ actually took to the parking lot of our local baseball stadium because they had nowhere else to put it. so they had nowhere else to put it. so they dumped it in the stadium? they
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dumped the snow in the stadium? they dumped it in the stadium? they dumped the snow in the stadium7m the parking lot of the stadium, not in the stadium. 0h the parking lot of the stadium, not in the stadium. oh my goodness, that is one way to deal with it. so you have had a of snow, you are saying. what about... where are the worst hit parts of the country, and in terms of the forecast going forwards, what is expected to happen next? the worst hit parts of the country will actually be the north—east, so places like massachusetts, the boston area, they had not only 12 to 18 inches of snow, but also they had tidal flooding as well. so you had that water flooding in from the atlantic 0cean, water flooding in from the atlantic ocean, and a lot of people's homes we re ocean, and a lot of people's homes were flooded and you had icy water flowing down streets. people lost their vehicles. so i feel especially bad for residents of eastern massachusetts. heading into the weekend, that is the bitter cold. the good news is, going into the second half of january, the good news is, going into the second half ofjanuary, we might have somewhat of a january saw, which we need across the eastern pa rt which we need across the eastern part of the united states to get rid
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of all at snow —— thaw. so everyone can get back to a somewhat normal life. well, we wish you all well. you have obviously been some fatalities as well, so we are very mindful of the weather hurting people as well. thank you so much for telling us what it is like that. good luck. thank you so much. plans to improve reading standards amongst children from disadvantaged backgrounds have been announced by the department of education. there will be a network of 35 literacy—teaching centres across england, to work with primary schools that are in challenging areas. labour says the funding will do nothing to change government cuts to school budgets. there will also be schemes to improve the vocabulary of pre—school children in the north of england. church, cheese. can you hear that? closing the inequality gap in classrooms is key to giving every child the best start. research has shown that five —year—olds who struggle with language are six times less likely to reach the expected standard in english at the age of 11 than those with good language skills. today, the government has launched literacy hubs backed by a
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£6 million of investments to improve standards in reading and writing. the idea, similar to one launched in 2014 for maths, will enable high performing schools to share knowledge and resources with those in deprived areas. this is about investing around the country, winning together teachers and literary specialists, so we can make sure we do even better on reading and writing standards, but also that we don't see any children falling behind. the plans also include a £5 million investment to include vocabulary for children before they go to school in the north of england. labour says the funding will do nothing to change government cuts to school budgets. a bar owner has been left shaken but not stirred after being reunited with what is thought to be the most expensive vodka bottle in the world. made of gold and silver, with a diamond—encrusted replica of the russian imperial eagle on its cap, this extravagant bottle on a construction site in the city.
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but it is not believed the theft will affect its value, and the bar owner says he simply intends to fill it up again. so maybe someone drank it, but it is the bottle and not the vodka which was valuable. dry january. let's have a look at the saturday morning papers. the daily mailfront page, the nhs saying don't get ill. we we re the nhs saying don't get ill. we were talking about coping with the winter nhs crisis, telling the public not to get ill. following an exceptionally busy week for the nhs, people have been urged to stay well this week. this advice has included stocking up on medicines, wrapping up stocking up on medicines, wrapping up warm, and trying to nip any early symptoms of cold in the bud. the
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daily mirror's front story is that one of those convicted in killing james bulger in the 19905 is to face another trial, this time over allegations of possessing child abuse images. he is now 35 and has a new identity, and for that reason it has been decided that the trial will be held in secret, in private. we will find out later what happened, but the mirror are asking questions about whether that should happen. the date and place of the trial and the details as it happens will not be publicised. the financial times this weekend, their top story is fire and fury, the book about being in5ide fire and fury, the book about being inside the white house, and donald trump has been tweeting a5 inside the white house, and donald trump has been tweeting as recently a5 trump has been tweeting as recently as an hourago trump has been tweeting as recently as an hour ago deriding it. and productivityjumping as an hour ago deriding it. and productivity jumping at the fastest rate for six years during the third quarter last year year, raising
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hopes for a turnaround in the uk economy. and when ben was here yesterday he said that car sales have dropped to the lowest in six years, have dropped to the lowest in six yea r5, partly have dropped to the lowest in six year5, partly because we feel we don't have enough extra money in our pockets to spend on luxury goods. also reflecting on the future of diesel cars. and the daily telegraph has lilyjones in the darkest 0ur, talking about her own family connections to the second world war —— darkest hour. and we expect some kind of reshuffle of the cabinet in the next week or two on the speculation is thatjeremy hunt might be promoted to become deputy prime minister, but theresa may is torn over whether it is the right time to do that, and it might look like she was promoting him at a time when the nhs is struggling. that might affect that reshuffle. you
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pointed that picture out of lily jone5, pointed that picture out of lily jones, i have made a list of pictures i want to see. darkest hour look5 excellent, and a5 pictures i want to see. darkest hour look5 excellent, and as i said, gary 0ldman play5 winston churchill. and gearing up towards the oscars in march and april, all these films competing for it. we talked about some amazing temperatures in america. what about here. look at it. canadian arctic air. it's been acro55 look at it. canadian arctic air. it's been across this part of the world for weeks. an extremely cold spell. these are daytime temperatures. —11 degrees in new york. the average is around three degrees. minu5 seven celsius. at
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night, even colder. it looks like toronto, quebec, genuine —— generally —23, —25 degrees. after that moves out, then there is ice. tho5e temperatures will be coming up a little less cold. back home, things are set to turn colder was well this weekend. not as cold as that. if you don't mind the cold and enjoy the sunshine, it will be pleasant. we start with a lot of cloud around, particularly for england and wales. the wearers you are heading out. some rain in some hill snow affecting part5 are heading out. some rain in some hill snow affecting parts of north wales, central and northern england. you can see the blob5 of white indicating snow. a bit of cloud to start from northern ireland. the
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generally speaking, a cold start for scotland. a sunny day to much of scotland. a sunny day to much of scotland. then into northern england i5 scotland. then into northern england is as cold northerly pu5h pushes the band southward. by is as cold northerly push pushes the band southward. by the end of the afternoon, most of the cloud with showery rain will be across southern england. as you can imagine, tonight, with those clearing skies, even tonight, with those clearing skies, eve n a cross tonight, with those clearing skies, even across the south, a really cold one. you can see the blue cover —— blue—collar extending southwards. a bit more to freeze across the south—east. you can see temperatures across freezing. very cold further north. it means sunday, a very cold start but plenty of crisp winter sunshine. a bit more of a breeze across the south—east. further north, that will be lighter. you can
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see this area of pressure. gradually through monday, we will start to see the cloud increasing. thank you very much, stav. keep those big blue patches away. let's find out some more because jane and jason are here with the film review. hello and a very warm welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's cinema releases i'm joined by jason solomons. what have you been watching this week? this week, we find out what happened when christopher plummer replaced kevin spacey in ridley scott's all the money in the world, a kidnap drama set mainly in 19705 italy but also on a huge estate in england.
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and saddle up for the return of the wild west. but is it the western revived or revised in hostiles? christian bale and rosamund pike, take to the wide open spaces for the violence of the wild west. and ben stiller checks in for a midlife crisis in brad's status, a comedy about middle age and loss and reflecting on your existence while you take your son to colleges. but let's start with all the money in the world. i'm reeling from the fact that christopher plummer is 88, because he looks astonishing. that is what you can do with all the money in the world, a lot of cgi! john paul getty, who kevin spacey was playing, and the film has been ‘despaceyed' and replaced very famously by christopher plummer, the very feat of that is what marks this film out as a footnote in film history. extraordinary from ridley scott
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to reshape his film around a new performance in christopher plummer. we watch the film now, especially in this climate, trying to see the join, to see if there was a ready break glow of cgi inserts from christopher plummer. can we spot the ghost of kevin spacey — you can't at all. the film is seamlessly done, and the reshoots are beautifully done and i think christopher plummer is fabulous in the role ofjohn paul getty. i think they would have been a different... ridley scott talked about how christopher plummer has a twinkle in his eye, whereas kevin spacey has a more cold look, more evil look, and i think that gives the film a lot more heart. we kind of pityjohn paul getty for being the richest man, but he is notjust the richest man but the richest man there has ever been in the world. and his grandson is kidnapped. yes, that's the essence. it was a huge media case back in the 19705, it gripped the world,
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asjohn paul getty refused to pay the ransom, $17 million, which back in 1973 was quite a lot of money! the point was that it became this kind of case and he refused to budge and i think we are supposed to seejohn paul getty as a curmudgeonly scrooge type, but christopher plummer gives it a real edge. there is a fabulous speech about him not trusting people, only objects, of which he amasses a huge amount. they don't give him grief. but the rest of the film is going on, michelle williams, golden globe nominated, and we will find out the results from la on monday morning. the film has been nominated for, i guess, the feat of scott getting it together. christopher plummer is nominated for that performance and michelle williams is nominated for the performance of gayle, the mum, and here she is wandering my son, paul, must be very frightened right now. i know i'm frightened for him.
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so, to the people who took him, i don't care why you did this, but i ask as a mother that you think of your own children or the child that you once were and set my boy free. thank you. her son's disappeared. a mother should cry for her son. enough. let the lady through. let's go! miss getty, i'm corvo. i'm the lead investigator. would you please follow us. tell us more. you said you had the money. i'm a big fan of michelle williams, and she has spoken quite nicely about how she felt ridley scott was trying to really show this horrendous story of the kidnap of a child through the mother's eyes. does that work, does it come through? it is there. she reminded me of katherine hepburn with that accent. the problem is i didn't know who i should be watching. obviously the story between kevin spacey and christopher plummer
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deflected a lot, and i was watching plummer and it's quite a hammy role, asjohn paul getty. she's doing something else. and then you've got the son, played by charlie plummer, no relation, kidnapped and held hostage in calabria by the italian mafia. the ‘ndrangheta. so you never quite know what the centre of the story is. for me, it became about plummer, and it kind of eclipses michelle williams, who is very good in the role, and the film looks good in a classic ridley scott smooth way. itjust didn't get to the heart of the matter. your heart went out to what it must be like to being the richest man in the world. it's something i've been contemplating! that's curious! and rather enjoying.
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curious! is the next film going to be quite brutal? i have heard lots about it but not seen it, hostiles. there is always room for one or two westerns per year now. it used to be what hollywood and america was made on. but now hostiles, i think we can tell there is irony in the title. it's what american armies called, what american cowboys and soldiers used to call the native americans, the injuns they were known as. we're not allowed to call them that now. when you have a film that revises that, what do you do about the brutality of the old west? the way of the gun. this film opens with rosamund pike and her entire family wiped out by comanche indians, so you are already thinking, i don't see where the balance is with a new look at the west, where we expect white america to be slightly kind of apologetic for the way native americans were treated. this film doesn't do that, which is rather brave of it. christian bale is the army man who has to escort a posse of cheyenne indians back to their natural homeland,
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and they come under attack from comanche indians. it is about warring factions. nobody comes out of it particularly well. it is fairly brutal and bleak landscape. but i think that is what it was like. so that realism that is coming into the western, that revisionism of what the hero is, pat garritt, and going back to billy the kid or dances with wolves with kevin costner. but it doesn't quite tell it from the point of view of the indian. quite a tough watch? it is. and you don't get the payoff that you usually get with the hero emerging. a bit more uplift in our third choice today, i say with some hope? it's a comedy, but a maudlin one, about ben stiller experiencing a midlife crisis. i thought this was very funny, directed by mike whyte, who people might know as the director of school of rock forjack black. this is about ben stiller who has to take his son, troy, on a tour of colleges. americans do this, flying off to see which colleges they want to get into, one of which is harvard. ben stiller was never able to get into it, as brad but his son troy harbours great ambitions of getting into it.
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but it sparks in brad, a reminiscence about all of his college chums and how much better than him they have all done at life. a—ha. i couldn't help but wonder, when was the last time craig fisher flew in economy? probably not in decades. mr fisher, can i offer you a warm towel? yes, thank you. i know jason hadfield has his own private plane. never has to fly commercial at all. nick pascale probably flies private, too. must be nice to always have the seas part for you. nothing out of reach.
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everything an option. it must be like a drug, always feeling important and special. better than, all the adventures, the exotic destinations. 0h, great. so does everyone leave the cinema feeling completely inadequate? a first world problem. they are. he envies everyone, his son's youth, his son's friends, they are all perky and bright. but then he confesses to them and they say, to pull yourself together, mate. you are all right. you live in sacramento, that's about the only thing you have done well. it's about assessing those things, and i thought it was painfully smart and painfully funny, well done and very well performed by ben stiller, who i think we think of as a cometic performer, doing his blue steel lot. we do, yes.
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but he does this well and he gets that midlife crisis very well, but perhaps it's a bit close to home for me, not that my son is at college yet. let's talk about something lovely. why not. the best out. you ask me this, i still have to say paddington 2. it is notjust the best out, it is one of the best films of last year and stretching into this year. it is doing great box office. and i think he isjust adorable in all his little outfits, lost in the big city of london. i mean, i've seen it twice. if i was the richest man in the world, i'd go and see paddington 2 every day. in your own private jet. surely you would have one of those, jason solomons? to stay in? i would get the dvd of limehouse gollum, it is out now. this is a sort of east end set victorian melodrama style. starring the great bill nighy — and a wonderful performance from 0livia cooke, a young british actor. danny mays.
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about murders going on. a jack the ripper—style thriller set in the east end with the london fog and people out and about like 0liver creatures going out and going oom pah—pah, but a grisly murder at the bottom of it, and it captures that gothic horror of london very, very well. interesting and well done. and as you have hinted, award season is nearly upon us, so we'll be talking plenty in the coming weeks. thank you for now, jason solomons. a taster of what is on offer this week. quick reminder before we go, all our film news and reviews from across the bbc are online. sure you know the address but there it is, bbc.co.uk/mark kermode. all previous programmes are on the iplayer. that is it for this week. enjoy your cinemagoing. goodbye. hello, this is breakfast, withjon kay and naga munchetty. good morning. here is a summary of today's main stories from bbc news: a lawyer who represented victims of the serial sex offender john worboys says some of her clients whose cases weren't taken to trial want to give evidence. the former black cab driver is being freed from jail, ten years after being convicted of 19 offences, although police believe he attacked many more.
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lawyers say that a number of women were told that their testimony wasn't required to put worboys behind bars for a longer period of time. five online gambling companies could have their licenses revoked over concern they are not doing enough to help problem gamblers or prevent money launderers from using their sites. the gambling commission has written to all 195 online casino operators, to tell them about the safeguards they should all have in place. it comes after some companies were not following up with gamblers who we re not following up with gamblers who were addicted, and failed to prevent money laundering by criminals or terrorists. president trump has taken to twitter overnight to show his continued frustration over the release of a controversial book documenting his first year in the white house. calling the author of the book, michael wolff, a total loser, the president accuses him of making up stories. mr trump also calls his former chief strategist steve bannon ‘sloppy steve', claiming he cried when he was fired.
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the book, called fire and fury, has now gone on sale early, despite attempts by the white house to block its publication. easyjet, ladbrokes and virgin money are among the major employers who have been revealed to pay women, on average, at least 15% less than men. 0rganisations with more than 250 workers must publish their figures by april. more than 500 have done so. another 8,000 must do by april, or risk being fined, under a new law intended to tackle workplace discrimination. the search for the missing mh370 malaysian airlines plane that disappeared almost four years ago is to be resumed. the jet was carrying more than 200 passengers when it vanished in 2014. now, a private us exploration company called 0cean infinity has been given permission to continue the search, which ended last year. the united states has been criticised by other members
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of the united nations security council for calling an emergency meeting to discuss anti—government protests in iran. china and france said the unrest did not threaten international security. the iranian ambassador called the meeting a farce, and repeated claims that the protests were directed from abroad. plans to improve reading standards amongst children from disadvantaged backgrounds have been announced by the department for education. there will be a network of 35 literacy—teaching centres across england, to work with primary schools that are in challenging areas. labour says the funding will do nothing to change government cuts to school budgets. there will also be schemes to improve the vocabulary of pre—school children in the north of england. if you are sitting at home and thinking you don't want to go outside, it is freezing, you ain't seen nothing yet. weather forecasters in the united states have warned that the weekend could bring record—breaking low temperatures in some parts of the north—east. the national weather service predicts wind chills as low as minus 40 degrees celsius. thousands of flights have been
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cancelled and up to 19 people have lost their lives. those are this morning's main news headlines. mike is here with the sport. to win cricket matches you have to take perhaps more than two wickets in a day. that is all england managed on the final day of —— the third day of the final ashes test. australia very much on top once again but i can cheer you up with some fa cup excitement shortly. it has been another morale—sapping day for england's bowlers in the sydney sunshine. despite taking the wickets of steve smith and usman khawaja early, it is advantage australia. the marsh brothers, mitchell and shaun, are the ones punishing england's bowlers now. mitchell has made 50, while shaun closes in on a century. australia now 454—4, a lead of 108. 0nto the fa cup third round, one of the highlights of any sporting year, because all the top
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teams enter the competition. and, in the merseyside derby, the world's most expensive defender scored the winner for liverpool, while manchester united left it late to beat derby county at old trafford. drew savage rounds up both matches. the pressure lifted off the shoulders of the man with a £75 million pricetag on his back. a debut to remember for virgil van dijk ona debut to remember for virgil van dijk on a night that provided plenty of talking points. for example, was this a penalty? the liverpool boss, kl°pp, this a penalty? the liverpool boss, klopp, didn't think so, but the referee's was the opinion that counted. james milner the calmest man at anfield. mason holgate was not. there was bound to be a reaction from firmino, the referee madly decided to step in. liverpool had had most of the play but everton countered with some quality, gylfi
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sigurdsson with a worthy second—half equaliser. until the big moment arrived for a certain dutch defender. a decent looking corner kick, but didn't get it, van dijk did. the man brought to strengthen their defence delighted fans and manager alike with a winning goal. yes, in front of the goal, makes it even better. really good. it was a merseyside derby, so that extra push for both teams, and you saw that tonight. it was a proper, proper cup fight, and i like that. championship side derby had put on a proper flight side derby had put on a proper flight away to manchester united, who were six minutes away from a replay when this happened. lingard, good hands. he has done it again! lingard, magnificent strike. derby will be free to concentrate on their push tojoin will be free to concentrate on their push to join manchester united in the premier league. lukaku wrapped things up at the end, the site please to avoid another defeat.
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as you saw, a rather unsavoury incident in the first half of that match. let's have another look. holgate does push firmino into the stands, and afterwards it appears firmino says something unwelcome in portuguese as the players come together. the referee has included it in his report, but they were not looked at the time. it is something we may hear more about in the coming hours and days. 0n fa cup third—round weekend, we were looking forward to seeing the return of jamie vardy to his old club, fleetwood town. but he is injured, so it seems unlikely he will be risked by leicester in the first cup tie of the day. elsewhere, there are nine premier league teams hoping to avoid an upset against lower—league teams, while there is an intriguing contest at the etihad. the runaway premier league leaders, manchester city, take on burnley, this season's surprise package, who are seventh in the table. of course we are going to rotate in
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some players, but the focus is going to burnley, and what they have done so far is difficult. they do not concede goals. they have received one goal, the other games all 1—0, 1-0. and one goal, the other games all 1—0, 1—0. and they show a strong physicality. the feud between manchester united managerjose mourinho and chelsea's antonio conte appears to be escalating. in mourinho's latestjibe, he said he would never be suspended for match—fixing. conte was given a four—match ban a few years ago for failing to report match fixing at his previous club, siena, although he was later cleared of any wrongdoing. mourinho was responding after conte said he was getting old and losing his memory when it came to his own touch—line antics. bath ended their three—match losing run in rugby union's premiership last night with a comfortable 46—25 victory at struggling worcester. they pulled away after the break with a flurry of tries, lockjames phillips going over for only the second time in his 63 league games to secure the bonus point for bath.
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in the pro14, scarlets have opened up a seven—point lead at the top of conference b with a dominant, 47—13 bonus—point win over dragons. the victory means scarlets are unbeaten in five welsh derbies this season. elsewhere, edinburgh beat southern kings. it is the sport that fuses gymnastics and free—running, and now, you can go on and become a professional ninja. ten years after it started as a tv contest injapan, athletes in the uk are getting ready for the fifth championship here. so i went along to one of the dozens of places where you can start on a ninja course — indeed, europe's largest one, in manchester. how long does it take to become a
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ninja? to become a professional, 50 yea rs. ninja? to become a professional, 50 years. but for someone like you, gymnastic, athletic... i went years. but for someone like you, gymnastic, athletic... iwent to have a look at europe's biggest one. running up the wall, hanging upside down, the increasingly common ninja. it is one of the new sporting crazes to be hitting the uk, and it started injapan. to be hitting the uk, and it started in japan. straightaway you to be hitting the uk, and it started injapan. straightaway you can see how challenging ninja course gives, with just the simple person swings, if you like, testing even the best of them. a ninja is officially defined as a person skilled in the
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japanese art of ninja two, the combination of free—running, obstacle racing and gymnastics. you're using your body like as a monkey. you are climbing, you're twisting your body, from the core areas. i think if you go to a normal gym y°u areas. i think if you go to a normal gym you are not getting anywhere near to ninja warrior. this does bring out the inner slot in you. whilejohnny trains bring out the inner slot in you. while johnny trains on bring out the inner slot in you. whilejohnny trains on the professional course in manchester, there are beginner slopes to get you started as you raise your mates for fun, building up to the intermediate and advanced courses, where the falls get bigger. a lot of these obstacles falls get bigger. a lot of these o bsta cles it falls get bigger. a lot of these obstacles it is about the technique in the preparation. i know it is a race, but it is in the planning as well. look at that for a role, though, eh? —— roll. this is the best place, in the end, isn't it?
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though, eh? —— roll. this is the best place, in the end, isn't mm is completely different to your normal gym. so you have all the ninja obstacles, it is challenging, it is fun. and i think the gym can bea it is fun. and i think the gym can be a little bit boring, so this keeps you motivated, and having fun. it is mentally and physically challenging. so it doesn't matter how fit you are, you need to have a certain technique to get accustomed to the apparatus. ninja courses around the world have become famous for their various challenges, like the spider wall. the trouble is, the longer you stay on this, the more sweaty you get. i think i am ready tojump. sweaty you get. i think i am ready to jump. just the fact that you think you can't do it and you just do it. and you have your friends like her who are motivated, and once you do it, even better. and the infamous climb at the end, when you eventually get there. that set. —— thatis eventually get there. that set. —— that is it. ninja warrior. a bit of cheating, maybe. but you do feel
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like you're one with the universe. there you are, the defending champion, johnny. it does bring out the inner child. i like the fact you could do the beginner courses, the children's courses, a bit like skiing, the beginner up to the black run, which is the professional ninja course. is that the one you are doing? i did a couple of things, but i could never complete it. i did the slot bar. there was that one with a guy... i think that is called the sammon bar. and johnny is one of the few who can do it —— salmon. sammon bar. and johnny is one of the few who can do it -- salmon. it is like a soft play for adults, isn't it? let's bring you up—to—date with the main stories. alleged victims of the serial sex offenderjohn worboys, whose cases were not taken to trial, say they want their day in court. in
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freezing temperatures recorded across the east coast of america in the aftermath of what is known as a bomb cyclone. yesterday we were talking about this. you heard about this last —— latte levy. a lot of people are taking disposable coffee cups, and the idea is that if you don't use one of those throwaway cups, then you would get a discount if you took your own plastic cup. the inside of those is lined with plastic so it makes it difficult to recycle when they are not plastic cups. lots of you have got in touch with pictures to the racks as facebook and twitter pages, including rachel, who collected 29 coffee cups in less than a mile, walking around near her home in falkirk on her afternoon walk with her dog. that is incredible, isn't it? one of our viewers got 50p off
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their coffee at gordon street in glasgow. that is because they used their reusable cup. so giving people discounts rather than charging people extra. another viewer said they have been using this awesome to raonic cup, and not a paper they have been using this awesome to raonic cup, and nota paper cup, as it says proudly. and it still hasn't smashed, well done. i have one at home. the ceramic ones? it is actually a plastic one, which makes me wrangle with how environ mentally friendly it is, but i reuse it. stav has a weather for us. what about the state of the weather in the uk? not as cold here as it is in the uk? not as cold here as it is in the north—eastern united states. we have arctic winds down from the north thanks to an area of high pressure. central northern area is starting a sunny and cold with the
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risk of ice but also some ice across the south—west of england. watch out if you are heading out first thing. for england and wales, a rather cloudy start. 0utbreaks for england and wales, a rather cloudy start. outbreaks of rain across central northern part. temperatures low enough to produce that. a few wintry showers across north—east england but generally speaking, we're going to start off ona dry speaking, we're going to start off on a dry note. cold and frosty the parts of scotland. that north—easterly wind will be brisk. it will push the cloud across england and wales. it will be located across southern counties of england the skies brightening up nicely. a few wintry showers. it really feel quite cold. as we head into the overnight period, it will clear away. brisk winds here. a cold
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night but not quite as cold as it is going to be further north. —10 degrees into central scotland. tomorrow morning, a cold and frosty start. loads of sunshine around. it will stay dry and sunny or date. still quite brisk across the south—east. temperatures barely above freezing in the north. there is our area of high pressure. it will allow more of an easterly wind to build as we go through monday. this weather front will let out in the middle part of the week. for monday, another cold start. the best of the sunshine. the cloud will continue to encroach in from the south—east. clad in rain pushing in from the west. it is becoming more mild. you know you are used to
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winter when you look at six degrees and think that is brilliant. now it's time for click. spencer kelly and the team are getting ready for their live welcome. hello, welcome. welcome, how are you? hello... ? welcome, welcome... second script — "how are you? how are you?" hello, everybody! i am literally being built from the skin out, currently, by these two lovely ladies who are going to try to make me look different... the all right, then. we are all good to go, brendan, you happy? so what we're going to do is go to silence, please, and go to black.
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lose the house lights. announcer: this is bbc click live. please welcome your host, spencer kelly! cheering and applause erm...right! there. hello! welcome. my own floor! welcome to click live! and have we got a show for you...! have we got a show for them? we have, we're ready to go. laughter we have some really amazing things for you tonight. we've got some things that noise, we've got some things that fly, we have some things for you to taste. some of it won't work, 0k? laughter bear with us, because hopefully the stuff that does work — fingers crossed,
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and a lot of it has in rehearsals — it is a world—first, and you won't see this anywhere else, and no—one has seen this before you. before any of that, i have to introduce you to the other half of the show. please welcome to the stage kate russell. applause brilliant, isn't it? when they said i'd have my name in lights, i was expecting more broadway than boardwalk — but it's a start! it's going to be a really, really crammed show. and i don't want you getting too comfortable, because there's a lot of audience participation. so i hope you're ready to take part. do you want to see some tech? crowd: yes! good stuff. i don't believe you. do you want to see some tech? crowd: yes!
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computers are a wonderful thing, but we're going to put them to one sidejust for the moment. i'd like to introduce you to the power of your own mind. breathe slowly and gently, and i'll discover more about you, with just a candle. now, i sometimes get some powers and signals through, and sometimes i get things wrong. but most of the time, it's right. so stay with me. i mightjust get pieces of information that come... i'm starting with a "".g let me just put this down for a moment.
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there's a "g" — so i'm going to start to pull something out of the audience. hopefully it's one of you. i'm getting a "".g let's start with "g" — gareth? i think this is him. because those are two different sites. we havejoe, and he's going to identify some people in the audience, and he's going to pretend to read their mind by telling them things about them, by reading information from them. it's actually us researching these people online and feeding that to him through a hidden earpiece. les? les...? it could have been a man, but i won't make wild assertions. is there a les? leslie? welcome to the show. glad you've got a microphone with you now. so we're researching some of the people in the audience right now. the gentleman who's just sat down in front of us — i've just found the address details of somebody who sat down at the front with her partner as well. so we're researching as much as we can about the people that are in front of us. do you have children called jack and sasha? um. . .we have cats called jack and sasha. oh, it's close! it's close, isn't it? i've set up a free wi—fi network. most people quite happily
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click "free wi—fi". it says please type in their name, click "connect", and that is how we start. we then have their name. it's the first thing to work from. fortunately, as well, because it's quite a big event, people will like the facebook page. people will say, "i'm at bbc click." we can see that publicly and openly. is this legal? completely legal, yes. that's a question we get asked a lot. we're just looking at information people have made available themselves. but congratulations on your four—year anniversary. a round of applause please. applause there's two main lessons - be careful what you're signing up for. the biggest thing that's helping us the most right now — people's social media profiles are open and public. we're not saying not to use it, just check that your profile is private. i'm a complete stranger to everybody in this audience, but so far i've been able to go onto all of their profiles and look at where they were born, their pictures, their statuses. as a total stranger, you probably don't want me reading that information.
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so just — we're not saying don't use it — just make it private so only your friends can see. that would protect you from all of the things we've found out so far, actually. we listen to radio, to tv, to music, to podcasts, using speakers. big speakers in your house and small speakers that you wear in your ears or that are built into your smartphones. so i'm just choosing the perfect bit of coffee for the levitation. it has to be both kind of small, but also regular, and i don't think they normally make coffee beans with levitation in mind. one of the things that steve has been working on is ultrasounds, 0k? and we've got a few ultrasound demos here. so i'll tell you what — rather than explain more about it, shall we, uh...just give it a whirl? so i'll tell you what — who's getting something there? raise your hand if you can hear this, then drop your hand as soon
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as you can't hear it again. so this is unusual for a speaker, because usually when you switch a speaker on, everyone can hear it. right now, we're getting a really narrow beam. really focused beam of sound. imagine this is a lot like a flashlight. imagine i'm pointing a torch around the room. you'd only see certain parts of it. this is the same idea, except with sound. so we're focusing the sound and we can focus all that energy, all that sound energy, in a specific place. wow! this is the weirdest and slowest and most continuous mexican wave i've ever seen... in my direction. ssgpgggmmx fir w- ,, seriously? i tell you what — this is not if. if; if); 24:2:
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weirdness we've got. it gets even weirder. pop that down, for goodness‘s sake. this looks like it's landed from another planet. this is incredible. stephen, for the second time tonight, what on earth is going on? so, if we can in here, you can see there's quite a regular pattern on some of these. i can't get too close because it disrupts the sound field. but maybe you can see there's a few balls — a bit of a gap. so how are you using ultrasound to actually make stuff levitate? well, these speakers are producing a big ultrasound signal, that's making a standing wave. and in between the gaps of the standing wave, the balls can get trapped and they get kept in the same place. oh, wow! well, that's fantastic. in fact, that's so amazing, steve, i think we deserve a drink. would you mix us one? yes, of course, spencer. fantastic, right.
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this is the weirdest drink... we rehearsed that, could you tell? what is this, steve? we've got a lovely, lovely delight for you today. it's a single grain of coffee with a, uh...drop of milk, all levitating in the middle of the air. it's a latte. laughter you have to have it in, though. you can't have it to go, unfortunately. right, so i'm going to try this. my tongue's not long enough... really slowly... laughter 0h! you got it! applause that's really...coffee—y. that's like really, really strong. is that supposed to be that strong? yes, yeah. that's what we've found. sugar tastes sweeter, and coffee's bitter. fantastic. sri, steve, thank you very much. a round of applause for sri, steve and the ultrasound latte! applause there were so many amazing demos and displays in the show that we just can't fit it into this program. here's a look at some
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of the other highlights from our evening of delight. we transformed our tech—loving audience into musicians, as kate and i conducted the biggest ever micro:bit processor orchestra. let's have some more micro:bits over here in the air. ok, let's have a few at the back... hold those up. i can see them all in the sky. we are still waiting on the guinness book of records to get back to us, though. we explored the potential of ar, with our lucky audience members left cowering as a full—scale aircraft suddenly appeared over their heads. hello, world! 300,000 peoplejoined us on facebook live during the evening as we asked them whether robots should feel pain. edward nemil, thank you for this
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question on facebook: "sacrificing a robot for the greater good might be necessary. why would you want it to feel pain?" if we're going to keep having a servant class of robots, then we shouldn't go down that route. but the aims of increasing intelligence may make that impossible. we watched drones that study the landscape and drones that dive, as we looked at how they could help in the future. it's been absolutely amazing. have you had a good time? crowd: yes! thank you very much for watching, and we will see you soon. bye. cheering and applause cut it. well done, well done, well done. hello. this is breakfast, withjon kay and naga munchetty.
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a call for the victims of serial sex attackerjohn worboys to have the chance to give evidence against him, following the announcement he is to be released from jail. this programme has been told some of the women whose stories weren't heard in court now want their cases to be reviewed by the police. good morning, it is saturday 6th january. also this morning: online casino operators are accused by the industry's watchdog of failing to prevent money laundering and protect problem gamblers. in sport, england's all is continue to toil in the ashes test. england are being smashed around sydney. england need 133 in the
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final test. and what does it take, to cut it as a ninja?

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