Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 7, 2018 6:00am-7:00am GMT

6:00 am
hello, this is breakfast, with rogerjohnson and rachel burden. plans to give mps a vote on fox hunting are abandoned by the prime minister. the conservatives promised an option on ending the ban on hunting during last years‘ election. good morning. it's sunday, 7th january. also this morning, some of the uk's biggest retailers agree to stop selling acids and corrosive substances to under—18s, in a bid to cut the number of life—changing attacks. plans are announced to plant a new northern forest stretching from liverpool to hull. and coming up in sport, we'll have the latest from the final ashes test — you probably won't like it. and mark hughes is sacked as manager of stoke, emf’mfiégfisgsfgiwfigzs‘ffi? ,.,,, ' '
6:01 am
fl that s. that f; and s. that 7and sunny s. that and sunny sunday. —— but. it lovely and sunny sunday. —— but. it stays cold into the beginning of next week, then we will see some changes. stay with me for the full forecast later. good morning. first, our main story. theresa may will abandon plans for mps to get a vote on fox hunting before 2022 when the next general election is due to be held. in an interview on the bbc‘s andrew marr show, she confirmed she would be going back on the pledge she made in last year's manifesto. our political correspondent eleanor garnier reports. it has been illegal to set a pack of hounds on a fox for more than a decade in england and wales. instead, hunts have had to follow
6:02 am
specially laid trails of sand. many conservatives in the campaigners would like the hunting act is to be scrapped to allow horses and hounds to go back to the way things were. but having lost the tories their parliamentary majority in last yea r‘s parliamentary majority in last year's general election, theresa may's plans to give mps a vote on theissue may's plans to give mps a vote on the issue were pushed back to 2019. now, in an attempt to prove her pa rty‘s fortu nes now, in an attempt to prove her pa rty‘s fortunes and now, in an attempt to prove her party's fortunes and show showers this to the electorate, the prime minister has gone one step further. 0ne minister has gone one step further. one of the clear messages we got on a number of areas was when people are concerned about what we were proposing. just as we have looked at issues on school funding and tuition fees and housing, we are taking forward approaches in relation to that. on this issue of foxhunting, what i can say is that there will not be a vote during this parliament. for now, then, there is little chance the law on foxhunting will be changing any time soon. and you can see the whole interview with the prime minister on the andrew marr show this morning
6:03 am
at 9 o'clock on bbc one. there will also be big changes ahead in the prime minister's cabinet from tomorrow morning as theresa may begins her reshuffle. there's speculation in the papers this morning as to who will be moved or sacked. 0ur political correspondent susana mendonca is in our london newsroom this morning. what could we expect to happen over the coming days? suggestions in the sunday telegraph thatjustine greening suggestions in the sunday telegraph that justine greening is suggestions in the sunday telegraph thatjustine greening is fighting for herjob. also on the front page of the sunday times, they don't have quite as much on it, it is inside the paper this morning. 0n the front page they talk again, a bit of speculation, jeremy hunt and chris grayling linked to replacing damien green, among the possibilities being discussed. susanna is in the london newsroom. can you tell us more about that reshuffle speculation? well, it is exactly that speculation, and
6:04 am
downing street have said that it is purely speculation at this stage. what we can expect is that tomorrow will have some of the cabinet positions reshuffled and then on tuesday some of the more junior positions. you mentioned justine greening. her name has been in the mix as being moved elsewhere. some of the rumour mill suggests that she might the moved into the role currently held by andrea leadsom. all of this, of course, is happening partly because theresa may had a torrid time over the last couple of months where we saw two ministers actually standing down. another minister, damian green, was forced to resign over issues around his conduct. so she is in a position where she does need to have something of a reshuffle. the understand there is lots of pressure oi'i understand there is lots of pressure on herto understand there is lots of pressure on her to bring up new names, people who are perhaps rising stars of the party. —— who are perhaps rising stars of the party. — — we who are perhaps rising stars of the party. —— we understand. the danger for theresa may, as always with reshuffles, is that you end up creating enemies, especially if you put somebody on the back and she doesn't want to be them, or you put
6:05 am
them ona doesn't want to be them, or you put them on a roll that they don't want, that could be difficult for her. she only has a working majority of 12. we saw her lose a vote before christmas because she had rebels within her own party. she cannot afford any more rebels. it is a difficult one for her to tread. susannah carr must rank you. some of the uk's largest retailers have voluntarily agreed to stop selling acids and corrosive substances to customers under 18 years old. ministers hope the measure will help stop the rise in attacks until new laws are considered by parliament. here's our home affairs correspondent, dominic casciani. the human cost of an acid attack. where is it hurting, mate, your eyes? police officers pour water over the victim lastjuly. thieves wa nted over the victim lastjuly. thieves wanted the london delivery driver's mopeds. his helmet saved him from serious injury. police recorded more than 500 attacks involving corrosive su bsta nces than 500 attacks involving corrosive substances in england and wales in the year to last april. 0fficials think the true figure could be twice
6:06 am
as high. ministers have launched an acid action plan to cut attacks. today the first part of that plan, and voluntary ban by diy chains, including b&q, on selling harmful chemicals to under 185. including b&q, on selling harmful chemicals to under 18s. waitrose and the co—op are also involved. agreeing to challenge underage customers, just like they would if they were buying alcohol. acid attacks are most horrific crimes, and what we want to do is make sure that we restrict access, supported victims, police these attacks really affect to believe. it isn'tjust major retailers who are signing up to secure their shelves. the association representing hardware shop is urging them to play their pa rt shop is urging them to play their part as well. this one in london says the move is long overdue. definitely a good idea. we have a lwa ys definitely a good idea. we have always checked ide for acid. same thing, if you go to a supermarket and you go to buy alcohol, you are asked friday. it should either same thing here. —— you are asked for id.
6:07 am
this measure may be a stopgap. ministers want a full ban on sales to under 18s, and have asked parliament to create a new crime for carrying acid without a good reason. a growing number of men are being targetted by stalkers, according to new research by five live investigates. crime figures suggest around 450,000 men in england and wales experience stalking over the course of a year. but, according to data from 41 police forces, only 1,800 stalking offences against men have been recorded by officers over the past three years. germany's christian democrats, led by the chancellor, angela merkel, will begin five days of exploratory talks today on forming a coalition government with the social democrats. mrs merkel has been trying to build a new coalition since september after her party lost more than 60 seats in the parliamentary elections. president macron of france is due to lay wreaths at the offices in paris of the satirical magazine, charlie hebdo, to remember the victims of an islamist attack
6:08 am
there three years ago today. 12 people, including several cartoonists, died when two gunmen burst into an editorial meeting. a policeman was shot dead outside. the president will also visit a jewish supermarket in the city where four hostages were killed by another islamist two days later. nasa's longest serving astronaut, john young, has died at the age of 87. he was one ofjust 12 men who have walked on the moon, and he flew the first space shuttle mission. former commander of the international space station, chris hadfield, has described him as an inspiration. john was a fascinating, devoted and passionate and really fearless man. just a role model to so many astronauts, including the six people who are up on the space station right now. a life really well lived and a good friend of mine. plans to create a new ‘northern forest‘ stretching from liverpool to hull have been announced
6:09 am
by the government. it's providing £5.7 million to increase tree cover along a belt spanning manchester, leeds and bradford. the woodland trust is running the project, which will cost £500 million pounds over 25 years. most of that money will need to be raised by the charity itself. 0ur correspondent roger harrabin has more. the bare hills of the north. 0ne the bare hills of the north. one of the most denuded parts of a country which itself has less woodland than almost anywhere in europe. the land stripped of centuries for timber and farming, scarred by industry, overg razed by farming, scarred by industry, overgrazed by sheep farming. at snowballs near manchester, things will be different. —— smithils. planting has begun for what will be known as the northern forest. we think the northern forest will be a pathfinder for extending forest and
6:10 am
woodland right across country. we think trees and woods can add value in many different landscapes. we just want to do it here first and do it big. it isn't really a forest. the project will create new woods near towns and plant river valleys liable to flooding. but money is tight, and many of these hills will look just as bleak and 35 years. what's more, the woodland trust expects some of their cash to come from environmentalfunds expects some of their cash to come from environmental funds linked to the hs two rail line. ——. hs2. from environmental funds linked to the hs two rail line. --. h52. the supreme the hs two rail line. --. h52. the supreme irony is that the government is giving with one hand and taking it with the other, and i'm referring to the root of h52, —— the root of hsz. why can't the government did with both hands and stop threatening asian forest? year is what some ambitious planting can do. this is the national forest in the midlands. begunin the national forest in the midlands. begun in the 1990s, now to lighting local people. what a good idea. yes, now, if you
6:11 am
are doing dry january, what a good idea. yes, now, if you are doing dryjanuary, this is a few months down the line so it will be all right. pub opening hours could be extended for the wedding of meghan markle and prince harry. the wedding falls on the same day as the english and scottish fa cup finals, saturday may the 19th. licensing hours were previously extended for the wedding of the duke and duchess of cambridge in 2011. and for the queen's 90th birthday in pretty 16. we all like a good excuse for a party. if you think it's chilly where you are this morning, spare a thought for people in parts of the us and canada who are currently experiencing temperatures as low as minus 29 degrees celsius. it's really affected the way people live there. let's speak to peter franklin, a cab driver in new york. peter, good morning. thank you to
6:12 am
talking to us on the bbc. good morning. just how cold is it there? send me a sweater, i'm freezing! it is the middle of the 90, i'm unbelievably cold. when you walk outside in new york city right now your eyes are cheering up. it is the worst cold that i can really remember. new york is a very residual kind of place where people work with this kind of problem and all that, but baby, it's cold outside! could be a song in there, peter. you obviously have the heating on where you are, you look reasonably warm. just in terms of the way people are going about their everyday lives, how was it affect him things? well, people who are working on a salary, in other words they are getting paid by the week or they are getting paid by the week or the month or the year, they don't have to worry about it. if they can't get to work they can sit home and count their money. people who are and count their money. people who a re really and count their money. people who are really getting hurt in new york city are the hourly workers, such as a cab driver, for instance. it is if you don't work, you don't make any
6:13 am
money. so the weather is a serious thing. ian cold is a serious thing. but what is really the serious thing about the whole thing is the economic hurt. we have a lot of situations where restaurants are not even bothering to open up. other restau ra nts even bothering to open up. other restaurants are giving what they are calling toll discounts, in other words, hey, if you come to our restau ra nt words, hey, if you come to our restaurant tonight we will charge of 1596 restaurant tonight we will charge of 15% less. so it all comes down to money. after all, the most important thing in new york city, the most important colour in new york city is green. there is a lot of talk in this country about energy prices, how much it costs to heat your home. imean, is how much it costs to heat your home. i mean, is that a concern for new yorkers? jim blair right now you need to crank up the central heating wherever you live? no question about it. remember, most people in new york are living in apartments, which means you are at the mercy of a landlord. and there are some landlords who not in a hurry to fix their furnaces landlords who not in a hurry to fix theirfurnaces in a landlords who not in a hurry to fix their furnaces in a week like this, because every day that goes by the furnaces not working, they are
6:14 am
saving fuel money. now, that's not all the landlords, but there are a lot stop at last count there were something like 15,000 or 30,000 people without any heat. i think that was a low estimation. 0n the other hand, if you live in a house you are other hand, if you live in a house you a re really other hand, if you live in a house you are really getting hurt because then you are paying for the fuel by then you are paying for the fuel by the gallon. and for you, what does today hold? the gallon. and for you, what does today hold ? will you the gallon. and for you, what does today hold? will you be getting out today hold? will you be getting out to work today? i'm broke! really! yeah. no, i mean, the fact of the matter is, people think when it is cold or rainy that is great for driving a cab. the opposite is true. when it is cold and rainy and especially when it is as cold as it is, people don't feel like going out. they stay at home. yesterday i didn't drive and i'm not going to drive today because it is not worth the effort. so i'm getting a bit of a vacation. i'm losing money on it, but i tell you, mother nature is the boss. but shows what's going on. but i tell you, mother nature is the boss. but shows what's going onlj think the forecaster seiyu should be warming up slightly, or be less cold, anyway. —— forecast is say it
6:15 am
should be. thank you to taking the time to talk to us. that was peter, a cab driver in new york city. mother nature is the boss, and that the truth? do you know what, it was cold enough outside yesterday watching the kids playford hall. i shouldn't complain, given those temperatures in new york. if you were out in the north—east with temperatures like that, you could get frostbite in a couple of minutes. it is hazardous. we have cold, are nothing like that. a frosty start for most of the uk. gorgeous winter sunshine. a blue hue over much of the board. i will show you the south—east in a second. the final beast, windy. less cold. 0utbreaks final beast, windy. less cold. outbreaks of rain on and off. —— far
6:16 am
north—east. england and wales, cold. in the south—east, a breeze. cloud. a few showers. not as cold as further north. holding onto the breeze further south. the southern half of england and wales, a spike from the wind will make it cold. further north, not above freezing in parts of scotland after the cold start. dry and sunny in most places. another cold one. central and northern areas, widespread frost. in the south, freezing. a repeat performance on monday. windy in the south. cloud around. creeping north through the day. england and wales, by the end of the afternoon, cold and grey. further north and west,
6:17 am
sunny and a very cold day once again. we start to see some changes taking place. high pressure holding on through tuesday. this weather front will make inroads during wednesday bringing outbreaks of rain and slightly less cold air to our shores. tuesday, breezy. cloud across the board. feeling cool to be the odd shower. the odd bit of snow. across the west, a change. a messy picture. at of rain at times. something more miles in the south. 8- 10 something more miles in the south. 8— 10 degrees. chilly in the north underneath the cloud and ring. back to you. —— rain. we'll be back with the headlines at 6:30. now it's time for the film review, with jane hill and jason solomons.
6:18 am
hello, and a very warm welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's cinema releases i'm joined byjason solomons. what have you been watching this week? this week, we find out what happened when christopher plummer replaced kevin spacey in ridley scott's all the money in the world, a kidnap drama set mainly in 19705 italy but also on a huge estate in england. and saddle up for the return of the wild west. but is it the western revived or revised in hostiles? christian bale and rosamund pike, take to the wide open spaces for the violence of the wild west. and ben stiller checks in for a midlife cri5i5 in brad's status, a comedy about middle age and loss and reflecting on your existence while you take your son to colleges. but let's start with all the money in the world. i'm reeling from the fact that christopher plummer i5 88,
6:19 am
because he looks a5toni5hing. that is what you can do with all the money in the world, a lot of cgi! john paul getty, who kevin spacey was playing, and the film has been ‘despaceyed' and replaced very famou5ly by christopher plummer, the very feat of that is what mark5 this film out as a footnote in film history. extraordinary from ridley scott to reshape his film around a new performance in christopher plummer. we watch the film now, especially in this climate, trying to see the join, to see if there was a ready break glow of cg! inserts from christopher plummer. can we spot the ghost of kevin spacey — you can't at all. the film is seamlessly done, and the reshoots are beautifully done and i think christopher plummer is fabulous in the role ofjohn paul getty. i think they would have been a different...
6:20 am
ridley scott talked about how christopher plummer has a twinkle in his eye, whereas kevin spacey has a more cold look, more evil look, and i think that gives the film a lot more heart. we kind of pityjohn paul getty for being the richest man, but he is notjust the richest man but the richest man there has ever been in the world. and his grandson is kidnapped. yes, that's the essence. it was a huge media case back in the 19705, it gripped the world, a5john paul getty refused to pay the ransom, $17 million, which back in 1973 was quite a lot of money! the point was that it became this kind of case and he refused to budge and i think we are supposed to see john paul getty as a curmudgeonly scrooge type, but christopher plummer gives it a real edge. there is a fabulous speech about him not trusting people, only objects, of which he amasses a huge amount. they don't give him grief. but the rest of the film is going on, michelle williams, golden globe nominated, and we will find out the results from la on monday morning. the film has been nominated for, i guess, the feat of scott getting it together.
6:21 am
christopher plummer is nominated for that performance and michelle williams is nominated for the performance of gayle, the mum, and here she is wandering into the media storm in italy. hubbub of voices. my son, paul, must be very frightened right now. i know i'm frightened for him. so, to the people who took him, i don't care why you did this, but i ask as a mother that you think of your own children or the child that you once were and set my boy free. thank you. her son's disappeared. a mother should cry for her son. enough. let the lady through. let's go! hubbub of voices. miss getty, i'm corvo. i'm the lead investigator. would you please follow us. grazie. hubbub of voices. tell us more. you said you had the money. hubbub of voices.
6:22 am
what about your son? miss getty! i'm a big fan of michelle williams, and she has spoken quite nicely about how she felt ridley scott was trying to really show this horrendous story of the kidnap of a child through the mother '5 eyes. does that work, does it come through? it is there. she reminded me of katherine hepburn with that accent. the problem is i didn't know who i should be watching. obviously the story between kevin spacey and christopher plummer deflected a lot, and i was watching plummer and it's quite a hammy role, a5john paul getty. she's doing something else. and then you've got the son, played by charlie plummer, no relation, kidnapped and held hostage in calabria by the italian mafia. so you never quite know what the centre of the story is. for me, it became about plummer, and it kind of eclipses michelle williams, who is very good in the role, and the film looks good in a classic ridley scott smooth way. itjust didn't get to the heart of the matter.
6:23 am
your heart went out to what it must be like to being the richest man in the world. it's something i've been contemplating! that's curious! and rather enjoying. curious! is the next film going to be quite brutal? i have heard lots about it but not seen it, hostiles. there is always room for one or two westerns per year now. it used to be what hollywood and america was made on. but now hostiles, i think we can tell there is irony in the title. it's what american armies called, what american cowboys and soldiers used to call the native americans, the injuns they were known as. we're not allowed to call them that now. when you have a film that revises that, what do you do about the brutality of the old west? the way of the gun. this film opens with rosamund pike and her entire family wiped out
6:24 am
by comanche indians, so you are already thinking, i don't see where the balance is with a new look at the west, where we expect white america to be slightly kind of apologetic for the way native americans were treated. this film doesn't do that, which is rather brave of it. christian bale is the army man who has to escort a posse of cheyenne indians back to their natural homeland, and they come under attack from comanche indians. it is about warring factions. nobody comes out of it particularly well. it is fairly brutal and bleak landscape. but i think that is what it was like. so that realism that is coming into the western, that revisionism of what the hero is, pat garritt, and going back to billy the kid or dances with wolves with kevin costner. but it doesn't quite tell it from the point of view of the indian. quite a tough watch? it is. and you don't get the payoff that you usually get with the hero emerging.
6:25 am
a bit more uplift in our third choice today, i say with some hope? it's a comedy, but a maudlin one, about ben stiller experiencing a midlife crisis. i thought this was very funny, directed by mike whyte, who people might know as the director of school of rock forjack black. this is about ben stiller who has to take his son, troy, on a tour of colleges. americans do this, flying off to see which colleges they want to get into, one of which is harvard. ben stiller was never able to get into it, as brad but his son troy harbours great ambitions of getting into it. but it sparks in brad, a reminiscence about all of his college chums and how much better than him they have all done at life. a—ha. i couldn't help but wonder, when was the last time craig fisher flew in economy? probably not in decades. mr fisher, can i offer you a warm towel? yes, thank you. i know jason hadfield has his own private plane. never has to fly commercial at all. nick pascale probably flies private, too.
6:26 am
must be nice to always have the seas part for you. nothing out of reach. everything an option. it must be like a drug, always feeling important and special. better than, all the adventures, the exotic destinations. 0h, great. so does everyone leave the cinema feeling completely inadequate? a first world problem. they are. he envies everyone, his son's youth, his son's friends, they are all perky and bright. but then he confesses to them and they say,
6:27 am
to pull yourself together, mate. you are all right. you live in sacramento, that's about the only thing you have done well. it's about assessing those things, and i thought it was painfully smart and painfully funny, well done and very well performed by ben stiller, who i think we think of as a cometic performer, doing his blue steel lot. we do, yes. best out? let's talk about something lovely. why not. the best out. you ask me this, i still have to say paddington 2. it is notjust the best out, it is one of the best films of last year and stretching into this year. it is doing great box office. it's still there, charming everyone. and i think he isjust adorable in all his little outfits, lost in the big city of london. i mean, i've seen it twice.
6:28 am
i would happily go again. if i was the richest man in the world, i'd go and see paddington 2 everyday. in your own private jet. surely you would have one of those, jason solomons? for anybody who wants to stay in? i would get the dvd of limehouse gollum, it is out now. this is a sort of east end set victorian melodrama style. starring the great bill nighy — and a wonderful performance from 0livia cooke, a young british actor. danny mays is in there. it is about murders going on. a sort ofjack the ripper style thriller set in the east end with all of the london fog and people out and about like 0liver creatures going out and going oom pah—pah, but there is a grisly murder at the bottom of it, and it captures that gothic horror of london very, very well. and as you have hinted award season is nearly upon us, so we'll be talking plenty in the coming weeks. thank you very much for now, jason solomons. that is a taster of what is on offer this week. a quick reminder before we go, all ourfilm news and reviews from across the bbc are online.
6:29 am
and all previous programmes are on the iplayer. enjoy your cinema going. goodbye. hello, this is breakfast with rogerjohnson and rachel burden. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. theresa may will abandon plans set out in her election manifesto for mp5 to get a vote on overturning the fox hunting ban. in an interview on the bbc‘s andrew marr show she confirmed she would go back on her pledge, meaning mp5 cannot vote on the issue until 2022 — when the next general election will be held. the fox hunting ban was introduced by the labour government in 200a. 0ne one of the clear messages we got was a number of areas in which people we re a number of areas in which people were concerned about what we were proposing. sojust as
6:30 am
were concerned about what we were proposing. so just as we have looked at issues on school funding, tuition fees, housing, we are taking forward approaches in relation to that. on this issue of foxhunting, what i can say is that they will not be a vote during this parliament. —— there will. the prime minister will carry out a cabinet reshuffle tomorrow. it is not yet known what changes she will make, but it is reported up to six ministers could either lose their jobs or be moved. a downing street source has described such stories as pure speculation and guesswork. some of the uk's largest retailers have voluntarily agreed to stop selling acids and corrosive substances to customers under 18 years old. thousands of independent hardware shops are also expected to follow suit. ministers hope the measure will help stop the rise in attacks until new laws are considered by parliament. a growing number of men are being targeted vice stalkers, according to new research by five live
6:31 am
investigates. crime figures suggest that thousands of men of england and wales experience talking over the course of every year. according to data from over a0 police forces, 1800 stalking offences have been reported by men to officers in the past three years. plans to create a new northern forest on a belt spanning manchester, leeds and bradford have been announced by the government. new forests will be planted near towns and river valleys liable to flooding. bob and trust is running the project and will raise most of the project and will raise most of the £500 million it is expect to cross over the next five years. the east coast of north america is shivering in a record—breaking freeze. it comes after a massive snow storm that reached as far south as florida. temperatures there are forecast to fall below minus 29 degrees celsius. in parts of the us temperatures are forecast to fall below minus 29 degrees celsius. the extreme weather has so far been linked to 19 deaths. now, time to sport, but if you are a
6:32 am
cricket fan you might not want to hear it. i am wondering how soon this fifth and final test match will be over. it could very well be today. let's not be too pessimistic. we might actually run out of time to be that pessimistic. you will notice australia celebrating behind you. if you are an england cricket fan you wa ke you are an england cricket fan you wake up every morning and check your phone to see what the scorers. you don't need to check! right, you consider how bad it might be, and then in your wildest imaginations, what might actually happen. it is usually the latter that happens, and not how bad it might be. a familiar story for england, i'm afraid. i think we have been saying that since november. they are looking forward looks like an inevitable defeat in the final ashes test in sydney, and a a—0 series loss as well. trailing by303
6:33 am
a a—0 series loss as well. trailing by 303 runs ahead of their second innings, they had only lost four wickets. david millar the most recent to fall. wa to nathan lyon. captainjoe recent to fall. wa to nathan lyon. captain joe root recent to fall. wa to nathan lyon. captainjoe root is still there. he is battling, though. literally. he needed painkillers after being hit on the glove. earlier australia scored 639— seven, with both much brother scoring a century. england will not have taken 20 wickets in any of the five ashes test in the series. england currently 80— four, so still trailing by 223. they're in the bottom three of the premier league, and now on the end of the biggest shock of the fa cup third round weekend so far. so mark hughes has been sacked as stoke city manager. they were beaten 2—1 at league two side coventry on a day where manchester city safely went through. but chelsea were taken to a replay by norwich city. joe lynskey rounds up the action. it has been a dark two decades for coventry city. financial turmoil and three relegations. but this was the day the clouds parted for the sky
6:34 am
blues. it is in! the shock is back on! a2-1 blues. it is in! the shock is back on! a 2-1 win for the fourth tier side, but coventry‘s joy braut marcuse' downfall. for stoke city's manager, this result meant the inevitable. in a premier league side goes out to a lower league side in the third round, it is news. it is not the news we wanted to create prior to the game today, but it has happened. in football, moving on can leave a bitter taste, but injured jamie vardy got a warm welcome back to fleetwood. lester brought in from here for £1 million, and now he is an internationalfor here for £1 million, and now he is an international for england. here for £1 million, and now he is an internationalfor england. but the mill— nil draw never matched his star quality. i contrast, style is what defines manchester city's season. they are going to glory on all fronts. even when they fell behind to burnley, the comeback was a lwa ys behind to burnley, the comeback was always coming. eau claire! -- aguero!. two in two minutes.
6:35 am
a—star turnaround for pep guardiola's side, the giants nobly wa nts to ta ke guardiola's side, the giants nobly wants to take on. there was merely an upset at bournemouth. five years ago wigan won the cup, now they are in the third tier. they led 2—0 against their premier league opponents before things looked away. warner fought back to force a replay. but extra games at this time of year can feel like a headache. the linesman at villa did recover, and so did this underdog. from one goal down, peterborough fought back to win 3—1. this was a january day for the blues in the cup, and proved the magic still matters. for a full list of yesterday's results head to the bbc sport website. the fa cup third round continues today with eight teams in action. the first tie of the day sees championship side leeds united travel to league two newport county. it's the first time the two sides have met in the fa cup since 19a9, when newport won 3—1 at elland road. elsewhere, there are three
6:36 am
premier league teams in action. west ham are away at shrewbury town, where david moyes will be hoping to avoid a repeat of his 2003 defeat as everton manager. tottenham host afc wimbledon and holders arsenal are away to nottingham forest. philippe coutinho will become one of the most expensive footballers in history after barcelona agreed to pay up to £1a2 million. for the liverpool forward. the brazilian has spent four and a half years at anfield and liverpool have eventually decided to do the deal after turning down three bids for him from barcelona in the summer. the initial payment will be £105 million, a british record. with the rest in add—ons. he's agreed a 55—year deal at the camp nou. northampton ended their run of seven consecutive premiership defeats with a 22—19 win over gloucester at franklin's gardens yesterday. the visitors led for much of the match. but a final—minute penalty try gave saints their first win since september. gloucester earnt a losing bonus point, with tries forjames hanson and john afoa in addition to their own penalty try. elsewhere, leicester came from behind to beat london irish, and sale narrowly got past harlequins. 05preys won the welsh derby in the pro1a, beating cardiff blues
6:37 am
by a single point. it turned on this piece of quick thinking from wales' fly half dan biggar, who set up what proved to be the winning score for 05preys, finished off byjustin tipuric. the blues attempted to mount a late comeback, but but the home side held on to win 29—28 in swansea. cardiff are still without a win there in 12 years. ulster slumped to a 38—7 defeat against leinster in dublin, jordan larmour and fergus mcfadden scored two tries apiece. and jonny sexton also touched down with this try. the victory leaves leinster within two points of leaders scarlets in conference b of the pro 1a. elsewhere glasgow warriors maintained their spot at the top of conference a. they beat zebre. 16—year—old james bowen has become the youngest jockey to win the welsh grand national. fittingly he was on the 16—1 shot raz de maree. taking the lead two fences from home and powering to victory. the jockey might be young, but at 13, the horse is the oldest
6:38 am
to win the race in modern times. just three years between the two, which is rather astounding. this is so stupid, but i was hope in it might show pictures of the game yesterday, i was there and i like to see myself on tv! that would be really exciting. do you know for a fa ct really exciting. do you know for a fact that the cameras picked you out? no, i wasjust fact that the cameras picked you out? no, iwasjust hoping. my goodness. cavill. there is a little thing underneath that shows you as well. hopefully england will still be playing cricket next time we see you. no guarantee of that, that's for sure. the red carpet is being rolled out, the champagne is on ice and the statuettes are about to be handed over, but the start of the 2018 hollywood awards season is expected to get off to an unusual start at the golden globes tonight. famous faces have vowed to wear all—black in solidarity against sexism and harrassment, prompted by a series of recent abuse allegations in the industry. we'll speak to one of the founding
6:39 am
members of the ‘time's up' campaign in a moment, but first here's our north america correspondent james cook who's in la. in hollywood, they are getting ready to put their best foot forward. at this year's award season, there may be more protest than parties. the dirty secrets of the movie business have been exposed in recent months and now scores of stars say they will wear black to the golden globes to promote a campaign called time's up. i never thought it would happen in my lifetime. truly i didn't. i think tomorrow, people will be in black, that i don't think it will be funereal, i think it will be a celebration of all of us saying, it is time to deal with this. it is time to deal with this and not put up time to deal with this and not put up at it any more. we are all wearing black to stand in solidarity, not just the women and what is happening in hollywood in this industry, but to represent and stand for all women across all
6:40 am
industries and to support them. and also to support equality in all its forms. i've suffered it all and worse. by the time i got to the music is the site just wasn't having it. -- music is the site just wasn't having it. —— music business. ididn't music is the site just wasn't having it. —— music business. i didn't have to deal with that. that i feel with those women, because they have secrets and i know about secrets, carrying secrets. and now their secrets are exposed and they are being set free, so i'm happy to them. the cleansing has already begun. kevin spacey, facing multiple allegations of sexual assault, was cut out of this film just weeks before its release. christopher plummer took over the role of oil tycoonj paul getty. co—star michelle williams told me she reshot her scenes for free. these films, because they are larger than life, they glorify people. i couldn't bear they glorify people. i couldn't bear the thought of being in a movie that glorified somebody who had her people. in these ways. —— who had hurt people. i didn't want anything to do with it. i wouldn't have gone
6:41 am
to do with it. i wouldn't have gone to promote it, i wouldn't have talked about it, because i would have felt like it was not the right thing to do for those people who have been hurt, they don't need to be re— traumatised by seeing this movie come out and seeing big posters and flashy appetisers. it is not appropriate. so i didn't want any part of it. other films tipped for awards include via shape of water, a sci—fi fantasy starring brits sally hawkins, leading to field with seven nominations. why did you put up these billboards? humourand did you put up these billboards? humour and heartbreak earned three billboards outside ed ling, neziri six nods. the tender love story called me by your name is also in the running. so too is via posts, tom hanks and meryl streep showcasing the power of the press. it is very much a story for the times. while hollywood is gathering to pat itself on the back as usual, everything has changed this year. just a few months ago the
6:42 am
entertainment industry was thrown into turmoil and everybody here is only just into turmoil and everybody here is onlyjust beginning to work out what that means for the future. actor amber tambyln from the time's up campaignjoins us now from new york. many thanks for your time this morning. how effective do you think it will be faq 100 actors turn up on the red carpet wearing black austin marque —— a few hundred actors. the red carpet wearing black austin marque -- a few hundred actors. that isa marque -- a few hundred actors. that is a misconception. it is more than a few hundred actresses. there will be many, many people wearing black from across industry lines he will appear on the carpet today. this is appear on the carpet today. this is a huge movement. it is nationwide. it is across industries. many people co—ordinated, wearing something that is supposed to symbolise a large cultural shift and change in our country. so it isjust cultural shift and change in our country. so it is just going to be people on the red carpet, we have
6:43 am
asked people to actuallyjoin us in wearing black and standing with —— standing in solidarity with women on the carpet and expressing to them why they feel this is a reset, that lack symbolises, we are starting over and taking control of our own power. —— black symbolises. over and taking control of our own power. —— black symboliseslj over and taking control of our own power. -- black symbolises. i hear what you are saying, but i suppose what you are saying, but i suppose what i mean really is, what does a well—paid hollywood actress like reese witherspoon or meryl streep really know about the day—to—day harassment that somebody working in catering or the agricultural industry might face? so, sexual harassment, sexual assault, the misappropriation of power, the power dynamic that is so problematic in our country and so off, you know, it sees no colour, it sees no age, it sees no colour, it sees no age, it sees no social discrepancy. it is a cross for everybody, every woman. every woman has experienced some form of harassment or power dynamic
6:44 am
shift. it is notjust women like meryl streep. it is them, it is women who are veterinarians or nurses or teachers or actresses or producers. it is all women, we have all experienced it. my mother is a school teacher and she has experienced it. iam school teacher and she has experienced it. i am sure everybody in the uk, everybody in the whole world. this isn't just in the uk, everybody in the whole world. this isn'tjust about... you know, it you think of these actresses and this moment in this movement as the face of it, at that doesn't mean we are necessarily all of it or at —— or that we are claiming all of it. all we want to do is support and rise up and puts a safety nets under women who have shared their stories and come forward and done the hard work so far. you talk about that safety net. there is a practical mission in this campaign, isn't there? to support women and indeed men who have in victims of sexual harassment, to fight in any legal cases they might wa nt to fight in any legal cases they might want to bring? yeah, so, several
6:45 am
months ago, the women of the farmworkers' union here in the us, over 700,000 of them signed a letter of solidarity, standing with the women of the entertainment business. it was a really beautiful letter and we decided to craft something that was a response letter to them. but it isn't just a was a response letter to them. but it isn'tjust a response saying that we stand in solidarity with them. it is also a call to arms. it is also saying, we will not tolerate this behaviour any more. this is notjust about sexual harassment, sexual assault. this is also about representation in all businesses and the fact that women are not represented in positions of power in a lot of different industries in the united states. so with that letter, with that response letter, we found that —— we founded the time's up legal defence fund, which at this point has raised over $15 million. it is our hope that defence fund will continue to get bigger and we will continue to get bigger and we will have many more events coming up this year and will have many more events coming up this yearand in will have many more events coming up this year and in the coming years to
6:46 am
support that. and the funds of that legal defence fund go to supporting the legal fees of people who have been sexually harassed or assaulted in the workplace. thank you very much for your time today, we really appreciated. thank you so much. it is very cold in the us. not as cold here, but very cold. watch out forice cold here, but very cold. watch out for ice as well. it will be a very sunny one for the majority of the country. cloud in the south—east. the odd shower. cloud in the northern isles, especially shetland. wind and outbreaks of rain at times. five celsius. cold and frosty in
6:47 am
northern ireland. cold for the whole day. at least sunshine. the south—east corner, breezy. a bit more cloud. not as cold. with the wind, it will feel really raw on the south coast. the wind will be strong. elsewhere, light winds. in the sunshine, it will be nice, despite temperatures in glasgow not getting above freezing to be further south, 5—6. high pressure is still with us this evening and overnight. asimilar with us this evening and overnight. a similar picture to last night. central and northern areas seeing the lowest temperatures. the south, more cloud around, even as far as the west country and south wales. monday, cold and frosty. further south, breezy, cloudier. that will go further north through the day. the odd light snow and drizzle in
6:48 am
that cloud as it goes north. for the north and west of the country, it should be dry but cold. the weather front will go to the west through wednesday. we pick up a southerly wind. more cloud is brought to more areas. sunshine in western scotland. quite cold because of the strength of the wind. then this weather front will arrive. a messy picture. more miles across the south. thank you. we have seen some messy weather. we'll be back with the headlines at 7am. now, it's time for click. welcome. hello, welcome. welcome, how are you? hello... ? welcome, welcome... second script — "how are you? how are you?" hello, everybody! i am literally being built from the skin out, currently, by these two lovely ladies
6:49 am
who are going to try to make me look different... all right, then. we are all good to go, brendan, you happy? so what we're going to do is go to silence, please, and go to black. lose the house lights. vt10 next. announcer: this is bbc click live. please welcome your host, spencer kelly! cheering and applause erm...right! there.
6:50 am
hello! welcome. my own floor! welcome to click live! and have we got a show for you...! have we got a show for them? we have, we're ready to go. laughter we have some really amazing things for you tonight. we've got some things that noise, we've got some things that fly, we have some things for you to taste. some of it won't work, 0k? laughter bear with us, because hopefully the stuff that does work — fingers crossed, and a lot of it has in rehearsals — it is a world—first, and you won't see this anywhere else, and no—one has seen this before you. before any of that, i have to introduce you to the other half of the show. please welcome to the stage kate russell. applause brilliant, isn't it? when they said i'd have my name in lights, i was expecting more broadway than boardwalk — but it's a start! it's going to be a really, really crammed show. and i don't want you getting too comfortable, because there's a lot
6:51 am
of audience participation. so i hope you're ready to take part. do you want to see some tech? crowd: yes! good stuff. i don't believe you. do you want to see some tech? crowd: yes! i think so. all right, so first of all, we need you to settle down, because our first guest tonight is very mysterious. his name is psychicjoe, and i'm told things are about to get very strange... eerie music playing hello. computers are a wonderful thing, but we're going to put them to one sidejust for the moment. i'd like to introduce you to the power of your own mind. breathe slowly and gently, and i'll discover more about you, with just a candle. now, i sometimes get some powers and signals through, and sometimes i get things wrong.
6:52 am
but most of the time, it's right. so stay with me. i mightjust get pieces of information that come... i'm starting with a "".g let me just put this down for a moment. there's a "g" — so i'm going to start to pull something out of the audience. hopefully it's one of you. i'm getting a "".g let's start with "g" — gareth? i think this is him. because those are two different sites. hello, gareth. how are you? we havejoe, and he's going to identify some people in the audience, and he's going to pretend to read their mind by telling them things about them, by reading information from them. it's actually us researching these people online and feeding that to him through a hidden earpiece. les? les...? it could have been a man, but i won't make wild assertions. is there a les? leslie? welcome to the show. glad you've got a microphone with you now. so we're researching some of the people in
6:53 am
the audience right now. the gentleman who's just sat down in front of us — i've just found the address details of somebody who sat down at the front with her partner as well. so we're researching as much as we can about the people that are in front of us. do you have children called jack and sasha? um. . .we have cats called jack and sasha. oh, it's close! it's close, isn't it? i've set up a free wi—fi network. most people quite happily click "free wi—fi". it says please type in their name, click "connect", and that is how we start. we then have their name. it's the first thing to work from. fortunately, as well, because it's quite a big event, people will like the facebook page. people will say, "i'm at bbc click." we can see that publicly and openly. is this legal? completely legal, yes. that's a question we get asked a lot. we're just looking at information people have made available themselves. but congratulations on your four—year anniversary. a round of applause please. applause there's two main lessons - be careful what you're signing up for.
6:54 am
the biggest thing that's helping us the most right now — people's social media profiles are open and public. we're not saying not to use it, just check that your profile is private. i'm a complete stranger to everybody in this audience, but so far i've been able to go onto all of their profiles and look at where they were born, their pictures, their statuses. as a total stranger, you probably don't want me reading that information. so just — we're not saying don't use it — just make it private so only your friends can see. that would protect you from all of the things we've found out so far, actually. we listen to radio, to tv, to music, to podcasts, using speakers. big speakers in your house and small speakers that you wear in your ears or that are built into your smartphones. so i'm just choosing the perfect bit of coffee for the levitation. it has to be both kind of small, but also regular, and i don't think they normally make coffee beans with levitation in mind. one of the things that steve has been working on is ultrasounds, 0k?
6:55 am
and we've got a few ultrasound demos here. so i'll tell you what — rather than explain more about it, shall we, uh...just give it a whirl? so i'll tell you what — who's getting something there? raise your hand if you can hear this, then drop your hand as soon as you can't hear it again. so this is unusual for a speaker, because usually when you switch a speaker on, everyone can hear it. right now, we're getting a really narrow beam. really focused beam of sound. imagine this is a lot like a flashlight. imagine i'm pointing a torch around the room. you'd only see certain parts of it. this is the same idea, except with sound. so we're focusing the sound and we can focus all that energy, all that sound energy, in a specific place. wow! this is the weirdest and slowest and most continuous mexican wave i've ever seen... i have no idea what you're hearing, because he's never pointed it in my direction.
6:56 am
beeping whoa! seriously? sorry, it's quite unpleasant, isn't it? it can make normal sounds as well. so ultrasound is really high—frequency sound, and then you're tying other stuff into that, which you're then sending around the room? so ultrasound is out of the range of human hearing, is pretty much the definition. we can hear up to 20,000 hertz, and anything above that is ultrasound. we can't hear ultrasound, but this is an ultrasound wave that's been combined or modulated with an audible signal. i tell you what — this is not just the only ultrasound weirdness we've got. it gets even weirder. pop that down, for goodness‘s sake. this looks like it's landed from another planet. this is incredible. stephen, for the second time tonight, what on earth is going on? so, if we can in here,
6:57 am
you can see there's quite a regular pattern on some of these. i can't get too close because it disrupts the sound field. but maybe you can see there's a few balls — a bit of a gap. so how are you using ultrasound to actually make stuff levitate? well, these speakers are producing a big ultrasound signal, that's making a standing wave. oh, wow! well, that's fantastic. would you mix us one? we rehearsed that, could you tell? what is this, steve? we've got a lovely, lovely delight for you today. it's a single grain of coffee with a, uh...drop of milk, all levitating in the middle of the air. it's a latte. laughter you have to have it in, though. you can't have it to go, unfortunately. right, so i'm going to try this. my tongue's not long enough... really slowly... laughter oh! you got it! applause that's really...coffee—y. that's like really, really strong. is that supposed to be that strong? yes, yeah. that's what we've found.
6:58 am
sugar tastes sweeter, and coffee's bitter. fantastic. sri, steve, thank you very much. a round of applause for sri, steve and the ultrasound latte! applause there were so many amazing demos and displays in the show that we just can't fit it into this program. here's a look at some of the other highlights from our evening of delight. we transformed our tech—loving audience into musicians, as kate and i conducted the biggest ever micro:bit processor orchestra. let's have some more micro:bits over here in the air. ok, let's have a few at the back... hold those up. 0h, great. i can see them all in the sky. we are still waiting on the guinness book of records to get back to us, though. we explored the potential of ar, with our lucky audience members left cowering as a full—scale aircraft
6:59 am
suddenly appeared over their heads. hello, world! 300,000 peoplejoined us on facebook live during the evening as we asked them whether robots should feel pain. edward nemil, thank you for this question on facebook: "sacrificing a robot for the greater good might be necessary. why would you want it to feel pain?" if we're going to keep having a servant class of robots, then we shouldn't go down that route. but the aims of increasing intelligence may make that impossible. we watched drones that study the landscape and drones that dive, as we looked at how they could help in the future. it's been absolutely amazing. have you had a good time? crowd: yes! thank you very much for watching, and we will see you soon. bye. cheering and applause cut it. well done, well done, well done. hello this is breakfast,
7:00 am
with rogerjohnson and rachel burden. plans to give mp5 a vote on fox hunting are abandoned by the prime minister. the conservatives had promised an option on ending the ban on hunting with dogs. now teresa may says it won't happen before the next election.
7:01 am

97 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on