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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 7, 2018 7:00am-8:01am GMT

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thank you very much for watching, and we will see you soon. bye. cheering and applause cut it. well done, well done, well done. hello this is breakfast, with rogerjohnson and rachel burden. plans to give mps a vote on fox hunting are abandoned by the prime minister. the conservatives had promised an option on ending the ban on hunting with dogs. now teresa may says it won't happen before the next election. good morning.
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first, our main story. theresa may will abandon plans for mps to get a vote on fox hunting before 2022, when the next general election is due to be held. in an interview on the bbc‘s andrew marr show, mrs may confirmed she would be going back on the pledge she made in last year's manifesto. plans are announced to plant a new northern forest stretching from liverpool to hull. and coming up in sport, you're waking up to the words "england" and "colla pse" again, i'm afraid. it's day four in sydney and needing 303 just to make australia bat again, england have lost four wickets already — and they‘ re heading for a 4—0 series defeat. hollywood stars prepare to use tonight's golden globe awards to highlight the campaign against sexism and harassment. and stav has the weather. good morning. it is very cold, but a lovely, sunny sunday for most of us. it will stay cold into the start of next week and then we will see changes. join me later for a full
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weather forecast. good morning. first, our main story. theresa may will abandon plans for mps to get a vote on fox hunting before 2022, when the next general election is due to be held. in an interview on the bbc‘s andrew marr show, mrs may confirmed she would be going back on the pledge she made in last year's manifesto. our political correspondent eleanor garnier reports. it has been illegal to set a pack of hounds on a fox for more than a decade in england and wales. instead, hunts have had to follow specially laid trails of scent. many conservatives and campaigners would like the hunting act to be scrapped to allow horses and hounds to go back to the way things were. but having lost the tories their parliamentary majority in last year's general election, theresa may's plans to give mps a vote on the issue were pushed back to 2019. now, in an attempt to improve her party's fortunes, the prime minister has gone one step further. one of the clear messages we got on a number of areas was when people
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are concerned about what we were proposing. just as we have looked at issues on school funding and tuition fees and housing, we are taking forward approaches in relation to that. on this issue of foxhunting, what i can say is that there will not be a vote during this parliament. for now, then, there is little chance the law on foxhunting will be changing any time soon. it's been confirmed the prime minister will carry out a cabinet reshuffle starting tomorrow. there's speculation in the papers over who will be moved or sacked. the front page of the sunday telegraph suggests the education secretary, justine greening, could be fighting for herjob. other names could be vulnerable as well. business secretary greg clark, patrick maclachlan, the party
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chairman, and also andrea leadsom, the leader of the house of commons. according to the sunday times, those who are likely to stay in their posts include boris johnson, who are likely to stay in their posts include borisjohnson, philip hammond, amber rudd, david davis, and speculation about a possible promotion forjeremy hunt, the health secretary, or chris grayling, who could step into the job vacated by damian green. our political correspondent susana mendonca is in our london newsroom this morning, what could we expect to happen over the coming days? i suppose at this stage, susanna, it is all speculation? very much so. if you speak to downing street, which we have, they have said it is all guesswork. but we know that there is going to be a reshuffle, said people are going to move about. we understand the cabinet posts will be reshuffled tomorrow, and on tuesday, we will have the more junior roles. what we understand is that theresa may is under lots of pressure to bring up new rising stars, as it were, within the conservative party. she has not had enough people coming from the 2015 in take, for example,
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into the cabinet. that is something we would expect to see tomorrow, and certainly on tuesday. in terms of the names, you know, you mentioned a few of names there, people who might be moved around. it is speculation at this stage. justine greening, there has been lots of speculation about whether or not she is moved out. damian green's job about whether or not she is moved out. damian green'sjob is up for grabs. it could havejeremy hunt or chris grayling. jeremy hunt is of course in the midst of the nhs winter crisis, so it might be a difficult time for him to move. for theresa may, moving people about is risky. it upsets people, and she cannot afford any more rebels on the back edge. —— backbench. some of the uk's largest retailers have voluntarily agreed to stop selling acids and corrosive substances to customers under 18 years old. ministers hope the measure will help stop the rise in attacks until new laws are considered by parliament. here's our home affairs correspondent, dominic casciani. the human cost of an acid attack. where's it hurting, mate, your eyes?
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police officers pour water over the victim lastjuly. thieves wanted the london delivery driver's moped. his helmet saved him from serious injury. police recorded more than 500 attacks involving corrosive substances in england and wales in the year to last april. officials think the true figure could be twice as high. ministers have launched an acid action plan to cut attacks. today the first part of that plan, a voluntary ban by diy chains, a growing number of men are being targetted by stalkers, according to new research by five live investigates. crime figures suggest around 450,000 men in england and wales experience stalking over the course of a year. but, according to data from 41 police forces, only 1,800 stalking offences against men have been recorded by officers over the past three years. germany's christian democrats, led by the chancellor, angela merkel, will begin five days of exploratory talks today president macron of france is due to lay wreaths at the offices in paris of the satirical magazine, charlie hebdo, to remember the victims of an islamist attack there three years ago today. 12 people, including several cartoonists, died when two gunmen burst into an editorial meeting. a policeman was shot dead outside. the president will also
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visit a jewish supermarket in the city where four hostages were killed by another islamist two days later. nasa's longest serving astronaut, john young, has died at the age of 87. he was one ofjust 12 men who have walked on the moon — and he flew the first space shuttle mission. former commander of the international space station, chris hadfield has described him as an inspiration. john was a fascinating, devoted and passionate and really fearless man. just a role model to so many astronauts, including the six people who are up on the space station right now. a life really well lived and a good friend of mine. plans to create a new and all forest stretching from liverpool to hull have been announced by the government. it is providing £5.7 million to increase tree cover long adults spanning manchester, leeds and bradford. the woodland trust will run the project, costing £500 million over 25 years. most of that money will need to be raised by the charity itself. roger hayden has more. the bare hills of the north.
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one of the most denuded parts of a country which itself has less woodland than almost anywhere in europe. the land stripped over centuries fortimberand farming, scarred by industry, overgrazed by sheep farming. at smithils near manchester, things will be different. planting has begun for what will be known as the northern forest. we think the northern forest will be a pathfinder for extending forest and woodland right across country. we think trees and woods can add value in many different landscapes. we just want to do it here first and do it big. it isn't really a forest. the project will create new woods near towns, and plants for river valleys liable to flooding. but money is tight, and many of these hills will look just as bleak and 35 years. what's more, the woodland trust expects some of their cash to come from environmental funds linked to the hs2 rail line. the supreme irony is that the government is giving with one hand and taking with the other,
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and i'm referring to the route of h52. why can't the government give with both hands and stop threatening ancient forests? here is what some ambitious planting can do. this is the national forest in the midlands. begun in the 1990s, now delighting local people. the east coast of north america is shivering in a record—breaking freeze. it comes after a massive snow storm that reached as far south as florida. temperatures there are forecast to fall below minus 29 degrees celsius. in parts of the us temperatures are forecast to fall below minus 29 degrees celsius. the extreme weather has so far been linked to 19 deaths. earlier, we spoke to new york cab driver peter franklin, who told us it's the coldest weather he's ever experienced. send me a sweater, i'm freezing! it
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is the middle of the 90, i'm unbelievably cold. when you walk outside a new york city right now your eyes are tearing up. it is the worst cold i can remember. new york isa worst cold i can remember. new york is a residual place where people work with this kind of problem and all that, but baby, it's cold outside! pub opening hours could be extended for the weekend of prince harry and meghan markle's wedding. their marriage falls on the same day as the english and scottish fa cup finals, saturday may 19th. licensing hours were previously extended for the wedding of the duke and duchess of cambridge in 2011, and for the queen's 90th birthday in 2016. do you know, we were having a conversation earlier, talking about pablo binning times. i am doing dry january, i do it every year. but now
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we are talking about v—january, where people obedient for the month of january. that would you find it harder to give of january. that would you find it harderto give up, of january. that would you find it harder to give up, alcohol or meet? or should it? sugar is one of those things we don't necessarily know when you are having it.|j things we don't necessarily know when you are having it. i maintain it would be sugar. i have no problem going about meat and alcohol, i would find it hard to go without chocolate. as we've been hearing, high street giants have thrown their weight behind a government plan to ban weight behind a government plan to ba n sales weight behind a government plan to ban sales of acid and other corrosive substances to under—18s. it is part of a voluntary scheme to curb the number of attacks while new laws are that being considered by parliament. how much of a problem is this? we have seen the figures, the
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horrific rise in the number of cases. very often in london, it seems to have been a london problem for some time, but now it is spreading? staggering. 500 attacks in the yearto spreading? staggering. 500 attacks in the year to april last year. that is an underestimate, because the home office estimates about double that, some people don't report the attacks because they didn't suffer any life changing injuries. it is a significant problem. london is the largest city and there are more organised gangs there than anywhere else, which i think is why london suffered more than anybody else anywhere in the country. but as you'd pointed out, it is now widespread. this is one way of tackling it. we need legislation, but legislation, as you know, takes a long time. the prime minister has indicated, you know, we have brexit and everything else to deal with. the voluntary code is good news. it means that some people will not have access to this material. but it certainly impacts young people. one
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in five attacks are by young people. fourin in five attacks are by young people. four in five. that was going to be the next question, is there any evidence to suggest it is teenagers, under 18s to carry this out? because you talk about organised gangs...m is organised gangs, and also, ex— partners. a lot of the things our domestic abuse related. one in five attacks are by young people. additionally, it is voluntary. until the get legislation in, there are no stations. there are no consequences, if the hardware chain or whatever wants to sell it, they can still do so. wants to sell it, they can still do so. hopefully they will abide by their code. the other issue is online. i checked on the way in. i can buy 99% sulphuric acid to £10, plus postage and packaging, and nextday delivery. what is the legitimate... i mean, excuse my ignorance, but what is the legitimate use of that? exactly. i am sure there is, but... when you
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are talking about serious drain blockages, maybe some of those industrial usages, you can imagine that. but for most of us, we do not need 96%. we don't need more than 10%. there is an issue for manufacturers, too. they need to look at why we need 96%, because we don't. is this the sort of thing you would find in the cupboard under the sink? not 96%, hopefully, would find in the cupboard under the sink? not 9696, hopefully, but you would still find significant damage being caused by the stuff you can find underyour being caused by the stuff you can find under your sink. the other issue, the bigger issue, is education. the way we tackle this, manchester used to be called gunchester, but we had a 95% reduction in firearms use amongst young people, to make sure they didn't take a gun or have a gun with their mid—on in time. there was a similar impact on knife crime. we can do the same thing with acid. what about the sentencing? the consequences of these attacks are devastating, life changing. the government is consulting on whether new criminal laws are required in
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relation to that. crown prosecution service issued guidelines place last year which said that it should start with imprisonment, we should be encouraged to send people to prison if they are found in possession of these items. unless the law changes to enable that to happen consistently, and again, raises awareness of it, it will not have any impact. you can destroy a life in a second. imean you can destroy a life in a second. i mean destroy. i met someone with 300 operations afterward. just to get her face back. she set up a charity to tackle this issue and raise awareness. it is... you can cause so raise awareness. it is... you can cause so much damage without even thinking about it. thank you so much. we appreciate it. the weather. good morning. a cold start.
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absolutely. not as cold as north america. my goodness. a lot of frost. icy. shetland has patchy rain. less cold because of the rain. on the mainland, very cold to start the day. sunshine. scotland, northern ireland, the midlands, wales. a few showers in east anglia and the south—east. mostly dry. the breeze will take the edge off the temperatures. further north, light winds. with sunshine, feeling pleasant. that is despite the fact temperatures will not get above freezing in scotland. 3—6 further south. high pressure with us again
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tonight. another cold one. light winds further north. gaps between the isobars. quite breezy in the south. it will go south—east. that will bring in more cloud across southern areas. further north, clear skies and widespread frost. monday, frosty and sunny in central and northern areas. the cloud in the south will go further north during the day. thick enough for the odd spot of light rain and the odd snowflake. temperatures, 3—6. the best of the sunshine in the north. to the west of the next area of low pressure which is going to bring a change to the weather on wednesday. a largely dry day on wednesday. more cloud in many areas. the best of the sunshine in the north—west of scotland. then the weather front goes through on wednesday. a messy
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picture. slightly milder in the south. 10 degrees. feeling cold and the north. more unsettled as we go through the latter part of the week. back to you. thank you. it was one of the most significant scientific breakthroughs of modern times. in 2003, the complete genetic code of a human being, the genome, was published. by the end of this year, it's hoped this code will help thousands of nhs patients who have rare diseases and unexplained conditions. this wouldn't have been possible without families taking part in the "genome project." ben schofield went to meet one of them. this is you in your incubator. for 19 years, doctors treated alex's symptoms without knowing exactly what was causing them. medics thought it was a rare condition, but genetic testing proved otherwise. he
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had 28 operations. there was always something else that was wrong whenever we checked. he had a skin condition, issues with his vision and hearing. you just need to know the answer. and as a parent, you wa nt to the answer. and as a parent, you want to know what is wrong with your child. this is the letter that i got in march telling me about your diagnosis. was only by reading and dig —— decoding his genome that gave a diagnosis last march.|j dig —— decoding his genome that gave a diagnosis last march. i remember reading it and actually crying knowing that they actually go to the diagnosis. and i just knowing that they actually go to the diagnosis. and ijust could not believe that this letter appeared in the post. for his mum, relief, and some certainty. from alex, a more modest response, it has been a great relief. i don't think about it
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mostly. you may not think about it much, but alex has helped lead the way for potentially thousands of other patients to find the answers to their symptoms. and this is where those mysteries are being solved, a laboratory in cambridge where they discovered his genome. it is more than 3 billion letters long, and showed his condition called leopards in turn. -- showed his condition called leopards in turn. —— leapord syndrome. it is hoped that thousands of other patients with red diseases will get the diagnosis they have been looking for. —— rare diseases. the diagnosis they have been looking for. -- rare diseases. it could hold the answers to he ring... it is 15 yea rs the answers to he ring... it is 15 years since the first human gene and was discovered. this man helped crack that first code which helps
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lead the 100 thousand genomes project. it is a really exciting field right now. 15 years since sequencing the first genome, we can apply it to the nhs. as well as diagnosing diseases, it also develops personalised treatment, treatment personalised to patients rather than diseases. we are all slightly different. a lot of the information is encoded in the genes. looking at your genome, in the future, we will be able to work out what is the most appropriate treatment for you. alex has tell—tale freckles for his symptoms. diagnosis does not mean a cure for him, but he starts better equipped than ever in 2018 to manage his condition. bbc news, in cambridge. coming up on bbc one at 9am is andrew marr. what's in store today, andrew? you have been talking to the prime
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minister. it sounds like a fascinating conversation. minister. it sounds like a fascinating conversationlj minister. it sounds like a fascinating conversation. i cannot talk about everything, but we talked about the nhs, donald trump, to be young, and much more. —— toby. theresa may is the first of a set of interviews we will be doing. i will also talk to jonathan ashworth, interviews we will be doing. i will also talk tojonathan ashworth, the shadow health secretary, about the nhs crisis. many stars, including scott thomas. the churchill film, and we also have franz ferdinand. star—studded start to the new year. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers. the writer and broadcaster, robert meakin, is here to tell us what's caught his eye. we'll speak to him in a minute. actually, we will go straight to
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you. we do not want to keep you waiting. this was in the sun. for tories to be succeeding, they need to unite. specifically, these two, theresa may and for the payment. to unite. specifically, these two, theresa may and for the paymentm was written by jacob theresa may and for the paymentm was written byjacob rees—mogg, who, as of today, has become the favourite to become the next conservative leader. much to the consternation and excitement of everyone. he is high—profile. i doubt this is normally his paper of choice, but he has a big column in their today. he denies all the talk he is interested in the topjob, as they always do. he feels philip hammond and theresa may need to unite. they should all sing from the same sheet, to be honest. one of the worst kept secrets in the last election was if she had done better, philip hammond would have been moved
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out, but she did not have the clout. that is extraordinary, jacob rees—mogg, you would think you would be the antithesis of the sun profile. it is amazing they are going to him he is almost beginning to ta ke going to him he is almost beginning to take over the borisjohnson title, the maverick right—wing voice in the conservative party. jacob rees—mogg has the role now. in the conservative party. jacob rees-mogg has the role now. theresa may and philip hammond and possibly all three with him. the mail on sunday. an indication of what it is like to be, well, one step removed from the royal family. like to be, well, one step removed from the royalfamily. this is the half brother of meghan markle. another embarrassing story. a boozy i’ow another embarrassing story. a boozy row with his fiance. how many stories will there be about meghan markle and potentially embarrassing relatives? we all have them and we
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will continue digging them up. everyone has it. old school friends with grudges. you will hear all of it. longer if they had a massive clear out of her accounts before the announcement was made. it is interesting, he says it is not interesting, he says it is not interesting being in the public eye. you have issues and then you are related to royalty. they probably have a few exclusives in there as well. the russian embassy complained about... i missed it. they are complaining about the portrayal of russia in the bbc‘s new programme.
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the crime rate of russians in the uk is well below average. they resent the idea london is a playground for russian mafia members. television is a lwa ys russian mafia members. television is always more dramatic. before it was kgb. now it is supposedly sinister russian billionaires. kgb. now it is supposedly sinister russian billionaireslj kgb. now it is supposedly sinister russian billionaires. i did not get the whole show. it is not a scottish mafia, as far as i understand. the sunday times. the injury woes of
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andy murray. we were talking about whether he would need hip surgery. pat cash has spoken to him and it may be both hips. that looks like a big blow for him. he has not played competitively since wimbledon when he was injured. it is a real worry. we should not write him off yet. we hope he can come back. we should not write him off yet. we hope he can come backlj we should not write him off yet. we hope he can come back. i was saying a few weeks ago he was laying the groundwork for his career beyond tennis, setting up a sport agency, hoping to represent other sports people, not just in hoping to represent other sports people, notjust in tennis. clearly, his mind is going beyond the competition at this stage. and he has a family at this stage as well. it is incredible the collar takes on your body. if you are 30 as a tennis player, it is old age. jimmy anderson was saying, the england
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cricketer, he says he cannot even raise his arm to brush his teeth without discomfort echoes of the toll cricket has taken and the pain. it is the price of being a professional athlete. it has come at a cost. we will not talk about this one because we have run out of time, we will do it next time. when you return in an hour, tell us about tom jones, giving up la and coming back to the uk. coming back to swansea.” will give him a call and ask about it. we are on until nine o'clock. coming up, going vegan injanuary. will it become the latest new year trend? how easy is it to embrace the lifestyle ? trend? how easy is it to embrace the lifestyle? hollywood stars will wear black to protest sexual harassment. we will speak to the women behind
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the protest. this is where we say goodbye on bbc one. join us on the news channel. good morning. this is the first with rogerjohnson and rachel burden. a summery of today's main stories from bbc news. theresa may has dropped plans to hold a vote on the foxhunting ban. last year's conservative manifesto contained a pledge to let mps consider repealing the hunting act, which bans the use of dogs to hunt foxes and other animals. in an interview with andrew marr, she confirmed the vote will now not take place before the next election in 2022. one of the clear messages we got was a number of areas in which people were concerned about what we were proposing. so just as we have looked at issues on school funding, tuition fees, housing, we are taking forward approaches in relation to that. on this issue of foxhunting, what i can say is that there will not be a vote during this parliament. the prime minister will carry out
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a cabinet reshuffle tomorrow. it is not yet known what changes she will make, but it is reported up to six ministers could either lose theirjobs or be moved. a downing street source has described such stories as pure speculation and guesswork. some of the uk's largest retailers have voluntarily agreed to stop selling acids and corrosive substances to customers under 18 years old. thousands of independent hardware shops are also expected to follow suit. ministers hope the measure will help stop the rise in attacks until new laws are considered by parliament. a growing number of men are being targeted vice stalkers, according to new research by five live investigates. crime figures suggest that thousands of men of england and wales experience talking over the course of every year. according to data from over 110 police forces, 1800 stalking offences have been reported by men to officers in the past three years. plans to create a new northern
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forest on a belt spanning manchester, leeds and bradford have been announced by the government. new forests will be planted near towns and river valleys liable to flooding. bob and trust is running the project and will raise most of the £500 million it is expect to cross over the next five years. —— the woodland trust. the east coast of north america is shivering in a record—breaking freeze. it comes after a massive snow storm that reached as far south as florida. temperatures there are forecast to fall below minus 29 degrees celsius. in parts of the us temperatures are forecast to fall below minus 29 degrees celsius. the extreme weather has so far been linked to 19 deaths. time to check the sport. close of play in sydney, the fifth ashes test. really it is just a stay of execution, isn't it? yeah, fraud cold temperatures over in the us, it
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has been incredibly hot in sydney. they have made the fifth day, but it isa they have made the fifth day, but it is a fifth day which will be in sweltering conditions and, we expect, will lead to inevitable defeat. it has been a day to survive in sydney, but the result does seem inevitable. england's 93— four in the second innings, still 210 runs behind on the panels would say. that is the penultimate day of the whole ashes series, which looks like it will end with a 4—0 win for australian. a dominant display by the host. the first brothers to make a century in the same innings since akin to thousand and one. that was shorn and mitchell marsh, both managing to hit hundreds. the warner brothers were the last to do it australia. 303 had when england returned to the crease. david milan, the last to fall, lbw to nathan lyon. skipperjoe root at odds with score of 41 not out as the tourists did at least managed to take it into the final day. as things happen in
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syd ney the final day. as things happen in sydney with an all—too—familiar tale, they have at least taken it to that final day. in many ways the of the last few days have summed up our trip, haven't they? it has been exceptionally tough. we have come up against a team which played very good cricket. they have kept the pressure on us at all times. the one thing we have talked an awful lot about is making sure that we keep fighting and battling and working as ha rd fighting and battling and working as hard as we possibly can. they're in the bottom three of the premier league, and now on the end of the biggest shock of the fa cup third round weekend so far. so mark hughes has been sacked as stoke city manager. they were beaten 2—1 at league two side coventry on a day where manchester city safely went through. but chelsea were taken to a replay by norwich city. joe lynskey rounds up the action. it has been a dark two decades for coventry city. financial turmoil and three relegations. but this was the day the clouds parted for the sky blues. commentator: it's in! the shock is back on!
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a 2—1 win for the fourth tier side, but coventry‘s joy brought mark hughes' downfall. for stoke city's manager, this result meant the inevitable. when a premier league side goes out to a lower league side in the third round, it's news. it is not the news we wanted to create prior to the game today, but it has happened. in football, moving on can leave a bitter taste, but injured jamie vardy got a warm welcome back to fleetwood. leicester bought him here for £1 million, and now he's an international for england. but the 0—0 draw never matched his star quality. by contrast, style is what defines manchester city's season. they are going to glory on all fronts. even when they fell behind to burnley, the comeback was always coming. aguero! two in two minutes! a a—star turnaround for pep guardiola's side, the giants nobody wants to take on. there was merely an upset at bournemouth. five years ago wigan won the cup, now they're in the third tier.
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they led 2—0 against their premier league opponents before things looked away. bournemouth fought back to force a replay. but extra games at this time of year can feel like a headache. the linesman at villa did recover, and so did this underdog. from one goal down, peterborough fought back to win 3—1. this was a january day for the blues in the cup, and proved the magic still matters. 25 thais in all yesterday. you can see all the results on the bbc sport website. it all continues today with eight teams in action. championship side leeds travel to lead to newport county. they last met in 19119. elsewhere, three premier league
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teams in action. west ham at shrewsbury. david moyes at everton, he lost there in 2003. arsenal begin theircampaign in he lost there in 2003. arsenal begin their campaign in defence of the trophy away to nottingham forest. philippe coutinho will become one of the most expensive footballers in history after barcelona agreed to pay up to £142 million. for the liverpool forward. the brazilian has spent four and a half years at anfield and liverpool have eventually decided to do the deal after turning down three bids for him from barcelona in the summer. the initial payment will be £105 million, a british record. with the rest in add—ons. he's agreed a 55—year deal at the camp nou. 16—year—old james bolan has become the youngest jockey to win 16—year—old james bolan has become the youngestjockey to win the welsh grand national. fittingly he was on the 16—1 shot raz de maree. taking the lead two fences from home and powering to victory. the jockey might be young, but at 13, the horse is the oldest to win the race in modern times. great britain's mica moore
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and misha mcneill crashed in the latest round of the bobsleigh world cup on saturday. the pair had been in seventh place after their first run but caught the wall halfway through their second attempt and turned the sled over. they both got out safely but seemed shaken. moore and mcneill have been competing this season with the help of crowdfunding after their financial support was withdrawn by british bobsleigh. in the men's two—man event, gb pair bradley hall and toby olubi improved on their first run to finish 15th overall. that looks so dangerous. and the speeds that you go out, the hardness of the ice, it makes it a very dangerous sport. notjust the bobsleigh guys, but also the skeleton and the luge, they are on their own, and facing forward. incredible speeds. more than 80 miles an hour, they go out. they are both fine. we can show it again. when you see them go over and their heads come out the side, it is unbelievable. it just takes the
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tiniest touch. everybody complains about all those fast that all players get one nudge and down they 90, players get one nudge and down they go, and the explanation is that it is because they are going so quickly, they only need that small amount. it is knowing what to do in that situation, adopting that crash position. that is part of the skill, of navigating your way around this course. that's true. and do they have time to yell out race? there is a driver and have time to yell out race? there is a driverand a have time to yell out race? there is a driver and a passenger, they don't have a great view at the back, i imagine they feel what is going to happen. the amount of things that people do at speed, you think, wow, how can even communicate? but they are ok. we were about to talk that the golden globes, we started watching school runnings.m the golden globes, we started watching school runnings. it is such a great movie, it really is. back in 1994, i'm going to guess? it has come to a whole new audience, the same with eddie the eagle. it is a brilliant film. it reminds you of how amazing eddie edwards was. he is
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going back to calgary to recreate thatjump, going back to calgary to recreate that jump, you know. going back to calgary to recreate thatjump, you know. on the 30th anniversary. all55 thatjump, you know. on the 30th anniversary. all 55 metres of it. he jumped off the 90 as well, didn't he? anyway, jumped off the 90 as well, didn't he ? anyway, great jumped off the 90 as well, didn't he? anyway, great films. the red carpet is being rolled out, the champagne is on ice and the statuettes are about to be handed over, but the start of the 2018 hollywood awards season is expected to get off to an unusual start at the golden globes tonight. famous faces have vowed to wear all—black in solidarity against sexism and harrassment, prompted by a series of recent abuse allegations in the industry. we'll speak to one of the founding members of the ‘time's up' campaign in a moment, but first here's our north america correspondent james cook who's in la. in hollywood, they are getting ready to put their best foot forward. at this year's award season, there may be more protest than parties. the dirty secrets of the movie business have been exposed in recent months and now scores of stars say they will wear black to the golden globes to promote a campaign called time's up. i never thought it would happen in my lifetime.
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truly i didn't. i think tomorrow, people will be in black, that i don't think it will be funereal, i think it will be a celebration of all of us saying, it is time to deal with this. it is time to deal with this and not put up at it any more. we are all wearing black to stand in solidarity, not just the women and what is happening in hollywood in this industry, but to represent and stand for all women across all industries and to support them. and also to support equality in all its forms. i've suffered it all and worse. by the time i got to the music is the site just wasn't having it. —— music business. i didn't have to deal with that. that i feel with those women, because they have secrets and i know about secrets, carrying secrets. and now their secrets are exposed and they are being set free, so i'm happy to them. the cleansing has already begun. kevin spacey, facing multiple allegations of sexual assault,
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was cut out of this film just weeks before its release. christopher plummer took over the role of oil tycoonj paul getty. co—star michelle williams told me she reshot her scenes for free. these films, because they are larger than life, they glorify people. i couldn't bear the thought of being in a movie that glorified somebody who had her people. in these ways. —— who had hurt people. i didn't want anything to do with it. i wouldn't have gone to promote it, i wouldn't have talked about it, because i would have felt like it was not the right thing to do for those people who have been hurt, they don't need to be re— traumatised by seeing this movie come out and seeing big posters and flashy appetisers. it is not appropriate. so i didn't want any part of it. other films tipped for awards include via shape of water, a sci—fi fantasy starring brits sally hawkins, leading to field with seven nominations. why did you put up these billboards? humour and heartbreak earned
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three billboards outside ed ling, neziri six nods. —— ebbing, missouri. the tender love story call me by your name is also in the running. so too is the post, tom hanks and meryl streep showcasing the power of the press. it is very much a story for the times. while hollywood is gathering to pat itself on the back as usual, everything has changed this year. just a few months ago the entertainment industry was thrown into turmoil and everybody here is onlyjust beginning to work out what that means for the future. gordon globes overnight sunday into monday. it is 7:43 a.m.. the main stories: theresa may has abandoned plans to give mps a vote on ending the foxhunting ban. some of the uk's largest retailers have agreed to stop selling acids to people under 18. ministers hope the measure will
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help stop the rise in attacks. let's ta ke let's take a quick peep at the front page of the sunday papers before we get the weather forecast. the front page of the sunday times, talking about google's profits, that is their main story. and a little mention in the bottom corner of an expected cabinet reshuffle, which theresa may is due to do tomorrow. more on the front page of the mail on sunday about the appointment of toby young to the office for students. the story has been rumbling all week. people have mined his twitter feed and found all kinds of... well, what many people would deem pretty offensive tweets, some quite misogynistic. he has deleted them all, but now the prime minister, she is under some pressure to act. according to the mail on sunday she is unhappy about this. the sunday express, a picture of prince harry and meghan markle, talking about the pubs being allowed
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to weapon with extra time on their wedding weekend. one minister's furia rate fast as the headline, talking aboutjohn furia rate fast as the headline, talking about john warboys furia rate fast as the headline, talking aboutjohn warboys release. -- fur talking aboutjohn warboys release. —— furat rape talking aboutjohn warboys release. —— fur at rape farce. we have seen some beautiful pictures of the weather. how is it looking? it is cold outside. be careful on the road. of sunshine. glorious, in fa ct. the road. of sunshine. glorious, in fact. a weather front across the northern isles, especially shetland. rain on and off across the day. less cold. the mainland, a cold start. _3’ cold. the mainland, a cold start. -3, -6. cold. the mainland, a cold start. —3, —6. central and cold. the mainland, a cold start. —3, —6. centraland northern parts of england and in towards wales, cold one sunny. less so across the south—east. it will feel very sharp
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in the south. the best of the sunshine in the north. with light winds, pleasant to be temperature is struggling to get above freezing. high pressure with us again overnight. cold and frosty. a breeze in the south. more cloud from the near continent affecting southern counties of england and possibly south wales. to the north, frosty. we start the new working week on a cold and frosty note once again. sunshine around. breezy across—the—board. more sunshine around. breezy across—the—boa rd. more cloud. sunshine around. breezy across—the—board. more cloud. that will spill further north in too much of wales and the midlands. drizzle. most of wales and the midlands. drizzle. m ost pla ces of wales and the midlands. drizzle. most places dry. high pressure slowly begins to ebb away into tuesday. this weather front will come in to play towards wednesday. tuesdayis come in to play towards wednesday.
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tuesday is looking rather cloudy. misty and murky in the south. cloudy. the best of the sunshine in the north—west. breezy. this weather front will move through tuesday night into wednesday. sunshine appearing behind it to be fairly mild in the south. 9— 10 degrees. still quite chilly in the north. the travel show. this week we are in north—east india. india. i'm on the banks of the mighty river and about to go to a very spiritual place. now there's 150,000 people on that
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island, and only six ferries a day, each one is really crammed. just looking at the list of prices for all the different categories: passengers, 15 rupees, that's ok, that's reasonable. then you go down, pass the vehicles, animals have today, buffalo has to pay 45. bull, cow, 30. and then the poor elephant has to fork out 907 rupees! perhaps fortunately, none of these creatures were travelling with us today. and incredibly, after a few last—minute panics, we are set to go. i climb onto the corrugated aluminium roof tojoin men who do this trip day in, day out. starting in tibet, the brahmaputra river is nearly 2000 miles long, second only to the amazon, in the volume of water that rushes through it.
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interesting game of cards going on here, i think they are playing whist. i'd like tojoin in. we arrived at majuli and it is turmoil again trying to get off the boat. to avoid the queue, there is a sneaky way out, which involves climbing onto another boat and going down that way. you know what, i think i'm going to take that one. well, he we are, on land, doesn't look quite as spiritual as i imagined, but if you look away into the distance, it's just one big flat land of desert.
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let's see. the island is home to 22 monasteries, or satras, initially established in the 16th century by the assamese guru, sankardeva. boys are instructive from a very young age in the religion that he preached, vaishnavism, an offshoot of hinduism. the monks are celibate and according to their beliefs they worship only one god, follow a vegetarian diet, and reject the caste system. and here, the doctrine includes this special art form. this form of classical dance is now
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recognised by the authorities as a genre in its own right. many of these monks have performed around the world. that was amazing. thank you very much indeed. i know you spend a lifetime learning the skills of this, but can i have a go, can i try? arms through here...? very good. thank you so much. one, two, three, four. there are 64 positions in this
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classical dance and i'm having trouble with the first two. it's very difficult. he makes it look so easy. and it's incredibly difficult. i'm going to leave it to the experts. an exquisite performance. but there's one problem, one very big problem, and that is, that this island may simply not exist in just a few decades time. hard to believe at the moment
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but there is a genuine worry that majuli will be submerged and destroyed within 20 years. in the last 70 years it has shrunk in size by two thirds. and a majority of the original 65 monasteries have gone. every monsoon, the brahmaputra river swells, eroding the terrain around it. bit by bit, land is disappearing. but there is hope. so now, i'm on my way, in a tractor, to go and see a man whose life ‘s mission has been to tackle the flooding that has afflicted this island.
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for the last 36 years, he has taken on an extraordinary challenge, to save this land from vanishing. and so, his lifelong calling began. jadav is known today as the forest man of india. he began planting trees so the roots would bind the soil, soak up excess water, and prevent the land from being eroded by flooding. from a barren landscape, he has created a forest the size of new york's central park. and he feels this will be more
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effective in saving nearby majuli then following government flood prevention schemes. so we are now going to do the ritual that every guest that comes here is asked to do, which is to plant a tree. what kind of tree is this? i'm going to put this in here... it's good. he has spoken at environmental summits all around the world, and his roll call of guests is equally international. i do know that everyone who plants a tree, when it grows, they put a plaque down with their name on it, and i'm going to have that privilege, fantastic, thank you. and so to my final day in assam,
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and a different kind of ritualistic celebration of nature. if there's one repairing theme throughout my trip in the north—east, it's the sense of community, everywhere, really, and there's nothing better to illustrate that than this... a local village going down to the river, to celebrate harvest. this community was started in 1939 by a young woman who came from the mountains in search of food. i believe she found that this place was better for her because it is coated in water, and civilisation needs water, she brought friends and family here, followed by a brother. the entire family of her own clan... all from that one woman? really, fascinating, wow. this is a much—loved annual celebration and people of all ages gathered to mark in, using fishing methods that have been passed down the generations. then you pull it towards you...
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pull the stick... and look! you can see this! it's full of fish, it full of fish. this is today's catch... wow! that is pretty good. and this, you will cook, now? excellent. so my trek across india from border to border is almost over, and it's been a realjourney of discovery for me off the beaten track. this isn't india "on tap", instant gratification, which some people are accustomed to, but the rewards, if you make the effort, are immense. good morning. plans to give mps vote
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on fox hunting have been abandoned by the prime minister. theresa may says it will not happen before the next election. it is sunday the 7th of january. coming up, some of the uk's biggest retailers agreed to stop selling assets and corrosive substances to under 18 is, assets and corrosive substances to under18 is, in assets and corrosive substances to under 18 is, in a assets and corrosive substances to under18 is, in a bid assets and corrosive substances to under 18 is, in a bid to cut the number of like changing attacks. £500 million plan to plant a forest from liverpool to hull gets backing from liverpool to hull gets backing from the government. england are heading for a 4—0 defeat in the
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ashes,, needing 103. england
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