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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 7, 2018 8:00am-9:01am GMT

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good morning. plans to give mps vote on fox hunting have been abandoned by the prime minister. theresa may says it will not happen before the next election. it is sunday the 7th of january. coming up, some of the uk's biggest retailers agreed to stop selling assets and corrosive substances to under 18 is, assets and corrosive substances to under18 is, in assets and corrosive substances to under 18 is, in a assets and corrosive substances to under18 is, in a bid assets and corrosive substances to under 18 is, in a bid to cut the number of like changing attacks. £500 million plan to plant a forest from liverpool to hull gets backing from liverpool to hull gets backing from the government. england are heading for a 4—0 defeat in the ashes,, needing 103. england ended the day on 93—4. hollywood stars
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prepare to use the golden globes to like to highlight the campaign against sexism. it is a very cold but sunny day. stein called the start of next week, before changes. join me laterfor the start of next week, before changes. join me later for the forecast. theresa may will abandon plans for mps to get a vote on fox hunting before 2022, when the next general election is due to be held. in an interview on the andrew marshall, mrs may confirmed she would be going back on the pledge he made in last yea r‘s manifesto. our back on the pledge he made in last year's manifesto. our political correspondent reports. it has been illegal to set a pack of hounds on a fox for more than a decade in england and wales. instead, hunts have had to follow specially laid trails of scent. many conservatives and campaigners
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would like the hunting act to be scrapped to allow horses and hounds to go back to the way things were. but having lost the tories their parliamentary majority in last year's general election, theresa may's plans to give mps a vote on the issue were pushed back to 2019. now, in an attempt to improve her party's fortunes, the prime minister has gone one step further. one of the clear messages we got on a number of areas was when people are concerned about what we were proposing. just as we have looked at issues on school funding and tuition fees and housing, we are taking forward approaches in relation to that. on this issue of fox hunting, what i can say is that there will not be a vote during this parliament. for now, then, there is little chance the law on fox hunting will be changing any time soon. and you can see the whole interview with the prime minister on the andrew marr show this morning at 9amon bbc one. it's been confirmed the prime minister will carry out a cabinet
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reshuffle starting tomorrow. there's speculation in the papers over who will be moved or sacked. our political correspondent susana mendonca but suggestion thatjustine greening might be in line for the tax. the future of the cabinet is also in doubt. the sunday times are continuing with this story. they speak about the possibility of jeremy hunt or chris grayling succeeding damian green as the de fa cto succeeding damian green as the de facto deputy prime minister. our political correspondent susana mendonca is in our london newsroom this morning — what could we expect to happen over the coming days? well, we know there is going to be a
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reshuffle. there will be people moved about. we understand that tomorrow we will get the reshuffle of the cabinet, so the senior positions, and then the morejunior positions, and then the morejunior positions will be reshuffled on tuesday. as you say, it is speculation and downing street have described it as purely that. bc it is guesswork. the rumour mill is suggesting thatjustine is guesswork. the rumour mill is suggesting that justine greening might be moved about. we know there is not a great supporter of grammar schools, which is something of a flagship policy for theresa may. perhaps she is somebody who they could move. theresa may is looking to promote newer members of the party in order to i suppose nurturing new talent. there is pressure on her to do that. she has to be careful to balance the remain and brexit factions within the cabinet. the key challenge for her is if she moves people about, there are always those who will be
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unhappy. she can't really find herself in a position where she ends up herself in a position where she ends up with more enemies on the backbenches because she only has a working majority of 12. we saw before christmas she had that rebellion by backbench conservatives and ended up losing that vote on brexit. she doesn't really want to find herself in a position where she makes more enemies on the backbenches. so that will be a challenge for her. but we understand some people will be moving about. people like boris johnson, some people will be moving about. people like borisjohnson, david davis, amber rudd and philip hammond will probably remain in the positions they are in. we could see some movement elsewhere. it will be interesting with jeremy some movement elsewhere. it will be interesting withjeremy hunt because there are suggestions he could be promoted. he is in the midst of the winter nhs crisis, so it is a difficult time to move him about. winter nhs crisis, so it is a difficult time to move him aboutm will be interesting to see who is coming and going from downing street tomorrow. thank you. some of the uk's largest retailers
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have voluntarily agreed to stop selling acids and corrosive substances to customers under 18—years—old. ministers hope the measure will help stop the rise in attacks until new laws are considered by parliament. here's our home affairs correspondent, dominic casciani. the human cost of an acid attack. where's it hurting, mate, your eyes? police officers pour water over the victim lastjuly. thieves wanted the london delivery driver's moped. his helmet saved him from serious injury. police recorded more than 500 attacks involving corrosive substances in england and wales in the year to last april. officials think the true figure could be twice as high. ministers have launched an acid action plan to cut attacks. today the first part of that plan, a voluntary ban by diy chains, including b&q, on selling harmful chemicals to under—18s. waitrose and the co—op are also involved, agreeing to challenge underage customers, just like they would if they were buying alcohol. acid attacks are most horrific
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crimes, and what we want to do is make sure that we restrict access, support victims, police these attacks really effectively. it isn't just major retailers who are signing up to secure their shelves. the association representing hardware shops urging them to play their part as well. this one in london says the move is long overdue. definitely a good idea. we have always checked id for acid. same thing, if you go to a supermarket and you go to buy alcohol, you are asked for id. it should be the same thing here. this measure may be a stopgap. ministers want a full ban on sales to under—18s, and have asked parliament to create a new crime for carrying acid without a good reason. a growing number of men are being targetted by stalkers, according to new research by five live investigates. crime figures suggest around
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450,000 men in england and wales experience stalking over the course of a year. but — according to data from 41 police forces — only 1,800 stalking offences against men have been recorded by officers over the past three years. nasa's longest serving astronaut, john young, has died at the age of 87. he was one ofjust 12 men who have walked on the moon — and he flew the first space shuttle mission. former commander of the international space station, chris hadfield has described him as an inspiration. john was a fascinating, devoted and passionate and really fearless man. just a role model to so many astronauts, including the six people who are up on the space station right now. a life really well lived and a good friend of mine. plans to create a new northern forest stretching from liverpool to hull have been announced by the government. it's providing £5.7 million
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to increase tree cover along a belt spanning manchester, leeds and bradford. the woodland trust is running the project, which will cost £500 million over 25 years. most of that money will need to be raised by the charity itself. our correspondent roger harrabin has more. the bare hills of the north. one of the most denuded parts of a country which itself has less woodland than almost anywhere in europe. the land stripped over centuries fortimberand farming, scarred by industry, overgrazed by sheep farming. at smithils near manchester, things will be different. planting has begun for what will be known as the northern forest. we think the northern forest will be a pathfinder for extending forest and woodland right across country. we think trees and woods can add value in many different landscapes. we just want to do it here first and do it big. it isn't really a forest. the project will create new woods near towns,
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and plant river valleys liable to flooding. but money is tight, and many of these hills will look just as bleak and 35 years. what's more, the woodland trust expects some of their cash to come from environmental funds linked to the hs2 rail line. the supreme irony is that the government is giving with one hand and taking with the other, and i'm referring to the route of h52. why can't the government give with both hands and stop threatening ancient forests? here is what some ambitious planting can do. this is the national forest in the midlands. begun in the 1990s, now delighting local people. acorns grow. days after a warning by the nhs in northern ireland of a possible surge in flu cases, one member of the catholic church has taken action to limit the spread
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of the virus during mass. the diocese of down and connor has suspended the customary sign of peace handshakes between those who attend mass, and advised priests to disinfect their hands before they distribute holy communion. pub opening hours could be extended for the weekend of prince harry and meghan markle‘s wedding. their marriage falls on the same day as the english and scottish fa cup finals — saturday may 19th. licensing hours were previously extended for the wedding of the duke and duchess of cambridge in 2011, and for the queen's 90th birthday in 2016. any excuse for a party. in the papers this morning, there are so many supplements about meghan markle, her life story and her
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family. the excitement is building! it was one of the most significant scientific breakthroughs of modern times — in 2003, the complete genetic code of a human being, the genome, was published. by the end of this year, it's hoped this code will help thousands of nhs patients who have rare diseases and unexplained conditions. this wouldn't have been possible without families taking part in the genome project. ben schofield went to meet one of them. this is you in your incubator. for 19 years, doctors treated alex's symptoms without knowing exactly what was causing them. medics thought it was a rare condition, but genetic testing proved otherwise. he had 28 operations. there was always something else that was wrong whenever we checked. he had a skin condition, issues with his vision and hearing. you just need to know the answer. and as a parent, you want to know what is wrong with your child.
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this is the letter that i got in march telling me about your diagnosis. it was only by reading and decoding his genome that gave him a diagnosis last march. i remember reading it and actually crying knowing that they actually got to the diagnosis. and ijust could not believe that this letter appeared in the post. for mum, relief, and some certainty. from alex, a more modest response. it has been a big journey, just another part of my life. i don't think about it mostly. he may not think about it much, but alex has helped lead the way
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for potentially thousands of other patients to find the answers to their symptoms. and this is where those mysteries are being solved, a laboratory in cambridge where they discovered his genome. the code is more than 3 billion letters long, and showed his condition called leopard syndrome. it is hoped that thousands of other patients with rare diseases will get the diagnosis they have been looking for. it could hold the answers to curing... it is 15 years since the first human genome was discovered. this man helped crack that first code which helps lead the "100,000 genomes project." it is a really exciting field right now. 15 years since sequencing the first genome, we can apply it to the nhs. as well as diagnosing rare diseases, it also develops personalised
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treatment, treatment specifically for patients rather than diseases. we are all slightly different. a lot of the information is encoded in the genes. looking at your genome, in the future, we will be able to work out what is the most appropriate treatment for you. alex has tell—tale freckles for leopard syndrome. diagnosis does not mean a cure for him, but he starts better equipped than ever in 2018 to manage his condition. the number of men being ta rgetted by stalkers is on the rise, that's according to new research by five live investigates. bob coughtrey is one of them — and he's here to tell us his story. we're also joined by five live reporter adrian goldberg. bob, tell us what happened to you.|j
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am bob, tell us what happened to you.” ama bob, tell us what happened to you.” am a driving instructor. i was giving lessons to this person. everything seemed ok. she was very quiet and we didn't really strike up a rapport. iam quiet and we didn't really strike up a rapport. i am there to provide a service. she passed her test. it started to unfold a couple of days later late at night. there was a text m essa g e later late at night. there was a text message to thank me. i replied saying you're welcome. more texts keep coming through. the next one said, part of me wished i had failed because i could have spent more time with you. then it got darker. to start with, it was just a nuisance. when it started to take a dark turn,
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i was slightly concerned. from a male perspective, whether it is male eagle or whatever, you think, don't be daft. you are a fella. and the more information see was sending me by voice or text, it was getting darker and darker. and then she found out where i lived. what was the point of which you decided to call the police? on the night of the first lot of texts. they were co nsta nt. i first lot of texts. they were constant. i didn't reply to the second one. i thought i should leave that alone. it went on and on and she was threatening suicide. i thought, is it an idle threatjust to get me to pick up the phone? if it isn't, how will i feel if i have done nothing? that is when i alerted authorities, basically for her safety. bob's case is one of many,
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but it is rare that it was reported? the vast majority of stalking victims are still women, but the evidence we have uncovered shows that you're on your there is an increase toward men as well. the crime survey for england and wales shows that for the last full year we have figures, the recorded 450,000 incidents of stalking against men. the vast majority of those don't get reported to the police, even when they do, very often they are not recorded as stalking. our research shows that over a four—year period, 1800 crimes of stalking were reported across the uk. is it a relu cta nce reported across the uk. is it a reluctance of men to report this? or is there an unconscious bias within
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the police force? it could be all these things. in some cases, men feel that perhaps they might not be believed. there is also a problem with the definition of stalking. there was a previous crime of harassment. stalking grows out of that, but the line at which harassment becomes stalking is actually blurred and indistinct. the watchdog for the police say there needs to be better training for the police about how the identify and re cord police about how the identify and record harassment and stalking as a specific crime. what was the final outcome after you contacted the police? on that specific day, they sent a response team round with some paramedics. she wouldn't let them in. the sergeant that was in
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attendance phoned me and asked me to speak to her. reluctantly i did, purely to get them into her property. they gave me an incident numberand property. they gave me an incident number and advised me to block the number, which i already had. she must have bought more sim cards because random numbers were coming through. as soon as i answered or read the text, i saw it was from her. the police stepped in when she was outside your house? yes. the comfort you feel within your own house has been impacted by this? comfort you feel within your own house has been impacted by thi57m is little things. things i didn't used to do. i would be in my house andi used to do. i would be in my house and i wouldn't lock the door until i was going to bed. note i do it as $0011 was going to bed. note i do it as soon as i come was going to bed. note i do it as soon as i come home. was going to bed. note i do it as
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soon as i come home. i unlock my car earlier then i used to, so that i can go straight in. thank you for coming in to speak to us. you're welcome. there is more on that story on radio 5 live at 11 o'clock this morning. here's stav with a look at this morning's weather. a lot of places starting off sunny with blue skies, but there was some cloud to the south—east. for most of us, this will be a typical picture. frosty start and a lot of sunshine. the breeze will continue to feed cloud across the south—east. further north, you can see it will be a very cold start. outbreaks of rain for
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the northern isles. well below freezing for much of scotland. further south, temperatures will be rising through the morning. the breeze is going to make things feel really raw and quite better throughout the day. despite it being very cold, with some places not even getting above freezing, it will feel pleasa nt getting above freezing, it will feel pleasant in the sunshine. looking at the pressure chart, you can see the tight isobars are bringing the breeze. further cloud over southern areas. again, a widespread frost. we start the new working week on a cold and frosty note. more cloud across the south. the north midlands, the
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odd spot of drizzle. further north, staying dry all day. the area of high pressure will slowly ebb away and elizabeth of battle ground. is weather fund will eventually win out to bring in slightly less cold air and outbreaks of rain. quite cold and outbreaks of rain. quite cold and raw over most of the country on tuesday. a lot of cloud around. later in the day, some signs of rain for northern ireland and south—west england. wednesday is a messy picture. brightening up a little in the west. a touch milder. still quite chilly in the north. back to you. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers.
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the writer and broadcaster robert meakin is here to tell us what's caught his eye. donald trump, you just can't keep him out of the papers or off twitter. this is a little subplot. a suggestion there are real concerns that should donald trump not be invited to the royal wedding, this could harm britain's chances of getting a decent trade deal post brexit. normally that is a bit of a punt, but because it is donald trump, one tweet and this could be a reality. whether meghan markle and prince harry will want any world leaders at their wedding, we don't
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know. these extraordinary tweet yesterday in which he described himself as a stable genius, whatever side you sit only trumped fence, it's hard to get your head around that level of self—confidence. it's hard to get your head around that level of self—confidencem it's hard to get your head around that level of self-confidence. it is extraordinary stuff, but we have become used to it. let's speak about jamie oliver. he has done wonders for a lots of different school meals and things like that. now he is talking about the campaign to get kids standing at their school desks. he is part of a new high profile campaign trying to tackle obesity in schools. one of the new big ideas is that kids should not be sitting at their desks, they should have new standing desks. when i was at
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school, standing was a punishment. at the idea that nobody could have nine—year—old kids standing at their deskis nine—year—old kids standing at their desk is an interesting proposition. he says he wants them all to squat instead of set. they say that working on the radio you are better to stand because your voice is better and you concentrate more. it is too early in the morning for that nonsense! earlier, we spoke about the story of tom jones moving back to the uk, leaving la after many years. he has been there for about 50 yea rs. years. he has been there for about 50 years. he says his wife passed away last year. she always wanted to
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come back to britain, so he has decided it is time. it seems he has come to london for the time being, not pontypridd. sir tom jones bought the house from dean martin. he said the house from dean martin. he said the benefit of that was that dean martin had left the bar. imagine the people who have been there! amazing. people have made a fair old job out of impersonating elvis over the yea rs. of impersonating elvis over the years. the european elvis championships final. the winner will be announced later, on the edge of oui’ be announced later, on the edge of our seats. elvis impersonators used to be widely mocked, but i think people have worked out the risk quite a lot of money to be made if
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you are decent elvis impersonator. as an elvis fan, i have to do say it tends to be a slightly more rotund gentleman in the jumpsuit, tends to be a slightly more rotund gentleman in thejumpsuit, but i think it always reinstates the caricature of elvis in his final yea rs, caricature of elvis in his final years, rather than in his prime. finally, the chelsea coach and manchester united football coach, no love lost between the two of them?” think it's getting a bit tiresome. the players need to be the ones responsible to be role models. these are two of the most high—profile managers in the land, antonio conte and jose mourinho. they are really going for each other. it is watching the managers on the touchline for the managers on the touchline for the real drama is. the idea with
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jose mourinho was this was a deflection tactic to take the attention away from his players. they are struggling with manchester city being supreme. even if manchester united are misfiring and the game is sometimes boring, jose mourinho is really boring. is able to command the headlines. thank you. good to see you this morning. stay with us, the headlines are on the way ina with us, the headlines are on the way in a moment. also coming up, going vegan in january way in a moment. also coming up, going vegan injanuary has become the latest new year trend. we will ask how easy it is to embrace the whole lifestyle. headlines are on the way. hello, this is breakfast with rogerjohnson and rachel burden.
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good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. theresa may has dropped plans to hold a vote on the fox—hunting ban. last year's conservative manifesto contianed a pledge to let mps consider repealing the hunting act — which bans the use of dogs to hunt foxes and other animals. in an interview with the bbc‘s andrew marr, she confirmed the vote will not now take place before the next election in 2022. one of the clear messages we got was a number of areas in which people were concerned about what we were proposing. so just as we have looked at issues on school funding, tuition fees, housing, we are taking forward approaches in relation to that. on this issue of fox hunting, what i can say is that there will not be a vote
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during this parliament. the prime minister is to carry out a cabinet reshuffle tomorrow. it's not known yet what changes and appointments theresa may will make, but it's being reported that up to six ministers could either lose theirjobs or be moved. a downing street source has described such stories as "pure speculation" and "guesswork". some of the uk's largest retailers have voluntarily agreed to stop selling acids and corrosive substances to customers under 18 years old. thousands of independent hardware shops are also expected to follow suit. ministers hope the measure will help stop the rise in attacks until new laws are considered by parliament. a growing number of men are being targeted by stalkers, according to new research by five live investigates. crime figures suggest around 450,000 in england and wales experience stalking over the course of a year. but according to data from 41 police forces, only 1,800 stalking offences against men have been recorded by officers over the past three years.
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plans to create a new "northern forest" along a belt spanning manchester, leeds and bradford, have been announced by the government. it will see new woods planted near towns and river valleys liable to flooding. the woodland trust is running the project and will raise most of the £500 million it is expected to cost over the next 25 years. the east coast of north america is shivering in a record—breaking freeze. it comes after a massive snow storm that reached as far south as florida. temperatures there are forecast to fall below minus 29 degrees celsius. the extreme weather has so far been linked to 19 deaths. and this is a story of the kindness of strangers and are very hardy pet, sub ideal —— surviving against the odds. a welsh border collie was fined after vanishing during a walk
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last week in the pembrokeshire mountains. her owner thought they would never see her again but after a 10—day search she was found by a stranger. she had lost some weight but the family said that 13—year—old dog is enjoying being back at home. this is a walk they did regularly but the snow was very thick and she had seemingly got lost, just ran off. they put out an appeal on facebook, and of course they were overwhelmed by people coming along to try and track her down. i'm one of those people, who the family did not know at all, managed to find her. apparently she is doing fine. cold weather in america and cold weather here this morning. in sydney in australia, 47 degrees, some people have said 43 degrees. but the heat has been on england either way! graham swann were saying that as he took his headphones that was a good
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deal sluttiness. .. just took his headphones that was a good deal sluttiness... just imagine what it was like for those players on the field. —— a lot of sweat. people have been trying to find different ways of saying australia on top. the ashes is heading for a 4—0 win for australia. england have survived the day in sydney, but the result seems inevitable. they are 93—4 in their second innings, still 210 runs behind at the close of the penultimate day of the ashes series, which looks like it is going to end in a 4—0 series win for australia. the hosts' first innings was a dominant display. 649—7 declared. patrick is here. if you are an england fan that will not be another wicket all —— oliver burke 15 hours. it was a day of unforgiving heat and unforgiving australia. australia
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only need six wickets to complete that 4-0 only need six wickets to complete that 4—0 ashes win. in reality, only one, that ofjoe root, the england captain, who has dug in. both the marsh brothers went to their centuries saw there were emotional celebrations between them. they really got stuck in after that into the england bowlers. all the way up to 649-7, the england bowlers. all the way up to 649—7, a lead of 303. and record highs in parts of sydney. england had a nightmare start, losing mark stoneman lbw. alistair cook was bowled by nathan lyon. james vince got out to a poor shot. then england lost dawid malan, one of the rare success stories of this tour. he was trapped lbw as well. he tried to review it but no good. butjonny ba i rstow review it but no good. butjonny bairstow came in and accompanied joe root by the way through to the closed. they dug in, to their credit. it does show they are still
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fighting and still determine. but the me, today has underlined the quality difference between these two sites. and i thinki know quality difference between these two sites. and i think i know the answer, but is there any hope? i'm afraid there is very little, to be honest. this is turning pitch, england have a long tail, there is not a great batting to come. they are not good at blocking. if there is hope, it rests withjoe root, who has been dearer today and doesn't wa nt to has been dearer today and doesn't want to let the australians pass if there is anything he can do. but talk is already turning to where england have gone wrong in this match and in the series as a whole. their assistant coach faced the media today to try and explain that. in many ways, the last few days have suit] in many ways, the last few days have sum up in many ways, the last few days have suit] up our in many ways, the last few days have sum up ourtrip. in many ways, the last few days have sum up our trip. it has been very top. we have come up against a team who played excellent cricket. they have kept the pressure on us at all times. but the one thing we have talked a lot about isjust making sure we keep fighting and battling.
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working as hard as we possibly can. he said there were a lot of questions to answer but there is still a day to go. if i can give you any hope, there are a few showers in the broadcast, by the weather here is about as predictable as england's batting. patrick, you are a tease! but thank you very much. now, onto the football. they are in the bottom three of the premier league and were on the end of the biggest shock of the fa cup third round weekend so far, and now they are without a manager. stoke sacked mark hughes after they were beaten 2—1 at league 2 side coventry. it was also a day where manchester city safely went through, but chelsea were taken to a replay by norwich. joe lynskey rounds up the action. it has been a dark two decades for coventry city. financial turmoil and three relegations. but this was the day the clouds parted for the sky blues. commentator: it's in! the shock is back on!
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a 2—1 win for the fourth tier side, but coventry‘s joy brought mark hughes' downfall. for stoke city's manager, this result meant the inevitable. when a premier league side goes out to a lower league side in the third round, it's news. it is not the news we wanted to create prior to the game today, but it has happened. in football, moving on can leave a bitter taste, but injured jamie vardy got a warm welcome back to fleetwood. leicester bought him here for £1 million, and now he's an international for england. but the 0—0 draw never matched his star quality. by contrast, style is what defines manchester city's season. they are going to glory on all fronts. even when they fell behind to burnley, the comeback was always coming. aguero! two in two minutes! a 4—star turnaround for pep guardiola's side, the giants nobody wants to take on. there was merely
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an upset at bournemouth. five years ago wigan won the cup, now they're in the third tier. they led 2—0 against their premier league opponents before things looked away. warner fought back to force a replay. but extra games at this time of year can feel like a headache. the linesman at villa did recover, and so did this underdog. from one goal down, peterborough fought back to win 3—1. this was a january day for the blues in the cup, and proved the magic still matters. for a full list of yesterday's results, head to the bbc sport website. the fa cup third round continues today with eight teams in action. elsewhere, there are three premier league teams in action. west ham are away at shrewsbury town, where david moyes will be hoping to avoid a repeat of his 2003 defeat as everton manager. tottenham host afc wimbledon.
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holders arsenal are away to nottingham forest. philippe coutinho will become one of the most expensive footballers in history after barcelona agreed to pay up to £142 million for the liverpool forward. the brazilian has spent four and a half years at anfield, and liverpool have eventually decided to do the deal after turning down three bids for him from barcelona in the summer. the initial payment will be £105 million, a british record, with the rest in add—ons. he has agreed a 5.5 year deal at the camp nou. northampton had a win over gloucester. this is in the pro 14. jonny sexton running off a very impressive victory. that leaves them pretty high up as well, two points from scarlets. elsewhere, ospreys w011 from scarlets. elsewhere, ospreys won the welsh derby, beating cardiff blues. and glasgow maintained a top
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at —— there is spot at the top. 16—year—old james bowen has become the youngest jockey to win the welsh grand national. fittingly he was on the 16—1 shot raz de maree. taking the lead two fences from home and powering to victory. the jockey might be young, but at 13, the horse is the oldest to win the race in modern times. great britain's mica moore and misha mcneill crashed in the latest round of the bobsleigh world cup on saturday. the pair had been in seventh place after theirfirst run, but caught the wall halfway through their second attempt and turned the sled over. they both got out safely, but seemed shaken. moore and mcneill have been competing this season with the help of crowdfunding, after their financial support was withdrawn by british bobsleigh. it is not ideal preparation but it
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isa it is not ideal preparation but it is a very swift learning curve ahead of the winter olympics. they are coming up soon. 33 days, they stopped him up on tuesday. what they stopped him up on tuesday. what they have had to do is not only get funding to fund a potential trip to the winter olympics but they also have to go through the world cup qualifying campaign. so there is a pretty vigorous and quick qualifying campaign that they need enough money for. the original mad they needed to raise was £30,000 but that is just the first of what has to follow. because they go to south korea, it will cost a lot of money and need extra funding. part of that has been resolved but they think they are still short. we wish them well. at least they we re we wish them well. at least they were all right. thanks very much. the red carpet is being rolled out, the champagne is on ice and the statuettes are about to be handed over, but the start of the 2018 hollywood awards season is expected to get off to an unusual start at the golden globes tonight.
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famous faces have vowed to wear all—black in solidarity against sexism and harrassment — prompted by a series of recent abuse allegations in the industry. here's our north america correspondent, james cook, who's in la. in hollywood, they are getting ready to put their best foot forward. but this your‘s awards season may be more protest than party. the dirty secrets of the movie business have been exposed in recent months and 110w scores been exposed in recent months and now scores of been exposed in recent months and 110w scores of stars been exposed in recent months and now scores of stars say they will wear black to the golden globes to promote a campaign called time's up. i never thought it would happen in my lifetime. tomorrow people will be in black, i don't think it will be funereal, it'll be a celebration of all of us saying it is time to deal with this, time to deal with this and not put up with it any. we are wearing black to stand in solidarity notjust with wearing black to stand in solidarity not just with women and what is
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happening in hollywood but to represent and stand for all women across all industries and support them, and also to support equality in all its forms. i have suffered all of that and worse. by the time ago to the music business, i was having it. but i feel for those women because they have secrets and i know about secrets. i know about carrying secrets. now the secrets are exposed and they are being set free so i'm happy for them. the cleansing has already begun. kevin spacey, facing multiple allegations of sexual assault, was cut out of this film just weeks before the release. christopher plummer took over the role of oil tycoonj paul getty. co—star michelle williams told me she re—shot her scenes for free. films are larger-than-life and they glorify people. i could not bear the thought of being in a movie that glorified somebody who had hurt people. in these ways. i did not
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wa nt to people. in these ways. i did not want to have anything to do with it. i would not have gone to promote it, i would not have gone to promote it, i would not have talked about it, because i would have felt like it is not the right thing to do for those people that have been hurt. they do not need to be traumatised again by seeing this movie come out and see big posters and flashy advertisements. it is not appropriate. so i did not want any pa rt appropriate. so i did not want any part of it. other films tipped for awards include the shape of water, the sci—fi fantasy leading the field with seven nominations. kumar and heartbreak and this film six nods. —— humour. a tender love story was also in the running... so also is the post, tom hanks and meryl streep showcasing the power of the press. it is very much a story for the times. while hollywood is gathering to pat itself on the back as usual,
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everything has changed this year. a few months ago, the entertainment industry was thrown into turmoil and eve ryo ne industry was thrown into turmoil and everyone here is onlyjust beginning to work out what that means for the future. james cooke, bbc news, los angeles. earlier we spoke to one of the founding members of the ‘time's up' campaign, actor amber tamblyn. there will be many, many people wearing black who are from a cross industry lines who will appear on the carpet today. this is a huge movement, it is nationwide, it is across industries and it is many people coordinated, wearing something that is meant to symbolise a large cultural shift and change in oui’ a large cultural shift and change in our country. so it is notjust going to be people on a red carpet, but we ask people tojoin to be people on a red carpet, but we ask people to join us to be people on a red carpet, but we ask people tojoin us in to be people on a red carpet, but we ask people to join us in wearing black and standing in solidarity with the women on the carpet and expressing to them why they feel like this is a reset button, that
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black symbolises that we're starting over and we are taking over control of our own power. i suppose what i mean of our own power. i suppose what i m ea n really of our own power. i suppose what i mean really is, what does a very well—paid hollywood actor like meryl streep really know about the day—to—day harassment somebody working in catering for in the agricultural industry might face? so, sexual harassment, sexual assault, the misappropriation of power, the power dynamic that is so problematic in our country and so off, it sees no colour it sees no age, it sees no social discrepancy, it is across for everybody, for every woman. every woman has experienced some form of harassment 01’ power experienced some form of harassment or power dynamic shift. it is not just women like meryl streep, yes, but it is also then, it is women who
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are veterinarians, who are nurses, teachers, actresses, producers, it is all women, we have all experienced it. my mother has experienced it. my mother has experienced it. my mother has experienced it and she is a schoolteacher. i'm sure everyone in the uk and the whole world. it is not just about. .. you the uk and the whole world. it is notjust about... you don'tjust think of the actresses, you can think of the actresses, you can think of the actresses, you can think of this movement as the face of it but it doesn't mean we're necessarily all of it or that we are claiming it. wejust want necessarily all of it or that we are claiming it. we just want to support and rise up and sort of put a safety net underneath women who have shared their stories and will come forward and who have done the hard work so far. there is very much a practical mission to this campaign, to raise funds to support women and indeed men who have been victims of sexual harassment to fight any legal cases. yes, several months ago, the women of the farm workers union here, over 700,000, signed a letter of solidarity, standing with the women
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of the entertainment business. it was a really beautiful letter. we decided to craft something that was a response letter to them, but it is not just a response a response letter to them, but it is notjust a response saying we stand in solidarity with them, it is also a call to arms, it is also saying we will not tolerate this behaviour any more. it is notjust about sexual harassment were sexual assault, it is also about representation in all businesses and the fact that women are not represented in positions of power in a lot of different industries in the us. so with that letter, we founded the legal defence fund which has raised over $50 million, and it is our hope that the defence fund will continue to get bigger —— defence fund will continue to get bigger -- $15 defence fund will continue to get bigger —— $15 million. we will have many more events coming up to support that. and the funds from that go to supporting the legal fees of people who have been sexually
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harassed or assaulted in the workplace. this is where we say goodbye to roger, who's reading the news for andrew marr over on bbc one. here's stav with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. it is a cold one, cold and frosty across many areas. but light winds and lots of sunshine. it is going to be pretty glorious throughout the holding. we have some cloud across the south and the south east coming in keen wind. there will be some patchy cloud throughout the morning and perhaps into the afternoon. similarly across the north of scotland towards the northern isles, a weatherfront bringing outbreaks of rain to shetland primarily. elsewhere, after the cold start, temperatures only slowly rising, maybe hovering around freezing. but around three to six celsius across england and wales. but the wind is remaining light
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across the nazr would will feel very pleasa nt across the nazr would will feel very pleasant as we reach around 3pm in the afternoon. despite the cold start. for the football match in shropshire this afternoon, it is looking pretty good, temperatures of around three celsius, lots of sunshine and the wind is light. high pressure is with us again this evening and overnight, another very cold one, central and northern areas with light winds. a widespread rural frost. further south, with light winds. a widespread rural frost. furthersouth, because we have more of a breeze, it will feed in more cloud to southern counties, perhaps reaching as far as south wales. it means monday morning, most places will be cold, frosty and sunny, but the south will be cloudy and grey. the grey skies moving a bit further north as the afternoon goes on, reaching parts of wales into the north and midlands, maybe some drizzle as well. but for much of scotla nd some drizzle as well. but for much of scotland and the far north, lots of scotland and the far north, lots of sunshine. the high pressure begins to move away into the near continent, pulling southerly winds
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across the country, that will bring more cloud. a weather front waiting in the atlantic will introduce some rain on tuesday night. a cloudy day for tuesday, quite chilly as well, particularly across the north. you can see the signs of the temperatures coming up across the far south—west. by wednesday the rain will be confined to eastern areas. brighterfurther rain will be confined to eastern areas. brighter further west and a touch milder across the south, eight touch milder across the south, eight to 10 celsius. move over stoptober, movember, and dryjanuary — it seems the latest month long health kick trend is all about becoming vegan. it's called veganuary — going vegan for the whole month of january — and it began four years ago with over 3,000 people taking part. so far this year 150,000 have pledged to get involved. different to vegetarianism, a vegan diet means not eating any food that comes from an animal. that includes dairy products and eggs.
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here to discuss it are the co—founder of veganuary, matthew glover, and dietician ursula philpot. thank you very much forjoining us. tell us about your vegan story, first of all. i went vegan seven yea rs first of all. i went vegan seven years ago, i had been a vegetarian for about ten years before that. my background is come on the mother on her side, they work meat traders and butchers so i spent a lot of time in slaughterhouses. so for me, it was the animal cruelty and the ethical reasons for adopting a plant —based lifestyle. veganuary, which is a terrible word, i have to say! but it is catching on? we have 150,000 people signed up, it is roughly doubling in size every year. we have worked out that by 2028, everyone in the world will be doing veganuary!” will wait and see. there are few
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people in my life i would see hard pushed trying to do it. it is is —— it isa pushed trying to do it. it is is —— it is a month without all animal products. so this is more thanjust skipping your burger. absolutely. this is something you need to plan carefully and think about carefully. luckily, there are great plans online these days, you can do a whole 30 day plan that some of the split together. if you are whole 30 day plan that some of the y whole 30 day plan that some of the split together. if you are happy to follow that and radically change what you eat, it is not as difficult as it might seem. but there are so many traces of milk powder and things like that. you have to plan it and do things carefully. it strikes me the easiest way of doing it is to cut out all processed foods. but that can be very time consuming football delaware. —— very time—consuming. consuming football delaware. —— very time-consuming. there are a lot more convenience products of these days
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that are vegan, that you can pick up and go with. and many restaurants these days offer vegan options. it is not as difficult as it once was. but yes, you have to be able to cook and plana but yes, you have to be able to cook and plan a menu and put things together. so it is going to be a challenge in terms of time to think about it. you don't want to be caught on the hop. your choices will be very limited. not really, we are making it as easy as possible for people. we have vegan starter kit on our website with meal plans and nutritional information. once you get involved, it becomes standard practice and you get used to it. particularly if people understand the reasons why, so it is very much about the health of the planet and the health of animals, had they are treated, and if you focus on that, it becomes quite easy to be able to just switch a few things. for example if you go to the supermarket, you do not buy the cow
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is‘ malcolm, you would buy the soy milk. -- milk. some people say that these products can be as damaging in terms of the intensive farming as dairyfarming. terms of the intensive farming as dairy farming. sawyer, for example, 90% of the soya is actually fed to animals, so it is animal agriculture thatis animals, so it is animal agriculture that is the problem. 14.5% of green gas emissions from animal agriculture, which is more than all transportation combine. take us through that start again. 14.5% of all greenhouse gas emissions come from animal agriculture. and transportation is 14%. but there is little focus put on this. it is from the methane from cows, it is from the methane from cows, it is from the clearing of the forests and the deforestation where animals are being grazed, and also growing food to feed animals. so this is the united nations, we definitely need
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to get off a meat and dairy diet and move towards plant —based. to get off a meat and dairy diet and move towards plant -based. and yet, i look at beautiful sheep and cows in the field and the rearing and the continuation of these rare breeds and so on and part of me thinks, well, if they are well reared and well, if they are well reared and well looked after, is it sustainable, is it ok? are there some people who should not do veganuary? probably. if you are an aduu veganuary? probably. if you are an adult and you are fit and well, you can do it if you plan for it. if you're just going to eat chips and crisps for the whole ofjanuary, you will have some health problems. but provided you follow a well balanced plan, you are absolutely fine. if you do it longer than that, you need to take care around some vitamins and minerals, particularly things like vitamin de, or omega three.
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zinc or calcium, those kind of things. you need to plan those carefully and there are supplements available. is there also an issue who are susceptible to food control issues? if you are underweight already, it is fairly low in calories, if you are pregnant and breast—feeding, women have to plan with particular care. teenagers going through growth spurts, again, you need particular care and attention. there is an association with disordered eating, but many teenagers who have disordered eating choose to go vegan so there is an association that you need to be mindful of. and annoyingly for us meat eaters, you look amazingly healthy! my health has improved dramatically over the last seven yea rs. dramatically over the last seven years. i have and have a cold in seven yea rs. years. i have and have a cold in seven years. thank you very much. -- i haven't had a call. that's it from us today. dan and louise will be here from
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six o'clock tomorrow morning. have a lovely day. goodbye. this is bbc news. the headlines at 9am: theresa may abandons plans to give mps a vote on over—turning the ban on fox—hunting in this parliament. ifi if i look back at what the messages we got from the election, one of the clear messages we got was a number of areas in which people were concerned about what we were proposing. the prime minister will carry out a cabinet reshuffle tomorrow. there are reports that up to six ministers could either lose theirjobs or be moved. some of the uk's largest retailers agree to stop selling acids and corrosive substances to customers under 18 years old. german chancellor angela merkel is to begin a new round of coalition talks in a bid to end the country's political stalemate. also in the next hour, plans to plant 50 million trees
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