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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  January 23, 2018 9:00pm-10:00pm GMT

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. china, south korea and the us are standing off over trade. president trump's america first approach is kicking in — he's approved steep tariffs on washing machines and solar panels. us attorney—generaljeff sessions is questioned by the investigation into russian interference in us election. q 0 mass appeal has died. he was a legend of south african music and a fighter in the struggle against apartheid. i stall so much from africa and the need to pay back. the only way to pay back is to make the people see how wonderful they are.
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we will look at why men who were reporting on vice president's mike pence replaced on the front row and women were asked to stand behind the barrier. women were asked to stand behind the barrier. welcome to outside source. america is bringing in tariffs of up to 50% on imported washing machines and solar panels. it's part of president trump's ‘america first‘ trade policy. here he is talking about it a little while ago. so we are bringing business back to the united states for the first time in many, many years. many, many decades, really. we are very proud of it. that is why the stock market is reacting the way it is. that is why the stock market is reacting the way it is. 1.6 million washing machines were imported to the us in 2010. american company whirlpool has been lobbying for protection against cheaper imports for years.
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its shares went up 2.5% on the news and it immediately announced it'd be hiring 200 more people. so whirlpool likes this — much less so chinese or south korean manufacturers. this is south korea's trade minister. our government is expressing regret for the latest us safeguard measures against our industry as they are excessive and would clearly violate the wto rules. we will actively respond to protectionist measures to protect the national interest and resolve the industry's difficulties. we've got the upside for the us. yogita limaye, new york explains the downside. whirlpool is among the companies that complained to the us international trade commission which find in their favour. international trade commission which find in theirfavour. today, president trump has approved these
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tariffs. what is the downside? let's look at the solar panel industry. one survey last year said that installation of solar power panels, thatis installation of solar power panels, that is one of the fastest growing jobs in america. there are many companies that do solar panel installation tear. if you can no longer import the number of solar panels, and people are saying that american manufacturers will be able to meet that demand, a lot of people here could potentially lose their jobs. all of these electronic items, the end of the day it is an entire chain. there may be part in a washing machine for example or in a solar panel that are imported from the us and then manufactured, progestin career. global trade is a chain and if you increase the price when it is coming back into america, at some level you will also harm
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businesses in your own country, as well. businesses in your own country, as well. yogita was talking there about the tax on solar panels in terms of the broad issue of tariffs. many are also pointing out the narrower issue of the development of renewables. former ny mayor michael bloomberg tweeted, "taxing solar panels up to 30% will destroy us jobs, raise americans' electric bills and hurt our environment. congress should stand up for american workers and consumers and overturn the administration's harmful decision". but this is essentially president trump doing what he said he'd do. yogita limaye. this isn't the first thing that we have heard from him as far as traders concerned. he pulled out of the transpacific partnership. he has been talking about the negotiating the north american free trade agreement and with canada. in mexico, there were import tariffs put on things like lumber from
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canada. in that sense, he seems to be picking a fight with everyone. even today, that reaction, stronger from south korea and china because they are the ones likely to be worst affected. they had european leaders saying they've regret this decision. the indian prime minister said that protectionism is raising its head and he defended globalisation. here is a tweet from paul page from the wall streetjournal. the first volley in the trade war might have been fired over washing machines and solar panels. here's yogita on how the chinese and south koreans might retaliate. it would involve them seeing if they wa nt to it would involve them seeing if they want to raise tariffs on things that are imported from the us. especially dgs trade equation with china is heavily tilted in favour of china, the trade with china is four times.
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in general, that is a trend that is set, other countries, india is a huge market for the us. if you have then other countries start raising ta riffs then other countries start raising tariffs on imports from the us, that will harm anyone he is making things here and wanting to sell them abroad. we can be sure that this news is being carefully noted by eve ryo ne news is being carefully noted by everyone attending the world economic forum in davos. it's a gathering of the global elite and donald trump's going. the first sitting us president to do so in 20 years. and there's no shortage of people warning against protectionism. justin trudeau for one. we are working very hard to make sure that your neighbour to the south recognises how good nafta is
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and how it has benefited his economy, the world economy. we are open to more trade deals involving more people as long as it is in the best benefit of all of our citizens. the us attorney—general, jeff sessions, has been interviewed by the mueller investigation. it's looking into alleged collusion between the trump campaign and russia — and this is the first member of president trump's cabinet to be questioned. here's anthony zurcher on what we can read into this development. jeff sessions sits in an interesting position, had a crossroad of different lines of the robert miller investigation. he served as a campaign adviser to donald trump. he had meetings with russians ambassadors during the campaign that he was not forthcoming on when asked about during his confirmation as us
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attorney general. as us attorney general he was involved in a conversation possibly with donald trump about james comey conversation possibly with donald trump aboutjames comey who conversation possibly with donald trump about james comey who was fired, the fbi director, fired by donald trump. another part of robert miller's investigation is to look at any possible evidence of obstruction of justice any possible evidence of obstruction ofjustice on part of the president oi’ ofjustice on part of the president or his staff. sessions may have information that could be valuable to that aspect of the investigation as well. in terms of the format, how does it work? this appears to be the same sort of setup that other members of donald trump's inner circle have had when they appeared before robert miller and his team. when they appeared before robert millerand his team. it when they appeared before robert miller and his team. it is not a subpoena, not a grand jury questioning. it is a sit down with either robert muller himself or a member to visiting to talk about the issues. he can take breaks. it is different to the grand jury that it
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looked like steve bannon was going to be subjected to, until he made his own deal with the mueller team. there's been a series of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions in the past 2a hours. mount kusatsu—shirane has erupted in japan. mount mayon in the philippines began erupting a few days ago. and then there have been earthquakes off the coast of java in indonesia, and off the coast of alaska. let's look at images from these events. i these from japan, where the eruption caused an avalanche. a soldier was killed. 14 others were injured. these are timelapse images of mount mayon in the philippines. these pictures are from indonesia. these workers and residents injakarta fleeing from high rise buildings that swayed after a 5.3 earthquake. and this is a trafficjam in alaska
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after people followed police orders to evacuate. that earthquake measured 7.9 and triggered a tsunami warning. that warning is no longer in place, by the way. the un office for disaster risk reduction sent out this tweet with details of those quakes and eruptions. but what's most interesting is it says the ring of fire is active today and included this map that shows the ring of fire — you can see it includes indonesia, the philippines, japan and alaska. that obviously begs the question, what exactly is the ring of fire and does it mean these events are connected? jonathan amos can help. the ring of fire isjust this the ring of fire is just this great region of activity that extends all the way around the pacific
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basin. from alaska, dined through japan, the philippines, down three new zealand. anywhere along the line then you will get activity of some sort. it is responsible for more than half of all the volcanoes above sea level. you find them on the ring of fire. what is the cause? it is this idea of plate tectonics. we have these great slabs covering the surface of the earth and as they move and jostle bigoted geological response. today we saw in alaska are big earthquake that was the result of the pacific late, the pacific ocean floor putting up against the north american plate and diving underneath the north american plate, they are colliding at about six centimetres a year. where that happened you get earthquakes but
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also volcanoes because as the rock coastline, it melts and comes up as magma to islands. you see activity all around the basin. are these events connected? all around the basin. are these events connected ? no, all around the basin. are these events connected? no, they are not, other than that underlying driver of plate tectonics, there is no connection between a net quake in tokyo or chile or alaska or have volcanoes may be in new zealand. the only time that there is a connection is where you get events that are very close together. today, for example, with a big earthquake in alaska you got a number of after—shocks, so clearly they are related. so those events aren't connected, theyjust happen a lot on the ring of fire. the bbc‘s rebecca henschke is based injakarta — tremors are part of life there. the epicentre of the quake was a kilometres away from where i am in centraljakarta, but office building
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on the 15th floor of a high—rise building shook for about 15 seconds and we were forced to evacuate down the stairwell. all the buildings in this area were evacuated, workers told to get out from these buildings and onto the street for their own safety. this included a number of government buildings as well as schools. there is no immediate tsunami threat and no reports of injuries. we are hearing of minor damage done to hundreds of buildings in the town closest to the epicentre, but today's events very much a reminder that we live here in the ring of fire, an area where tectonic plates often collide making earthquakes and volcanic eruptions pa rt earthquakes and volcanic eruptions part of daily life here. inafew
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in a few minutes tojerusalem and bring you up—to—date on mike pence's visit. he has been to the western wall. female reporters invited to cover this were asked to stand behind the men who were asked to come along. it's emerged that police are investigating a new allegation of sexual assault made against the convicted rapistjohn worboys. convicted in 2009, worboys is due to be released by the end of the month. we learned today that scotland yard have received a fresh allegation of sexual assault dating back to 1997, so sexual assault dating back to 1997, so five years earlier than was thought his offending started. that allegation was made this month. it is being taken extremely seriously i understand by detectives from scotla nd understand by detectives from scotland yard, but the enquiry is in its early stages and they haven't as
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yet arrested worboys or interviewed him, but potentially this is significant because there is growing u nrest significant because there is growing unrest about his impending release. if that investigation moved swiftly and effectively, and potentially lead to a criminal charge, it is impossible to see really high worboys could then be left out. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story: president trump's approved steep tariffs on washing machines and solar panels from asia. china and south korea have vowed to defend their interests. pakistani authorities say they have arrested the main suspect in the rape and killing of six—year—old zainab ansari. the chief minister of punjab province accused the suspect of being a serial killer. russia's culture ministry has
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withdrawn the british and french film the death of stalin from distribution in cinemas two days before its release. a member of the ministry's advisory council called the film ideological warfare. neil diamond is retiring from performing after being diagnosed with parkinson's disease. he turns 77 tomorrow and says on this website he's made the decision "with great reluctance and disappointment". us vice—president mike pence visited the western wall injerusalem today. reporters were allowed to cover the event. but male and female journalists were kept segregated. this is a rule enforced byjewish ultra—orthodox authorities at the site injerusalem. men and women are not allowed to pray together at the wall.
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it's the holiest site where jews are permitted to pray. and the third holiest site in islam. to be clear, this is not new. there were complaints when women were segregated when donald trump came in may. but this time, journalists there say women were kept behind the men — not at an equal distance like on previous vip visits. on twitter, washington postjenna johnson said, "as vice president pence visits the western wall, male journalists are given the front—row spots. female journalists are standing in the very back, standing on chairs to try to see over all of the guys." in fact, the hashtag #pencefence quickly gained traction. reporter noga tarnopolsky said male journalists were also allowed access to the vice—president in a tent. she posted this video. here you can see life as all of the
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men are given access to cover the vice president's visit directly and personally and we women are literally stuck in a pen behind them, just stuck in a pen. here you can see our events. here you can see our events. tal schneider was there. she is the political and diplomatic editor for globes. while it wasn't a nice experience, we went there being invited by the american embassy in israel to cover the vice president's visit to the wall. obviously they say it is a private event for him, but they wanted coverage. as you know, the area is segregated between men and
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women in the last ten years, but it wasn't always like that. that is a new tradition. it was a common area in the past. today, in order to accommodate the vice president they closed the entire place, so no people, ultra—docs —— orthodox or rather, were not allowed in. we protested. we said it is not a regular line of business to have woman behind not been able to work, ta ke p hotos woman behind not been able to work, take photos or be equal with the photographers and reporters. that we re photographers and reporters. that were male. are you upset that segregation happens at all at the western wall or that the americans allowed it to happen in this particular circumstance?
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iam upset particular circumstance? i am upset about this segregation at all times. it shouldn't happen. there are associations in israel, religious associations that protest this every month. i am a working reporter. i am a secular person. i am not normally going to pray at the western wall, i came over to work and be professional. it is another example of something that shouldn't happen here. israel is a western democracy. we have equal rights laws and this is unacceptable to us. obviously i am upset that the regular scene that goes on over there, but as a working professional today the fact that i was there to see it with my eyes, i will protest against it, that's for sure. bill cosby has
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returned to the stage. in a few months he has a retrial on charges of sexual assault. quad the performance was a jazz club in philadelphia. this is some of it. my my wife, who loves me and does not wa nt my wife, who loves me and does not want me to walk into anything said... why is it these people can talk? why is it these people can talk? cosby‘s trial begins in march. it's happening because last year a jury was unable to reach a unanimous verdict. mr cosby is accused of drugging and molesting university basketball coach andrea constand at his home in 200a. she is one of around 60 women to have accused mr cosby of being a sexual predator. you may remember this powerful front cover of the new yorker in 2015, when 35 of his accusers spoke out. now, despite a fairly appreciative audience,
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he didn't have things all his own way at last night's performance. he was asked about his retrial. npr radiojournalist billy allyn was also there. he tweeted this picture, saying: "here is the unforgettable face cosby made when i asked him how he thinks jurors will see his case differently in the #metoo era." mr allynjoins me now. hi, bobby. thank you for your time. can you tell us more about what exchange you had with bill cosby. was he willing to talk? yes, his handlers were keeping him away from the press during his whole performance, which was quite bizarre
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and freewheeling. even after the performance a bunch of camera people and other journalists performance a bunch of camera people and otherjournalists tried to huddle around him and his publicist just said that asking questions about the trial, he will not and to any questions about his accusers. he didn't come here to talk about that. i thought, look, didn't come here to talk about that. ithought, look, bill cosby didn't come here to talk about that. i thought, look, bill cosby is going to make this big public performance in philadelphia, invited the press and then not talk about the elephant in the room? i said to him, mr cos by, in the room? i said to him, mr cosby, are you prepared to defend yourself in your second criminal trial? you didn't say a word. i said, in this neat, too, era, the jurors might view your case eventually this time? he made this very animated kind of frown that said, i don't know, then he walked away. did anyone in the crowd want to talk about it? it sounded like they were having a good time. to talk about it? it sounded like
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they were having a good timem to talk about it? it sounded like they were having a good time. it is a small little jazz club in germantown neighbourhood, a section of philadelphia that is predominantly african—american. the drive there was mostly older, probably grew up watching his television shows. he is very beloved in this community in philadelphia. long before the accusations of sexual assault really melted against him he would come to this jazz club and do his kind of impromptu drum playing and do storytelling. he does this bit at this small little club for a while, so he walked into it in front of a very favourable audience who warmly received him. when i talk to some of the attendees afterwards, most of them are bill cosby supporters. most of them have a real emotional connection to their hometown comedic legend. a few others said it was kind of offensive. it looks like a charm campaign, iway
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offensive. it looks like a charm campaign, i way of trying to change public opinion ahead of his trial and it is maybe a little manipulative and the little mean—spirited. you should be keeping his head down and focusing on being a criminal defendant in a serious criminal trial this spring. that was the view of some of the people who we re the view of some of the people who were there watching his performance last night. i only have 30 seconds, but this isn't part of an temp two get back to the heights of fame before all this question might know, i don't think so. his career imploded two years ago when the accusations started. this is to try to remind the public ahead ofjury selection, hey, don't you remember bill cosby, this american legend, this practised funnyman? trying to instil those images into the public consciousness before his trial starts. great to chat with you. i will be back in a couple of minutes. let's ta ke
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let's take a quick tour of the world's weather and have a look at the weather events happening around the weather events happening around the world. injapan, heavy snowfall here, 23 centimetres in tokyo. cold north—westerly wind and a cold plunge of their into eastern china. it could be heavy snow in the yangtze valley region and into shanghai. further south, heavy rainfall in the southern philippines. here is a satellite image across northern parts of australia showing all this cloud to stop the australian monsoon is getting going. heavy rainfall in the forecast on wednesday across the northern territory, particularly hammering the gulf of carpentaria that could be an metre of rain in the next five or six days. in north america low—pressure both to the east and to the west. this system
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will bring heavy snowfall across the rockies and brisk winds. that heavy rain also will still be cleared away from the north—east states with further snowfall to come towards the eastern canada. looking ahead, things will stay cold in new york and montreal with further heavy spells of room for vancouver and san francisco, with some hail showers mixed in, too. in south america, particularly heavy rain in paraguay. it is because of this central belt in south america, we could see flooding problems with thunderstorms, also the risk of tornadoes in northern argentina, paraguay and southern brazil in particular. let's head towards europe. it is a mix in weather types. unsettled in the north—west with the pressure moving in. higher pressure holding on the southern and eastern parts of europe. heading to the alps skiing, have window of
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decent weather after all of that snow, but milder air moving in. decent weather after all of that snow, but milderair moving in. some of the school on the alps could floor for of the school on the alps could floorfor a while. cold conditions across eastern parts of europe with the wind is coming in from a northerly direction. things will turn more stormy in northern parts of france, scandinavia and across the uk with low—pressure sweeping in here. if we have a quick look at the forecast closer to home, the outlook you in the uk, things are staying pretty mild but windy over the next few days. we have the low—pressure moving into the cause of tuesday night and on through weapons they bringing severe gales at times towards the north—west, and also a quick look at the forecast closer to home, the outlook year in the uk, things are staying pretty mild but windy over the next few days. we have the low—pressure moving into the cause of tuesday night and on through weapons they bringing severe gales at times towards the north—west, and also abandoned heavy rain. it is moving fairly quickly as it pushes towards the south and
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east. by thursday it should be less windy and it should be drier. more on the weather for the week ahead in half an hour. this is outside source, some of the main stories. china, south korea and the us are standing off over trade. president from's america first approach is starting to kick in as he approves steep tariffs on washing machines and solar panels. you're going to have people getting jobs again and we're going to make our own product again. us attorney generaljeff sessions has become the first member of the president's cabinet to be questioned by investigators looking into alleged russian interference in the presidential election. the red view of life in the seas around antarctica as scientists discover unique ecosystems that they want protected. no one can deny this region needs protecting but what is the best way to do it? if a line on a map going to make much difference and who is going to police anything here? staying with the story which we have
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covered every day for the last week, the fight for a place called afrin in syria which is controlled by kurdish militia and kurdish leaders are asking civilians to join the fight against the turkish offences. you can see it here in the north—west of syria close to the turkish border. turkey says the kurdish militia based there are terrorists. these are new pictures we have had from the turkish side of the border, artillery fire coming out of turkish territory and targeting kurds who are in syria. this is the fourth day : syria ff ,
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whether in iraq or turkey or syria —— on kurds. whether in iraq or turkey or syria -- on kurds. the turkey say that our branch of the pkk party in syria but the reality is, they have a picture of the imprisoned leader of the pkk leader, they follow the same ideology but they have said repeatedly that they don't have any organisational link but they have some ideological link. but the kurdish people inside syria and in turkey, which is a large number, are from the same i could even say tribe because the border was drawn at the fall of the ottoman empire. the kurds in iraq and syria and iran are different from each other but these are completely similar and the
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turkish authorities say that not a single bullet in the past seven yea rs single bullet in the past seven years after the arab uprising in syria, they have been controlling the city, had been shot from afrin towards turkey. turkey say it is for their security but again, none of those terrorist attacks against turkey have been carried out by kurdish, it has been isis militants which the kurds have been fighting in syria. we mentioned islamic state, i wanted to clear up one thing, how involved have the militia in afrin been in the fight against is in that part of syria? that place has been surrounded, one part was is, another was another islamic gi’oup is, another was another islamic group and the fsa and the syrian government so there has been fighting in that region but not kurdish ypg in other places like
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kobani. but in that place it was pretty much defending themselves and even sometimes pushing back from surrounding villages. if you want background information on syria you can get it online from bbc news. turning to a un report that says that un peacekeepers should be prepared to use force when necessary. this is a direct response to the fact that almost 200 peacekeepers have died in the past five years. this was footage from mali recently and you can see them wearing those distinctive blue helmets but the un says that no longer offers what it calls natural protection. they have given us this map which marks the countries where its 15 peacekeeping missions operate. eight of them are in africa and those missions have been the most vulnerable. this is an image from a funeral last month in tanzania 1a tanzania and soldiers
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died in the democratic republic of congo which was the worst attack on un peacekeepers in over 20 years. more broadly around africa, mali has the highest number of fatalities of any mission, the next on the list is the central african republic and sudan more specifically in darfur. we can hear more from the un. the context in which we have deployed forces has fundamentally changed, we are being directly attacked and targeted. we have taken more casualties in the last year than in the previous two combined and the old ways of doing business are not sufficient to deal with the changed environments. there are a couple of issues, one is to do with the equipment and technology and there is also mindset, having clear instructions, being trained to use the equipment you have but also willing to take action. defending yourself is one thing but sometimes
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projecting strength is necessary because that deters against attacks. in these particular contexts, when we are being directly targeted, we have to be more robust and sometimes that might mean going on the offensive and having different technologies and equipment than before and the troops that have been trained to handle these types of environments. a new bbc news report on new research on antarctica's underwater ecosystems. scientists are saying they are so rare they need special protection and there is now a need special protection and there is nowa campaign need special protection and there is now a campaign to make the entire region in the world's largest wildlife sanctuary. if that happened, that would mean banning all fishing in a large part of the seas around the antarctic peninsula and that is not without its dispute about whether it should happen. claire marshall has been a long way south to cover this. antarctica, the most south to cover this. antarctica, the m ost re m ote south to cover this. antarctica, the
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most remote continent in the world. it is still largely unexplored and we know even less about the icy seas ring it. now machines are making it possible for us to catch a glimpse. a mini submarine is taking marine biologist doctor susan lock down into antarctic deep. —— susan lockhart. above is a land of frigid ice, below a thriving mass of life. that is really pretty. no light penetrates this deep, plants cannot grow, these are all animals. then it was my turn to go down with pilot john. we dropped much deeper, or more than 1000 feet down we fight a wall of life. sponges and corals. see stars are stars, all thriving
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com plete see stars are stars, all thriving complete darkness. a robot arm ca ptu res sa m ples. complete darkness. a robot arm captures samples. some of the species and never been filmed before. they are threatened by an increase in fishing in the region. too sooner we increase in fishing in the region. too sooner we have increase in fishing in the region. too sooner we have to leave. there is apparently a storm brewing on the surface so the ship have asked us to come up. we surfaced close to some icebergs. that will be a massive chunk of ice. at last the diver gets a hawk on the sub. —— hook. but then the crane breaks and we are stranded foran the crane breaks and we are stranded for an hour. it feels good to
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finally be down. that is nice! we gathered evidence of a unique ecosystem that deserves protection. it is really exciting, really dense sea bed full of life, huge diversity. and also organisms living together and creating a 3—d structure so that more organisms can live and these can be very vulnerable to disturbance and they need special protection. no one can deny that this region needs protecting but what is the best way to do it? is a line on a map going to do it? is a line on a map going to make much difference? and who is going to police anything out here? the proposal to protect all of these creatures and their world will be held by the antarctic nations in october. claire marshall, bbc news,
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the antarctic peninsula. much more on our environment reporting and signed reporting online on the bbc website. you will also find analysis of jeff website. you will also find analysis ofjeff sessions being the first member of president tom's cabinet to be questioned by robert mueller‘s investigation. —— president trump's cabinet. let's talk about tennis, this was not something we saw coming, kyle edmund it into the semifinals of the australian open. here is the moment when he did it. bear in mind he went into this tournament unseeded and is ranked 49th in the world but he beat the world number three grigor dimitrov. with that ball going long, it was
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overin with that ball going long, it was over in four sets. it was the first time kyle edmund had beaten a player ranked the top five and he is now the sixth british man ever to get to the sixth british man ever to get to the semifinals of a grand slam and understandably it is big moment. the semifinals of a grand slam and understandably it is big momentlj am understandably it is big moment.” am loving it right now! the way i am playing, i'm 23 and in my first grand slam semifinal, the first am i played on one of in the world and to beat a quality player like grigor, these things aren't aware of and their great feelings, you don't play in a grand slam semifinal every day, or the quarter is. i tried to enjoy it as much as possible and i knew i
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was ina it as much as possible and i knew i was in a good place and there was no reason why my tennis was not good enough to win pulls up it is obviously about going out there and doing it. and he did just that. obviously about going out there and doing it. and he didjust that. he was born in johannesburg doing it. and he didjust that. he was born injohannesburg in 1995 to a welsh father and south african mother but his family moved to yorkshire when he was three years old. jo wilson picks up the story. kyle edmund may have peaked on the other side of the world but he was made right here in yorkshire. as an eight—year—old you might have spotted him on one of these courts. and it is here in beverley where you will find a man who was hitting against kyle edmund as a boy. he a lwa ys against kyle edmund as a boy. he always had the ability. he seemed to come off second best in tight match, may be down to the mental side of the biggest thing i have been impressed with his mental side and how he has applied himself on court. will this change in? absolutely not come he is very grounded and level have that —— level headed.
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come he is very grounded and level have that -- level headed. a talented junior, he has worked hard on his physique and he was brought through the lta national training programme. it was in the winning davis cup team of britain in 2015 although the murray brothers won the match is in the final. while andy murray moved to spain as a junior, kyle edmund it's at least in part the lta's man. he has come through the lta's man. he has come through the system and also had tremendous support from family and friends with a big supporting and has found a way to get himself to the top of the game. he will play marin cilic in the semifinal, certainly beatable, and the man from beverley‘s hills may soon be a softly spoken superstar everywhere. and you can follow the tennis through the bbc sport app on your smartphone. if you have been watching regularly for the last week or so you will know we have covered the extra merhi scenes in the sentencing hearing of this, doctor
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who once worked with the us national gymnastics team. one development is today with this statement in which three members of the governing body of the sport resigned and the testimonies of the victims we have heard at make that all but inevitable and they have continued today. while these people have spoken, larry nassar has had to sit there and listen to more than 150 women taking the stand to talk about the consequences of his sexual abuse and the sentencing has been delayed as more and more athletes have asked to speak. yet already pleaded guilty to speak. yet already pleaded guilty to ten counts of molesting female gymnasts and among those speaking works one victim who is just 16 yea rs old works one victim who is just 16 years old and another who is the mother of an underaged victim. not only me as a little girl but my pa rents only me as a little girl but my parents and friends and many others just like me. i trusted him to take
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ca re of just like me. i trusted him to take care of me, my parents trusted him and he used me as a toy for his own leisure. larry nassar destroyed my childhood innocence and shattered any positive experience that i had in gymnastics. i willingly took the most precious gift in this world to you and you hurt her. physically, me ntally you and you hurt her. physically, mentally and emotionally. and she was only eight. i will never get rid of the guild that i have about this experience —— with the guilt. of the guild that i have about this experience -- with the guilt. the judge in the case is this woman. thejudge has been widely praised
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for allowing all of these testimonies to be heard and because larry nassar has already pleaded guilty, she has no need to be neutral and she has not been, she had been praising each of the victims and their families for speaking out and this was a response to the mother we heard just a moment ago. red flags may have been there but they were designed to be hidden. you are not alone in this and i have heard it in your voice at how you love your daughter, and the only way to do that is to forgive yourself and leave the blame here with him. we have been following proceedings in the court in michigan. thank you for being with us. the cumulative effect of these astonishing testimonies must effect notjust the victims and their families but
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everybody present? yes, it really does. what started out last tuesday when i first got here is something around 98 women who were signed up to testify and share their stories has ended at 158. there are three more testimonies expected tomorrow and then the sentencing will begin. reflecting on the time i have been here, there has been a real sense of collective empowerment as more women share their stories and more have come forward and in the corridors during the breaks women have been going up to each other and encouraging each other. there has been a real sense that it is very difficult, if you are a survivor of sexual abuse, to be able to share your story but there is a sense that there is safety in numbers in this case and many feel that the judge has been incredibly encouraging and supportive. one thing that has struck me sitting in the courtroom
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and watching testimony is that it ta kes a and watching testimony is that it takes a lot for anyone to relive the ordeal of sexual abuse but to relive it when your attacker is only a few metres away, that takes some real determination and courage. and following this from afar, the more i listen to these women, the more it seems astonishing that this man was able to do this on this scale without anyone knowing. absolutely. one of the things that the women who have been speaking to want to make sure is that larry nassar is served justice and he spent the rest of his life behind bars but they are also looking for accountability from the organisations that they say enabled him to carry on his behaviour unchecked. he was for two michael beckett a team doctor for usa gymnastics —— two decades. we have heard many testimonies from women who have condemned the organisation
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for not believing them, not listening to them when women came forward over the years and raised concerns about his behaviour. they have also been complaining about michigan state university from where he worked in this state as well. the head of usa gymnastics was at the court the first two days last tuesday and wednesday but she has been seen here since an overnight we heard that members of the executive board of the organisation had resigned as well. usa gymnastics say that athlete safety is their biggest concern but that does not wash with a lot of the women here who believe there is a wider culture here in gymnastics where women are often physically abused and in this case of course larry nassar was the culprit, but also emotionally abused. they believe the whole of the sport needs to take a good hard look at itself in the wake of this case. thank you very much. next we will talk about tea growers and
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elephants in india. this is because tea plantations are expanding which means they are encroaching into forests a nd means they are encroaching into forests and people believe that is making elephants more aggressive. it is particularly pronounced in the north—eastern indian state of assam which is one of the biggest tea producing areas in the world but we know that around 800 people in that region were killed by wild elephants between two dozen six and 2016. hundreds of elephants have also been killed —— hundreds of elephants have also been killed -- 2006. hundreds of elephants have also been killed -— 2006. this hundreds of elephants have also been killed —— 2006. this shows a section of forest which has been cleared for a tea garden and that will shrink the natural habitat of the elephant. this war has been built to enclose a tea garden but it has been damaged by the elephants because it blocked one of their favourite routes. this was a video we have been given, if you look at this man over here and this very agitated elephant, you can
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see the man throwing something towards the elephant trying to scare it away. all of these images have been supplied by the bbc‘s koss pondered who travelled to assam to cover the story. the government has brought out a report which said that tea plantations have contributed to the loss of forest covered in assam but when you talk to people who are running the business, for instance the major association of tea companies, they say that this is baseless because they also need forests for the tea plants. and then they say that this is baseless and they say that this is baseless and they also say say this allegation that their land has never been surveyed. that is not for us to do, thatis surveyed. that is not for us to do, that is for the government to do,
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the government kalex the revenue and they have no influence in that, that is their position —— the government kalex ‘s revenue. somerby small growers accept it is a problem. they don't want to use the word encroach but they say they have moved in because that is what the government promised, they promised them land and the government is not living up to its words. therefore people had to its words. therefore people had to ta ke to its words. therefore people had to take the land themselves and as a result you see this. and all of the people who would like fewer elephants to be dying, fewer people to be killed by them, is that a solution, simply that these tea gardens should not expand in this way? the thing is, what officials say is that these forests actually acted as a buffer between the real reserved forests of the wildlife sanctuary ‘s and national parks, and
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the villages. but what has happened now, the villages have moved into the buffer area and that has been the buffer area and that has been the problem and it isjust the buffer area and that has been the problem and it is just not the habitats. these places are also natural corridors which elephants have been using for ages. i showed bojan, and the elephants come from there into assam —— bhutan. there are 56,000 the moment registered small growers and unofficially there are an equal number not registered, over 100,000 small growers and that is mushrooming. hence the question, can is mushrooming. hence the question, ca n tea is mushrooming. hence the question, can tea gardens and elephants survive side by side? we finish the programme in south africa because it is morning hugh masekela, the father
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of south african jazz and the huge figure in the struggle against apartheid. president zuma has said that he kept the torch of freedom alive, fighting apartheid through his music. this is what the kenyan president said. tributes have been pouring in from all over the world. hugh masekela actually had a number one hit in 1968 with grazing in the grass and we will finish the show by watching him perform it a few years ago. if you have been with me in recent
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days you know we have a degree of certainty of what is going on in the next few days, it is the outlook period in which we have a degree of uncertainty. what i am very sure of in the short term is that wednesday is very much going to be about the influence of storm georgina which will be a real player across the northern part of scotland which will all feel the wind from that feature and then there is this front to content with writerly moving across the whole of england and wales. that is georgina close to the orkney islands as we start the afternoon and noticed the strength of the gusts, widely across the northern half of great britain looking at 50 or 60 mph at the list and even further south and inland behind the weather front it will brighten up but it'll stay windy with 30—110 mph gusts and anything behind that is
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very squally indeed. that will eventually move off and georgina moves towards scandinavia leaving another area of low pressure behind and this wind is still pretty strong but nowhere near as it will be on wednesday. thursday will have sunshine, especially in the south—east, elsewhere there is a fair chance of some customary showers. and closing of the week, the low pressure field in situ, the ice baths at this stage have come right out of the south—west and there is more of a north—westerly about proceedings and that is pretty cold also the last of the showers in eastern shores with temperatures between 4—mac and 8 degrees. that will be the last of the cool days simply because as we get towards the weekend, look at where the air is coming from, this high pressure and bumping into the british isles also this carries a lot of moisture which means a lot of cloud and there will
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bea means a lot of cloud and there will be a weather front to thicken that up be a weather front to thicken that up in western parts. not a great deal of difference going into sunday, the high—pressure trying to influence things in the southern half of the country but it runs out of influence as we get to the northern and western parts of scotla nd northern and western parts of scotland with some more cloud and rain here but the temperatures are back to the sort of values that many of us had on tuesday. starting the new week, we will still be influenced by this high—pressure with milder air coming influenced by this high—pressure with milderaircoming in influenced by this high—pressure with milder air coming in from the atla ntic to with milder air coming in from the atlantic to dominate many parts of the british isles, perhaps notjust the british isles, perhaps notjust the far north of scotland because there we have some fresh conditions with the boundary between the mild and colder air normally meaning some fairly strong winds and that'll be the way in northern scotland. we think the high—pressure will settle down towards the south of the british isles with that mild air and that will generate quite a bit of cloud. but this is the uncertainty,
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if it drifts to the western side of the country we end up with a fairly cool northerly to north—westerly flow across the british isles and that would give us a slightly different look and feel to the days across many parts of the country. brighter but a bit cooler. we think the driest conditions will be in the south with the mist and fog and frost around, wet and windy in the north but there is a degree of uncertainty. tonight at 22.00: tensions in cabinet, as borisjohnson is rebuked by the prime minister, for demanding more health spending. reporter: do you want to be the chancellor, foreign secretary, or perhaps health secretary? mrjohnson was told that cabinet discussions should remain private, as the chancellor stepped in to add his case. mrjohnson is the foreign secretary. i gave the health secretary an extra £6 billion at the recent budget and we'll look at departmental allocations again at the spending review when that takes place. but as winter pressures take their toll, in many hospitals, the health secretary acknowledges that more money would be welcome.
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i don't think any health secretary is ever going to not support potential extra resources for his or her department. we'll have the latest on the cabinet divisions,
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