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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 1, 2020 10:00am-1:00pm BST

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hello, welcome to bbc news — i'm victoria derbyshire, bringing you the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. police in hong kong use tear gas and a water cannon — and arrest 30 democracy protestors, as china's new national security law comes into force. it's a bit of a weird stand—off at this moment with the riot police here and people walking away, and some of the police are leaving as well. the water cannon truck has just been doing rounds. more uk job losses because of coronavirus — 5,000 jobs are under threat at upper crust and 1,700 jobs are to go at airbus uk. the us buys up nearly all stocks for the next three months of the drug remdesivir — one of the only drugs shown to work against covid—19.
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councils in england will get real—time data on coronavirus cases in their areas, after signing a data sharing agreement with public health england. it follows criticism over how long it took to get data in leicester. and remembering the man who should've been england's first black player — jack leslie was subject to racism — now fans want to see him honoured with a statue outside his club. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world — and stay with us for the latest news and analysis from here and across the globe. for the first time since beijing imposed a new security law on hong kong, police have carried out dozens of arrests and used water cannon and tear gas against protestors. under the new measures, people convicted of threatening security could face life in prison.
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david campinale reports. hong kong's new security law enforced on the streets. demands by democracy protesters once tolerated by the authorities are now illegal in hong kong. calling for independence is grounds for arrest. a few thousand protesters defied a ban on rallies to gather in the shopping district of causeway bay, blocking some roads. riot police responded with water cannon and pepper spray, taking dozens into custody. the first to be arrested was a man carrying a hong kong independence flag. purple police banners carried a warning that certain slogans and flags might constitute serious crimes under the new law. anyone convicted of trying to split the territory from the rest of china now faces up to life in
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prison. they say black is white. you just can't argue and you shouldn't argue because it's the emperor that's speaking, because they are the law. it's so obvious by now, so clear, that beijing just wants to stu n clear, that beijing just wants to stun hong kong into nothingness, into a black hole. hong kong, cheers! speaking at a ceremony to mark the 23rd anniversary of the handover from britain, hong mark the 23rd anniversary of the handoverfrom britain, hong kong's chief executive described the legislation as a turning point. from what she called chaos to being governed well. since this announcement of the piece of national security law at the state level we heard much criticism. it is alleged that it is undermining one country boss mick independence but
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it is the opposite. under the 1997 handover deal china guaranteed hong kong's civil liberties as well as judicial and legislative autonomy until 21w. in a deal known as one country, two systems. its critics say that international agreement ended yesterday. david campinale, bbc news. 0ur correspondent martin yip has been out onto the streets in hong kong to report for us. so i'm now in causeway bay, the very place where you might have heard about those arrests. we can't actually distinguish if these people are all protesters but obviously they are being guided by riot police to leave the central shopping area of causeway bay all the way out onto the street and out the back into what is called victoria park up there. these are all police in riot gear. like you said, we have so far been told by the police that
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dozens have been arrested, this is what they have told local media. and some have already been arrested under this new piece of law that was only enacted last night, just one hour before midnight. at least for this side it is rather peaceful but there is also reports of a water cannon being deployed on the other side, which should be around another mile away from where i am now. protesters have been trying to occupy the street, that's what we have been told so far. so definitely some more angry people out on the street and definitely yesterday there were protesters who tried to hold a peaceful protest singing inside a shopping mall, so the whole protest is still going on but today with this new piece of law the dynamic has officially been changing. the protesters will have to think a lot more on how they would be able to express their opinion without being arrested, or they will simply have to prepare themselves for being arrested. a growing list of companies are now
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slashing jobs as the uk economy suffers its worst contraction in 41 years. the world's largest aircraft manufacturer, airbus, says it plans to cut 1,700 jobs from its uk workforce, as it deals with the effects of the crisis on the travel industry. thousands more jobs will also go, in germany, spain and elsewhere. this morning, ssp group — which owns the sandwich chain upper crust — says up to 5,000 jobs could be cut across its uk outlets and head office. it's because of reduced numbers of passengers at railway stations and airports. and about 600 workers will lose theirjobs, after the shirtmaker tm lewin announced it will close all of its uk shops. it says it's taking all of its sales online, to help cut costs. this report is from andy moore. it's a global aerospace giant manufacturing a fleet of aircraft, but airbus is being hit by coronavirus like every part of the aviation sector. thousands ofjobs will be lost at plants across europe.
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in the uk, it's expected about 1,700 jobs will go in broughton in flintshire and filton in bristol. that represents about 15% of the british workforce. in a video press release, the airbus chief executive warned the path to recovery would be slow and agile. the path to recovery would be slow and fragile. we need to act now by adapting our workforce to reflect the new situation in the international aircraft sector and protect the longer term future of the company. jobs in the aviation sector are highly paid and highly skilled. it's estimated two or three jobs will be lost in the supply chain for every singlejob that goes at airbus. it is devastating. we've been working very hard with airbus and many other companies in the aerospace sector to try and avoid this happening but unfortunately, because of indecision by government to intervene, it's resulted in today's announcement.
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the government says it will do its best to minimise the impact. we accept that we cannot save every job, even though nine million people have been furloughed through a scheme which is cost £20 billion and counting. billion and counting. everyone realises you can't count on that forever, but we can't save every job. and there is even more grim news in the aviation sector from the airline easyjet. they've warned they may have to close bases at stansted, southend and newcastle airports. the union unite says at least 1,300 people could lose theirjobs. andy moore, bbc news. here's our business correspondent ben thompson. what a dire day in terms ofjobs in the uk are concerned and that ssp story, as you said, the firm we probably all use,
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maybe on a daily basis, but probably never heard of it because it operates all the brands we may know at airports and train stations, you mentioned upper crust, it also runs caffe ritazza, camden food company found at some airports, and also runs a franchise in those locations for some of the starbucks and burger king outlets as well. it is a huge business, one operating right around the world. but what is interesting about the announcement this morning is that the job losses will come for ssp only in the uk. it says the recovery in the uk is taking longer than elsewhere in those markets overseas and so it has been forced into a position to cut these 5,000 jobs. that is primarily because ssp is a business that operates in railway stations and they have said passenger numbers on the railways are still down by 85% as we all continue to work from home if we can. we are not commuting, we are not travelling, we are not picking up that cup of coffee or a croissant on the way into work in the morning and that means for them business is really struggling. what they have said
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this morning is this is the start of a consultation. 45 days of consultation with the unions and its staff and if the pick—up in the uk economy and in that market is better than they are expecting then they won't have to make as many job cuts. but nonetheless it does underline the difficulty that many firms are facing right now. they say that the market in 2020 will remain subdued and therefore they are taking action to address that. for upper crust, caffe ritazza, for starbucks, some of those workers employed by ssp, a worrying time this morning. but it does underline particularly for the travel and tourism industry, remember once again this is a travel firm for all intents and purposes, struggling as we stay at home as a result of the coronavirus outbreak. the us has bought up virtually all stocks for the next three months of a drug shown to work against covid—19. more than 500,000 treatment courses of remdesivir for american hospitals have been secured. the vice—president explained the steps the us are taking to treat those with the illness.
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we are in a much better place because of the availability of what's known as therapeutics, or medicines, to treat people that have contracted the coronavirus and are experiencing severe symptoms. dr steve hahn of the fda is here and he will speak about the progress that we are making, whether it be the availability of remdesivir which we are distributing in another tranche this week, the use of blood plasma, steroid treatments, and also we continue to hear very hopeful signs about the continuing progress for developing a vaccine for the american people. with me now is our global health correspondent naomi grimley. what is the significance of them buying up so many of the stocks of this? the significance is that it really shows the way that america is intent on going if it believes it
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can get hold of drugs, and may be a future possible vaccine. 0ne can get hold of drugs, and may be a future possible vaccine. one thing that we should stress is that remdesivir is not some amazing wonder drug. it has been proven in some trials to cut the length of stay for those hospitalised with coronavirus by about four days. but it's not as dramatic as the drug that uk trials found to be very useful in treating coronavirus, that's dexamethasone, which is much more readily available much cheaper. nevertheless, it does show that america, if it wants to come i will have the economic firepower to buy drugs up like this. so what is the consequence of that for supplies for the rest of the world? well, for developing countries the news might be slightly better because gilead, who developed this drug, they do
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deals with generic companies in asia, bangladesh, india, for example, so they might still be able to get it at a low cost but it does pose a big dilemma for countries like britain, like the eu, like australia, because they will have to face the dilemma if they want to use the drug of trying to sort of ignore patents law, basically, and try to get it by other means, by something called a compulsory licence. so it is really a minefield for a country stuck in the middle, developed countries that can't afford to buy it off the us, but on the other hand don't get access under agreements with the developing world. thank you very much, naomi. the us democratic presidential candidate, joe biden, has criticised donald trump's handling of the coronavirus crisis, saying the sacrifices people have made shouldn't be wasted by a president who ignores the science. the country's top infectious disease
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expert, anthony fauci, has warned that the infection rate could more than double — to 100,000 a day. 0ur north america correspondent peter bowes reports. a nation on edge again. the coronavirus outbreak is worse than ever. the southern and western states florida, arizona, texas and california account for about half of all new cases. some hospitals are running out of intensive care beds and experts are warning of a looming catastrophe if the outbreak isn't brought under control. testifying to a senate committee on the effort to reopen schools and businesses, the us government's leading expert on the virus, dr anthony fauci, said he feared the situation could get a lot worse. we are now having 40,000 plus new cases a day. i would not be surprised if we go up to 100,000 a day if this does not turn around. stepping up his campaign for the presidency, joe biden has launched a blistering attack
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on president trump's handling on donald trump's handling of the pandemic. the promises and predictions and wishful thinking pulled out of thin air are not only doing the country no good, they're making them lose more faith in their government. america knows this crisis isn't behind us, even if you don't. without responding directly to the former vice—president, mr trump once again blamed china. with no end in sight to the covid crisis and a holiday weekend approaching, the worst affected states are now renewing some lockdown measures. in texas, the closure of bars has provoked a backlash from some but weary acceptance from others. it's obviously spreading in bars, so if we've got to shut it down for the better of the community, that's what we've got to do. right now we are the first guys to get shut down, the last to open and they're not hearing us and if we've got to scream as loud as can be, we want to be heard. in california, the beaches have been
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shut down again and people urged to stay at home. there will be little to celebrate this independence day. peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles. borisjohnson has warned israel that britain will not recognise any annexation of palestinian territory which he said would be a violation of international law. the prime minister said that annexation would take both sides further away from the goal of a lasting peace. of lasting peace. mrjohnson said: "annexation would represent a violation of international law and that it would also be a gift to those who want to perpetuate the old stories about israel." the headlines on bbc news. police in hong kong use tear gas and a water cannon — and arrest 30 democracy protestors, as china's new national security law comes into force. further uk job losses due to coronavirus as the owners of sandwich chain upper crust say 5,000 jobs are under threat, and 1,700jobs are to go at airbus uk. the us has bought up almost the entire global
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supply of remdesivir — one of two drugs used to treat coronavirus. the uk government says local authorities will now get full data in real time about potential spikes in coronavirus cases in their areas, to help deal with local outbreaks. it comes after criticism of the length of time it took to provide information to officials in leicester, which became the first city in the uk to be put under a local lockdown yesterday. dr manish pareek is a professor of infectious diseases at the university of leicester. he says other cities will also see more cases in the coming weeks. those of us who work in the health system always expected that there would be, even after this first wave, that there would be ongoing spikes in activity. the virus hasn't changed. it remains with us, as we know. and as people start to move and mix, what the virus will do is transmit.
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so in those areas of the city in leicester at the moment which are inner—city city and have a lot of dense housing there is likely to be transmission. but i think it's unlikely to be the only city. i think looking forward there is likely to be spikes in activity in other inner—city areas in the coming weeks and months. here's a gp, dr rosemary leonard, explaining why it's therefore so important for local health experts to have access to detailed data. there seems to be a problem getting very detailed information out. and it hasn't been explained why. but we do need that information if these local outbreaks are to be contained. i think what we really need to know is really detailed information, so where actually are people testing positive. is it because there has been screening done in a care home, for instance, and there are a lot of positive instances? for instance, and there are a lot of positive cases? really down to that much detail where exactly are the outbreaks happening.
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and in what age groups. this morning the uk business secretary alok sharma responded to the claim that local authorities aren't receiving enough data. that local authorities aren't receiving enough information. data is obviously being monitored constantly by the joint bio—security centre together with public health england and the test and trace system and information is being made available to local authorities. there is a dashboard and information on test and trace is made available to local authorities right now. so information is being shared. of course, where we are able to improve we will do that. azeem majeed is professor of primary care and public health at imperial college london. good morning to you. what is the hold—up, what has been holed up in leicester? because they knew early injune leicester? because they knew early in june there was leicester? because they knew early injune there was a problem but they couldn't do anything about it until they had full data, which was last week. i think there were problems getting data on testing results from
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local public health teams and as leicester shows this can lead to a much bigger outbreak. we know that this disease covid—19, the doubling rate as every 3—4 days so a seven day delay in getting information on an outbreak means the number of cases increases fourfold, which then means more cases, more contacts, more work for public health teams. this has been an ongoing problem for the last few months with test results not being sent to teams in a timely mannerfor a results not being sent to teams in a timely manner for a number of different reasons. we were promised by the government that test results would come back within 2a hours. by the government that test results would come back within 24 hourslj think would come back within 24 hours.” think the test results are sent back to patients quite quickly now in most cases but the problem is trying to collect that data in a meaningful way at a local level and then that data being sent on to local public health and nhs teams, that is still i think slow in the way it is happening. although people are being told their own test results, what is
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not happening so quickly is that information then being sent to local public health and nhs teams who can then act on these very quickly. we heard earlier that only today public health england and officials in leicester are signing a data sharing agreement so that information can be passed over. what do you think of that? again, just shows that throughout this outbreak we have been very slow in the way we have responded. this should have been foreseen, that we would see local outbreaks and the sort of agreement should have been in place a long time ago across cities across england. it is disappointing that it is only now we are seeing action in this area. would you say that the pattern of this virus has changed now from a single national pandemic to the kind of smaller outbreak around the country? i think that's a good point. in march and april we saw a very large national outbreak. in the last few weeks we are seeing more localised outbreaks. these outbreaks need to be identified quickly and suppressed so they don't
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become larger outbreaks. but you are right, we are seeing local outbreaks rather than this national outbreak we saw during march and april. thank you very much for talking to us this morning. thank you. 36 suburbs in australia's second biggest city, melbourne, are to go back into lockdown later today after the authorities identified an "unacceptably high" number of infections there in the past few days. the restrictions will affect more than 300,000 people. speaking today, the premier of victoria, daniel andrews, said he was buoyed to see "some consistency" in the infection rate following mass testing. but he warned a state—wide lockdown was possible — if people became complacent with australia's worst outbreak in almost three months. ultimately, if i didn't shut down those postcodes i'd be shutting down all postcodes, and i don't think we really wa nt all postcodes, and i don't think we really want to get to that point. we all want to work hard, literally day and night, to try and avoid that sort of an outcome. i'm confident
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because the public health team are confident that the strategy of lockdown, just as it worked the last time we did it, albeit across the state, will again be successful in pulling this thing up. that's the most important thing we all have to focus on and that's exactly what we are focused on. let's talk to professor mary—louise mclaws, a professor of epidemiology at the university of new south wales, expert in infection prevention and control and advisor to the world health organization. thank you forjoining us. what are these outbreaks down to, would you say? there are three major categories. 0ne say? there are three major categories. one is in the community and mostly clusters in families. then you have outbreaks in hotels that are used for quarantine and where infected staff are now causing infections, sorry, infected travellers are causing outbreaks in
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the staff. then you've got health workers and those health workers are also interconnected with the families. so you've got three highly interconnected groups and it's unusual. it could happen in any city, potentially, that have highly interconnected, highly sociable groups. we have had the end of ramadan and sadly for some of our multicultural groups, and we love oui’ multicultural groups, and we love our multicultural groups, have not had a lot of assistance, i don't think, from the authorities in understanding the rules as they apply for this year for eid. there may not read regular television, newspaper and pamphlets. they need to hear it verbally. it is also,
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their level of literacy in english may be low and even in their own language, so we have really failed them, and of course, this virus has utilised that and it has gone out and expanded itself into further areas where these highly connected families are sadly spreading it. and now it's gone into some shops as well through those interconnections. so it's a sobering reminder that we need to look after our multicultural gi’oup need to look after our multicultural group with verbal information and it isa group with verbal information and it is a sobering reminder for everybody. but we had a warning that 14 day rolling average was five times higher than the previous 14 day rolling average. so this lockdown of the ten suburbs is important, it could have happened a little earlier, but it is not quite a full lockdown because people can
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actually leave to go to work without wearing a mask. so i'm sure that sadly we may see a further spread outside those ten focus groups. 0k. do you think people will take this new lockdown seriously? often people get fatigued when it comes to pandemics, and the most important thing is to have hearts and minds involved in this, and also understand when authorities are telling them we are lifting restrictions but it doesn't mean we are out of the woods. they are not hearing that because australians trust their government and they don't expect their government to place them at risk. so they are hearing, we are lifting the restrictions and therefore i'm not at risk. and also the young ones are hearing you are at less risk of the disease and you are at less risk of driving it. so therefore they are
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flouting the social distancing rules and they are not understanding that, yes, they can still get it, it may be milder, but they need to also be pa rt be milder, but they need to also be part of the prevention strategy. thank you for talking to us, professor mary—louise mclaws, professor of epidemiology at the university of new south wales. the final day of voting is taking place in russia in a wide ranging referendum that could pave the way for president putin to remain in office for 16 more years. the vote had been spread over a week due to the pandemic. sarah rainsford reports. all week russians have been voting on the biggest package of reforms to the constitution since the 1990s and it has taken place in venues like this, not the most formal—looking setting for such an important vote. it is also taking place, of course, in the midst of the covid—19 pandemic so there are extra precautions. 0n the side of the tent here is an explanation of what people are actually voting on, some of the amendments. and the headings look
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pretty attractive. there's access to quality medicine for all, the defence of russia's territorial integrity. even environmental rights. but it all looks like very attractive wrapping for the key amendment here for the kremlin. that's article 81. and this will allow president putin to run for office for two more terms. he could, in fact, stay in the kremlin until 2036, if he chooses. we have driven even deeper into the countryside now and the vote here looks even more makeshift. 0pposition figures here have dismissed it as a joke. some have even called it a constitutional coup.
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but it is taking place across the country at places like this. well, this tent was supposed to be here three more hours but we've just been told that the election officials have taken the ballot box and they are now going around the houses instead. the kremlin seems to have been in a rush with this vote from the very start. that could be because vladimir putin's approval rating, although still high, has begun to slide and this coronavirus crisis isn't going to make things any easier. so if this vote is primarily about extending his time in power, what do people here actually think of that?
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one of the odd things about this process is that russia's new constitution is already printed and on sale in all the book shops here. in theory, the result of the popular vote could see this entire project scrapped. but the fact it is already in print suggests the authorities here are pretty confident. let's speak to drjenny mathers — senior lecturer in international politics at aberystwyth university. hello to you. so, the outcome of the vote is not in doubt, it would say? not at all. i think the state is taking lots and lots of measures, both to increase the turnout or ensure a large turnout and to be confident about which way people are going to vote. so i think nobody is in any doubt about what is going to happen. what kind of measures, what kind of things to do the authorities do to encourage people vote the right way? there are positive measures to encourage them to come
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out, they are having lots of raffles at polling stations, you could win a new flat, for example, quite a generous prize and almost unprecedented. we have positive measures like that to encourage people to come out and vote. you have the bundling together of all the constitutional amendments. people can't vote individually yesterday son —2 that that, you take it or leave it. and the and the fact the publicity has highlighted the more attractive amendments, like the ones that guaranteed pensions and things like protecting russia plasma history and its traditions and so on, these are quite popular so people would want to vote for them. the changes to the powers of the presidency have been kept quite quiet. and if the constitution is changed, if people vote for it, which everyone expects they will, what does that mean for russia? what it means in practical terms is putin could stay on until 2026. it doesn't
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mean that he will but it gives him that opportunity. it also significantly strengthens the institution of the presidency. it gives the president more powers over appointments and over the opportunity to fire the prime minister, for example, or any minister without any approval from parliament. it strengthens the institution and putin's position within it. and why does he want to strengthen his already very, very strong position? well, this is the interesting thing. i think it's a bit of a paradox because although it looks like these measures would make everything much stronger and more stable, actually, ithink everything much stronger and more stable, actually, i think it's a sign of weakness. i think it's a sign of weakness. i think it's a sign that the regime has sort of run out of other options because there is no obvious safe pair of hands for putin to hand over to. there is no successor waiting in the wings and there aren't really any credible contenders for the successor position, it's putin or no one
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pretty much. that is not really a position no regime wants to be in, depending on the fragility of one human being to carry the whole system human being to carry the whole syste m o n human being to carry the whole system on his shoulders. so i think it's a bit of a paradox and i think we need to be a little bit cautious about thinking it is just about strength. fair enough, it's a one—man team, effectively. strength. fair enough, it's a one-man team, effectively. exactly. thank you for talking to us, dr jenny mathers, senior lecturer in international politics at aberystwyth. plans by israel's leadership to annex parts of the occupied west bank appear to have stalled. july1st had been set as the date from which it could begin the legislative process. but prime minister benjamin neta nyahu is still trying to build a consensus. and palestinians have warned it would be the absolute end of the two—state solution. uk prime minister borisjohnson has warned israel that britain will not recognise any annexation of palestinian territory which he said would be a violation of international law. the west bank has been occupied by israel since the middle east war
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in 1967, but after decades of talks its final status remains unresolved. both israel and the palestinians assert rights there. israel still has civil and military control over much of the area — which you can see here in blue. 430,000 israelis live in a number of settlements and outposts built under israel's occupation. but they are regarded as illegal under international law. and in orange are the areas under varying degrees of palestinian control. the result? a complex patchwork, in one of the most disputed regions in the world. 0ur correspondent tom bateman sent us this. july 1st was always going to be the day mr netanyahu had said that he could bring proposals either to his cabinet or to the israeli parliament, the knesset, to be discussed and to be voted upon.
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now, some to his political right wing saw that, in effect, as a date for a big announcement. that was never necessarily going to be the case but, nevertheless, july 1st was seen as a key date for those proposals. but mr netanyahu has faced friction, really, from two key sides that he ultimately needs on board for these highly controversial plans. 0n the one hand, the defence minister, the so—called alternate prime minister in israel, benny gantz, who was elected with the backing of quite a few left—wing voters in israel and has been really walking a tightrope on this issue. he has said that the timing, with the coronavirus crisis, is not the moment, effectively, to do this. also, he's thought to be opposed to the potential scale of annexation that mr netanyahu may be interested in. 0n the other hand, you have those from mr netanyahu's right, key supporters of the settlement movement, who think that what the trump plan allows for isn't enough. they oppose a future
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palestinian state and want more land to be annexed. so, mr netanyahu has been holding meetings last night with the american envoy, also the american ambassador to israel. that appeared to break up without any decision, any map being brought forward and he has said that the work goes on, it will continue in the coming days. meanwhile, growing international opposition. much of the rest of the world sees this as a clear violation of international law. we've had the british prime minister, borisjohnson, writing in a top israeli newspaper today, saying that as a friend of israel, he sees this as a mistake, is urging it not to happen and has said that the uk for one would not recognise annexed areas. authorities in ecuador have started using artificial intelligence to track people in the capital city quito to combat the spread of coronavirus. there has been a rise in new cases in parts of the city, which authorities hope to get under control. sylvia lennan—spence has more. it's like a game of
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trigonometry, measuring the distance between people. and if you're caught too close, authorities will be watching. the high—tech security software is being funded by the inter—american development bank. it's being used first in ecuador, where coronavirus has infected more than 55,000 people. translation: we think roughly 90% of citizens use a face mask but we don't know if they're being used correctly and we can see out on the street, in many areas, social distancing is not practised. it's just not being done. lockdown measures have eased across ecuador but there are new outbreaks in parts of quito. translation: we are very concerned at the increase in infections in some suburbs of the capital. in coordination with the authorities, there are to be restrictions in the historic centre.
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unfortunately, that is where there has been an increase. the world health organization says the virus is yet to peak across south america and one of the biggest fears is widespread complacency. sylvia lennan—spence, bbc news. the european union says it will allow vistors from 15 countries it considers to be safe — to start coming from today. they include canada, morocco and australia, but not the united states, brazil or russia. china is on the safe list, but the eu says it wants reciprocal arrangements for its citizens to travel there — before it grants permission. freya cole reports. na zdravi — or cheers to the end of the coronavirus lockdown in the czech republic. the country of almost 11 million people enforced antivirus measures early on and it paid off. coronavirus cases in the czech republic remain relatively low, which means
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it's time to get back to business. translation: the society must stop being afraid because if it is, we will have an economic crisis, a depression. and that's what will hit the society much harder than the whole covid—19. italy too is opening up in all its glory. this mosaic of colour two hours north of rome is bursting with blooms for tourists to enjoy and from today, europe is opening borders to 15 countries but it won't include america, brazil and russia, where the virus is still strong. it's because fears of a second wave remain. croatia is in the grip of a new outbreak which authorities say are linked to nightclubs. translation: we have made special recommendations for clubs and if the situation improves, there will be no reason to close them
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but if it happens again, and there are more cases, the option of closing them is on the table. it will be a european summer like no other. with a new rule book which has the potential to change the moment things go bad. freya cole, bbc news. fans of the english football club plymouth argyle are starting a campaign to have a statue erected of a former player called jack leslie. leslie was selected for england in 1925. but he was then taken out of the squad — because he was black. clive coleman has the story. jack leslie, a phenomenal footballer, but was he denied his place in sporting history because of the colour of his skin? jack leslie played for plymouth argyle, then in the 3rd division, in the 1920s. he's believed to be the first black player to captain a league side. here at plymouth, jack
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leslie scored 137 goals. at times, suffering racial abuse from both crowds and opponents but, in 1925, the club manager called him into his office and gave him some thrilling news —jack leslie had been picked to play for england. it was the talk of the town. but when the papers came out some days later, billy walker, of aston villa, was in the team. jack was named as a travelling reserve. he never travelled. england struggled a 0—0 draw in belfast, while jack scored twice in plymouth's 7—2 victory at home to bournemouth. what happened to jack has passed into family history. you've got the wedding picture there, which is just lovely, isn't it? they looked so happy, didn't they? certainly did. lovely picture. yes. well, in those days, you didn't have the television. if someone came down to watch him, they were not watching his football, they were looking at the colour of his skin and, because of that, he was denied the chance
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of playing for his country. plymouth argyle has already honoured one of its greatest players in this mural and has renamed its boardroom after him, but fans want a statue ofjack and a campaign is under way. we think that at a time when some statues are coming down, we want a campaign to put a statue up — to celebrate jack leslie, his incredible achievements, but also to remember that historic injustice, where he was denied his england cap. the last thing on my mind was me being the first black player to play for england. commentator: intercepted by viv anderson, he's on his way. one to his right, one to his left... 53 years afterjack leslie's selection for the national side, viv anderson became the first black player to win a full england cap. it's incredible that, to get the euphoria of getting the call up from the manager to say that you've been picked for england and then, within a few days, the let down of being dismissed from the squad because of the colour of his skin,
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it is appalling, really. i'd never heard ofjack leslie until two weeks ago and that's a crying shame, because what he achieved and what he did should be paramount in every black person's mind, you know? but, hopefully, this statue we're trying to get erected will carry on his legacy. after his playing days, jack returned to his trade as a boilermaker, before ending his working life in the boot room at west ham, where he cleaned mud from the boots from england stars bobby moore and geoff hurst — hardly fitting for a man who should have been remembered alongside them and now, perhaps, will be. clive coleman, bbc news. the english fa have released a statement about jack leslie. they say stories like this are incredibly sad. discrimination of any formal from any time period is unacceptable. we must always remember pioneers like jack leslie and be thankful that football is in and be thankful that football is in a very different place today. we are very pleased to support this campaign which will hopefully ensure that jack does my career is appropriately recognised.
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the attorney general for new york has announced that a £15 million settlement has been reached to settle two lawsuits brought by women who claim they were sexually abused by harvey weinstein. the 68—year—old was convicted in february of rape and sexual assault and jailed for 23 years. 0ne lawyer who represents several of weinstein's alleged victims, said they considered the settlement to be ‘deeply unfair' as it did not require him to "accept responsibility or personally pay out any money". members of the uk armed forces have been advised they should not take the knee in support of the black lives matter movement while on duty and in uniform. the ministry of defence said the guidance was in line with long standing military policies, and it did not tolerate racism. this is in contrast to the police who've allowed officers to take the knee while on duty. the headlines on bbc news. police in hong kong use pepper spray and a water cannon — and arrest 30 democracy protestors, as china's new national security law comes into force.
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further uk job losses due to coronavirus, as the owners of sandwich chain upper crust say 5,000 jobs are under threat and 1,700 jobs are to go at airbus uk. the us has bought up almost the entire global supply of remdesivir — one of two drugs used to treat coronavirus. over a third of universities and higher education institutions in the uk will deliver lectures online only for at least the first term of the next academic year, according to research by the bbc. the data also showed that most universities will be charging students in full. tim muffett reports. student life as was — lectures, learning, people, parties. but a measure of the reality that awaits. the university of surrey, where preparations are being
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made for september. there will be fewer students on campus, lecture theatres will remain empty as lectures move online. we're looking at the guidance we are receiving from the government and then putting that into practice. we're going to have one—way traffic when we need to and we will have limited numbers of students and certain capacity restrictions on some spaces. bbc breakfast has analysed the views of 166 universities and higher education institutions across the uk. there are 178 in total and this research was done before the most recent government announcement regarding the easing of lockdown restrictions. more than a third said that from september, lectures will be online only for the first term at least. when it comes to smaller groups, for tutorials and seminars, 60% of universities said they would be delivered through a combination of online and face—to—face sessions. laural from bolton has
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been put off education, she's going to defer her place at leeds arts university for a year. i don't really want to be paying upwards of £9,000 to do online learning, especially from home. university's, like, an experience, it's notjust a degree at the end of three years — it's going away from home and doing things as, like, an adult for the first time. how do you feel about all this uncertainty? it's kind of terrifying, being 18 and going out into the world is terrifying as it is but to then have a world where everything is uncertain upon what you're already uncertain about, it's, like, overwhelming. this summer term, more than 90% of universities suspended all face—to—face teaching and yet only one, staffordshire, reduced its fees for uk students. the overwhelming majority of universities are planning to charge students fees
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in the full next year. this isn't the university experience some have signed up for, shouldn't there be some reduction in fees? students will have access to our excellent academic staff who will be teaching them and teaching them in different ways, so it's not about reducing fees, it's about ensuring excellent education. for school friends kieran and bhiramah, there are glimmers of light and its gloom. 0nline lectures, there could be a benefit if they are recorded and you will be able to learn in a different way. grades permitting, both intend to go to university in september. is it right you should pay full fees for your university experience? i'm not too sure. my university has assured me that all the resources i would need that would be in the libraries etc, and all my lectures and seminars will be transferred online, so i guess that's ok, but so many of university isn't about the academics, it's about the clubs and societies, going into the next stage of life and having all these careers fairs, which i will miss out on.
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voiceover: wear your uel id card and a face covering at all times. the university of east london has produced this promotional video for new students. we have here a campus which houses over 10,000 students on a normal basis, so, actually, to get that campus covid secure is actually obviously quite a challenge. you've got to deliver a full university experience, it cannot be replaced with an online experience. the department of education in england told the bbc it was up to universities to set their own fees and students should be given as much certainty and transparency as possible. scottish students studying in scotland don't pay fees, the government said there that safety on campus would be a priority during a phased return from september. the welsh government said:
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the northern ireland executive said: compared to previous years, though, higher education is likely to look and feel very different. tim muffett, bbc news. here in the uk — five—year—old tony hudgell promised to walk ten kilometres to raise money for the hospital which saved his life. yesterday, scores of well wishers turned up to see him do just that — he's raised more than £1 million along the way. graham satchell looks back at his inspiring story. applause five—year—old tony hudgell is taking the final few steps of an extraordinary challenge. captain tom made me done it. i saw him on tv
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walking the other day. i said i could do that. the plan — to walk every day for a month and raise money we want to raise money — £500. isn't that right, mum? he has done a little better than that. people have donated more than £1 million. it's a lot of money, isn't it? yes! are you ready? let's go. take it nice and slow. go back a month, and this is day one of the challenge, on his new prosthetic legs. the first walk took almost an hour. keep going, you're doing so well. bearing in mind he could barely take a few steps on 1st june, and now he can just fly off. and there he goes. tony has come a remarkably long way in his short life. when he was just a few weeks old, tony was admitted
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to the evelina hospital in london. he had been abused by his biological parents so badly, he had to have both legs amputated. but tony is a fighter, and he hit the jackpot when paula and herfamily adopted him. he isjust one in a million. he's had such a difficult start in life, and to succeed as he has isjust tremendous. mark, how strong is that son of yours? 0h, incredibly strong. hejust keeps going. on this programme, we followed tony's challenge from the start. hello, tony. it's david walliams here. i wanted to say congratulations on your incredible achievement. he has had messages of support from celebrities... what an amazing thing it is you're doing. 0h, absolutely amazing. you are a hero. ..and from the man who first inspired him. well done, tony. haven't you done well!
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on behalf of captain tom and the entire family, we're so impressed by what you have done, tony. it's incredible. so, i'm an amputee. i lost part of my leg in an accident, and i have my running legs beside me. just before his final walk, we set up a call with paralympian long jumper stef reid. is this your leg? as well as comparing legs, stef wanted to give tony a present. i want you to have my rio 2016 competition singlet. i've been saving it for a special occasion, and this is it. you're everything i have strive to be as paralympian. go, tony, go. from stef reid. wow. aren't you so, so lucky? hold it up. so, tony, you are now an honorary paralympian. you cannot buy those in stores, and i'm so glad you now have one.
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wow. applause and so, after a month of walking every day, tony finishes his challenge. the money he has raised for the evelina hospital will change lives. who knows what he might do next... he can achieve anything that he absolutely wants to. he has proved that. he has proved that today. he has proved that with surviving. that, you know, whatever he wants, he will do, and i'm sure he'll be a great success in life. applause so moving. what an amazing little boy. joanna gosling will be here in the next few minutes. before we go, we will bring you the latest
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pictures from hong kong, where... well, you can see the clashes between police and pro—democracy protesters. those crowds marking 23 yea rs protesters. those crowds marking 23 years since the end of british rule and it is also the day that a new law, imposed by beijing, comes in. police have been arresting protesters under this new law, including a man holding a pro—independence flag. dozens have been arrested during a rally, anyway. the law tackles subversion and protesting with up to life in prison and activists say, unsurprisingly, it erodes their freedoms. china has dismissed that criticism and hong kong's sovereignty was handed back to china by britain in this day in 1997. you may remember, certain rights were supposed to be guaranteed for at least 50 years under the one country
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two systems agreement. we will be watching and reporting, of course, on how long those protests go on for. you're watching bbc world. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. hello again. the weather this week remains fairly unsettled with temperatures near to where they should be at the stage injuly. now, today we are looking at a little bit of sunshine, particularly so across northern scotland, central—southern and south—eastern england but also some heavy showers in the forecast. low pressure is still dominating our weather with weak weather fronts moving southwards. they are producing some showers, especially so across scotland. those showers getting into northern england later on as well as northern ireland. now, they are not likely to be thundery, but as temperatures rise in any sunshine further south across the rest of england and also wales, you will see some potent showers and they are likely to be thundery as well.
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temperatures chilly in the north, 11, we have a northerly breeze. whereas down south, we are looking at 21 degrees but gusty winds through the english channel. through this evening and overnight, we will see these showers merge and we will have a period of persistent rain across parts of northern wales, the midlands, the pennines, towards the wash. 0n either side of that, some clear skies, cold with the northerly wind across north of scotland but still relatively mild further south. tomorrow, we have a little ridge of high pressure coming into the west but we still have our fronts to get rid of. we start off with that rain across parts of england, pushing off into the north sea through the course of the day. a drier day for many with a bit more sunshine. there still will be some cloud around and in any sunshine it could spark off some heavy and potentially thundery showers. more likely across parts of the midlands and into the south east as well as east anglia. temperatures 11—22 degrees. on thursday into friday, though,
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we see a new area of low pressure in the atlantic with its front swinging across the british isles, introducing thicker cloud, windy conditions and also some heavy rain. so here it comes, moving from the west towards the east. there will always be cloud building ahead of it with the odd shower but the south—east should stay largely derived —— dry during daylight hours. that's reflected in the temperatures. we have 21 degrees in london and norwich, feeling cooler in glasgow at 15, and especially so if you are in the wind. into the weekend, it remains unsettled. it will also be windy with rain or showers at times, and highs up to 22.
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this is bbc news with joanna gosling, the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. clashes between police and protestors in hong kong — as the first protestors are arrested under china's new national security law it's a bit of a weird stand—off at this moment with the riot police here and people walking away, and some of the police are leaving as well. the water cannon truck has just been doing rounds. this is the scene in hong kong now. today marks 23 years since the end of british rule there more uk job losses because of covid—19 — five thousand jobs are under threat at sandwich chain upper crust and 1,700jobs are to go at airbus uk. the us buys up nearly all stocks for the next three months
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of the drug remdesivir — one of the only drugs shown to work against covid—19. councils in england will get real time data on coronavirus cases in their areas, after signing a data sharing agreement with public health england. it follows criticism over how long it took to get data in leicester and remembering the man who should've been england's first black player — jack leslie was subject to racism — now fans want to see him honoured with a statue outside his club. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world — and stay with us for the latest news and analysis
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from here and across the globe. police in hong kong have made their first arrests under a new security law imposed by beijing. they used water cannon and pepper spray to disperse pro—democracy protesters. so far there have been 180 arrests; seven related to the new law. so far there have been 180 arrests, seven related to the new law. david campinale reports. hong kong's new security law enforced on the streets. demands by democracy protesters once tolerated by the authorities are now illegal in hong kong. calling for independence is grounds for arrest. a few thousand protesters defied a ban on rallies to gather in the shopping district of causeway bay, blocking some roads. riot police responded with water cannon and pepper spray. the first to be arrested was a man carrying a hong kong independence flag. purple police banners
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carried a warning that certain slogans and flags might constitute serious crimes under the new law. they went on to take dozens of protesters into custody. anyone convicted of trying to split the territory from the rest of china now faces up to life in prison. they say black is white. you just can't argue and you shouldn't argue because it's the emperor that's speaking, because they are the law. it's so obvious by now, so clear, that beijing just wants to stun hong kong into nothingness, into a black hole. hong kong, cheers! speaking at a ceremony to mark the 23rd anniversary of the handover from britain, hong kong's chief executive described the legislation as a turning point.
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from what she called chaos to being governed well. since this announcement of the piece of national security law at the state level we heard much criticism. it is alleged that it is undermining one country but it is the opposite. under the 1997 handover deal china guaranteed hong kong's civil liberties as well as judicial and legislative autonomy until 2047. in a deal known as one country, two systems. its critics say that international agreement ended yesterday. david campinale, bbc news. 0ur correspondent martin yip has gone out onto the streets in hong kong to report for us. so i'm now in causeway bay, the very place where you might have heard about those arrests. we can't actually distinguish if these people are all protesters
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but obviously they are being guided by riot police to leave the central shopping area of causeway bay all the way out onto the street and out the back into what is called victoria park up there. these are all police in riot gear. like you said, we have so far been told by the police that dozens have been arrested, this is what they have told local media. and some have already been arrested under this new piece of law that was only enacted last night, just one hour before midnight. at least for this side it is rather peaceful but there is also reports of a water cannon being deployed on the other side, which should be around another mile away from where i am now. protesters have been trying to occupy the street, that's what we have been told so far. so definitely some more angry people out on the street and definitely yesterday there were protesters who tried to hold a peaceful protest
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singing inside a shopping mall, so the whole protest is still going on but today with this new piece of law the dynamic has been changing. the protesters will have to think a lot more on how they would be able to express their opinion without being arrested, or they will simply have to prepare themselves for being arrested. let's ta ke let's take you live to hong kong, protesters out in force and a stand—off. the eu has expressed its great concerns about the law which it says could undermine the independence of the territory. dominic raab has said the passing of the law is a grave step and he will be speaking in the commons later. we will get his latest perspective on this later, he has been looking at
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the legality of this new law. it is understood and breaches agreements made with the uk before hong kong was handed over in 1997. freedoms guaranteed for 50 years under that agreement. a growing list of uk companies are now slashing jobs as the economy suffers its worst contraction in 41 years. the world's largest aircraft manufacturer, airbus says it plans to cut 1,700 jobs from its uk workforce, as it deals with the effects of the crisis on the travel industry. thousands more jobs will also go, in germany, spain and elsewhere. this morning, ssp group — which owns the sandwich chain upper crust — says up to five thousand jobs could be cut across its uk outlets and head office. it's because of reduced numbers of passengers at railway stations and airports. and about 600 workers will lose theirjobs, after the shirtmaker tm lewin announced it will close all of its uk shops.
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it says it's taking all of its sales online, to help cut costs. this report is from andy moore. it's a global aerospace giant manufacturing a fleet of aircraft, but airbus is being hit by coronavirus like every part of the aviation sector. thousands ofjobs will be lost at plants across europe. in the uk, it's expected about 1,700 jobs will go in broughton in flintshire and filton in bristol. that represents around 15% of the british workforce. in a video press release, the airbus chief executive warned the path to recovery would be slow and fragile. we need to act now by adapting our workforce to reflect the new situation in the international aircraft sector and protect the longer term future of the company. jobs in the aviation sector are highly paid and highly skilled. it's estimated two or three jobs will be lost in supply chain
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for every singlejob that goes at airbus. we've been working very hard with airbus and many other companies in the aerospace sector to try and avoid this happening but unfortunately, because of indecision by government to intervene, it's resulted in today's announcement. the government says it will do its best to minimise the impact. we accept that we cannot save every job, even though nine million people have been furloughed through a scheme which is cost £20 billion and counting. everyone realises you can't carry on forever, but we can't save everyjob. and there is even more grim news in the aviation sector from the airline easyjet. they warned they may have to close bases at stansted, southend and newcastle airports. the union unite says at least 1300 people could lose theirjobs. andy moore, bbc news. i'm joined now by steve turner, assistant general secretary
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of unite the union. what is your reaction to these job losses? this is the latest announcement not just an losses? this is the latest announcement notjust an aviation production the whole economy and our thoughts this morning and with the 1700 uk direct employees and the up to fourfor 1700 uk direct employees and the up to four for everyone 1700 uk direct employees and the up to fourfor everyonejob 1700 uk direct employees and the up to four for everyone job in the supply chain enable space that woke up supply chain enable space that woke up to an announcement that was not unexpected as such but the scale of this is quite devastating. do you expect this to be the start of more of the same as the furlough scheme ends. we have been warning for a long time of a tsunami ofjob losses over the summer and the end of the retention scheme in october. what needs to happen is what is happening in france and germany and across in
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the us where specific measures, long—term measures are being taken to address specific problems and sectors of the economy that are not going to reopen as quickly as others at the end of october. for some time we have known as a consequence of the crisis in aviation and tourism the crisis in aviation and tourism the aerospace sector is going to be in some difficulty, we sought with rolls—royce and today with airbus. that is to be specific measures introduced for aerospace and without a motive and others that protect the medium—term viability of these good businesses. what specific measures would like to see? short-term working arrangements in france and germany which mean people return on 50% hours with a phase two of their own equivalent of the job retention scheme picking up a proportion of the lost earnings for that time are
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using it to up skill and retraining the existing workforce so that when volume picks up again and it will, no question about that, the workforce will simply increase it's ours. they will not lose the sort of jobs quoted in france and germany, these will be mitigated by the actions of the government. the problem in the uk as a government sitting on its hands and i will argue again this afternoon for specific measures to be introduced to safeguard jobs now and the long—term viability of sectors that are usually important to our economy. when you say the government is sitting on its hands, million and sitting on furlough. we want that and full stat on government as it was initially a loans so i am proud of thejob retention was initially a loans so i am proud of the job retention scheme, we
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played our part in doing that and we welcome it. the issue is when that comes to an end and i understand the chancellor wants to end the genetic scheme there needs to be scheme introduced that address specific problems in particular sectors that are not going to simply return to work immediately. these are viable industries, high—value industries that bring revenue into the economy that bring revenue into the economy that will support the sort of projects that the prime minister outlined yesterday. it is important we detain the skills and experience in these sectors and we can do that by introducing short—term working, by introducing short—term working, by retraining. i am just off a call with the welsh government will do what they can to support research and development of a next—generation aircraft, quieter and more fuel efficient, zero emissions that the prime minister spoke about, they will play their part and put money
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they have got forward but it needs westminster to step up now... thank you. some breaking news about the murder of two sisters and a london park, they were killed in wembley in the early hours of the 6th ofjune, we had healing and 18—year—old man has been arrested over there emerges at an address in south london on suspicion of the murders. the detective leading the investigation says this is a priority for the
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metropolitan police and my officers have been working around the clock to identify the person responsible. given the significance of this development visited the family in person to inform them of the arrest. 0ur person to inform them of the arrest. our thoughts remain with them at this very difficult time. the headlines on bbc news... police in hong kong use pepper spray and a water cannon — and arrest 30 democracy protestors, as china's new national security law comes into force further uk job losses due to coronavirus as the owners of sandwich chain upper crust say 5 thousand jobs are under threat — and 17—hundred jobs are to go at airbus uk the us has bought up almost the entire global supply of remdesivir —one of two drugs used to treat coronavirus the uk government says local authorities will now get full data in real time about potential spikes in coronavirus cases in their areas,
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to help deal with local outbreaks. it comes after criticism of the length of time it took to provide information to officials in leicester, which became the first city in the uk to be put under a local lockdown yesterday. this morning the business secretary alok sharma responded to the claim that local authorities aren't receiving enough data. data is obviously being monitored constantly by the joint bio—security centre together with public health england and the test and trace system and information is being made available to local authorities. there is a dashboard and information on test and trace is made available to local authorities right now. so information is being shared. of course, where we are able to improve we will do that. dr chaand nagpaul is from the british medical association. this has taken a little while to iron out, it is the case a data
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sharing agreement has been signed between public health england and local councils so data—sharing can speed up. do you understand why this hasn't happened until now?” speed up. do you understand why this hasn't happened until now? i don't because having it in real time would have been fundamental to identifying where outbreaks are occurring and how to act promptly. this has been a court from public health doctors at the bma so it has been announced but it should have been the case for a while and as you heard from the mayor of lester t did not know the scale and his own city until a late stage. what also needs to match this information is clear trigger points about what level of infection in an area would result in a warning to the public because they need to know there is an emerging outbreak in their area, higher numbers of
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infections and to take measures to prevent a local lockdown. what trigger points would apply for a lockdown in an area. we need to have that sort of transparency and systematic national approach to be meaningful in terms of containing the virus. this has to be matched by an agile test entry system that has capacity because what we want to avoid is exactly what has happened in leicester and that can only happen if as you begin to see new cases they are identified, the results come back promptly and those are contacted and isolated. that is what we need to do in real time and thatis what we need to do in real time and that is currently not happening. now that is currently not happening. now that it has been sorted in leicester and this agreement has been assigned, do you think the issues of local data—sharing have been ironed out? and in terms of actually working out where our spikes and
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cases, it seems the public health england data is providing much more of the resource than the app. therefore an be any situation can actually know i am getting the information quickly? the level of testing at the moment, there is more information and we are disadvantaged because the lockdown easing was predicated on having an app that will give you more information about who as not affected. the data is in dryden who gets tested, every day we get information at the briefings about the number of tests, we do not get told to many people have been tested. there are still information we are not receiving that we need to deceive. it is important to emphasise that the aim is to have early warnings of information to prevent a lockdown and to give you a
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statistic the most recent figures show we are seeing 22,000 new cases every week with a prevalence of around 51,000 people infected, much higher than many other european nations and fb at competitor new zealand they have no new cases so there is lots of work to do and so there is lots of work to do and so the government has to in addition to all the local information continue very clear public messaging that the virus is still present and the rates are not going down, it has levelled off, we are not seeing further reductions and so the message from saturday onwards must be that we continue to be vigilant, that the public must continue with social distancing and need to understand what one metre plus means i need to wear face coverings and public weather cannot socially distance because every did not do all of that
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meat on the desk of future local lockdown switch as the —— we run the risk of future local lockdown is and the icing we want as a national lockdown. plans by israel's leadership to annex parts of the occupied west bank appear to have stalled. july first had been set as the date from which it could begin the legislative process. but prime minister benjamin neta nyahu is still trying to build a consensus. and palestinians have warned it would be the absolute end of the two—state solution. uk prime minister borisjohnson has warned israel that britain will not recognise any annexation of palestinian territory which he said would be a violation of international law. the west bank has been occupied by israel since the middle east war in 1967, but after decades of talks its final status remains unresolved. both israel and the palestinians assert rights there. israel still has civil and military control
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over much of the area — which you can see here in blue. 430,000 israelis live in a number of settlements and outposts built under israel's occupation. the majority of the international community regards these settlements as illegal under international law. and in orange are the areas under varying degrees of palestinian control. the result? a complex patchwork in one of the most disputed regions in the world. we can speak now to the bbc‘s middle east editorjeremy bowen. this plan for the annexation seems to be delayed tell us more about the difficulties of getting it through. it is very difficult, president trump festival encouraged him a note he is looking at is the election chances and that is has priority. all of israel's allies including
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britain have said they do not want this to happen, borisjohnson even did a piece for one of israel's newspaper saying it was a bad idea. the king ofjordan has sertic lead to an enormous clash withjordan, palestinians and against it and there are internal israeli issues from the right side of politics saying the premise that is not thinking about doing enough and this may come with some kind of palestinian state. it has got very complicated and the prime minister who sometimes has a history of hesitating and dithering seems now to be wondering is there something he can pull off. do you think it may just quietly disappeared? no, i think the genie is out of the bottle soido
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think the genie is out of the bottle so i do not think it will quietly disappear and benjamin netanyahu will want to give people something because among them is popular. the reality on the west bank is that the israelis control everything they wa nt to israelis control everything they want to control and palestinian administration is essentially security cooperation but they pick up security cooperation but they pick up the rubbish and things. as it is out of all that many palestinians say this may not change a great deal. but i think it would change a light because there is always in the background this thought that perhaps the idea of a two state solution, power stain alongside as real as the only way of getting some kind of peace but fa did this annexation then i think that idea would finally be buried. what about other international reaction? the un
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secretary general has said it would bea secretary general has said it would be a terrible violation of international law, the settlements as you has been building out illegal international law, the settlements as you and neen building out illegal international law, the settlements as you and iten building out illegal international law, the settlements as you and it would ding out illegal international law, the settlements as you and it would ding o| the egal
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