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tv   BBC World News  BBC News  January 25, 2021 5:00am-5:31am GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm sally bundock with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. democrats say they'll implement a huge covid relief package with or without republican support, as the us passes 25 million cases. oxfam says the combined wealth of ten of the world's richest men has increased by $540 billion — enough to pay for the whole world to be vaccinated. the president of mexico — who has repeatedly played down the severity of the coronavirus — says he has himself tested positive. ten years after the arab spring, we ask whether egypt has changed in the years since the tahir square protests. lauched into the record books —
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spacex sends 143 satellites into orbit on a single rocket flight hello to you. we start in the us, where the democratic leader in the senate says president biden�*s multi—billion dollar covid—19 relief plan will be implemented, with or without support from the republican party. chuck schumer said the nearly $2 trillion bill could reignite the country's economy and significantly increase the number of americans being vaccinated. presidentjoe biden has promised 100 million vaccine shots in his first 100 days. the us has been hit by the coronavirus harder than any other country in the world, more
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than 400,000 people have died cases have exceeded 25 million. david willis is in los angeles. david, first of all, tell us more about this huge stimulus plan and what it could do for the american economy. sally, president _ the american economy. sally, president biden _ the american economy. sally, president biden has _ the american economy. sally, president biden has made - president biden has made combating the coronavirus pandemic here his number one priority. in the four days he has been in office, he has already introduced a raft of measures, executive orders designed to combat the spread of the pandemic, including a mandate on the wearing of masks in us federal buildings. he has also made clear that he intends to reimpose a ban on travellers from the uk, ireland and most of europe. those people coming
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into the us, that dan was to have been lifted under donald trump's presidency. mr biden believes this is not the time to do that. and you mentioned, that vast bill, nearly $2 trillion thatjoe biden would like to see past which would include measures for more vaccinations, more coronavirus testing and of course, money for those who have lost their jobs because of the pandemic. many republicans are wary of the size of the bill. they say that borrowing lots of money, trillions of dollars from the chinese at this particular time, is not the best way to go about combating the problems affecting the us economy. the democrats and indeed the new senate majority leader chuck schumer made it clear today that they intend to press ahead regardless. lam i am hopeful that republicans will see — i am hopeful that republicans will see the need but if they don't. — will see the need but if they don't, there are tools we can use _
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don't, there are tools we can use to — don't, there are tools we can use to move forward on our own and we — use to move forward on our own and we will— use to move forward on our own and we will because the number one goal— and we will because the number one goal is a bold package that meets— one goal is a bold package that meets the needs of the american people _ meets the needs of the american people. back in 2008, the aid was whittled down and the recovery took a decade and we can't _ recovery took a decade and we can't go — recovery took a decade and we can't go through that again. we must talk about the impeachment trial bound to dominate headlines. talk through the process as it begins this week.- through the process as it begins this week. later today, dail , begins this week. later today, daily. monday _ begins this week. later today, daily, monday at _ begins this week. later today, daily, monday at about - begins this week. later today, daily, monday at about seven | daily, monday at about seven o'clock local time, just before midnight in the uk, the article of impeachment will be presented to the senate stop it charges donald trump with incitement of insurrection in connection of course with that mob uprising at the capitol building earlier this month, which involved a lot of donald trump's supporters. senate leaders agreed on friday to delay the impeachment trial for a two weeks in order forjoe
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biden to assemble his cabinet and for donald trump to get his defence organised. 0nce and for donald trump to get his defence organised. once the trial does get under way, early february, then it will require a two—thirds majority of the upper house in order to convict donald trump. and then he could, potentially, the barred from holding public office in the future. that requires 17 republicans to cross the aisle, if you like, and vote with the democrats. a very tall order sally, it seems, particular because many republicans are trying to work out whether their political interests are best served by continuing to support donald trump or by distancing themselves from him. interesting, that will keep all of our script, i am sure. thank you very much david willis with the latest there. the mexican president, andres manuel lopez 0brador,
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has tweeted that he has covid—nineteen. the president has been criticised for playing down the seriousness of the coronavirus pandemic by resisting pressure to wear masks or introduce tougher covid restrictions. mexico has recorded 1.7 million cases of coronavirus. 0ur central america correspondent will grant reports. president andres manuel lopez 0brador is in his late 60s but is generally considered to be in good health and has no known underlying conditions. he told mexicans of his diagnosis via twitter. the irony of the president's diagnosis hasn't been lost on his criticism, critics, of which there are many in his handling of the pandemic. he has repeatedly been accused of playing down the gravity of the situation, especially early on when he failed to wear a face mask in public. now hospitals in mexico city are taking point
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with almost all icu beds currently occupied. there is a widespread shortage of oxygen supplies, both the infection rate the death rate from coded are among the western world. late are among the western world. we were are among the western world. - were looking hospitals all day and there was no room in any. this was the only place that would receive us unfortunately, my family member did not survive. ~ . . , , survive. with the health crisis by running, there is also a - by running, there is also a bleak economic outlook in mexico where many are frustrated as what they see is a greater emphasis on keeping the economy moving rather than controlling the pandemic. mexicans on all sides will want to see the president make a speedy recovery, however now the extent of the problem has been brought home to him in his own personalfight with been brought home to him in his own personal fight with this disease. will grant, bbc news. police in the netherlands have clashed with demonstrators angry about new coronavirus restrictions. there were protests in eindhoven and amsterdam. dozens have been arrested, as anna holligan reports from the hague.
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burning bicycles were built as a barricade. in eindhoven, they wore facemasks to avoid detection, and hurled rocks to repel the riot police who eventually used tear gas to clear the streets. families stopped to stare, while others steered clear. the roads were blocked and supermarkets looted as frustration turned to opportunism. the netherlands has just entered its toughest lockdown since the start of the pandemic. while the number of daily covid—i9 cases about the risks posed by the new variants. first detected in the uk, south africa, south america. on saturday, all flights from these places were banned. there is resentment, too.
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this liberal nation that enjoyed a relatively relaxed lockdown during the first wave has been forced to change its tune and is now facing one of the toughest in the world. anna holligan, bbc news, in the hague. all around the world there are vaccine haves and have nots but one of the most stark contrasts is in the middle east. while israel has been vaccinating its population against covid—i9 at a faster rate than any other country, the palestinian authority has onlyjust received its first delivery of a few thousand doses of the russian vaccine for the occupied west bank and gaza strip. human rights groups say israel has responsibilities under international law to do more to help, but it disputes that. 0ur correspondent, yolande knell reports. around the world, there are
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covid vaccine have and have—nots. but at this palestinian hospital, they are under a single roof. these cancer patients come from the occupied west bank and gaza are so could be waiting months for theirjabs. is disappointing, frustrating, sad. _ theirjabs. is disappointing, frustrating, sad. but- theirjabs. is disappointing, i frustrating, sad. but because the hosnital_ frustrating, sad. but because the hospital is _ frustrating, sad. but because the hospital is in _ frustrating, sad. but because the hospital is in east - the hospital is in east jerusalem which is under israel's full control, it has already vaccinated the dock as. i got the scene but i'm not relieved we were able to deliver vaccinations to our patients and families back in the west bank and gaza. it is a unique quality. you don't feel happy that you're getting the vaccination and other parts of your people cannot.— your people cannot. there is a hot debate — your people cannot. there is a hot debate about _ your people cannot. there is a hot debate about who - your people cannot. there is a hot debate about who should l your people cannot. there is a i hot debate about who should be vaccinating palestinians in the west bank and gaza. those who think it is israel's responsibility point to the geneva conventions. those who say it is up to the palestinian authority look to the oslo
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accords. it all adds up to a long list of unresolved issues that experts on international law disagree on here. but this building site, the nuts and bolts of the situation are seen very differently. he relies on workers from the west bank and are pushing for israel to vaccinate them. they are central to israel's strong economy and the week palestinian ones. late economy and the week palestinian ones. we are depending _ palestinian ones. we are depending on _ palestinian ones. we are depending on 65,000 i palestinian ones. we are - depending on 65,000 palestinian workers. they are working in the core drops of construction and we need them because without them we cannot construct. now, ithink without them we cannot construct. now, i think this is logic that also we have two vaccinate these israeli people and also the palestinians, at least the ones who are working with us. ~ ., ., ., , ., least the ones who are working with us. a, ., ., , ., ., with us. mohammed has had to sta in with us. mohammed has had to stay in lsrael — with us. mohammed has had to stay in israel for _ with us. mohammed has had to stay in israel for his _ with us. mohammed has had to stay in israel for his job - with us. mohammed has had to stay in israel for his job and - stay in israel for his job and is homesick. i asked if he wants to be vaccinated. translation: {eli wants to be vaccinated. translation: . ., , ., wants to be vaccinated. translation: , ., ., translation: of course, all of us are waiting. _ translation: of course, all of us are waiting. whether - translation: of course, all of us are waiting. whether we - translation: of course, all of
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us are waiting. whether we are | us are waiting. whether we are arabs or dues. if i took the vaccine, that would mean i would be immune to the virus and i could go back to my family. and i could go back to my famil . , p and i could go back to my famil. , . , family. this pandemic has been revealing- _ family. this pandemic has been revealing. israel's _ family. this pandemic has been revealing. israel's economic - revealing. israel's economic connections, its money and reputation with science help to to get vaccines. the palestinians, relatively poor, stateless and a lot less organised, have been at a disadvantage. it has clearly shown the interdependence of both sides but also the deep divisions. the palestinians are being helped by the world health organization and is doing some of their own vaccine deals. israel says it's prioritising its own citizens but isn't ruling out vaccinating more palestinians. we are living together, we almost have no borders. if you vaccinate the israelis and don't accidentally palestinian people in the west bank and gaza, you can't make the chain of infection. you cannot fight the pandemic very well. the
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coal of the pandemic very well. the goal of herd _ the pandemic very well. the goal of herd immunity could get bring israelis and palestinians closer together. yolande knell, bbc newsjerusalem. calculations by 0xfam suggest the combined wealth of ten of the world's richest men has increased during the coronavirus pandemic by 400—billion—pounds. the charity says that's enough to pay for every single person in the world to be vaccinated. it's called the situation shameful and says the richest people need to be taxed more fairly. in around 20 minutes time i'll be talking to 0xfam's chief executive. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: a moment of magic let's manchester united knock liverpool out of the fa cup. the shuttle challenger exploded soon after lift off. there were seven astronauts on board, one of them a woman school teacher. all of them are believed to have been killed.
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by the evening, tahrir square, the heart of official cairo, was in the hands of the demonstrators. they were using the word �*revolution'. the earthquake singled out buildings and brought them down in seconds. tonight, the search for any survivors has an increasing desperation about it as the hours passed. the new government is finally in control of the republic- of uganda. survivors of the auschwitz concentration camp have been commemorating the 40th anniversary of their liberation. they toured the huts, gas chambers and crematoria, and relived their horrifying experiences. this is bbc news, the latest headlines:
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democrats in the us congress say they'll implement a huge covid—i9 relief package with or without republican support. the aim of the bill, worth nearly $2 trillion, is to reignite the us economy and greatly accelerate the number of people being vaccinated. calculations by 0xfam suggest the combined wealth of ten of the world's richest men has increased during the coronavirus pandemic by $540 billion. the charity says that's enough to pay for every single person in the world to be vaccinated. it's been ten years since egyptians took to the streets to unseat their longest—serving president, hosni mubarak. their uprising was part of a movement of pro—democracy protests in the arab world to end autocratic rule. although mubarak left power, many believe the dreams of a democratic egypt have been shattered. human rights groups repeatedly criticise severe restrictions imposed on freedom of expression under egypt's current president, abdul fattah al—sisi.
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but the authorities say that mr sisi is protecting the country from chaos. sally nabil from cairo has more. tahfir tahrir square in tahriquuare in cairo tahrir square in cairo one decade ago. an overflow of hope. in 18 days, president hosni mubarak is gone, after three decades in power. and in the following years, egypt goes through extreme political upheavals. but what has become of the big dream of a free democracy? translation: what ha--ened happened seven or eight years ago won't be repeated again. egypt's current military duct president, abdel fattah el—sisi, is referring here to the january revolution. —— military—backed. he sees it as
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the cause of many of egypt's medical and economic woes. the protesters like mohammed, the revolution is not to blame. he fled egypt after spending a few months injailfor taking part months in jail for taking part in months injailfor taking part in an anti—government protest. translation: the in an anti-government protest. translation:— in an anti-government protest. translation: the revolution was not defeated. _ translation: the revolution was not defeated. it _ translation: the revolution was not defeated. it is _ translation: the revolution was not defeated. it isjust _ translation: the revolution was not defeated. it isjust facing - not defeated. it is just facing an oppressive regime that wants to strip us of all we have achieved. i to strip us of all we have achieved.— to strip us of all we have achieved. . w ., ,., , achieved. i ask him about his dreams now and back then. l achieved. i ask him about his dreams now and back then. i | dreams now and back then. i once wished for a free democracy. now all i want is to be able to go back to egypt. in 2013, mr sisi, then a minister of defence, led the military�*s overthrow of mohammed morsi, and islamists who became the country's first democratically elected president. —— islamist. mohammed morsi's ouster came following mass protests against his rule, and since president sisi came to power, human
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rights groups have warned of tens of thousands of political prisoners. the government has always denied that. for mr sisi's supporters, he simply saved the country. translation: free speech without legal parameters is not helpful to any country. before september 11 no—one felt unsafe in egypt. egyptian split. priority now is security, then economic stability, then comes democratic and political practice. —— egyptians' top priority now. practice. -- egyptians' top priority now— practice. -- egyptians' top priority now. journalists are not in a better— priority now. journalists are not in a better place. - priority now. journalists are not in a better place. egypt| not in a better place. egypt ranks as one of the world's worst jailers ranks as one of the world's worstjailers ofjournalists. khaled el—bashy has co—founded three news websites. all of them have been shut down. this is b far them have been shut down. this is by far the _ them have been shut down. this is by far the worst _ them have been shut down. this is by far the worst for _ is by far the worst for the press. the state does not want us to speak. what is left of our dreams that we have journalists who are still
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willing to work.- journalists who are still willing to work. the 2011 uprising _ willing to work. the 2011 uprising will _ willing to work. the 2011 uprising will always - willing to work. the 2011 uprising will always be l willing to work. the 2011 uprising will always be a j uprising will always be a reminder of the strong call for change. but freedom now seems to be a faraway dream. even the face of tara square has changed, repainted with sparkling lights, but many hopes have dimmed. —— tahrir square. let's get some of the day's sports news. what a weekend of sport we have been treated too. we will start in the fa cup, when manchester united undeliverable finally gave us a game to enjoy in the fa cup fourth round, though i suspect that united fans will have enjoyed it more than their rivals. they are through to face west ham after a brilliant free kick from renison and is earned his side a 3—to win at old trafford, coming off the bench to settle the tie. —— free kick from bruno fernandez.
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brilliant. you go down, i think the reaction of everyone, we really played some good stuff in periods. the goals that we scored, we know that we have to defend well against them, of course. i thought that we managed to react well. and of course towards the end there are always some moments, but we kept them away. are always some moments, but we kept them away-— kept them away. legal action in germany but — kept them away. legal action in germany but some _ kept them away. legal action in germany but some decent - kept them away. legal action in| germany but some decent goals in this one, as bayern munich move seven points clear in the bumper �*s leader, beating shelter 4—0. bumper �*s leader, beating shelter4—0. robert bumper �*s leader, beating shelter 4—0. robert levin dusty scored in his eighth straight league game to put the defending champions through two to the good. not an easy angle, but one. that was sandwiched in between two headers from the german international thomas mueller, and then a couple minutes later, david alibi tried his luck from long—range. a pretty good decision to come up a pretty good decision to come up with bayern munich staying on course for a ninth straight title. a happy family in florida asjessica one with her parents watching honestly pga tournament of champions. ——
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won. and her sister —— sister finished third. she drained this mammoth 30 foot putt, then had to have daniel king didn't do the same. she missed, and handed quarter her six career win and herfirst in handed quarter her six career win and her first in three years. still a couple more ties to complete, the fourth round in the fa cup. could we see our first upset, jose mourinho will be hoping that is not the case, when he takes his tottenham team to second—tier strugglers wycombe wanderers. i team to second-tier strugglers wycombe wanderers.- team to second-tier strugglers wycombe wanderers. i would like to make some _ wycombe wanderers. i would like to make some changes. _ wycombe wanderers. i would like to make some changes. but - wycombe wanderers. i would like to make some changes. but yes, | to make some changes. but yes, we go with the whole group, because we know that we have a difficult match, and we don't want to throw away any competition, if we lose the competition, if we lose the competition, if we are knocked out of some competition, it has to be because we were not good
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enough, not because we didn't face the game with respect. find face the game with respect. and finall to face the game with respect. and finally to some _ face the game with respect. and finally to some remarkable pictures from the cross—country skiing world cup meeting in finland. an extraordinary conclusion to the men's four x 7.5 kilometre relay. russia's alexander balch and i've took exception to the skiing of finland'sjohnny making in finland's johnny making in their finland'sjohnny making in their battle for second. they crossed skis, then walsh and of lashed out with his pole. —— bolshanov. that wasn't the worst of it, he barged into maki and their teammates across the line. unsurprisingly, he and his team were disqualified. if you want to find out who will be playing american football's super bowl, turn on the bbc news sport up or head over to the website right now. whatever you up to, have a great day. let's hope we do. now that 143 satellites have made it into space on a single rocket, some are questioning what is happening to the space industry.
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with many more actors now involved, thanks to low—cost components that can be transported into orbit more and more easily, is anyone monitoring the satellites themselves — and how crowded is it getting up there? mark lobel takes a closer look. three, two, one... ignition. and left off.— and left off. spacex's record-breaking - and left off. spacex's. record-breaking rocket and left off. spacex's - record-breaking rocket leaving record—breaking rocket leaving cape canaveral in florida. it is quite a sight. but is the path they had four satellites becoming more clouded? separation confirmed. the launch of— separation confirmed. the launch of 143 _ separation confirmed. the launch of 143 satellites used to take a year, not a single moment like this.- to take a year, not a single moment like this. should have the fairing _ moment like this. should have the fairing deployed... - moment like this. should have the fairing deployed... this . the fairing deployed... this load, a veritable airborne vending machine for multiple customers, will spew into orbit broadband boosters, cogs that connects the internet of things and dozens of satellites taking
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pictures like these from san francisco's 0ne pictures like these from san francisco's one at company, imaging the earth's surface daily. imaging the earth's surface dail . , h. imaging the earth's surface dail . , u. ., daily. they scan the whole earth, looking _ daily. they scan the whole earth, looking for- daily. they scan the whole | earth, looking for changes, and that is used by a variety of people, in commercial areas like in agriculture, to understand crop yields, forestry, to understand deforestation, mapping, to improve the maps you see online, humanitarian use cases, like helping disaster response after floods and fires and earthquakes and so on. but there are — earthquakes and so on. but there are now— earthquakes and so on. but there are now over - earthquakes and so on. but there are now over 3000 working satellites in orbit. that is causing some consternation for space conservation. shill causing some consternation for space conservation.— space conservation. all of these satellites _ space conservation. all of these satellites are - space conservation. all of these satellites are going| space conservation. all of i these satellites are going on all different directions of 18,000 miles an hour. it is getting crowded enough that there is a serious risk of collisions. and these modern satellites are all manoeuvring, changing may be somewhat unpredictably in their orbits. and so it is a real challenge, because nobody is really in charge, like with our planes and our traffic control, telling each satellite where to
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go. telling each satellite where to .o_ ., telling each satellite where to io, ., , telling each satellite where to 0. ., , , . ., , ., , go. that is because the last olicin go. that is because the last policing manual— go. that is because the last policing manual for - go. that is because the last policing manual for outer i go. that is because the last - policing manual for outer space was written over 50 years ago. earlier this month, version 0rbit showed that satellite packed rockets can now be launched from a jumbo jet. with the size and price of a spacecraft shrinking, and demand for bespoke heights and launch times growing, are we witnessing a burgeoning space economy that risks crowding certain altitudes out? mark labelle, bbc news. a digital davos kicks off later today. that is of course the event that normally takes place in the swiss ski resort, happening virtually this year as opposed to everybody physically descending on davos. we will be talking to the boss of oxfam
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great britain about their report out today, which talks about the widening gap 20 rich and the poor, because of the pandemic, and what can be done to solve that problem. stay with us. see you in a moment. hello. monday will start with widespread frost and ice after a wintry weekend which, of course, brought some significant snow in places. it won't be the last covid—secure snowman we see sent in to us this winter and, hopefully, sunday's weather did bring a bit of fun at least. but of course, more people have to be out in the morning, and so that does mean some difficult conditions on untreated roads because it will be icy in places with that widespread frost. after further wintry showers overnight and into the morning across parts of scotland, rain and sleet on the coasts, some snow inland and into the hills. maybe the odd shower into northern ireland and northern england but, actually, monday is one of the better weather days of the week. most places will be dry,
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variable cloud, decent amount of sunshine and it will feel a bit less cold than it did over the weekend. into monday night, still some showers, wintry in nature, particularly to hills, affecting parts of scotland, northern ireland and northern england. still frosty and icy, although temperatures start to come up across western areas as we see another system heading our way. and that's going to spread its rain and a bit of hill snow it brings a bit more rain, as do others that follow this week, so if you are in a flood—affected area, certainly worth keeping across conditions near you. not as much rain as last week, but more rain isn't necessarily what you want. we see some rain spreading further north and east during tuesday, into the colder air. at least hill snow into parts of northern england and scotland, and the chance as tuesday comes to an end, especially in scotland, some
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snow even to low levels here. whereas further south, it turns a bit more milder, but of course, it is wetter. as we go into wednesday, the next weather system will start to move in. looks like it's a pretty slow affair, bringing its rain to the south—west initially, and it is of course the source of milderair coming in from the atlantic. but running into that cold air towards the north and east, it does set up a bit of a battle, and as that battle takes place during wednesday, again as the wet weather starts to move in, as it moves further north and east, there's the chance of seeing some snow out of that, particularly as we get into wednesday night. although some parts are turning milder this week, it isn't going to last because by the end of the week and into the weekend, the colder air will come south again and there is the chance again next weekend of some parts seeing a bit of snow. that's the forecast.
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this is bbc news with the latest business headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. as world leaders get ready for today's virtual economic forum, 0xfam warns the gap between rich and poor is widening putting millions at risk of poverty. kicksarting the job market for the uk's young workers — we'll be hearing from the chancellor rishi sunak about how he is still optimistic over the government's two billion pound scheme. and as europe and the uk look set to allow boeing's 737 max to return to the skies, we hearfrom one former employee of the plane maker who warns of more turbulence.

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