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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  January 25, 2021 7:00pm-8:01pm GMT

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hello, i'm ros atkins. this is outside source. as coronavirus deaths in the uk near 100,000 — the government looks at tougher travel restrictions to curb infection rates. with the pandemic worsening and more contagion to various contagious variant spreading, this isn't the time to be lifting restrictions on international travel. tougher restrictions are being rolled out in other countries including in israel. the prime minister will be resigning. and we talk about donald
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trump's second impeachment moving to the senate. indian media reporting a fierce brawl between indian and chinese troops in flare—up along their disputed border. concern over new variants of covid—i9 are leading to tougher travel restrictions around the world. one of those variants originated in the uk. this is the government's health secretary. as we have throughout this unprecedented crisis, we are learning more all the time, and the new variant that was first discovered in kent, which comprises now a significant number of our cases, it is spreading 30 to 70% more easily than the existing variance. and based on analysis conducted by academic colleagues
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in a variety of studies, there is a realistic possibility that this variant may be associated with increased mortality compared to the old variant, as well as increased transmission. even before that statement, some countries were imposing travel restrictions. in the us, president biden is set to impose a ban on people arriving from the uk, ireland and the 26 european countries in the �*schengen free travel area'. and from brazil and south africa too. here's the white house press secretary. the president will sign a presidential proclamation to reduce the spread of covid—i9 to travel, especially as we see faster spreading variance emerging. with the pandemic worsening and more contagions variant spreading this is not the time to be lifting restrictions on international travel. elsewhere — sweden has closed its border with norway for three weeks. and france and singapore are now demanding negative coivid tests from all arrivals.
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next israel, where prime minister benjamin netanyahu said on sunday that the country was "closing the skies hermetically, except for rare exceptions". that ban is coming into place at midnight local time tonight. and its left some people struggling to making last minute changes. translation: also want to travel tomorrow morning. _ translation: also want to travel tomorrow morning. everything - translation: also want to travel| tomorrow morning. everything was ready and i have my flight. suddenly i was told the airport will be closed and i cannot leave. i asked whether this with north korea are israel and the response was yes, it is israel, this is the government decision. all fo these actions are connected to the fact that the global number of coronavirus cases is rising faster than ever. this graph shows us — we're now approaching 100 million cases according tojohns hopkins university. and as you can see — the rate of new infections is increasing drastically. it took two months for cases to go from 20 million to a0 million cases. and half that time to go from 60 to 80 million. and there's concern
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that these variants — particularly the ones that originated in the uk, south africa and brazil— are the cause. here's the world health organisation's david nabarro speaking to the bbc. we know about a variant that has emerged in south africa, several variants that have emerged in brazil, a variant that is reported from southern california as well as the variant reported in the uk and one that was found in denmark associated with minkfarming. and there will be more. each of these variants that i am talking about that i am talking about are contained a fairly large number of changes of what we call mutations in the virus make up. they are all a cause for concern, but they are all being studied and right now the judgement that we all have is that some of them appear to be
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transmitted more easily and when there are suggestions that one of them, the uk one, may be more virulent but overall there is no evidence that any of them yet are resistant to the antibodies produced through vaccination. now there have been questions about whether covid vaccines will be as effective on these variants. well one company, moderna has confirmed that its vaccine will work against the uk variant and the south african variant. but it says it's adding a second booster to its vaccine — making three shots in total — to ensure its success. the bbc�*s naomi grimley has more on this. what they will do is run some big trials again in the us, they will give people a third jab, once with the original formula and then another one that has been tweaked especially to try and meet the challenge of the south african variant and they are hoping to get those results out as quick as possible so if necessary the manufacturers can indeed change the formula. as countries look to contain
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the variant from the uk, the government here is also looking at new travel restrictions of its own. reports suggest they could involve a period of enforced hotel quarantine to try and contain the introduction of more new cases of other mutant variants into the already struggling nhs. hotel quarantine is nothing new. it's a method that australia and new zealand — countries praised for their handling of the pandemic — have had in place since early in the first wave. here's prime minister boris johnson speaking earlier. we need a solution that gives us the maximum possible protection against reinfection from abroad because it doesn't take, you can see the risk which is that we can do an amazing job of vaccinating our population, we have to realise there is atleast a theoretical risk of a new variant that is a vaccine—busting variant coming in and we have to be able to keep that under control. iain watson — westminster. we heard from matt hancock that the data is whirring on the new variant
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what if the government planning in terms of policy shift to response that knowledge? matt terms of policy shift to response that knowledge?— terms of policy shift to response that knowledge? matt hancock also said today in _ that knowledge? matt hancock also said today in his _ that knowledge? matt hancock also said today in his press _ that knowledge? matt hancock also said today in his press conference l said today in his press conference that it was imported to be cautious at the border and the principal analysis of the new variance carried out. so effectively that was signalling that what we expect to see tomorrow is a meeting of what is called covid—i9 organisation committee, senior cabinet ministers who will discuss what further action to take of the border and as you mentioned we are expecting to see this idea quarantine hotels are people arriving in the country would have to quarantine for up to ten daysin have to quarantine for up to ten days in a hotel accommodation somewhere near major airports. but at the moment, what is not clear, and may yet have to be thrashed out at that meeting tomorrow at just and may yet have to be thrashed out at that meeting tomorrow atjust how widespread that policy would be, so already because of concerns over the south african and brazilian variance come if you like foreign residents of those countries are already subject to a travel ban by british
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residents coming back are not coming so weird you simply impose the quarantine hotel option on the british residents returning from coronavirus hotspots i would you make it a blanket ban? and again from what matt hancock was saying to him he said what worried him today was notjust simply him he said what worried him today was not just simply the variants that have been identified but what might be out there that having yet been identified. the important government is to give his vaccination programme completed and get the most vulnerable people vaccinated by the middle of february, and they don't want to do anything which i think may be potentially undermined that and that may well tip the balance towards more restrictions rather than fewer restrictions at the moment and people still need the result of a test to be presented before they can get to the country and it looks like the option of pointing hotels will happen and the other thing tomorrow will be how many incoming travellers that might affect. if will be how many incoming travellers that might affect.— that might affect. if that is travel, what _ that might affect. if that is travel, what about - that might affect. if that is travel, what about the - that might affect. if that is i travel, what about the impact that might affect. if that is - travel, what about the impact of the statement from matt hancock on other
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discussions in particular around schools and about the nature of the lock and how long it may go on for? that is right. the difficulty there is at the moment there is pressure on the prime minister from two wings of his own party and sometimes for the same people in his own party because some of them are saying you should take tougher action and should've taken tougher action on borders earlier but others are saying actually what we want to see is a lockdown especially for schools. we want to see greater emphasis on bringing schoolchildren back into the classroom and at that moment only key workers and vulnerable work your children get that provision. there is worried that provision. there is worried that the government will not do this before orjust that the government will not do this before or just after the that the government will not do this before orjust after the traditional february half term and this may run on until easter, so there will be pressure on the government from people and what is called the covid—i9 recovery group of conservative mps to say as soon as
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people are vaccinated come if it happened my schedule in february, you should then set a certain timetable to bring children back. again, borisjohnson the's own party and committees have been saying that children need to pre—perhaps, they seem to be the forgotten victims of the coronavirus crisis and they need their mental health to go back to school to get back as soon as possible but the strong message from matt hancock and for the prime minister is simply it is too soon to say. they were stressing this will be something which will depend very much on the course of the virus rather than setting out an arbitrary timescale. . ~ rather than setting out an arbitrary timescale. ., ~ , ., , . breaking news coming the last few minutes. it only�*s prime minister is to tender his resignation on tuesday. konta likes his majority in the upper house of parliament after a small party left the coalition. ——
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it happy konta. let's get help from mark loewen. tell us more. —— just happy konta. he mark loewen. tell us more. -- 'ust happy konta.— mark loewen. tell us more. -- 'ust happy konta. he lost his ma'ority in the u- her happy konta. he lost his ma'ority in the upper house i happy konta. he lost his ma'ority in the upper house oft happy konta. he lost his majority in the upper house of parliament - happy konta. he lost his majority in the upper house of parliament last| the upper house of parliament last week after a small party within the coalition quit. —— giuseppe conte. following that he has tried to send some opposition senators to jump ship and give him the numbers that he needs but it seems he has to do so. you will not have a cabinet meeting tomorrow morning and he will then go to the president's office and tender his regulations. it is likely that he would be tasked with forming a new coalition government which might sound rather strange to you that when the prime minister quits he is given a chance to form a new government but that is one of the quirks of italian politics. this is a country that is at 66 governments since the second world war. a country of perennial political crisis assembly and when a prime minister quits, they then go to inform the president and then usually help to be given the chance
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to form a new strength in coalition in every form coalition. if he manages to do so he can relaunch his government and if he does not come of the task would move to another political figure and failing that, if nobody can do it, fresh elections for that. ., ., , ., if nobody can do it, fresh elections forthat. ., ., , ., for that. not really what you need in the middle _ for that. not really what you need in the middle of _ for that. not really what you need in the middle of a _ for that. not really what you need in the middle of a pandemic. - in the middle of a pandemic. absolutely. this is a country with more than 85,000 deaths in the covid—i9 crisis, the highest death toll in the european union. and of course the most profound economic crisis now since the second world war. so it's really, really chooses his moments for a political crisis. and this is absolutely the last thing that he needs. giuseppe conte has said that he hopes to be given that mandate into a bit coalition partners have already said they will back him and the question is whether he can get enough of centrist mps and senators behind him and a new strength in coalition or whether his days as is italy only�*s 29th prime minister since the second world war will come to a close. he
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minister since the second world war will come to a close.— will come to a close. he laid out the different _ will come to a close. he laid out the different steps _ will come to a close. he laid out the different steps that - will come to a close. he laid out the different steps that could i the different steps that could follow depending on his success or failure at each step but how much time does he have at each part of the process?— time does he have at each part of the process? time does he have at each part of the hrocess? �* ., . ~ ., the process? about sort of a week or two, maybe — the process? about sort of a week or two. maybe a — the process? about sort of a week or two, maybe a little _ the process? about sort of a week or two, maybe a little bit _ the process? about sort of a week or two, maybe a little bit longer. - the process? about sort of a week or two, maybe a little bit longer. so - two, maybe a little bit longer. so we should know within the next two or three weeks whether conte will be the new, old prime minister or whether it is italy will have a new man or woman but usually in this country it is a man.— man or woman but usually in this country it is a man. thank you very much, country it is a man. thank you very much. mark- _ country it is a man. thank you very much, mark. more _ country it is a man. thank you very much, mark. more twists - country it is a man. thank you very much, mark. more twists and - country it is a man. thank you very| much, mark. more twists and turns country it is a man. thank you very i much, mark. more twists and turns in italy. to the us, where in a few hours' time an article of impeachment against donald trump will be delivered to the senate. he's charged with "incitement of insurrection", after the deadly storming of congress. here's why. on sixjanuary mrtrump hosted a �*save america' rally by the white house. and he said this. after this, we're going to walk down
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and i'll be there with you. we're going to walk down... we're going to walk down, any one you want, but i think right here. we're going walk down to the capitol, and we're going to cheer on our brave senators, and congressmen and women. we're probably not going to be cheering so much for some of them because you'll never take back our country with weakness. you have to show strength, and you have to be strong. according to his impeachment charge, it's this speech which incited what happened next. because mr trump's supporters did walk down to the capitol. and they didn't stop there. the mob breached the building and fought with police in the halls at the heart of american democracy. five people died as a result.
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the us house of representatives then impeached donald trump for a second time. the next stage is a trial in the senate. forsome, impeaching donald trump is about fighting against the disinformation which led to the capitol riots in the first place. elizabeth neumann was assistant secretary for the department of homeland security under donald trump. but she resigned last year. the group that i'm most concerned about are those that belong belong to the president, the people who call themselves the people who call themselves maga and qanon, they are very disheartened right now and increasing vulnerability, and acceptability to being recruited by these rights of premises. and acceptability to being recruited by these white supremacists. in fact, we see chatter on line indicating they are attempting to do
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just that, to recruit this hard and maga and qanon to followers into this darker more nefarious evil of white supremacy violence and anti—government extremist violence and that is a big concern. this is what happens next. later, house speaker nancy pelosi will make a ceremonial walk with the article of impeachment through the capitol building to the senate. but the trial there against donald trump won't start for another two weeks. for mr trump to be convicted, two—thirds of senators must vote against him. that means 17 republicans must go against a former president from their own party. when he was impeached a year ago that didn't happen, and it's unlikely to this time. but a lot has changed in a year. matt terrill is a republican strategist and former chief of staff to senator marco rubio. each individual senator will be able to make their own choice with regard to how they vote on impeachment. we have seen some republican senators indicate that they will wait till the end of the trial of course to let this process play out then make a decision. other republican senators have been quite vocal frankly with regard to pushing back on the notion that this process should continue into the senate. in the end, i think it is important to know that this process is only
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availed what has been taking place for quite some time in the republican party and that the party is very divided right now. the real question for the republican party, and for the country, is not only how to get through this process of impeachment but how do you unite the country going forward. impeachment charges are political, not criminal. and even if donald trump is convicted, we don't know if there would be lasting consequences for him. here's constitutional law expert professor suzanna sherry. the republicans have a way to slap trump on the wrists. the first vote is whether to convict him and that takes the two thirds vote. but there are no consequences for that, because the only direct consequence of a conviction is removalfrom office, and of course he is no longer in office. so, if they do convict him, if 17 republicans vote to convict him, there will be a second vote on whether to disqualify him from future office. that would be the only punishment of future consequence.
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so, the republicans could vote in favour of impeachment, and then against punishing him. and that would be almost equivalent to a censure, which several republicans have said they would support. meanwhile president biden is busy unpicking donald trump's legacy. he's just signed an executive order overturning a ban on transgender peoplejoining the us military. here's what he said. what i'm doing is in enabling all qualified americans to serve the country in uniform and essentially restoring the situation before with transgendered personnel well qualified in every other way can serve our government in the united states military. that's on top of 30 executive orders he's already signed. they range from halting mr trump's border wall, reversing the travel ban on largely muslim countries and ramping up
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vaccination supplies. nataliejennings is editor of the washington post's politic blog the fix. thank you forjoining us on the bbc. i guess some viewers are wondering how long can thejoe biden administration keep this pace up. thank you for having me. i think we are seeing a flurry of activity here but that i think biden rather explicitly as an antidote president trump and he came and prepared to the degree that he can with the stroke of his pen, rollback things was that i don't think we can expect this sort of pace to keep up and i think the biden administration came in very ready, targeting things they wanted to do in their opening days and then they will have to move their efforts to working with congress to get more lasting things done and can't be undone with the stroke of the pen like he is doing now. , , , ., ., .,, now. help us understand what those thins now. help us understand what those things might — now. help us understand what those things might be- _ now. help us understand what those things might be. what _ now. help us understand what those things might be. what would - now. help us understand what those things might be. what would be i now. help us understand what those things might be. what would be the| things might be. what would be the first or the second thing that he would to congress about? he has
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already really _ would to congress about? he has already really pushing _ would to congress about? he has already really pushing for - would to congress about? he has already really pushing for more i already really pushing for more coronavirus relief. and that is something that that is already frankly will be difficult for them to navigate with them. congress is very close to evenly divided between democrats and republicans and he gets to work with the opposite party but a top priority is getting more money for things like people who are out of work for or reopening schools, for vaccination distribution, and then he wants to move on to immigration, overhauling the immigration system to create a pack for citizenship. a lot of people in this country who are not legal document residents who don't really have a path at this point to becoming so. that has been a fight that has been going on for a long time and when we think it will take up. infrastructure after that is something we are also expecting to tackle. i something we are also expecting to tackle. ., ., , ., u, ., tackle. i immigration you can argue one of the main _ tackle. i immigration you can argue one of the main reasons _ tackle. i immigration you can argue one of the main reasons donald i tackle. i immigration you can argue i one of the main reasons donald trump one of the main reasons donald trump one and it was because he connected with a section of american society which was uncomfortable about how immigration was working. is that
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likely to get the bipartisan support that he may need in congress to make significant progress on policy? i don't know about likely but i think it is a very difficult issue. donald trump launched his candidacy over five years ago now. we're still talking about the same issues and there is no resolution clearly one way or the other. that has to come from congress. find a consensus about doing anything is really hard but to the degree that you can achieve a deal like that, the thinking goes a lot of time it is easiest to do that in the early days of a presidency we have some momentum so if biden will get something none of that, that it might be worth taking a shot earlier and i think that is what has administration is hoping for right now. , , ,., ., administration is hoping for right now. , , ., ., ~ ., now. very useful. good to talk to ou, now. very useful. good to talk to you. natalie- _ now. very useful. good to talk to you, natalie. please _ now. very useful. good to talk to you, natalie. please come i now. very useful. good to talk to you, natalie. please come on i now. very useful. good to talk to i you, natalie. please come on again. you can say all a lot of predators have a lot of political power to use
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at the beginning. —— most presidents have. there's one final transition for the us first family. the president's dogs, moving from delaware to the white house. this is champ — one of the biden�*s two dogs. he's used to the official residence, having been with the family since 2008 — when they were in the vice presidential mansion. major though — was only adopted two years ago — so it's all new to him. donald trump was the first president in modern times not to have a dog. so — all change in the white house. you pandemic has notjust impacted how we can move around the world from it is impacting on how we work and how much we can work. look at these new figures from the international labour organisation. it found almost 9% of global working hours were locked in 2020 due to the pandemic. it is also estimated that 140 million workers have been made unemployed and millions more are working reduced hours. put all that
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together and the total number of hours laws equate to 255 million full—time jobs. hours laws equate to 255 million full—timejobs. here is the head of the iola. full-time “obs. here is the head of the iola. , , , the iola. this is been the most severe crisis _ the iola. this is been the most severe crisis for _ the iola. this is been the most severe crisis for the _ the iola. this is been the most severe crisis for the work i the iola. this is been the mostj severe crisis for the work since the iola. this is been the most i severe crisis for the work since the great depression. —— ilo. its impact is far greater then that of the global financial crisis of 2009. the aiello also says the number of working hours locked in the pandemic is worth for times worse than after the 2009 financial crisis. there are many questions about which industries in which groups will be particularly badly hit. here is our bbc business correspondent michelle fleury. far bbc business correspondent michelle fleu . ., ., , ., ., , fleury. far from being an equaliser the pandemic— fleury. far from being an equaliser the pandemic is _ fleury. far from being an equaliser the pandemic is making _ fleury. far from being an equaliser the pandemic is making inequalityl the pandemic is making inequality worse. the latest to sound the alarm is that you win�*s labour by the international labour organisation because they confirm something that we already suspected, that women and younger workers are bearing the
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brunt. for example, unemployment among those aged between 15 and 24 was more than double the rate for adults, prompting the geneva—based group to one of the of a lost generation. even in the most optimistic scenario and then report the ilo suggested that we won't get back to where we started pre—pandemic. guy writer, the director general said we are a fork on the road warning that the success of the recovery will depend on the pace and the policies leaders bring to thejob. fist pace and the policies leaders bring to the “ob. �* ., , to the “ob. at the moment is the world to the job. at the moment is the world economic _ to the job. at the moment is the world economic forum, - to the job. at the moment is the world economic forum, the i to the job. at the moment is the i world economic forum, the worlds, the event where the worlds richest and most powerful would normally gather in the swiss ski resort of devils, but of course this year everything is being done remotely. needless to say covid—19 is very musty focus. here is china's president taking part. he made the case the economic sanctions between countries harm efforts to help the global economy recover from the pandemic. here is michelle again.
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with the global economy in crisis there is no searches of weighty topics are world leaders to discuss, soaring unemployment, widening income inequality, and climate change. but on day one and come all eyes were on china, and the united states, china's president xi jinping, the world to abandon ideological prejudice. many failed, to the biting and ministration, he warned against starting a new cold war —— in a veiled shot at thejoe biden administration. he called for a return to mutual respect. it comes as mrjoe biden�*s team is looking for a way to rebuild alliances tested during the trumpet ministration to counter china's rise, how will this multilateralism not confrontation appeal? be received in thejoe biden era? is it the start of a reset and relations that the chinese desire?- the start of a reset and relations that the chinese desire? thank you. plenty more — that the chinese desire? thank you. plenty more on _ that the chinese desire? thank you. plenty more on the _ that the chinese desire? thank you. plenty more on the website. - that the chinese desire? thank you. plenty more on the website. we i that the chinese desire? thank you. | plenty more on the website. we talk about the latest skirmishes between
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india and china in the next few minutes. hello. it's been a beautiful day across much of the country. sunny skies, the skies will remain clear through this evening and overnight, and that means it will be another cold one, frost and ice on the way, especially when the snow has melted during the day and it will refreeze tonight into tomorrow morning. the skies remain clear across england to wales however winter weather is possible to the early hours in scotland, the temperatures will dip down to around —5 or 6 degrees across rural parts of england and scotland went out towards the west, the temperatures will rise to the night. in advance of this milder atlantic air. you can see the south—westerly winds. that is there with a front in this weather front
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is expected to bring rain to northern ireland and already in the morning a little bit a hill snow. i think it is mostly rain across many western parts. that crisp icy start in some parts of the country will give way to a gray, wet, very unpleasant afternoon and additionally across the pennines and the hills and mountains of scotland we will see further there but to the south, it is going to be much milder temperatures between five and 10 degrees. all of rain you can see that sleet and snow across the north and the rain in the south, as it moves across the country during the course of tuesday evening. wednesday we find ourselves in between weather systems. this is another weather front that is heading our way. very early in the morning it is still way to the south of us and it is bringing yet more mild air. wednesday we are expecting southwestern parts of the country to cloud over of the morning in the afternoon, rain reaching cornwall and devon, set the afternoon, rain reaching cornwall and devon,
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southern parts of wales, by about lunchtime, towards the east of the north a different story here. the skies will be clear, still pretty crisp air in newcastle and edinburgh around four or5 crisp air in newcastle and edinburgh around four or 5 degrees. that weather front will sweep across the country, it will bump into the cold air in the north, we are expecting a speu air in the north, we are expecting a spell of sleet and snow across some parts of northern england, the hills and mountains but not exclusively. here is the outlook for the week ahead. you can see from the chris monday we just had to something a lot modric as we go through the course of the week. goodbye. —— something a lot milder.
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hello, i'm ros atkins. this is outside source. the us is about to reimpose bands on nearly all foreign travellers to slow the spread of new variants of covid—19. slow the spread of new variants of covid-19. ~ slow the spread of new variants of covid-19. . u, . covid-19. with the pandemic worsening — covid-19. with the pandemic worsening and _ covid-19. with the pandemic worsening and more - covid-19. with the pandemic. worsening and more contagions various spreading —— contagion variance spreading, this isn't the time to lift national travel. including israel, where temporary ban begins within hours. mexico's president has tested positive for covid—19. we'll be live in mexico city. in the last hour, the italian prime minister will resign on
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tuesday as the strains and his coalition reached breaking point. and we'll talk about frank lampard. he's been sacked as chelsea's manager. evidently, the results weren't good enough. chinese and indian troops have reportedly clashed and age of booted order area. reportedly clashed and age of booted orderarea. detail on reportedly clashed and age of booted order area. detail on this story is a scant. —— borderarea. we order area. detail on this story is a scant. —— border area. we know the incident took place on wednesday in a small indian state that borders tibet. indian media says there was fierce hand—to—hand fighting with injuries on both sides. some troops reports suggest —— reports suggest
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troops use sticks and stones. no gunfire was and change and the situation is now under control. we heard from india's army. haste situation is now under control. we heard from india's army.— situation is now under control. we heard from india's army. we had an indian heard from india's army. we had an indian army — heard from india's army. we had an indian army statement _ heard from india's army. we had an indian army statement which i heard from india's army. we had an| indian army statement which seems heard from india's army. we had an i indian army statement which seems to be playing it down. it talked about this being a minorface—off. it said this being a minorface—off. it said this was something resolved by local commanders. it doesn't say anything about injuries. compared with that, we had indian defence sources briefing the indian media and quite a comprehensive way. they painted a picture of a situation where people are being injured on both sides of, but they said there'd been a chinese foot patrol which crossed the line of actual control. they say they were confronted by indian troops there and there were clashes. we don't know a lot about exactly why we had that discrepancy in accounts, but certainly, the indian defence sources are speaking more off the record and some more serious. this
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is how it's — record and some more serious. this is how it's been _ record and some more serious. this is how it's been reported in china. the editor of the global times tweeted... china's foreign ministry says it has no information, but a spokesperson said this. translation: i want to stress that china's border troops _ i want to stress that china's border troops are — i want to stress that china's border troops are committed to upholding peace _ troops are committed to upholding peace and — troops are committed to upholding peace and stability along the border with indie — peace and stability along the border with india. we urge the indian side to work— with india. we urge the indian side to work in— with india. we urge the indian side to work in the same way with us and refrain _ to work in the same way with us and refrain from — to work in the same way with us and refrain from any action that may escalate — refrain from any action that may escalate or— refrain from any action that may escalate or complicate the situation. we hope both sides will take for— situation. we hope both sides will take for erected precautions to manage — take for erected precautions to manage their differences. this hasn't come — manage their differences. this hasn't come out _ manage their differences. this hasn't come out of _ manage their differences. in 3 hasn't come out of the blue. india and china share a three and a half
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thousand border. one of the most serious was injune last year. tram serious was in june last year. two countries fought _ serious was in june last year. two countries fought a _ serious was injune last year. thh'hrr countries fought a major war over there in 1962. then it was relatively stable for many decades after the 1980s, which is why last year's after the 1980s, which is why last yea r�*s events are a after the 1980s, which is why last year's events are a major clash between the two armies. much further to the west in a province. that's why that was such a big deal. it indicated that the ability of these two countries to manage their border dispute peacefully without weapons, without guns, without fatalities and loss of life that it had essentially collapsed. it wasn'tjust loss of life that it had essentially collapsed. it wasn't just this class, we saw the first ever use of firearms since the 1970s on the border last year. i think what we have to remember here is in the context of the latest class, is
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there are still very substantial numbers of armed forces on both sides that are still deployed to the front lines. very near the disputed line of actual control as it's called. even now, even the very harsh winter months, so the risk of the flare—ups are is going to be ever present. the flare-ups are is going to be ever present.— the flare-ups are is going to be ever present. the flare-ups are is going to be ever resent. , , . ,, ., ever present. this is happening in a art of ever present. this is happening in a aart of the ever present. this is happening in a part of the himalayas _ ever present. this is happening in a part of the himalayas that's - ever present. this is happening in a part of the himalayas that's been i ever present. this is happening in a part of the himalayas that's been a| part of the himalayas that's been a flashpoint between india and china for decades. it’s flashpoint between india and china for decades-— flashpoint between india and china for decades. it's also about a much wider sense _ for decades. it's also about a much wider sense of _ for decades. it's also about a much wider sense of distrust _ for decades. it's also about a much wider sense of distrust and - wider sense of distrust and hostility that has erupted between india and china in recent years because it's notjust about land and these mountainous areas. very limited practical utility. it's also about things i like india's production of the dalai lama. india's improvement diplomatic proximity of the united states, china's rival, and competition in
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the indian ocean with an increasing number of chinese ships flooding in those maritime areas. it isn'tjust about sovereignty, it's about geopolitical competition as much of anything else. mexico's president has covid—19. and this has instantly become political because his critics accuse him of underestimating the virus, in part because he's resisted tougher covid regulations. well, the president says he had mild symptoms, but he's been well enough to talk to vladimir putin. he tweeted that mr putin was "genuinely affectionate" and he "thanked him for the decision to send us 24 million doses of the sputnik v vaccine". let's speak to marcos gonzalez of bbc mundo. explain to us why this is such a political development.- explain to us why this is such a political development. people in
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mexico are _ political development. people in mexico are looking _ political development. people in mexico are looking very - political development. people in mexico are looking very close i political development. people in mexico are looking very close to | mexico are looking very close to this information about the health of the president. his symptoms are mild so he is going to be working from home. the president is 67 and has hypertension, but he says he feels a strong and very optimistic about it. some members of the government who have been working with him during the last days are already taking covid tests and in isolation. but obrador almost never uses a facemask. he always says it's much more important to maintain social distancing or handwashing for instance, because of this, he has been strongly criticised by many people here. been strongly criticised by many people here-— been strongly criticised by many aeaole here. . , ., ., ., people here. aside from not wanting to wear masks. _ people here. aside from not wanting to wear masks, how _ people here. aside from not wanting to wear masks, how else _ people here. aside from not wanting to wear masks, how else has - people here. aside from not wanting
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to wear masks, how else has he i to wear masks, how else has he reacted to covid—19? why is he accused of underestimating the virus? ~ , ., , , accused of underestimating the virus? . , ., , , ., accused of underestimating the virus? . , , ., , ., virus? well, this has been a strong criticism towards _ virus? well, this has been a strong criticism towards the _ virus? well, this has been a strong criticism towards the president, i virus? well, this has been a strong criticism towards the president, as| criticism towards the president, as i said. he's always saying that the official recommendation even by the experts in his government are more close to this social distancing. once he's giving a press conference, regarding these facemasks, it's a big issues here... obrador agreed with putin that mexico would receive 2 million doses. so far, the vaccine tjy 2 million doses. so far, the vaccine by oxford and the one by pfizer have
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been approved. the one by pfizer has already been given to 600,000 health workers. the trust in this russian vaccine, i couldn't see their was a big recognisation among the mexican people. between 60 and 85% of mexicans would accept the russian vaccine. let's see what they think now that the russian vaccine is officially coming to mexico. take ou ve officially coming to mexico. take you very much — officially coming to mexico. take you very much indeed. _ officially coming to mexico. take you very much indeed. if - officially coming to mexico. take you very much indeed. if you speak spanish, you can get news through bbc mundo .com. this graph shows the number of vaccination doses countries have administered for 100 people. israel is top of this graphic. it has 40 doses per 100 people. next is the united arab emirates with 25 doses. the uk with ten and the us with six. israel has
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been vaccinating as population faster than any other country, but the situation is not as positive in the situation is not as positive in the gaza strip. the palestinian authority �*s essay is onlyjust received its first deliveries of a few thousand doses —— authorities essay. israel must do more to help, but israel disputes that. around the world, there are covid vaccine haves and have—nots. at this palestinian hospital, they're under one roof. these cancer patients come from the occupied west bank and gaza, so could be waiting months for their jabs back. it’s could be waiting months for their 'abs back. �*, , jabs back. it's disappointing, frustrating. _ jabs back. it's disappointing, frustrating, sad. _ jabs back. it's disappointing, frustrating, sad. because i jabs back. it's disappointing, | frustrating, sad. because the hosaital frustrating, sad. because the hospital is— frustrating, sad. because the hospital is in _ frustrating, sad. because the hospital is in east _ frustrating, sad. because the hospital is in east jerusalem, j frustrating, sad. because the i hospital is in east jerusalem, it's hospital is in eastjerusalem, it's already vaccinated the doctors. i got the vaccine but i'm not relieved. we were not able to deliver vaccination to all patients. ourfamilies, there is an
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inequality. you don't feel happy that you are getting the vaccination and other people are not.— and other people are not. there's a hot debate — and other people are not. there's a hot debate over _ and other people are not. there's a hot debate over who _ and other people are not. there's a hot debate over who shall - and other people are not. there's a hot debate over who shall be i hot debate over who shall be vaccinating faxon aged —— palestinians. those who think it's israel's responsibility point to the geneva conventions. those who say it's up to the palestinian authority �*s look to the oslo accords. it all adds up to a long list of unresolved issues but expert on international law disagree at this building site, the nuts and bolts of the situation are seen very differently. it all relies on workers from the west bank and is pushing for israel to vaccinate them. they're essential to israel's strong economy and the week palestinian one. we israel's strong economy and the week palestinian one.— israel's strong economy and the week palestinian one. we are depending on 6000 workers — palestinian one. we are depending on 6000 workers that _ palestinian one. we are depending on 6000 workers that are _ palestinian one. we are depending on 6000 workers that are working - palestinian one. we are depending on 6000 workers that are working jobs i 6000 workers that are working jobs of construction and we need that because — of construction and we need that because without them we cannot construct — because without them we cannot construct. i think this is logic...
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we also — construct. i think this is logic... we also have to vaccinate the israeli — we also have to vaccinate the israeli people and the palestinians. mohamed's had to stay in israel for hisjob at is home mohamed's had to stay in israel for his job at is home sick. mohamed's had to stay in israel for hisjob at is home sick. i mohamed's had to stay in israel for his job at is home sick. i asked mohamed's had to stay in israel for hisjob at is home sick. i asked if he wants to be vaccinated? translation: of course. all of us are waiting whether we are arabs orjews. if i took the vaccine, that would mean i was immune to the virus. and i could go back to my family. this pandemic's _ go back to my family. this pandemic's been - go back to my family. this pandemic's been revealing. israel's international connections, it's international connections, its money it's international connections, its money its reputation all helped it to get vaccine. while the palestinians, relatively poor, stateless and a lot less organise have been at a big disadvantage. it's clearly shown the interdependence of both sides, but also the deep division. deep division. to the netherlands now. on sunday, the city of eindhoven saw
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a huge day of protests against the country's latest and strictest lockdown measures yet, including a night—time curfew which runs from 9pm to 4:30 in the morning every night. this was the scene on sunday. the rioters threw rocks, golf balls and even fireworks at police. they also burnt cars and looted shops. riot police needed tear gas and water cannons to disperse the rioters, and earlier today, the dutch prime minister responded to the violence. translation: normal people can only watch this with discussed. you really wonder what possesses these people. this is nothing to do with demonstrating. it is criminal violence and we will treat it as such. our correspondent anna holligan has been there today as authorities inspect the damage. you can see up here on the station, some _ you can see up here on the station, some of— you can see up here on the station, some of the — you can see up here on the station, some of the damage. so the
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supermarkets inside was looted, windows — supermarkets inside was looted, windows smashed. the police spokesman here has said he hasn't seen _ spokesman here has said he hasn't seen any— spokesman here has said he hasn't seen any kind of street violence like this— seen any kind of street violence like this in— seen any kind of street violence like this in the netherlands in 14 years— like this in the netherlands in 14 years -- — like this in the netherlands in 14 years -- 40 _ like this in the netherlands in 14 years —— 40 years. the mayor has described — years —— 40 years. the mayor has described it — years —— 40 years. the mayor has described it as a civil war and actually, _ described it as a civil war and actually, there is huge division here _ actually, there is huge division here in— actually, there is huge division here in the netherlands. objections to the _ here in the netherlands. objections to the lockdown, which is now one of the toughest in the world. the 9pm curfew— the toughest in the world. the 9pm curfewjust— the toughest in the world. the 9pm curfewjust came in, but there is a caveat _ curfewjust came in, but there is a caveat to— curfewjust came in, but there is a caveat to all — curfewjust came in, but there is a caveat to all of this because a lot of the _ caveat to all of this because a lot of the people who are involved yesterday, people here are telling us had _ yesterday, people here are telling us had nothing to do with the protests _ us had nothing to do with the protests. they were just bored young people _ protests. they were just bored young people who wanted something to do. we receive _ people who wanted something to do. we receive reports of a second night of riots. we will update you as we get it. stay with me on outside source. in a few minutes we'll talk about president putin and his reaction to those protests.
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denims will no longer be a present on the high street. the website has been brought by island retailer boo—hoo but these jobs will disappear. boohoo, the brash, fast fashion retailer that has piled on sales during the pandemic. so too has asos, another online fashion giant, and they are both making a move on some of our biggest high street names. today, boohoo swooped on debenhams. it has bought the brand, the website, but not the stores. and asos is closing in on a deal to buy topshop, top man at miss selfridge. it is not interested in shops either. what we are seeing is boohoo suggesting they want to break the uk's biggest online marketplace,
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a department store form modern day, selling more than just closing. neither asos nor boohoo are retailers that like stores, they are retailers who want to take their offer to the shoppers and they do not want the past associated with a large store estate. these high street chains are big employers. some 12,000 jobs will be lost at debenhams at its 118 stores. the arcadia group, also in administration, has around 13,000 workers and more than 400 stores. those are at risk as well. sharon works at debenhams. big gaps to fill on the high street as well. mark robinson, a landlord who advises the government on revitalising town centres. it's going to be dreadful, but then the date we created these things that people fell in love, we had these problems before covid started and we will have to replace them with things that are relevant for the future and if we get it right, i can see 2021
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being the turning point for the high street. the remaining debenhams stores will reopen to clear stock and then close for good. emma simpson, bbc news. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story... the us is about to re—impose bans on nearly all foreign travellers to slow the spread of new variants of covid. president putin has described protesters who'd gathered across russia last weekend in support of the jailed opposition leader alexei navalny as "terrorists who drive women and children in front of them". mr putin was being interviewed by students. here he is. the russian president doesn't often speak about mr navalny or his movement, but his arrest and the protests have given the issue a much higher profile in russia. here's what mr putin had to say. translation: all people have the right to express
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their point of view within the framework of the law. everything that goes beyond that is not only counterproductive, but also dangerous. in the history of our country, we've repeatedly encountered situations when the situation went far beyond the law and shook our society and the state. mr navalny�*s supporters turned out in their thousands across russia on saturday. this was moscow. you can see police bundling demonstrators into vans and taking them away. there were about 3,000 arrests in total. about 40,000 people are thought to have turned out to protest across the country. mr navalny himself was arrested shortly after his plane touched down in moscow. he'd been receiving treatment in germany for novichok poisoning, an attack that bears all the hallmarks of the russian security services. russia's clampdown on mr navalny and his supporters was discussed by european foreign ministers today. this was the eu's foreign policy chiefjosep borrell. translation:
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the council condemned mass detentions and the police brutality over the _ detentions and the police brutality over the weekend, and we call on russia _ over the weekend, and we call on russia for— over the weekend, and we call on russia for their release of mr navalny— russia for their release of mr navalny and those detained. but there's navalny and those detained. emit there's been no announcement of new sanctions against moscow. here's nick beacon brussels.— sanctions against moscow. here's nick beacon brussels. looking to the west and seeing _ nick beacon brussels. looking to the west and seeing what _ nick beacon brussels. looking to the west and seeing what the _ nick beacon brussels. looking to the west and seeing what the biden i west and seeing what the biden administration want to do in terms of forging a new relationship, whether it's a good one or a difficult one between america and between russia. whether the eu is waiting in part to see what messages are sent out from the white house, we shall have to see but certainly, the condemnation was very, very strong. we had meps in brussels who've gone much further, saying there needs to be notjust sanctions which we saw in october, when the
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navalny affair came to light, but they want to take it a lot further and what they eu to use these sanctions approved just a month ago. so far, no one has been sanctioned under this new way of doing things, but basically, it's based on something they've brought in in both the uk and also in the united states. ironically, that was brought in after the treatment of someone who tried to blow the whistle on what was going on in russia, and there would be an irony if it was news for the first time to target russian officials as a result of what we've been seeing over the last few weeks. == what we've been seeing over the last few weeks. . ~ what we've been seeing over the last few weeks. n �* ., ~ president putin was also pressed by students today about a viral video released by mr navalny, that alleges he or his family own a billion dollar palace in the black sea. here's olga ivshina is from the bbc�*s russian service. today, mr putin spoke to students and one _ today, mr putin spoke to students and one of— today, mr putin spoke to students and one of them asked the question about— and one of them asked the question about protests. he said these are
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old rumours from opposition, and as always. _ old rumours from opposition, and as always. he _ old rumours from opposition, and as always, he answered the things he was comfortable to answer and skip certain— was comfortable to answer and skip certain points. he says not only do they have — certain points. he says not only do they have nothing to do with that, and private businessmen can do what they want. _ and private businessmen can do what they want, he knows certain people and doesn't know some others. what he didn't— and doesn't know some others. what he didn't answer is that why this area _ he didn't answer is that why this area is— he didn't answer is that why this area is a — he didn't answer is that why this area is a no—fly zone. special objects— area is a no—fly zone. special objects have this no—fly zone. 0r objects have this no—fly zone. or why the — objects have this no—fly zone. or why the coast guard doesn't allow any fishermen or anyone coming one mile close _ any fishermen or anyone coming one mile close it — any fishermen or anyone coming one mile close. it can be explained by businessman buying a land and building — businessman buying a land and building a castle. certain points which _ building a castle. certain points which are — building a castle. certain points which are not comfortable and those that are _ which are not comfortable and those that are easy to answer are underlined and put to the front page
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by the _ underlined and put to the front page by the state—controlled. is underlined and put to the front page by the state-controlled.— by the state-controlled. is that the fact that mr — by the state-controlled. is that the fact that mr putin _ by the state-controlled. is that the fact that mr putin is _ by the state-controlled. is that the fact that mr putin is engaging i by the state-controlled. is that the fact that mr putin is engaging with | fact that mr putin is engaging with these allegation, evidence that some pressure is being successfully asserted? ., . , pressure is being successfully asserted?— asserted? the fact they can't ne . lect asserted? the fact they can't neglect is — asserted? the fact they can't neglect is the _ asserted? the fact they can't neglect is the video - asserted? the fact they can't neglect is the video itself i asserted? the fact they can't| neglect is the video itself has asserted? the fact they can't i neglect is the video itself has more than 70 _ neglect is the video itself has more than 70 million views on youtube, and its— than 70 million views on youtube, and it's especially popular among youngsters and russian tiktok and links to _ youngsters and russian tiktok and links to the video. but the answer in the _ links to the video. but the answer in the way— links to the video. but the answer in the way which is prohibited both to them _ in the way which is prohibited both to them -- — in the way which is prohibited both to them —— profitable. russian ten o'clock— to them —— profitable. russian ten o'clock news — to them —— profitable. russian ten o'clock news spread one third of their— o'clock news spread one third of their programme to allegations that navalny— their programme to allegations that navalny had engaged violently or forcefully with youngsters. so, they're — forcefully with youngsters. so, they're trying to twist certain points — they're trying to twist certain points to _ they're trying to twist certain points to use them as allegations against _ points to use them as allegations against the opposition. these are
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tactics _ against the opposition. these are tactics by— against the opposition. these are tactics by the kremlin to show they are the _ tactics by the kremlin to show they are the surrounded fortress, the thing _ are the surrounded fortress, the thing they— are the surrounded fortress, the thing they usually do to try and unite _ thing they usually do to try and unite the — thing they usually do to try and unite the people around them. meanwhile, we have the european union considering further sanctions against russia. how does that fit into the political calculations? well, the project there, it has been around _ well, the project there, it has been around for— well, the project there, it has been around for a — well, the project there, it has been around for a long time. which lobby sanctions _ around for a long time. which lobby sanctions for various political reasons _ sanctions for various political reasons. it'sjust another sanctions for various political reasons. it's just another peg to rise the — reasons. it's just another peg to rise the question once again. sanctions _ rise the question once again. sanctions have been embraced for a while, _ sanctions have been embraced for a while, but _ sanctions have been embraced for a while, but it— sanctions have been embraced for a while, but it seems that putin's cronies~ — while, but it seems that putin's
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cronies... all the russians are paying — cronies... all the russians are paying a — cronies... all the russians are paying a price. old cronies... all the russians are paying a price-— cronies... all the russians are paying a price. old guy from bbc russian. paying a price. old guy from bbc russian- -- _ paying a price. old guy from bbc russian. -- olga. _ sport and chelsea have sacked their manager, frank lampard. he's been in charge of the premier league club for 18 months. olie had more. then just olie had more. thenjust saying olie had more. then 'ust saying there is olie had more. then 'ust saying there he he * olie had more. then 'ust saying there is no path i olie had more. thenjust saying there is no path towards - olie had more. thenjust saying there is no path towards any i there is no path towards any sustained improvement. that will have really hurt frank lampard. a lot of reaction today. pep guardiola from manchester city saying this really is a result of business in this day and age. in one of the top european leagues to actually be able to work on a project. roy hodgson
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said frank lampard should have been given more time. you just felt because of all he'd done as a player at chelsea, three league titles, four fa cups, champions league winner. that he would be afforded a little bit of patience with what he was trying to achieve, but he should know more than everybody else that that's not the kind of man that rome abramovich is, the chelsea owner. probably about 18 months to two years and he lasted 18 months —— roman abramovich. a reminder of the breaking news this hour.... italy's prime minister has announced he will resign on tuesday, in the hope of being asked by the president to try to form a new and stronger alternative government. giuseppe conte lost his majority in the upper house of parliament last week after a small party left the coalition. the challenge is to see if he could
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build a new one. thank so much for watching. i'll see you tomorrow. bye—bye. hello. it's been a beautiful day across much of the country. sunny skies, the skies will remain clear through this evening and overnight, and that means it will be another cold one, frost and ice on the way, especially when the snow has melted during the day and it will refreeze tonight into tomorrow morning. the skies remain clear across england to wales however winter weather is possible through the early hours in scotland, the temperatures will dip down to around —5 or 6 degrees across rural parts of england and scotland out towards the west. the temperatures will rise to the night in advance of this milder atlantic air. you can see the south—westerly winds. that is where this weather front is expected to bring rain
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to northern ireland and already in the morning a little bit of a hill snow. i think it is mostly rain across many western parts. that crisp, icy start in some parts of the country will give way to a grey, wet, very unpleasant afternoon and additionally across the pennines and the hills and mountains of scotland we will see further there but to the south, it is going to be much milder temperatures between five and ten degrees. all rain. you can see that sleet and snow across the north and the rain in the south, as it moves across the country during the course of tuesday evening. wednesday, we find ourselves in between weather systems. this is another weather front that is heading our way. very early in the morning it is still way to the south of us and it is bringing yet more mild air. wednesday, we are expecting southwestern parts of the country to cloud over of the morning in the afternoon, rain reaching cornwall and devon, set the afternoon, rain reaching
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cornwall and devon, southern parts of wales, by about lunchtime, towards the east of the north a different story here. the skies will be clear, still pretty crisp air in newcastle and edinburgh, around four or 5 degrees. that weather front will sweep across the country, it will bump into the cold air in the north, we are expecting a spell of sleet and snow across some parts of northern england, the hills and mountains but not exclusively. here's the outlook for the week ahead. you can see from the crisp monday we just had to something a lot milder as we go through the course of the week. goodbye.
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this is bbc news, i'm tim willcox. the headlines at 8: as pressure mounts on the prime minister over reopening schools, he says he's looking at mid—february to see what restrictions could be relaxed in england. to see what restrictions the to see what restrictionsjcvi groups one to four are going thejcvi groups one to four are going to be vaccinated by the 15th of february. before then, we will be looking at the potential of relaxing some measures. up for discussion by ministers tomorrow, compulsory quarantine in hotels for people travelling to the uk. after more than 240 years, debenhams will vanish from the high street, bought by online retailer boohoo. and chelsea sack the man they call their club legend — frank lampard is out as manager afterjust 18 months in charge.

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