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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 25, 2021 11:00pm-11:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. democrats in the us house of representatives will shortly trigger donald trump's impeachment trial over the storming of congress. president biden has set out goals to speed up coronavirus vaccinations, saying the us should be well on the way to herd immunity by the summer. italy's prime minister giuseppe conte is set to resign, in the hope of forming a stronger government. will his gamble pay off? and sacked — frank lampard is fired. chelsea say — recent results haven't been good enough. we'll ask a former player who'll replace the chelsea legend. the impeachment of donald trump will move a step closer
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in the next couple of hours, when the us house of representatives formally charges him with inciting insurrection. this was the moment pro—trump supporters stormed the capitol building on january 6th. trump is specifically accused of "inciting violence against the government of the united states", for statements he made at a rally prior to the attack. today, speaker nancy pelosi will walk the article from the house, through the capitol and to the senate, marking the formal start of the impeachment trial. but there will be a two—week lull in proceedings, partly to allow both sides
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to prepare and to give the senate time to hear cabinet nominations for the new biden administration and work on the coronavirus relief bill — which the democrats say they will push ahead with whether or not the republicans vote for it. for these reasons, the senate majority leader chuck schumer has promised a quick trial. however, for former president trump to be impeached, two—thirds of senators must vote against him to convict. that means 17 republicans must go against a former president from their own party. let's go to barbara. i spoke to a few hours ago. it's almost upon us now. just talk us through that process. this is the formal start but not the actual start of the trial. ., �* , , but not the actual start of the trial. . �* , , , ., but not the actual start of the trial. . �*, , , ., trial. that's right. this is a sort of symbolic— trial. that's right. this is a sort of symbolic beginning - trial. that's right. this is a sort of symbolic beginning of - trial. that's right. this is a sort of symbolic beginning of the i trial. that's right. this is a sort i of symbolic beginning of the trial. it's going to be a procession from the lower house, the house of
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representative which impeached mr trump two weeks ago. and it's going to then move through the capitol building to the senate. they are the article of impeachment will be read. in this procession will be led by the sergeant of arms. nancy pelosi, the sergeant of arms. nancy pelosi, the speaker of the house will be in it as well as the impeachment manager is which are the democratic lawmakers that she has appointed to act as prosecutors during the trial. as you say, the trial itself is not going to begin for another two weeks. on the 8th of february, monday. the pretrial briefs will be submitted and then on the ninth, on tuesday the arguments will start. yes, mr schumer has talked about it being a short trial. the first impeachment trial was 21 days. this one is quite different from that in terms of content, argument, place and so on. we can't say for sure how long it's going to take. i think we can say probably both sides would like to have it shorter rather than
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longer. like to have it shorter rather than [on . er. , , , , like to have it shorter rather than loner. , , , , ., longer. interestingly this is all takin: longer. interestingly this is all taking place — longer. interestingly this is all taking place in _ longer. interestingly this is all taking place in the _ longer. interestingly this is all taking place in the building . longer. interestingly this is all taking place in the building in | taking place in the building in connection. and some of the people involved will of actually witnessed what happened onjanuary involved will of actually witnessed what happened on january the involved will of actually witnessed what happened onjanuary the 6th. yes, exactly. which is quite interesting. the trial is taking place in the scene of the crime, so to speak. of course it was the capitol building that was under siege, that was attacked two weeks ago, almost two weeks ago. and the jurors are also witnesses a step which is very unusual because they were all in the building when it was being attacked. that is going to bring i think a sense of immediacy to the trial. as well the article of impeachment is quite short and is very much based on events over a short period of time that people witnessed and which are documented. again which is a difference from the previous impeachment trial and the democrats feel that they will be able to make their case swiftly and concretely because of that. barbara i'll be back to _ concretely because of that. barbara i'll be back to you _ concretely because of that. barbara i'll be back to you a _ concretely because of that. barbara i'll be back to you a bit _ concretely because of that. barbara i'll be back to you a bit later- concretely because of that. barbara i'll be back to you a bit later on. - i'll be back to you a bit later on. thank you.
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president biden at the start of his first full week in office has set out goals to speed up coronavirus vaccinations, saying the us should be well on the way to herd immunity by the summer. the us is also set to impose a ban on people arriving from the uk, ireland and the 26 european countries in the �*schengen free travel area'. and from brazil and south africa too. president biden said he hoped to raise his target for vaccinations during his first hundred days in office to one— hundred— i'm quite confident that we will be in a position within the next three weeks or so to be vaccinating people at the range of a million a day or in excess. that is, i promise that we would get a least a hundred million vaccinations, that's not people because sometimes you need more than one the vaccination. but
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100,000, 100 more than one the vaccination. but 100,000,100 million shots in peoples arms of the vaccine. the us travel bans come amid intense concern over new strains of the virus and whether the vaccines will work against them. the new variants have been spreading fast in a number of different countries including the uk, brazil and south africa. our science crrespondent rebecca morelle has been looking at why these new variants are such a threat and how to deal with future mutations as they come along. a year into the pandemic, and the virus is changing. new variants are emerging around the world, altering its structure and the way the virus behaves. the variant spelling in the uk has a significant mutation. it's called n501y and it changes the spike of the virus. that spike is like a key opening up a lock. it inserts into receptors and enters ourselves. the mutation gives this key a much betterfit, which is how it can infect more people.
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the variant in south africa and a separate one in brazil has another worrying mutation. it's called e484k01y and it works differently, meaning any past immunity is not as effective. this mutation is also important for vaccines, they can no longer block the virus. which means any past immunity is now not as effective. this mutation is also important for vaccines, which trigger antibody production. today, moderna announced its vaccine wasn't as effective for the south african variant, although it still provided enough protection. it did fully work against the uk variant, though. moderna, pfizer and astrazeneca can adapt their vaccines, which target the spike. but others, aimed at different parts of the virus, are also being developed. we want to be developing vaccines in the next generation that do cover these mutations that have been redesigned, and that shouldn't be difficult. we also need vaccines that cover other parts of the virus,
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because we can see that the spike protein is a highly malleable, adaptable piece of the virus. so how much more could the virus change? in the us, scientists are studying every possible mutation to the spike — nearly 4,000 of them — to flag which ones are the most dangerous. if we start out by looking at all possible mutations, then as things change in nature, we can look back at our reference table of data and see how these mutations might affect immunity rather than always trying to catch up with the virus and always being one step behind. we can't stop more mutations from appearing, but our actions will affect how quickly this happens. we really need to getj the prevalence down, because the less viruses out there in fewer people, - the less chance there is of any- mutations arising or being selected. it'sjust like rolling a dice. the fewer times you roll it, the less chance there -
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is that you roll a six. there's still much to learn about the new variants, and urgent studies are under way to see if the one first identified in the uk is more deadly, but the whole world needs to step up surveillance to keep ahead of this rapidly evolving pandemic. rebecca morelle, bbc news. police in the netherlands have arrested at least 70 people after rioting broke out for a third night on monday. it followed weekend protests that were initially linked to dissent over a government decision to implement a nighttime curfew — the country's first since world war two. in rotterdam, officers used water cannon and tear gas to clear the streets where hundreds had gathered, some looting shops. the director general of the world health organisation has hit out at richer countries continuing to buy up — or hoard vaccines to put their own populations first. he's been talking in geneva — about the problem of vaccine nationalism.
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vaccine nationalism might serve short—term political goals. but it is in every nations own medium and long term economic interest to support vaccine equity. until we end the pandemic everywhere, we won't end it anywhere. as we speak, rich countries are rolling out vaccines while the worlds least developed countries watch and wait. every day that passes the divide grows larger between the worlds haves and have—nots. let's get some of the day's other news. the mexican president, andres manuel lopez obrador, says his country will receive 2a million doses of russia's coronavirus vaccine, sputnik vee, to help deal with a spike in
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infections and deaths. he made the announcement after a phone conversation with president putin. president putin has described protesters who'd gathered across russia last weekend in support of the jailed opposition leader alexei navalny as "terrorists". mr putin said the rallies — which led to mass arrests — were illegal. he also denied allegations in a viral video released by mr navalny that he owned a billion dollar palace in the black sea. rescuers in china say the bodies of nine dead miners have been found at the gold mine where 11 people were rescued yesterday. efforts are still under way to recover the one person still unacounted for two weeks after a blast at the site. a group of 22 were caught in the mine in the shandong province. donald trump's ban on transgender peoplejoining the us military has been overturned by mr biden. the president described america as being stronger when it's more inclusive.
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italy's prime minister has announced he will resign on tuesday, in the hope of being asked by the president to try to form a new government. giuseppe conte lost his majority in the senate last week, after a small party left the coalition. our correspondent mark lowen — who's in rome — explained what could happen next. giuseppe conte lost his majority, an absolute majority in the in the upper house of parliament last week after a small party within the coalition quit. following that he has tried to tempt opposition senators to try and jump ship and given the number that they need. it seems he hasn't managed to do so. so he will now have a cabinet meeting tomorrow morning and he will then go to the presidents office and tender his resignation. now, it is likely that he would be tasked with forming a new coalition government. which might sound rather strange to you, that when the prime minister quits he's given a chance to form a new government. but that's one of the quirks
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of italian politics. remember, this is a country that has had 66 governments since the second world war. a country of seemingly perennial political crises. and when a prime minister quits, they then will go to inform the president and then usually and hope to be given a chance to form a new stricter coalition, a reformed coalition. if he manages to do so he can relaunch his government. if he doesn't then the task would move to another political figure. and failing that, if nobody can do it well then fresh elections would beckon. this is a country with more than 85,000 deaths in the covid crisis. the highest death toll in the european union. and of course the economic crisis now since the second world war for subs to italy really chooses its moments for a political crisis. and this is absolutely the last thing that it needs. mr conte has said that he has hope to be given that mandate and two of his coalition partners have already said that they will back him. the question is whether he can get
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enough centrists mps and senators behind him. and a new strength in coalition or whether his days as it his 29th prime minister since the second world war have come to a close. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: a new report from the un calls on countries in asia—pacific to do more to combat the stigma around hiv and aids but why are attitudes in reverse? we'll speak to one the organisation's regional directors in a moment. the shuttle challenger exploded soon after lift off. there were seven astronauts on board, one of them a woman schoolteacher. all of them are believed to have been killed. by the evening, at the happiest wear, the heart of official cairo, the demonstrators. they were using the word revolution.
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the earthquake singled out buildings and brought them down in seconds. i tonight the search for any survivors has an increasing desperation - about it as the hours passed. the new government is firmly in control of the entire republic of uganda. survivors of the auschwitz concentration camp have been commemorating the 40th anniversary of the liberation. they toured the gas chambers and crematoria and relived their horrifying experience. this is bbc news, the latest headlines... the us house of representatives will shortly deliver a single article of impeachment to the senate, accusing donald trump of inciting the storming of the capitol. president biden has set
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out goals to speed up coronavirus vaccinations, saying the us should be well on the way to herd immunity by the summer. a new report has highlighted that many governments in the asia—pacific region are not doing enough effort to reverse the stigma surrounding hiv and aids. an estimated 5.9 million people live with the infection in asia pacific and many report discrimination is getting worse. the region is second only to sub—sahara africa in the number of people living with hiv and aids. let's speak to eamonn murphy, unaids regional director for asia and the pacific. he joins us from bangkok. thanks forjoining us on bbc news. why is there this reverse when treatment for hiv/ aids is getting better and better? there's a commitment or there was a commitment
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to eradicate the epidemic of aids in 2030 which is only nine years away. it's a mix of good progress and reversals in some places. it's populism, it's our rising conservativism in some countries are seeing good changes like in the philippines with new laws on hiv. very comprehensive laws was not yet negative crackdowns in terms of issues. the challenge is, these laws make people afraid to come in to health services or access information because they may be targeted with some of the aspects of their lives. ora targeted with some of the aspects of their lives. or a conservative historical laws that will then affect them. so they stay away from services so they get hiv. or they come into treatment services so late it's too late to help them. find come into treatment services so late it's too late to help them.— it's too late to help them. and 'ust lookin: at it's too late to help them. and 'ust looking at the fi it's too late to help them. and 'ust looking at the worst i it's too late to help them. and just looking at the worst offenders. - it's too late to help them. and just looking at the worst offenders. i i looking at the worst offenders. i was struck by was happening in singapore, for example. and
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malaysia. and is the litigation in those countries affecting this as well or is it again just a size of attitude? well or is it again 'ust a size of attitude? �* , ., , attitude? it's a mix. sometimes there are laws _ attitude? it's a mix. sometimes there are laws and _ attitude? it's a mix. sometimes there are laws and politicians i attitude? it's a mix. sometimes. there are laws and politicians find it hard to change them. there are laws that restrict access on immigration. treatment is easily available, low cost, people on treatment leave normal lives like everybody else was out and can't can bring that transmits aids anymore. the sciences. yet why do we have immigration laws and so many countries that require hiv test in the region? this is not an effective approach. the death penalty, the restrictive approach around issues of drug use or consensual sex between two adults, these are issues. same—sex relations, there's been a repeal in india of these laws. at the same laws are in about 40 laws. at the same laws are in about a0 countries around the world and
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many in the asia—pacific have them. sometimes it's the crackdowns that come along with laws for the bangladesh, since 2017 is started the crackdown on issues around sexuality. sex work, consensual sex between men. yet that law as they are since the 1860s and have not been applied. it’s are since the 1860s and have not been applied-— are since the 1860s and have not been applied. it's a mix of issues. what effect _ been applied. it's a mix of issues. what effect is _ been applied. it's a mix of issues. what effect is covid _ been applied. it's a mix of issues. what effect is covid having - been applied. it's a mix of issues. what effect is covid having on i been applied. it's a mix of issues. j what effect is covid having on this as well, if any? we what effect is covid having on this as well. if any?— what effect is covid having on this as well, if any? we are seeing both. we've seen — as well, if any? we are seeing both. we've seen service _ as well, if any? we are seeing both. we've seen service disruption i as well, if any? we are seeing both. we've seen service disruption would j we've seen service disruption would seemed very big concerns about the impact of people able to access service. where is a decline and those who have been able to be introduced to new treatment for the at the same time we seemed really innovative approaches. countries like me and mark have got to take of treatment for drug dependence to heroin. we've seen really innovation across the region at the same time significant impact and a setback in terms of the achievements. in some places it could be a ten year
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reversal on achievements like other parts of the world from covid. depressing news on that front. thank you forjoining us here on bbc news. the company which provided voting machinery for the us election is seeking $1.3 three billion in damages from donald trump's lawyer rudy giuliani for defamation. the firm, dominion, accused him of promoting narratives that deceived millions of people into believing their votes were stolen by its machines. a key member of mr trump's legal team challenging the results of the election, mr giuliani has repeated unproven claims that dominion is a venezuelan enterprise which switched votes from republicans to democrats. chelsea have sacked their manager, frank lampard. he's been in charge of the english premier league club for 18 months. in a statement, frank lampard said: "it has been a huge privilege and an honour to manage chelsea,
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a club that has been a big part of my life for so long." chelsea said it was difficult to part ways with a club legend. but they said, that �*recent results and performances have not met the club's expectations. our sports correspondent katie gornall has more. as a chelsea player, frank lampard's timing was impeccable. but as a manager, even his status as a club legend couldn't stop time from running out. the warning signs were there after a slump in form saw chelsea lose five of their last eight games in the premier league, and this is not a club known for its patience. they've just always done this. i thought it would be different this time because it's frank. ithought, at last, chelsea are going to do something different. i was wrong. it's just what chelsea always do. this morning, chelsea confirmed his departure, saying: while owner roman abramovich took the unprecedented step of adding his comments,
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describing lampard as an icon of the club whose status remains undiminished. lampard was handed the reins just 18 months ago. under him, chelsea finished fourth last season and reached the fa cup final. but more than £200 million was spent on players in the summer, and when a title challenge failed to materialise, he was dismissed all we can really do is sympathise with him. �* ., ., , with him. and in most of our cases at the price — with him. and in most of our cases at the price of— with him. and in most of our cases at the price of a _ with him. and in most of our cases at the price of a been _ with him. and in most of our cases at the price of a been in _ with him. and in most of our cases at the price of a been in football. with him. and in most of our cases at the price of a been in football a | at the price of a been in football a long time there will be many people who can't look back and say i never once got the sack.— once got the sack. chelsea are exected once got the sack. chelsea are expected now _ once got the sack. chelsea are expected now to _ once got the sack. chelsea are expected now to turn - once got the sack. chelsea are expected now to turn to i once got the sack. chelsea are expected now to turn to the i once got the sack. chelsea are i expected now to turn to the former gsp manager. but whoever come will find more often than not reputation cou nts counts for little in the long run. pat nevin is a former chelsea player who you just saw in that report — hejoins me now for more.
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thanks forjoining us. he still incredibly popular with the fans. do you think he was given enough time? for my point of view, if it was me making the decision than i used to make that sort of decision when i was chief executive i would've given him more time. but that's not the chelsea method. the chelsea method is they change their minds very quickly. it's not really the british way, the british way is to stick by their managers, have a look at what manchester had done in a similar situation. they start by and that it's paid off. however, from chelsea point of view they change their managers constantly. and they've been successful constantly. their methodology does work. it's an expensive way to do it because you have to pay off those managing teams and also you have to often rebuy a lot of different players. however, it does tend to work. i am
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absolutely sure every body thinks the same thing. he'll be devastated feeling he had to make this decision. ., ~ feeling he had to make this decision-— feeling he had to make this decision. . ~ ., .,' ., decision. frank will go off with a big payout- _ decision. frank will go off with a big payout- we _ decision. frank will go off with a big payout. we shouldn't - decision. frank will go off with a big payout. we shouldn't weep i decision. frank will go off with a l big payout. we shouldn't weep for him too much on that. he also had the worst points for game average i think of any manager under the brim of edges control.— of edges control. yeah. you can spin the stats anyway _ of edges control. yeah. you can spin the stats anyway you _ of edges control. yeah. you can spin the stats anyway you like. _ of edges control. yeah. you can spin the stats anyway you like. he - of edges control. yeah. you can spin the stats anyway you like. he took. the stats anyway you like. he took over a team with had big 200 million spent. he spent nothing last season and lost his best player. yet still manages to get top four. which is staggering. you actually count anyway you like. six weeks ago they were top of the table. it's the madness of the season. if you take things in isolation they can be made to state one thing on the other.
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he's not a bad manager, its gonna take a while. i would suggest part of the reason why that team his players were getting smaller point percentage is purely because he got all young players through through the youth development the academy. they were big names. they were big young names. it's going to take them a long time to settle. maybe a year or two to settle. i don't think franks actually had the see the fruition of that. that's a bit of a shame for him. i think frank is an intelligent man, he went into it with open eyes and he understood that this was always a possibility. if there was a slum. thing is i think he expected in a deep slump would lead to this not a minor slump which i think it's been recently. it's a tough business, is in a? thank you very much pat forjoining us here on bbc news. just to remind you that you are watching bbc news and in a few minutes times we are going to be back with another look at actually the selection of
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national and international papers. then we will be going to washington to see the start of the impeachment process against donald trump. the only time that a president has been impeached twice. hello. a cold, frosty start to tuesday morning means the risk for some ice on untreated surfaces. bear that in mind if you are making an essentialjourney. through the day, we'll see rain pushing from the west. and as that wet weather runs into some cold air, snow is likely to develop, especially over high ground in the north of the uk. this frontal system pushing in from the west will bring the wet and wintry weather, cold air ahead of our weather front. behind this frontal system, though, is much milder air starting to make inroads. ice to start off, then, just about anywhere, but especially through the midlands, into wales and northern ireland, where rain will be falling on cold
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surfaces, and a little bit of sleet and snow to start off across parts of central scotland. through the day, our main band of wet weather will continue to push its way eastwards. briefly, we could see a little bit of snow mixing in over high ground in north wales, in the peak district, but more especially across the pennines, where we could see five cm of snow accumulating on the highest ground, through the southern uplands of scotland and into the grampians, where some places could well see ten cm of snow before the day is done. more likely mixing with some rain and sleet at low levels, butjust three degrees in glasgow. holding onto some brightness in northeast scotland, just three there in aberdeen. conversely, 10 degrees in plymouth, into the milder air pumping in behind ourfrontal system. and the front will tend to die out a little bit through tuesday night into wednesday morning. still some patchy rain, sleet and snow across scotland. quite a chilly night in prospect here, although not as cold as the last few, and very, very mild indeed down towards the south west. wednesday is looking like a drier day for many. it'll be quite cloudy, misty and murky, and we'll see some showers of rain moving through northern ireland,
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england and wales at times. the further north and east you are across scotland, it should be dry with some spells of sunshine. 3 or a degrees here, 10 or 11 across parts of wales and south west england. and as we go through wednesday night, we'll do it all again, another frontal system pushing in from the southwest. again, that'll run into the relatively cold air, giving the potential for some snow, especially over higher ground in northern england and southern scotland. ahead of that frontal system, still some pretty cold air in place, so temperatures maybe 3 or a degrees across parts of northern scotland. down towards the south, though, highs of 12 or 13.
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hello, you're watching bbc news. our headlines this hour. the us house of representatives will shortly deliver a single article of impeachment to the senate, accusing donald trump of inciting the storming of the capitol. the move will trigger the first—ever impeachment trial of a former president. it's the first time a president has ever been impeached twice. president biden says he hopes to raise his target for vaccinations during his first 100 days in office to 150 million. he says the us should be well on the way to herd immunity by the summer. the italian prime minister is to tender his resignation on tuesday, in the hope of being able to form a new, stronger government. and chelsea has sacked their manager frank lampard, with the london club struggling in ninth place in the premier league. the former manager of psg, thomas tuchel, is favourite to take over.

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