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tv   The Papers  BBC News  February 3, 2021 11:30pm-12:01am GMT

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this is bbc world news, the headlines... scientists at oxford univerity and astrazeneca say they're working on the next generation of covid vaccines — which could be ready by the autumn — so that the jab can be adapted to work against different strains of the virus. canada has become the first country in the world to designate the far—right anti—immigrant proud boys group as a terrorist organisation. some members were among the supporters of donald trump who stormed the us capitol last month. aung san suu kyi, the deposed de—facto leader of myanmar, has been charged by the military authorities who took power in a coup. she's accused of breaching the country's strict import and export laws and illegally possessing two—way radios. all of thursday's warm up matches in the australian open tennis tournament have been cancelled, and more than 500 people told to go into isolation after a worker at a hotel were players were staying tests positive for coronavirus.
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hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are telegraph chief political correspondent, christopher hope, and columnist for the evening standard and times radio presenter, ayesha hazarika. let's ta ke let's take a look first at tamara's papers. —— tomorrow's paper. the telegraph says the chancellor, rishi sunak, fears scientific advisers are "moving the goalposts" on the requirements for ending lockdown amid a growing split within the government over when to lift restrictions. the i marks the news that more than ten million people in the uk — 15% of the population — has now recieved a first dose of a coronavirus vaccine. the metro quotes england's chief medical officer saying "we are past the peak" of the pandemic.
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professor chris whitty hailed a continual steady decline in the death toll but warned infection rates remained incredibly high. according to the guardian, the nhs has been urged to rethink safety for thousands of frontline staff after new research found that coughing generated at least ten times more infectious "aerosol" particles than speaking or breathing. the daily mail says the prime minister is backing its campaign for a statue of captain sir tom moore, who died aged 100 yesterday. and the times says consumers face higher prices on meat, cheese, and gas heating under plans being drawn up by borisjohnson for new carbon taxes and charges. so let's begin. thanks to both of you forjoining us to look through the papers. let's start first of all with the front page of the daily express. "ten millionjabs and we
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are past the peak." a hopeful front page there?— are past the peak." a hopeful front page there? yes, very hopeful. and it is a great — page there? yes, very hopeful. and it is a great milestone, _ page there? yes, very hopeful. and it is a great milestone, it _ page there? yes, very hopeful. and it is a great milestone, it does - it is a great milestone, it does feel like it's quite a big moment in this war against the virus, about 15% of the population have had their firstjab, including my own father today who had his up in glasgow. so we felt quite emotional about it, it was quite a bit deal. so it is quite a huge thing to have done this so far. we all, particularly myself and many others, criticised the government and there's lots to criticise the government on. but they have done a good job on this. and one of the reasons they've been really good about this, i think is that they've been very strategic, they moved quickly, ordered lots of vaccine early, they hedged their bets across the different companies, but instead of farming it out to private companies that had no experience, they used the
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infrastructure of the nhs at a local level, which is really important. it shows how brilliant our nhs is, and of course the army helped as well. but we are not out of the woods yet. yes, they hope the peak has passed, but the cases are still very high, the death rate is very high, and people still need to get their second jabs.— people still need to get their second jabs. people still need to get their second “abs. ~ , ,., , ., �* , second jabs. absolutely, and it's im ortant second jabs. absolutely, and it's important to _ second jabs. absolutely, and it's important to remember - second jabs. absolutely, and it's important to remember that - second jabs. absolutely, and it's important to remember that this second jabs. absolutely, and it's. important to remember that this 10 million figure for the most part is just one jab. million figure for the most part is just one jab-— million figure for the most part is just one jab. just one 'ab. absolutely right, my arents just one jab. absolutely right, my parents were _ just one jab. absolutely right, my parents were jabbed _ just one jab. absolutely right, my parents were jabbed last - just one jab. absolutely right, my parents were jabbed last week . just one jab. absolutely right, my parents were jabbed last week in | just one jab. absolutely right, my i parents were jabbed last week in the northwest and they're delighted. the excitement they showed when they were jabbed, it was such an uplifting _ were jabbed, it was such an uplifting thing, we've gotten past the 10 _ uplifting thing, we've gotten past the 10 million mark. but don't forget — the 10 million mark. but don't forget it's— the 10 million mark. but don't forget it's a 12 week weight, so thrat's— forget it's a 12 week weight, so that's really april before people are jabbed now can be finally protected from this virus. so it by that point— protected from this virus. so it by that point we will be well into
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easter— that point we will be well into easter and looking forward to the suninter— easter and looking forward to the summer holidays, if there will be any _ summer holidays, if there will be any~ 50— summer holidays, if there will be any 50 we — summer holidays, if there will be any. so we are some way off. the issue _ any. so we are some way off. the issue of— any. so we are some way off. the issue of transmission is an issue repeated — issue of transmission is an issue repeated by borisjohnson. issue of transmission is an issue repeated by boris johnson. just because — repeated by boris johnson. just because you are jabbed it doesn't mean _ because you are jabbed it doesn't mean you — because you are jabbed it doesn't mean you are safe, and that's a big debate _ mean you are safe, and that's a big debate going forward.— debate going forward. christopher, i'll sta debate going forward. christopher, i'll stay with _ debate going forward. christopher, i'll stay with you — debate going forward. christopher, i'll stay with you if _ debate going forward. christopher, i'll stay with you if i _ debate going forward. christopher, i'll stay with you if i may. - debate going forward. christopher, i'll stay with you if i may. this - debate going forward. christopher, i'll stay with you if i may. this is i i'll stay with you if i may. this is the daily telegraph, rishi sunak apparently telling allies that he's worried about scientists moving the goal posts. what does that mean? what it means, i think it's kind of a mess— what it means, i think it's kind of a mess of— what it means, i think it's kind of a mess of the government's own making — a mess of the government's own making. because we are told repeatedly about what measures will be received before they can lift social— be received before they can lift social distancing measures, such as overwhelming the nhs and the other things _ overwhelming the nhs and the other things. but the detail isn't always there _ things. but the detail isn't always there. now this story is saying that
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rishi sunak, the chancellor, fears advisers _ rishi sunak, the chancellor, fears advisers are moving the goal posts. particularly— advisers are moving the goal posts. particularly this concern, an ally of mr_ particularly this concern, an ally of mr sue — particularly this concern, an ally of mr sue neck is saying that as far as he's— of mr sue neck is saying that as far as he's concerned, the idea of the lock on— as he's concerned, the idea of the lock on was— as he's concerned, the idea of the lock on was to protect the nhs and stop the _ lock on was to protect the nhs and stop the rising numbers of people and nhs — stop the rising numbers of people and nhs beds. but according to allies— and nhs beds. but according to allies of— and nhs beds. but according to allies of mr at rishi sunak, it's about— allies of mr at rishi sunak, it's about keeping cases down and being covid-i9 _ about keeping cases down and being covid—19 free. according to rishi sunak. _ covid—19 free. according to rishi sunak, that's not the deal, that's moving _ sunak, that's not the deal, that's moving the — sunak, that's not the deal, that's moving the goal posts. once the nhs are protected, some tories on the right— are protected, some tories on the right would — are protected, some tories on the right would say let's use this moment— right would say let's use this moment to lift the economy, get out there _ moment to lift the economy, get out there and _ moment to lift the economy, get out there and start to deliver a normal life again — there and start to deliver a normal life again. and the chancellor is saving _ life again. and the chancellor is saying he — life again. and the chancellor is saying he would agree with that, but he's concerned that the pressure from _ he's concerned that the pressure from the — he's concerned that the pressure from the scientist internally means that wont— from the scientist internally means that won't happen.— from the scientist internally means that won't happen. what do you make of that? it's — that won't happen. what do you make of that? it's quite _ that won't happen. what do you make of that? it's quite unhelpful _ that won't happen. what do you make of that? it's quite unhelpful for - of that? it's quite unhelpful for the treasury — of that? it's quite unhelpful for the treasury and _ of that? it's quite unhelpful for the treasury and the _ of that? it's quite unhelpful forj the treasury and the chancellor of that? it's quite unhelpful for i the treasury and the chancellor to think that they know better than the
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scientists. it is not of the scientists. it is not of the scientists are moving the goal posts — this virus is shape shifting as we know, there are mutations of mutations now. we don't know what lies ahead, so we need to be extra vigilant now, particularly when you look at our record. yes, we've hit this 10 million milestone which is fantastic, but let's not forget we've also got a really high death rate, well over 100,000 now. and look, i understand the concerns about the economy — of course i'm someone affected by it, we are all suffering from this. but we do have to follow the science. one of the mistakes that we made during this pandemic is we've done stuff in a halfhearted way, and that's why we've had to go in and out of lockdown. when you look at other countries like australia or some of the asian countries where they've done their lockdown pretty hard and fast — but it has allowed real life
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and the economy to get back to normal. with respect to the chancellor, it's not his place to decide what the goal posts are. that's the job for the scientists. let's talk about the guardian's front page. this is an interesting study, isn't it? "coughing risks to nhs staff greater than feared." coughing generated ten times more infectious particles than breathing. this has led to fresh demands that anyone caring for someone with covid—19 should be provided with proper ppe. the most interesting thing about this is that health workers on general wards doubled the infection rate than those working on covid—19 wards. the big difference between these groups is the quality and the amount of ppe. yes. between these groups is the quality and the amount of ppe.— and the amount of ppe. yes, you miaht and the amount of ppe. yes, you might expeet _ and the amount of ppe. yes, you might expeet if — and the amount of ppe. yes, you might expect if you're _ and the amount of ppe. yes, you might expect if you're on - and the amount of ppe. yes, you might expect if you're on the - and the amount of ppe. yes, you might expect if you're on the 1c. might expect if you're on the ic reward — might expect if you're on the ic reward if— might expect if you're on the ic reward if you have covid and are reaiiy _ reward if you have covid and are reaiiy iii— reward if you have covid and are really ill with it, you need ppe.
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but what's _ really ill with it, you need ppe. but what's happening is there is less monks that among the general wards— less monks that among the general wards and _ less monks that among the general wards and there's more coughing there. _ wards and there's more coughing there. and — wards and there's more coughing there, and they're catching at worst there _ there, and they're catching at worst there this— there, and they're catching at worst there. this looks like bad news for nurses— there. this looks like bad news for nurses and — there. this looks like bad news for nurses and nhs staff, because they'll— nurses and nhs staff, because they'll need to wear more protection wherever— they'll need to wear more protection wherever they are in hospital, not 'ust wherever they are in hospital, not just in_ wherever they are in hospital, not just in the — wherever they are in hospital, not just in the keywords with covid patients — just in the keywords with covid patients. it shows how this virus is desperate — patients. it shows how this virus is desperate to spread itself, that's why it's _ desperate to spread itself, that's why it's creating different mutations to spread, and that's why it needs _ mutations to spread, and that's why it needs to— mutations to spread, and that's why it needs to be more careful that protection. i wonder if at some point _ protection. i wonder if at some point the — protection. i wonder if at some point the government might mend mandate _ point the government might mend mandate us to wear proper masks, not 'ust mandate us to wear proper masks, not just cloth— mandate us to wear proper masks, not just cloth ones when we are out and about— just cloth ones when we are out and about and _ just cloth ones when we are out and about and shops. | just cloth ones when we are out and about and shops.— just cloth ones when we are out and about and shops. i see you nodding, do ou about and shops. i see you nodding, do you agree? _ about and shops. i see you nodding, do you agree? absolutely, _ about and shops. i see you nodding, do you agree? absolutely, i - about and shops. i see you nodding, do you agree? absolutely, i thoughtj do you agree? absolutely, i thought this re ort do you agree? absolutely, i thought this report was _ do you agree? absolutely, i thought this report was fascinating _ do you agree? absolutely, i thought this report was fascinating and - do you agree? absolutely, i thought this report was fascinating and just i this report was fascinating and just shows you what a devil this virus is. it is so keen to transmit, and the transmission rates are so high
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and aggressive. i think this is something hospitals will have to look at really carefully, particularly in other wards like other parts of the hospital where people are getting their cancer treatment, where their immunity is already low. so they'll have to be very careful. i think christopher is right about this discussion with masks. there's been a bit of chat about people may be wearing double masks, and i think this�*ll be a conversation that we will be having more of. so people might have been crossed just wearing one mask, they might have to wear even stronger masks to try to fight this virus. [30 masks to try to fight this virus. do ou masks to try to fight this virus. do you think people will keep wearing masks even beyond the cove covid pandemic? masks even beyond the cove covid andemic? , , ~' , pandemic? sorry, i used think they will, actually- _ pandemic? sorry, i used think they will, actually. i— pandemic? sorry, i used think they will, actually. i know— pandemic? sorry, i used think they will, actually. i know they - pandemic? sorry, i used think they will, actually. i know they aren't i will, actually. i know they aren't comfortable and a lot of people hate them, _ comfortable and a lot of people hate them, but _ comfortable and a lot of people hate them, but i — comfortable and a lot of people hate them, but i can't imagine ever wanting — them, but i can't imagine ever wanting to _ them, but i can't imagine ever wanting to go back on public transport. wanting to go back on public transport-— wanting to go back on public
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transport. wanting to go back on public transort. ~ ., ., ., ., transport. without wearing a mask, not 'ust transport. without wearing a mask, not just from _ transport. without wearing a mask, not just from covid _ transport. without wearing a mask, not just from covid but _ transport. without wearing a mask, notjust from covid but also - transport. without wearing a mask, notjust from covid but also getting | notjust from covid but also getting other germs. i think other people may follow the same path that asian societies have — they've gotten good with dealing with sars based infections, and they standardly wear masks. it might be a future for quite a while to come.- masks. it might be a future for quite a while to come. what do you think, christopher? _ quite a while to come. what do you think, christopher? just _ quite a while to come. what do you think, christopher? just the - quite a while to come. what do you think, christopher? just the idea i quite a while to come. what do you think, christopher? just the idea ofj think, christopher? just the idea of be ond the think, christopher? just the idea of beyond the pandemic— think, christopher? just the idea of beyond the pandemic made - think, christopher? just the idea of beyond the pandemic made me i think, christopher? just the idea of. beyond the pandemic made me smile, because _ beyond the pandemic made me smile, because i_ beyond the pandemic made me smile, because i can't see when that moment is. i because i can't see when that moment is ithink— because i can't see when that moment is i think will— because i can't see when that moment is. i think will be stuck with this virus _ is. i think will be stuck with this virus or— is. i think will be stuck with this virus or the _ is. i think will be stuck with this virus or the threat of coronavirus for many— virus or the threat of coronavirus for many years to come. i think we will all— for many years to come. i think we will all be — for many years to come. i think we will all be wearing masks. i wonder whether— will all be wearing masks. i wonder whether the handshake is gone, the way of— whether the handshake is gone, the way of the _ whether the handshake is gone, the way of the dinosaurs. you whether the handshake is gone, the way of the dinosaurs.— whether the handshake is gone, the way of the dinosaurs. you watch the handshake now _ way of the dinosaurs. you watch the handshake now and _ way of the dinosaurs. you watch the handshake now and hugging - way of the dinosaurs. you watch the handshake now and hugging on i handshake now and hugging on television, and itjust feels very strange, doesn't it? sorry? i get ruite strange, doesn't it? sorry? i get quite agitated — strange, doesn't it? sorry? i get quite agitated when _ strange, doesn't it? sorry? i get quite agitated when i _ strange, doesn't it? sorry? i get quite agitated when i see - strange, doesn't it? sorry? i get quite agitated when i see people like that, i'm like, oh my goodness, what are you doing? i like that, i'm like, oh my goodness, what are you doing?— what are you doing? i feel the exact same. what are you doing? i feel the exact same- let's — what are you doing? i feel the exact same. let's change _ what are you doing? i feel the exact same. let's change the _ what are you doing? i feel the exact same. let's change the story i same. let's change the story completely and talk about brexit and
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northern ireland. i know you are desperate to get brexit out again. this is the front page of the financial times, and it isjust more on the ongoing dispute between the uk and brussels over post—brexit rules and northern ireland. christopher, talk us through this, because obviously this all stems from what happened on friday with the eu and their thread about vaccines. ~ ., , the eu and their thread about vaccines. ~ . , ., , , , vaccines. when a big thing happens in real diplomacy, _ vaccines. when a big thing happens in real diplomacy, the _ vaccines. when a big thing happens in real diplomacy, the eu _ vaccines. when a big thing happens in real diplomacy, the eu tried i vaccines. when a big thing happens in real diplomacy, the eu tried to l in real diplomacy, the eu tried to impart _ in real diplomacy, the eu tried to impart a — in real diplomacy, the eu tried to impart a border on northern ireland, the ripples— impart a border on northern ireland, the ripples of that carry on into wednesday or thursday in these papers — wednesday or thursday in these papers. because there's massive concern — papers. because there's massive concern about what on earth was the eu doing? _ concern about what on earth was the eu doing? it's brought a new focus on how— eu doing? it's brought a new focus on how our— eu doing? it's brought a new focus on how our northern ireland protocol is working _ on how our northern ireland protocol is working which allows the uk and the eu _ is working which allows the uk and the eu to _ is working which allows the uk and the eu to have their festivals and northorh— the eu to have their festivals and northern ireland with no hard border~ — northern ireland with no hard
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border. and there's a real concern here _ border. and there's a real concern here from — border. and there's a real concern here from many in the dup and northorh— here from many in the dup and northern ireland politicians who are worried _ northern ireland politicians who are worried about the fact that british soil cannot currently go across the irish soil cannot currently go across the irish sea _ soil cannot currently go across the irish sea from gb to northern ireland — irish sea from gb to northern ireland. forvarious irish sea from gb to northern ireland. for various reasons that the uk _ ireland. for various reasons that the uk government thinks might be an issue for— the uk government thinks might be an issue for the _ the uk government thinks might be an issue for the eu. the uk government thinks might be an issue forthe eu. a the uk government thinks might be an issue for the eu. a lot of this is in the _ issue for the eu. a lot of this is in the hands of borisjohnson, a deal— in the hands of borisjohnson, a deal of— in the hands of borisjohnson, a deal of over interpreting areas of the northern ireland protocol and 'ust the northern ireland protocol and just allow— the northern ireland protocol and just allow everyone to get on better~ — just allow everyone to get on better. fouryears just allow everyone to get on better. four years of misery during the brevit— better. four years of misery during the brexit talks, let's try to move on. the brexit talks, let's try to move on you _ the brexit talks, let's try to move on. you might agree. | the brexit talks, let's try to move on. you might agree.— the brexit talks, let's try to move on. you might agree. i would love us to all move — on. you might agree. i would love us to all move on _ on. you might agree. i would love us to all move on and _ on. you might agree. i would love us to all move on and be _ on. you might agree. i would love us to all move on and be in _ on. you might agree. i would love us to all move on and be in a _ on. you might agree. i would love us to all move on and be in a state i on. you might agree. i would love us to all move on and be in a state of i to all move on and be in a state of kumbaya, but look — it was always going to be the case that the situation with northern ireland would be tricky, this was always the sticking point. this was something that was not talked about, i'm afraid, in the referendum campaign. i don't want to start everything up again and i'm not, i completely
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accept the result. however, i think what people need to be honest about in government, they need to be honest about the fact that this has caused a huge amount of torment for small businesses and lots of bureaucracy, a lot of paperwork, lots of admin and delay, and lots of red tape — something which the conservative party prides itself on not wanting to have, not strangling businesses with. but putting some sort of border between northern ireland and the uk was always going to be difficult. they didn't want to have a hard border and there was lots of discussions about that, but this bordered on the irish sea was something a lot of people were worried about, particularly unionists. we are seeing the results of that now. unionists. we are seeing the results of that now-— unionists. we are seeing the results of that now. , ., , ., ., , ., of that now. christopher, how do you think it'll play — of that now. christopher, how do you think it'll play out? _ of that now. christopher, how do you think it'll play out? in _ of that now. christopher, how do you think it'll play out? in the _ of that now. christopher, how do you think it'll play out? in the short i think it'll play out? in the short term, think it'll play out? in the short term. the _ think it'll play out? in the short term. the uk — think it'll play out? in the short term, the uk government i think it'll play out? in the short term, the uk government is i think it'll play out? in the short i term, the uk government is asking for an—
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term, the uk government is asking for an extension on this transition period. _ for an extension on this transition period. to — for an extension on this transition period, to use old language from brexit— period, to use old language from brexit days, for another two years. ithink— brexit days, for another two years. i think there's a degree of trying to learn— i think there's a degree of trying to learn to — i think there's a degree of trying to learn to rub along better in this new world — to learn to rub along better in this new world. five weeks into the new brexit _ new world. five weeks into the new brexit world, one would hope this would _ brexit world, one would hope this would pass and sort itself out. let's _ would pass and sort itself out. let's move on now to the times's front page. this is the ongoing saga in myanmar, and we have found out that on song suit she now faces years injail, according to this headline, over illegal walkie—talkies. these are charges brought in front of her by the military in myanmar. this is a really worrying situation, isn't it? it's a really worrying situation and there's been this military coup by there's been this military coup by the junta there, there's been this military coup by thejunta there, and there's been this military coup by the junta there, and they've brought
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in these ludicrous trumped up charges about the radio. clearly it's just over the fact that they want to basically put aung san suu kyiback want to basically put aung san suu kyi back into exile again. and it's a real shame because myanmar was an emerging democracy, and that was something that she had fought for for a long time. listen, aung san suu kyi is not an unblemished character. hersilence suu kyi is not an unblemished character. her silence and some say complicity over the appalling treatment of the rohingya muslims is deeply, deeply troubling and casts a big stain over her. but this is not healthy, this military coup is not healthy. so it is very troubling. christopher, what do you think the role of the international community will be now? it’s role of the international community will be now?— role of the international community will be now? it's hard, the burmese 'unta is will be now? it's hard, the burmese junta is probably — will be now? it's hard, the burmese junta is probably gambling - will be now? it's hard, the burmese junta is probably gambling on i will be now? it's hard, the burmese junta is probably gambling on the i junta is probably gambling on the fact that — junta is probably gambling on the fact that the position of aung san suu kyi _ fact that the position of aung san suu kyi is— fact that the position of aung san suu kyi is not entirely good, she is a nobel— suu kyi is not entirely good, she is a nobel peace prize winner but her
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behaviour— a nobel peace prize winner but her behaviour with the rohingya muslims, and her— behaviour with the rohingya muslims, and her defending and standing up forthe— and her defending and standing up for the way the military behaved means— for the way the military behaved means it's — for the way the military behaved means it's not entirely clear. the americans— means it's not entirely clear. the americans are trying to be as tough as they— americans are trying to be as tough as they can— americans are trying to be as tough as they can on the burmese junta, but it's_ as they can on the burmese junta, but it's not— as they can on the burmese junta, but it's not where we were ten years a-o but it's not where we were ten years ago with— but it's not where we were ten years ago with the — but it's not where we were ten years ago with the burmese leader anyway, in terms _ ago with the burmese leader anyway, in terms of— ago with the burmese leader anyway, in terms of the world's sympathy. but clearly — in terms of the world's sympathy. but clearly this attempt at years in 'ail but clearly this attempt at years in jail for— but clearly this attempt at years in jail for illegal walkie—talkies is making — jail for illegal walkie—talkies is making sure she can't stand again and carry— making sure she can't stand again and carry out her democratic time in government — and carry out her democratic time in government-— government. moving on to the teleu-rah government. moving on to the telegraph - — government. moving on to the telegraph - amazon _ government. moving on to the telegraph - amazon sales i government. moving on to the i telegraph - amazon sales during the telegraph — amazon sales during the pandemic. this is talking about how the pandemic has really boosted amazon sales in britain. apparently the uk is on track to become the company's second largest market after the us as soon as this year. £19.73 after the us as soon as this year. £19.3 billion in revenue in britain
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last yearfor amazon. £19.3 billion in revenue in britain last year for amazon.— last year for amazon. that's 'ust chris's orders! i last year for amazon. that's 'ust chris's orders! will i last year for amazon. that's 'ust chris's orders! will be i last year for amazon. that's just chris's orders! will be confess . last year for amazon. that's just i chris's orders! will be confess our last amazon by? i chris's orders! will be confess our last amazon by?— chris's orders! will be confess our last amazon by? i bought my pets some nail clippers _ last amazon by? i bought my pets some nail clippers from _ last amazon by? i bought my pets some nail clippers from amazon. | last amazon by? i bought my petsj some nail clippers from amazon. i bought myself some nail clippers, but it's like an amazing machine that removes bubbles from your jumper... i that removes bubbles from your 'umer... .., that removes bubbles from your 'umer... .. ., ., that removes bubbles from your 'um er. .. .. ., ., ., jumper... i can do with that, e-mail me that later- _ jumper... i can do with that, e-mail me that later. breaking _ jumper... i can do with that, e-mail me that later. breaking into - jumper... i can do with that, e-mail me that later. breaking into this i me that later. breaking into this chat about _ me that later. breaking into this chat about baubles, _ me that later. breaking into this chat about baubles, if— me that later. breaking into this chat about baubles, if you're i me that later. breaking into this chat about baubles, if you're a l me that later. breaking into this i chat about baubles, if you're a dad of three _ chat about baubles, if you're a dad of three teenagers, i seem to get loads— of three teenagers, i seem to get loads of— of three teenagers, i seem to get loads of notes about amazon delivering things i haven't bought on my— delivering things i haven't bought on my e—mailall delivering things i haven't bought on my e—mail all the time. i got six e-mails_ on my e—mail all the time. i got six e—mails today. but this is a really important — e—mails today. but this is a really important point — it's really about tax, important point — it's really about tax. what — important point — it's really about tax, what tax amazon is paying, and it's about _ tax, what tax amazon is paying, and it's about money they made during lockdown — it's about money they made during lockdown. poor oldjohn it's about money they made during lockdown. poor old john lewis and marks _ lockdown. poor old john lewis and marks & _ lockdown. poor old john lewis and marks & spencer can open their shops, — marks & spencer can open their shops, and they could be paying big business _ shops, and they could be paying big business rates after the holiday ends _ business rates after the holiday ends in — business rates after the holiday ends in march. let's hope the
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government looks kindly on the issue of tax _ government looks kindly on the issue of tax and _ government looks kindly on the issue of tax and retail, because that's what's _ of tax and retail, because that's what's hurting.— of tax and retail, because that's what's hurting. of tax and retail, because that's what's hurtinu. ., , , ., what's hurting. you guys disagree on ruite a few what's hurting. you guys disagree on quite a few things, _ what's hurting. you guys disagree on quite a few things, including - what's hurting. you guys disagree on quite a few things, including brexit l quite a few things, including brexit and how to pronounce you and tough. but let's give sir tom a statue, captain sirtom but let's give sir tom a statue, captain sir tom moore. obviously he passed away sadly at the age of 100. a move now to possibly give him a memorial, a statue? is that a good thing? memorial, a statue? is that a good thin ? , ., memorial, a statue? is that a good thin? , ., ., , memorial, a statue? is that a good thing? yes, a really good thing, and i think it thing? yes, a really good thing, and i think it could _ thing? yes, a really good thing, and i think it could be _ thing? yes, a really good thing, and i think it could be very _ thing? yes, a really good thing, and i think it could be very fitting. i i think it could be very fitting. not only did he raise that amazing amount of money for the nhs, but i think he lifted all of our spirits with his positivity and resilience. so i'm really up for the idea of a statue. however, what i would also like the government to do is honour his love of the nhs by also looking to pay nhs staff properly and carers, as well.— to pay nhs staff properly and carers, as well. and very briefly, christopher? _ carers, as well. and very briefly, christopher? i— carers, as well. and very briefly, christopher? i completely i carers, as well. and very briefly, | christopher? i completely agree.
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there's a big _ christopher? i completely agree. there's a big history _ christopher? i completely agree. there's a big history in _ christopher? i completely agree. there's a big history in this i there's a big history in this country— there's a big history in this country of statues erected by public subscription, so it's basically up to us— subscription, so it's basically up to us as — subscription, so it's basically up to us as britons to do it. i think there's— to us as britons to do it. i think there's enough pictures to statues of military— there's enough pictures to statues of military figures looking heroic, but i _ of military figures looking heroic, but i think— of military figures looking heroic, but i think having a pick to make her hero— but i think having a pick to make her hero in— but i think having a pick to make her hero in a walking frame is ekactly— her hero in a walking frame is exactly right. her hero in a walking frame is exactly right-— her hero in a walking frame is exactly right. you've both been treat exactly right. you've both been great guests — exactly right. you've both been great guests this _ exactly right. you've both been great guests this evening, i exactly right. you've both been i great guests this evening, thanks so much for talking to me. that's it for the papers tonight. from us all, goodbye. hi there, good evening. i'm chetan pathak with your latest sports news. we start with liverpool — their premier league title defence has taken a huge set back tonight. brighton have left anfield with all three points after a brilliant 1—0 win. they put in an outstanding display and got the winning goal on 56 minutes.
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steven alzate given it. brighton move ten points clear of the relegation zone. liverpool are fourth — seven points behind the leaders manchester city, who they face on sunday. as for manchester city, their winning run continues. they're three points clear of manchester united after a 2—0 win over burnley at turf moor. gabrieljesus opened the scoring afterjust three minutes. raheem sterling got the second, seven minutes before half time. it was not about how many games we have to win, or runs of games. for the statistics, it's nice to open full pages. it's ok, but the fact is what is next, try to win. this is the only way we will do it, we've done it in the past when we made 18 games in a row, 1a in a row. there's always the next one. everton bounced back from their defeat to newcastle with a win at leeds. gylfi sigurdsson and dominic
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calvert—lewin here gave them a 2—0 lead at half—time. and though leeds pulled one back, they held on to win 2—1. what a night forjesse lingaard, who scored two on his debut for west ham as they beat aston villa 3—1 — a great start to his loan spell after struggling at manchester united. and all five matches in the premier league tonight were away wins, as fulham lost at home to leicester, james maddsion set up kelechi iheanacho for the opening goalfor the visitors. and then just before half time, maddsion was again the provider, as jamesjustin made it 2—0 before the break. leicester are up to third. fulham are eight points from safety. and in scotland, rangers have restored their 23—point lead at the top of the table with a 1—0 win over stjohnstone. ianis hagi with the goal that gives steven gerrard his 100th win as rangers manager. there were 2—1wins for motherwell and ross county. southampton say their teenage
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midfielder, alex jankiewitz, was racially abused on social media. it follows his sending off in their 9—0 defeat to manchester united last night. it's the latest in a string of such incidents. southampton say they're passing on all abusive messages to hampshire police. preparations for the australian open tennis have taken another blow, with more than 500 players, officials, and support staff going into isolation. it's after a worker at one of the event's quarantine hotels tested positive for the virus. tennis australia says the tournament itself, which gets under way on monday, won't be affected. but, as austin halewood reports, the build up's been farfrom ideal. tennis training in quarantine. for two weeks, this is how some of the world's best players had to prepare for the first grand slam of the year. and now, they're going to have to do it all over again. late today, we were notified that a 26—year—old man from noble park has tested positive for coronavirus. he'd been working as a resident
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support officer as part of the australian open quarantine programme. he's now in a health hotel and his household contacts have been isolated. now all the people associated with the australian open staying in that hotel have been classed as casual contacts. that means they'll have to isolate until they can return a negative test. so, as things stand, the tournament itself shouldn't be affected. but this latest quarantine will play havoc with the six warm—up events currently under way. in a statement, tennis australia said that while they wre doing everything they could to initiate testing as soon as possible... something that's caused confusion with some of the players. but the fact these tennis stars are here at all has been questioned by the many thousands of australians stranded around the world, unable to return home because of the strict restrictions.
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i can completely understand how victorians i feel. i have a lot of friends and family down here, i lived down here for about 18 months. so to know they're feeling safe is the most important thing, but i know we as players, we should be extremely grateful to have the opportunity to start our season in australia. while there's no questioning that the preparations have been farfrom ideal, the australian open are confident that this latest episode won't affect the tournament. but after one positive test put more than 500 people in isolation, the fear now is whether it escalates from here. austin halewood, bbc news. finally, geraint thomas will get a chance to race for a second tour de france title this summer — while his team—mate, egan bernal, who led the ineos grenadiers in last year's race, will focus on the giro d'italia. thomas will be competing in france alongside fellow briton tayo geoghegan hart, who won't defend the giro title he won last year. and their team boss feels
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that thomas, who took the yellowjersey three years ago, has a good chance of winning another. this tour really suits geraint�*s attributes. he's very, very motivated for it. and, given the time trialling and the nature of the climbing, and the first week in the crosswinds — that element lends itself well to his skills and attributes, as well. so on paper, it's a great tour for geraint. and that's all your sport for now. more reaction to tonight's football on the bbc sport website. but from me and the team, goodnight. hello there. winter is about to ramp up to another gear by the end of this week, certainly into the weekend. it'll be turning much colder with the risk of some disruptive snow in places. so for the next few days, it'll gradually be turning colder for all, and we'll see increasing snow particularly over
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the hills in the north. now for thursday, we've still got low pressure close by to the uk, it's the weather front across the north bringing further cloud, outbreaks of rain to northern ireland, much of scotland, northern england too, and here we'll see further snow over the scottish hills accumulating and drifting in that strong east—southeast wind. further south, after a bright start to the day, we'll start to see showery bursts of rain moving up from the south. here, it'll tend to be fairly mild, 8—10 celsius, but very cold across the north where we have that snow. through thursday night, it continues with rain and the snow across scotland — significant accumulations over the grampians and the highlands, very wet weather with a risk of flooding. further south, a drier night to come and clear skies, could see some mist and fog across southern england, and again, a big temperature contrast from north to south. now the snow continues as we head on into friday and saturday — significant accumulations have prompted the met office to issue an amber warning for this heavy, incessant snow. and also, some very heavy rain for lower levels could cause some localised flooding —
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so a whole host of issues there. further west, we'll have sunny spells, a few showers, tends to stay dry across the far southeast — again, 9—10 celsius, much colder further north where it will also be windy with that drifting snow in the hills. moving on into the weekend, our area of low pressure sinks a bit further southwards, so it means the rain and the hill snow across scotland will drift into parts of northern england at times too, so a whole wintry mix here could be disruptive. further south, quite a bit of cloud around with outbreaks of rain, and temperatures dropping generally across—the—board. still cold in the north and a little bit colder for much of england and wales, too. as we head on into sunday, the very cold air across the east pushes southwards right across the uk, and it'll be very windy, so the wind making it feel even colder — 2—3 celsius, some snow pushing into northern and eastern areas which could be disruptive. so turning very cold through this weekend for all areas, with the risk of some disruptive snow for some of us.
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this is bbc news. i'm maryam moshiri with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. future proofing the covid vaccine — how scientists are already working to make sure the new vaccines can be adapted to deal with any new variant. protests in myanmar as the un urges the world to make sure monday's military coup, which removed leader aung san suu kyi, fails. hundreds of players and officials at the australian open tennis championship go into isolation after a worker at one of the event's hotels tested positive for coronavirus. three female directors make history by being nominated for a golden globe awards, the first time more than one
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has been shortlisted in a single year.

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