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tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 4, 2021 5:00pm-6:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines: the bank of england forecasts that the economy will rebound strongly from the spring, largely as a result of the vaccine rollout. i am optimistic that we are now seeing a hugely impressive programme of vaccination and that we're also now going to see the positive benefits of it. neighbour accused the government of risking life with the best labour accused the government this is that working at pace to get it right. a trial is like to see whether different covid—19 vaccines can be given to people for the first and second dose. the approach could offer greater protection.
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we're very proud of our track record as you know on the vaccines task force and of course the deployment programme, but this is another part of the armoury. eleven of the uk's leading health groups have signed a letter urging the prime minister to make the temporary £20 per week increase to the standard allowance of universal credit and working tax credits permanent. there's international condemnation of china after a bbc report alleges women were systemically raped and tortured in uighur camps. beijing brands it fake news. and, how green is your football club? fans are encouraged to persuade their team to be more environmental. hello. the uk's rapid covid—19 vaccination programme will help the economy rebound strongly this year as people
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become more confident about spending— that's according to figures released today by the bank of england. the economy is expected to shrink 4.2% in the first three months of 2021, amid tighter lockdown restrictions to slow the spread of the virus. (ami and while government support schemes to slow the spread of the virus. and while government support schemes are expected to limit any immediate increase in unemployment, the jobless rate is still projected to rise to 7.8% later this year as the furlough scheme winds down. however, high earners working from home have saved more during the pandemic. the bank of england said £125 billion more was squirrelled away in uk savings accounts last year. speaking after the data was published, the governor of the bank of england said he can see light at the end of the tunnel for investment and growth in the uk economy. i am optimistic that we are now seeing a hugely impressive programme of vaccination and that we're now also beginning to see the positive benefits of it.
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and i think, as we move forwards, that should reduce uncertainty. it will take time but it will reduce uncertainty, and that will create something that's hugely important in the economy going forward to support growth, which is to support business investment. it's a very high priority, very high priority of mine, by the way, to create the conditions that support it. we can speak to our business presenter, victoria fritz. there presenter, victoria fritz. seems to be a bit of a contradiction there seems to be a bit of a contradiction between the figures the bank of england have released which sound like the economy is in trouble and then the more optimistic tone from the governor himself. the ke to all tone from the governor himself. the key to all of — tone from the governor himself. tue: key to all of this tone from the governor himself. tte: key to all of this is time. basically what we are looking at is historic numbers and what they think might happen in the future. we'll look at what has happened so far, we know that the economy actually has not done as badly as at first thought. yes the economy by 8% come up thought. yes the economy by 8% come up with these unheard of numbers in
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peacetime britain. however, the expectation was for far greater than that. those furlough scheme to government assistance games have definitely taken some of the edge off the economic pain that britain would have otherwise fell. however, there is more contraction to come. this latest lockdown has really hammered the economy so we will see further contraction before we start seeing anything really starting to recover. how much we will recover and when, very much depends on the speed and pace of the vaccine roll—out. when social distancing is relaxed, we will see a pick—up in economic activity and that should lead to greater spending and lead to greater investment. the best guess for the bank of england at the moment is the middle of the summer for when we will see this pick—up. but what happens beyond that is very much unknown. as you say, the furlough scheme have yet to unwind and it is difficult to know exactly what the unemployment picture in
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this country will be because for sure, the nature of unemployment in britain has completely changed, so is andrew bailey says, there may be light at the end of the tunnel, but i am saying just don't expect the picture when we emerge from that tunnel to be quite as familiar as the one you're used to. so tunnel to be quite as familiar as the one you're used to.- tunnel to be quite as familiar as the one you're used to. so isn't the case the vaccination _ the one you're used to. so isn't the case the vaccination programme i the one you're used to. so isn't the | case the vaccination programme has allowed andrew bailey to be more optimistic than he otherwise would be but it is still quite a dark picture? t be but it is still quite a dark icture? ~ . , be but it is still quite a dark icture? ~ ., , , , picture? i think that is probably riuht. picture? i think that is probably right. probably _ picture? i think that is probably right. probably the _ picture? i think that is probably right. probably the right - right. probably the right assessment. we saw a similar picture over states from the federal reserve. the biggest monetary policy tool at the moment from the independent bank of england is what is going on with the vaccine. something they cannot control whatsoever. however, the latest numbers that we have seen in terms of the 10 million vaccines handed out, that is encouraging. of course, at the summer arrives and things start to get a little bit easier, we will see economic activity picked up. but it is very difficult to know
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what shape the economy will be and beyond that because we have more people self—employed and more people underemployed and more people working morejobs, so it is very difficult as companies, to know exactly the whole economic picture will be. it will be very different from the britain pre—covid—i9. maw; from the britain pre-covid-19. many thanks. labour has accused the government of "�*risking lives', but failing to implement its hotel quarantine policy so far. in a letter to the home secretary, seen by the bbc, the shadow home secretary, nick thomas symonds, has asked priti patel for an "�*urgent update', after the prime minister promised that the plan would emerge today. subsequently, government sources suggested the details might not be announced until next week. labour has also criticised the government for you turning on other issues. our political correspondent iain watson is in westminster.
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strong words from labour but it appears to be something of a gap in the governments implementation of this policy. the governments implementation of this oli . . , ~ the governments implementation of this oli. ., , . ., this policy. that is right. we have this policy. that is right. we have this letter from _ this policy. that is right. we have this letter from the _ this policy. that is right. we have this letter from the shadow - this policy. that is right. we have | this letter from the shadow home secretary in the past few minutes and there is really a ramping up of the rhetoric in that letter to priti patel accusing the government of risking lives by not having a tougher policy at the borders, but also a range of specific questions in that letter to priti patel as well. so for example, nick thomas simmons, the shadow home secretary, is asking whether any hotels have been consulted over the policy and when a start date will be announced for a policy which was in a self announced more than a week ago at in this letter again at labour claiming it is 46 days since the government became aware of the south african variant so why is he not taking tougher action now? what i think it's edge thing about this is not only trying to rip up the rhetoric
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but also trying to get some kind of clarity from the government and they understand there will be further meetings about it later today but it follows from the prime minister apparent pledge to provide more details on this policy today and he said the health department would be provided more details and then later we were told after his press conference yesterday that he had been misinformed but the health secretary matt hancock today denied there was any delay to the scheme for hotel quarantine. clearly we are alwa s hotel quarantine. clearly we are always looking _ hotel quarantine. clearly we are always looking to _ hotel quarantine. clearly we are always looking to make - hotel quarantine. clearly we are always looking to make sure - hotel quarantine. clearly we are always looking to make sure wej hotel quarantine. clearly we are - always looking to make sure we have more _ always looking to make sure we have more security at the borders. hence we brought— more security at the borders. hence we brought in the need for isolation for everybody arriving in this country _ for everybody arriving in this count . , , . . for everybody arriving in this count. ,,. country. on the specific policy, he still hasn't — country. on the specific policy, he still hasn't been _ country. on the specific policy, he still hasn't been announced - country. on the specific policy, he still hasn't been announced whenl country. on the specific policy, he. still hasn't been announced when it will be _ still hasn't been announced when it will be announced. _ still hasn't been announced when it will be announced. why— still hasn't been announced when it will be announced. why is - still hasn't been announced when it will be announced. why is there - still hasn't been announced when it i will be announced. why is there such a delay? _ will be announced. why is there such a delay? where — will be announced. why is there such a delay? where the _ will be announced. why is there such a delay? where the urgency? - will be announced. why is there such a delay? where the urgency? there. a delay? where the urgency? there isn't a delay- _ a delay? where the urgency? there isn't a delay. what _ a delay? where the urgency? there isn't a delay. what that _ a delay? where the urgency? there isn't a delay. what that is _ a delay? where the urgency? there isn't a delay. what that is is - a delay? where the urgency? isn't a delay. what that is is work to make — isn't a delay. what that is is work to make sure that the borders is always— to make sure that the borders is always executed as anisa b. we have i’ilht always executed as anisa b. we have right in— always executed as anisa b. we have right in therefore isolation. as
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well— right in therefore isolation. as well and — right in therefore isolation. as well and is an argument over the timing— well and is an argument over the timing of— well and is an argument over the timing of the hotel quarantine. his timing of the hotel quarantine. argument timing of the hotel quarantine. ti 3 argument continuing over the substance. for example, if you're trying to come from a so—called to read a list country, more than 30 countries where the brazil south african variant has been spreading, you will not be allowed to get into the uk at all unless you are a british resident. if you are, this must be going into hotel quarantine once that is set up but the government is stressing that it has to border measures in place such as pretesting before departure and also the obligation to self—isolate for ten days in any case but what labour are saying is that this is not good enough. we don't really know where the variants are coming from so all of rivals into the country should have to go into hotel quarantine and it is that that the government is suggesting is impossible because that means 20,000 hotel rooms have to be found each day but we know that inside government to people are pressing for a much wider use of quarantines, so looks like some of
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the internal arguments may be continued in the absence of an announcement.— continued in the absence of an announcement. interesting. many thanks. scientists have begun a trial to see whether giving people different covid vaccines for their first and second dose works as well as the current approach, using the samejab. it's thought the move could give more flexibility if there's any disruption to supplies — and may even offer better protection against the virus. the results from the study won't be available until the summer — so the government says there's no change to the vaccine programme yet. here's dominic hughes. this fire station in hampshire is the latest venue to become part of the vaccination roll—out, one of thousands of sites now operating across the uk. more than ten million people have now had theirfirstjabs, but a new study aims to find out if mixing doses of the oxford astrazeneca and pfizer—biontech vaccines could offer the body even more chances to develop defences against the virus.
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what we're doing is seeing how well people's immune systems respond if you give the first dose of one covid vaccine and the second dose with another. the reason to do that is to build flexibility into the uk immunisation schedule for covid vaccines. and even globally, it makes it much easier to administer the vaccines if we don't have to worry too much about always giving the second dose the same as the first dose. the trial will mix doses from the two vaccines currently being used. but others could be added as they're approved. the study will involve 820 volunteers, none of whom have yet had the vaccine. all will be aged 50 or older, part of the group to be vaccinated in the next priority wave. the trial will run initially at eight sites across england. tackling outbreaks of ebola is one reason why researchers believe this approach may work. mixing vaccine doses was used successfully against this highly infectious virus. a second boosterjab that utilises a different way to prompt an immune response can sometimes be more effective than two jabs from the same vaccine, and it is already in use for many
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inoculations we are familiar with. it is something that is done historically with vaccines for hepatitis, children's vaccines, polio, measles, mumps and rubella. it will hopefully maintain the uk at the forefront of research into covid vaccines. we are proud of our record on the vaccines taskforce and the deployment programme. but this is another part of the armoury. given the erratic nature of vaccine supply, described by ministers as lumpy, a degree of flexibility in the vaccination programme could be a real help in the months to come. but perhaps the biggest benefit will be for those developing countries that have yet to get vaccination programmes up and running. being able to mix and match supplies could make all the difference. the first results of this trial should be known by the early summer. earlier, professor robin shattock, head of immunity at
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imperial college london, explained why he believed trialling mixed vaccines would be worthwhile. there's good scientific rationale for trying this. what is really important is to generate the evidence, and that evidence then means we can roll these out in an informed way of doing it, rather thanjust making the assumption that it is appropriate to mix and match. what is also important is that the data we'll get from this new study will tell us about the particular combination they're testing, and it will need to be done for other combinations rather than being a generalised principle. so, other combinations of the available vaccines? correct. so what we may see is the combination of the astrazeneca and biontech pfizer vaccine works well, but that doesn't necessarily mean different combinations will work to the same extent, so it will have to be done on a combination
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by combination process. it's fascinating, because the minister said there that this is done for other vaccines and he named a few there. why does it work for some vaccines and not others? it is done for other vaccines but that is when the evidence has been produced. i'm not saying it won't work for other combinations, but each time, we need to have the evidence to see how well they work together and different combinations may work better than others. it's just about producing that evidence so you can make an informed decision. we have been told repeatedly that the means of manufacture of the pfizer vaccine is very different from that of the oxford astrazeneca one, instinctively, one would feel they would not be a good match for each other? in some ways, there are a good match because they're so different. that way, you may get the benefit of those different technologies working together.
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we are being told that it might be that mixing the first and second dose could actually provide more protection, why would that be the case? certainly, it might be the case for something like the astrazeneca vaccine, which is based on a viral vector, because we know that that second dose, the immune system recognises a defector that's carrying the vaccine, so it may be less effective. if you come in with a second dose that's different technology, rna technology, you may be able to boost the response higher. those are assumptions, we need to look at them by doing clinical trials and seeing what the evidence is. figures released in the past hour show that a further 915 people have died within 28 days of a positive coronavirus test in the uk. that's down from 1,322 a day earlier.
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more than 20,000 people tested positive for the virus. and the number of those receiving their first vaccine has climbed to 10.49 million — up from just over ten million yesterday. a more detailed look at the government's data dashboard for coronavirus shows. the number of patients in hospital is still high — at 31,670 people. daily deaths also remain high — with a seven—day average of 1,018 deaths a day. however, cases are beginning to fall, with a seven—day average of 21,246 people testing positive each day. the headlines on bbc news... the bank of england forecasts that the economy will rebound strongly from the spring, largely as a result of the vaccine programme. labour accuses the government of "risking lives", by delaying the introduction of quarantine hotels for high—risk travellers arriving in england. the government insist they're working at pace to get it right.
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a trial is launched to see whether different covid vaccines could be given to people for the first and second dose. eleven of the uk's leading health groups have signed a letter urging the prime minister to make the temporary £20 per week increase to the standard allowance of universal credit and working tax credits permanent. the letter, signed by groups inclduing the royal colleges of paediatrics and psychiatrists and the association of directors of public health say... it also says...
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in response, the government said... "we are committed to supporting the lowest—paid families well, amongst the groups, who've written to the prime minister appealing to him to keep the temporary 20 pounds increase in universal credit a week during the pandemic — is the british psychological society. julia faulconbridge is from that organisation and joins us now live. hello there, withjulia. thank you forjoining us. from your own
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particular point of view, from your organisation, what are the fears about taking away this £20 per week some? t about taking away this £20 per week some? ., about taking away this £20 per week some? ~' ., about taking away this £20 per week some? ~ ., ., ., , , some? i think one of our biggest fears is the _ some? i think one of our biggest fears is the impact _ some? i think one of our biggest fears is the impact of _ some? i think one of our biggest fears is the impact of this - some? i think one of our biggest fears is the impact of this upon l fears is the impact of this upon show tension on families. you mentioned about the impact of the families who the money was taken away, the current estimates are we will have 5.2 million children in the uk living in poverty by 2022 anyway. what the levels have been increasing and we know the pandemic has pushed far more families in the poverty and dependence on benefits. and i think it we know that we have got so much evidence that poverty is a major risk factor, the development of all physical and mental health problems, you can see that for the physical health point of view with the impact in the far greater impact of covid—19 and our poor communities. but if you look at children, those growing up in
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poverty are three to four times more likely to develop mental health problems, and that is according to the government owned figures. things like anxiety, depression, problems with behaviour, all of these things that contribute to difficulties and growing up and learning and education, so we really don't want to see anything that worsens this picture. t to see anything that worsens this icture. ., , ., ~' to see anything that worsens this icture. ., , ., ~ ., picture. i wonder if you think that the uncertainty _ picture. i wonder if you think that the uncertainty over— picture. i wonder if you think that the uncertainty over this - picture. i wonder if you think that the uncertainty over this issue . picture. i wonder if you think that the uncertainty over this issue is | the uncertainty over this issue is contributing to the effects that you have said because we know there will be a budget in early march. the government is saying it will lay out in this stall then but it is an uncertain time for people i suppose. is certainly is. if you think about what the things about poverty which makes children vulnerable, one set of things is the impact on the children themselves are being hungry or in poor housing, feeling ashamed and embarrassed by their situation.
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but actually, crucially, it is the impact on parents and carers, people in those situations constantly stressed by trying to make ends meet, struggling to provide and care for their children as they want to. we know from a recent research study that during the pandemics, the families with a single person households and those on low incomes are the ones who are reporting the highest levels of stress and mental health problems. and uncertainty is a huge stressor, it is bad enough not knowing how much money you have at the moment, being even more worried about what you have next week or next month will hold will really add to the stress and anxiety from parents and that immediately impacts upon what is happening within the families and within the household. tt within the families and within the household. , ., ., ., , household. it is one of the harsh realities that _ household. it is one of the harsh realities that the _ household. it is one of the harsh realities that the treasury - household. it is one of the harsh realities that the treasury has i household. it is one of the harsh. realities that the treasury has had to spend the billions of pounds to get hundreds of billions of pounds to get people to do this pandemic.
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you are making a strong case for the £20 per week to be extended. how long would you want to see extended for a question of our correspondent said that extension could cost £6 billion. tt said that extension could cost £6 billion. , ., ~' said that extension could cost £6 billion. , ., ~ ., ., billion. if you think about that, £20 a week— billion. if you think about that, £20 a week is _ billion. if you think about that, £20 a week is actually - billion. if you think about that, £20 a week is actually a - billion. if you think about that, £20 a week is actually a very l billion. if you think about that, - £20 a week is actually a very small amount of money for a family. it does not go very far. the fact that it is a bit making a significant difference to families shows how low our levels of benefits are in this country. compared to other western economies was that we are very low down on the table. i would argue and i think many people would argue this should be permanent. we should not be looking at reducing levels of benefits. the impact, the economic benefits. the impact, the economic benefit of the pandemic is not going to be a short—term thing. so many people, including very many women, are actually have lost theirjobs.
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there will be far fewerjobs available for them at least in the next year or two. i think this needs to be a permanent uplift. {etc next year or two. i think this needs to be a permanent uplift.— to be a permanent uplift. ok. we will have to _ to be a permanent uplift. ok. we will have to leave _ to be a permanent uplift. ok. we will have to leave that _ to be a permanent uplift. ok. we will have to leave that there. - to be a permanent uplift. ok. we l will have to leave that there. thank you, julia forjoining us. there's been international condemnation after the bbc reported allegations of systematic rape and torture of women in so—called re—education camps for the uighur muslim minority in china. the us government says it's deeply disturbed by the report — adding, these atrocities shock the conscience and must be met with serious consequences. australia's government demanded the un be given immediate access to these sites. uk ministers said the report showed, �*clearly evil acts. the bbc investigation broadcast harrowing first hand testimony, from a female detainee, a former camp guard — and those forced to help. china's foreign ministry — has denied the allegations and accused the bbc of making a false report.
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just a warning — matthew hill's report — contains distressing accounts of rape and torture from the start. two days ago, we broadcast the story of tursunay ziawudun. she described how she was held in this re—education camp in xinjiang for months and was the victim of repeated rape. translation: they were three men. not one, but three. they did whatever evil their mind could think of. and they did not spare any part of my body, biting it to the extent that it was disgusting to look at. they didn't just rape. they were barbaric. they had bitten all over my body. we also heard from gulzira, now living in the relative safety of istanbul, having fled china. she's a khazak who says
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she was forced to be complicit in the rape that goes on in the camps. translation: my job is to remove | their clothes completely and then | handcuff them on their beds so they cannot move. reaction to our story has been global. the australian foreign minister says the united nations should be given immediate access to the region. the uk foreign office minister told lawmakers in parliament that the bbc�*s report was chilling, and said china needed to be open about what is happening in xinjiang province. the evidence of the scale and the severity of these violations is now far—reaching. it paints a truly harrowing picture. if china wishes to dispute this evidence, then it must allow unfettered access to the region forthe un high commissioner for human rights or another independent fact—finding body. and there has been this from the us state department. "these atrocities shock with conscience and must be met with serious consequences."
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it is estimated that a million uighurs and other muslim minorities are held in camps in xinjiang. china has responded to our report insisting that their camps are vocational training centres, designed to stop muslims living in the region from turning to extremism. and it denounced the bbc report as lies and misinformation. translation: there is no so-called systemic sexual assault _ and abuse against women. china is a country ruled by law. 0ur constitution guarantees and protects human rights and it is embodied in our legal system and the government's work. now we can show you new testimony. a former inmate who describes how regular rape was in the camp she was in, and how it was used as punishment. translation: one day, they assembled many people in a large hall. _ then they brought a young girl, 20 or 21 years old. she was forced to confess a bogus crime in front of everyone.
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she pleaded guilty to the made up crime in a flood of tears in her speech, in which she was forced to confess. after that, in front of so many people, the police raped her in turns. despite the huge international outcry that these women's testimonies have provoked, it is unlikely that china will act and allow independent scrutiny of what is going on inside their re—education camps. responding to accusations by the chinese government that the report was false, the bbc issued a statement, saying: the statement went on to say...
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the irish foreign minister, simon coveney, says the eu is considering whether to extend grace periods for checks on goods entering northern ireland from great britain that were agreed as part of the brexit trade deal. talks, described last night as constructive, are continuing between the eu and the uk governments after border controls were stopped this week. now, imagine if everyone was as passionate about the environment as they are about football. a new project aims to use the energy of football fans to encourage sustainable habits. in planet super league, the greener the fans are, the more points their club gets. a pilot scheme hasjust finished — and joe wilson has been keeping score. 0ur planet is football—shaped. well, the world's certainly shaped by football. it matters to millions. the english premier league could still be won by various contenders. it remains a race.
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but there is one title that's been decided already. ok, it's not quite that trophy again. but leicester city have won planet super league, the tournament that rewards sustainable achievements. well, supporters at home won points for their clubs by carrying out various covid—friendly tasks with an environmental angle. for example, make a goalkeeper from the things you find on a walk. make a family meal which is meat—free. 0r make a football stadium for worms. well, my players were left looking in vain for a ball. so i spoke to the experts, the adatiya family. the pilot scheme involved 11 different clubs, and their efforts in particular helped win the league for leicester. we baked gingerbread men, and we did the vegan meals. you do get drawn into the competitive aspect of the tournament.
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so, you know, we were very much vying for leicester city to finish top and watching the league tables of the scores every day. my wife wouldn't allow us to eat a single meal without taking a picture of it and sending it in. so we did at one point get quite obsessed with it. and it worked! yes. football to save the planet. well, it's never quite that simple. but if the environment begins at home, my worms, you'll be relieved to learn, are safely back on earth. joe wilson, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah keith—lucas. hello. we've got some colder weather on the cards as we head over the next couple of days, particularly across scotland. there's an amber warning enforced
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from thursday until saturday. heavy health not tonight. elsewhere it is milder and plenty of rain showers. some of these heavy showers following unsaturated grounds. some flooding may be. fog practice tonight over seven parts of england well slowly clearing the way in more showers to come for northern ireland and western parts of england and wales, northeast england and for the hills know which could be disruptive across parts of central and northern scotland. about three to 10 degrees on friday but it will turn colder for all of us to the course of the and some disruptive snow in the east. goodbye for now. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... the bank of england forecasts the economy will rebound strongly from the spring, largely as a result
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of the vaccine rollout. i am optimistic that we are now seeing a hugely impressive programme of vaccination and that we're also now going to see the positive benefits of it. labour accuses the government of "risking lives" by delaying the introduction of quarantine hotels for high—risk travellers arriving in england. the government insist they're working at pace to get it right. a trial is launched to see whether different covid vaccines could be given to people for the first and second dose. the approach could offer greater protection. we're very proud of our track record as you know on the vaccines task force and of course the deployment programme, but this is another part of the armoury. 11 health groups sign a letter, urging the prime minister to make the temporary twenty pounds a week increase in universal credit permanent. there's international condemnation of china after a bbc report alleges women were systemically raped and tortured in uighur camps.
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beijing brands it fake news. and how green is your football club? fans are encouraged to persuade their team to be more environmental. time to catch up with all the sport now. fora time to catch up with all the sport now. for a full round up, here's jane dougall. the calcutta cup is on the line this weekend as both england and scotland prepare for the oldest international match in rugby. england head coach eddiejones has dropped george ford to the bench and moved 0wen farrell to number ten ahead of the opening match of the six nations at twickenham. jones has also given 0llie lawrence his first start, which he says is a great chance for the 21—year—old to shine. lawrence lines up against cameron redpath who chose to represent scotland after playing for england under 20s. he's developing nicely. he's got a lot of work to do. he got potential,
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but we got to see the talent come through and set that as an opportunity. through and set that as an opportunity-— through and set that as an opportunity. through and set that as an ouortuni . v , , opportunity. he's lining up. does he feel like the — opportunity. he's lining up. does he feel like the one _ opportunity. he's lining up. does he feel like the one that _ opportunity. he's lining up. does he feel like the one that got _ opportunity. he's lining up. does he feel like the one that got away? - feel like the one that got away? players— feel like the one that got away? players have choices. he's made choices like scotland and we wish him all the best. if you want to play for england, he could have stayed, but he decided he wanted to go to with scotland. we wish him all the best. when the sides face each other at twickenham on saturday it will mark the sport's oldest international rivalry. the game will mark the 150th anniversary of the first ever test, which took place in march 1871 in edinburgh, but of course this time there won't be any fans in the stadium. it's something that won't detract from the battle for the calcutta cup, according to the scotland head coach. 100%. as the first game of the tournament. we play for one of the old est oldest rugby's in sports —— oldest
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rugby in sport. 150 years since his game, so the rivalry will always be there. a, ., , ., game, so the rivalry will always be there. ~., ., , ., �* �* game, so the rivalry will always be there. ., , ., �* �* ,, , ., there. more details on the bbc sport website. a freak accident has resulted in zak crawley injuring his wrist and subsequently being ruled out of the first two tests against india. the opener slipped on a marble floor during practice yesterday and has sprained his wrist. it's expected he'll be replaced in the battling line up by either 0llie pope or dan lawrence. his captain joe root says it's really frustrating. you feel for the players that pick these kind of injuries up because — that pick these kind of injuries up because they do everything they can to get— because they do everything they can to get themselves ready, mentally, physicallx — to get themselves ready, mentally, physically. skill —based wise. something as free as that can happen and have _ something as free as that can happen and have such a big impact, sol really—
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and have such a big impact, sol really feel— and have such a big impact, sol really feel for zak but he has a great — really feel for zak but he has a great attitude. he will do everything you get himself and ready as quickly— everything you get himself and ready as quickly as possible. rory mcilroy has critisiced golf�*s authorities for spending "millions of dollars" on "the wrong thing", after they proposed changing the length of golf clubs in an attempt to reduce the distance players can hit the ball. the sport's two main governing bodies, the r&a and the usga, want to reduce the maximum length of clubs from 48 to 46 inches to restrict hitting distances. but mcilroy says those proposals �*reek of self importance', and rule makers should invest in grassroots golf instead. meanwhile, england's david horsey leads the way after the first round of the saudi international after a stunning round of 61. horsey made seven birdies in eight holes, and nine in total. horsey is nine under par. he's a shot ahead of scotland's stephen gallacher. austria's bernd wiesberger is in third place on six under. the fa have overturned southampton defender jan bednarek�*s red card,
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which he was given in his side's 9—0 defeat to manchester united. bednarek was shown a straight red in the second half at old trafford, after varjudged he had denied anthony martial an obvious goalscoring opportunity. he'll now be available for southampton�*s match against newcastle at the weekend. bednarek was the second southampton player to be sent off in the match after alexandre jankewitz was dismissed in the second minute. more on all those stories on the bbc sport website, plus confirmation that the bbc will broadcast england women's first official fixture in almost a year. they play northern ireland on the 23rd of february at st george's park. it'll be live on the bbc iplayer and red button. they'll also host canada in april. that's all the sport for now. gps say they say they seem dropped in cases of the common cold. the number of people being diagnosed
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with the flu virus has dropped by 95% to a level not seen in the uk for more than 100 years. why is this the case? are you seeing this as well in your surgery?— well in your surgery? thanks for havin: well in your surgery? thanks for having me- _ well in your surgery? thanks for having me- we _ well in your surgery? thanks for having me. we have _ well in your surgery? thanks for having me. we have seen - well in your surgery? thanks for having me. we have seen a - well in your surgery? thanks for| having me. we have seen a drop well in your surgery? thanks for. having me. we have seen a drop in the number of cases compared to other years. the number of cases compared to otheryears. i the number of cases compared to other years. i think there's a lot of reasons for this. one of course is with coronavirus and social distancing, people aren't meeting up and the mode of transmission is the same as coronavirus pretty much. the other thing is this year, the vaccine has been on a larger scale to people. additionally it was only 65, and it's actually seen a big uptake, which is really hard because people are worried about catching coronavirus and the flu. it's been
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brilliant. the reason is because patients with mild cases, they probably haven't phoned us about their illness because we been advising those with coronavirus to stay—at—home in isolate. again, the symptoms overlap. stay-at-home in isolate. again, the symptoms overlap-— symptoms overlap. that's really interesting- _ symptoms overlap. that's really interesting. so _ symptoms overlap. that's really interesting. so you _ symptoms overlap. that's really interesting. so you could - symptoms overlap. that's really interesting. so you could be - symptoms overlap. that's really . interesting. so you could be feeling a bit ropey, i think you may have covid—19 and stay away from the surgery, but you've actually got the flu. �* , ,., , ~ surgery, but you've actually got the flu. absolutely. we know we see lots of --eole flu. absolutely. we know we see lots of people with _ flu. absolutely. we know we see lots of people with viral _ flu. absolutely. we know we see lots of people with viral symptoms - flu. absolutely. we know we see lots of people with viral symptoms who . flu. absolutely. we know we see lots | of people with viral symptoms who go on to have a covid test which is negative. but again, that could have been a form of the flu. we seen a dramatic increase in cases recently. it could be people have got both, which can be a possibility. they
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focused everything around that coronavirus. there's a multitude of reasons. i think pharmacies as well are vaccinating lots of people properly, so that's helped as well. there is... it is the case with the flu virus that there is a mutation quite frequently, and i suppose you might wonder about what will happen next winter us not many people had it this winter —— if not many people. tt it this winter -- if not many --eole. .., it this winter -- if not many --eole. .. , it this winter -- if not many --eole. , ., it this winter -- if not many n-eole. , ., ., , people. it can erupt at any time, but we're — people. it can erupt at any time, but we're getting _ people. it can erupt at any time, but we're getting toward - people. it can erupt at any time, but we're getting toward the - people. it can erupt at any time, but we're getting toward the end people. it can erupt at any time, i but we're getting toward the end of this season. we see a big drop in numbers towards march. next year, i think people will take up the flu vaccine, and scientists are judging about the strains and they have the vaccine prepared. i think we should try not to worry about that just yet. try not to worry about that 'ust
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et. �* . , ., try not to worry about that 'ust et. �* ., , ., ., try not to worry about that 'ust et.�* ., ., ., , try not to worry about that 'ust et. ., ., . ., yet. and have you got any advice for eo - le if yet. and have you got any advice for people if they _ yet. and have you got any advice for people if they are — yet. and have you got any advice for people if they are feeling _ yet. and have you got any advice for people if they are feeling flu? - yet. and have you got any advice for people if they are feeling flu? i - people if they are feeling flu? i think it's a similar with coronavirus. i think if you're well, you can stay at home, then do so and make sure you adequately hydrate. vest up as much as you can, that's very, very important. if you're on well anyway which is beyond more than you seen, very fatigued, breathless, pick up the phone and ring your gp and they will further guide you on what to do next. tilers; guide you on what to do next. very useful. thank _ guide you on what to do next. very useful. thank you _ guide you on what to do next. very useful. thank you so _ guide you on what to do next. very useful. thank you so much. there's been growing demand for science—based courses at universities and colleges, according to figures from admissions service ucas. computing and engineering
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are proving increasingly popular with students, but subjects like english, history and philosophy have become less sought—after in the last decade. and there's concerns about the fall in acceptances to languages courses. they're down more than a third since 2011. let's get more from john cope, director of strategy, policy and public affairs at ucas. hejoins me now. afternoon to you, john. what do you think is driving this greater popularity of science and technology subjects? popularity of science and technology sub'ects? ,., ., ., ., ., subjects? good afternoon. the students. _ subjects? good afternoon. the students, more _ subjects? good afternoon. the students, more than _ subjects? good afternoon. the students, more than ever, - subjects? good afternoon. the students, more than ever, are | subjects? good afternoon. the - students, more than ever, are making the choices and weighing up the different options between universities and in chips. they're incredibly savvy, and we look at our surveys and talking to applicants, more and more, they're looking for recession proof courses. —— universities and apprenticeships.
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they are looking for an option that gives them the best prospect, and they perceive as the best bet. 0ften they perceive as the best bet. often when they look at the data and the graduate earnings, things like ai, law, medicine, they come up really high. so it's a good choice for them. 50 high. so it's a good choice for them. , , ., ., them. so these figures relate to the ast them. so these figures relate to the past decade. _ them. so these figures relate to the past decade. but — them. so these figures relate to the past decade, but i _ them. so these figures relate to the past decade, but i wonder— them. so these figures relate to the past decade, but i wonder if- them. so these figures relate to the past decade, but i wonder if you - past decade, but i wonder if you would expect to see an increase interest in courses for nursing, for example, as well as medicine, given the focus we've had on the nhs this past year. and possibly also for sciences such as chemistry, given the success of the vaccination programme. the success of the vaccination programme-— the success of the vaccination programme. yeah, the increase interest in _ programme. yeah, the increase interest in nursing _ programme. yeah, the increase i interest in nursing apprenticeships on that you cast —— ucas system has gone up significantly. you're
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absolutely right, that interest in things that really high earnings but are really also excited. they want to contribute, they want to help and they're also driven towards pewter science because these are the parts of the economy that are growing and full of exciting companies. absolutely, students really way up the choices they're making. they are very savvy. they pick the stuff that looks like a good career option and looks like a good career option and looks really exciting.— looks really exciting. those of the urowth looks really exciting. those of the growth areas. _ looks really exciting. those of the growth areas, but _ looks really exciting. those of the growth areas, but are _ looks really exciting. those of the growth areas, but are there - looks really exciting. those of the growth areas, but are there areasj growth areas, but are there areas that you're worried about? absolutely. the decline in foreign languages and significant, and it's been happening over many, many years. ten, 15 years or so. when you really think about the government's ambition of global britain and trading around the world, the decline in foreign language courses
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is a real problem. businesses need people with foreign languages in order to trade, so reversing that the client is incredibly important. 0ne the client is incredibly important. one of the big factors behind the decline of foreign languages is the provision of the a level, so lots of foreign language teachers are rare. lots of schools and colleges don't have the features they need to get that subject —— the teachers they need. alongside foreign languages, there's also been quite a big july and in —— quite a big decline in philosophy subjects. they may not have the same graduate earning potentials on some of the other subjects, but they're just as valuable to society. t subjects, but they're 'ust as valuable to society. i wondered about the modern _ valuable to society. i wondered about the modern foreign - valuable to society. i wondered - about the modern foreign languages. is it not possible for universities
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to lay are not an assembly early foundation course, but take on students who are keen who don't necessarily have an a level? most universities. _ necessarily have an a level? most universities, in _ necessarily have an a level? most universities, in fact _ necessarily have an a level? most universities, in fact all— universities, in fact all universities, in fact all universities who have outreach programmes for going to schools trying to talk to young people well before they get to that point and give them advice and guidance. we do that a lot as well at ucas making sure people realise the choices they make at a—level really do have an impact on their courses. as i said, one of the big issues here is for foreign language teachers. as a result, schools and colleges being unable to put on the course is often. that's one of the big problems that needs to be sorted. not to talk to you. that'sjohn cope from the university admission service ucas. thank you.
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the headlines on bbc news... the bank of england forecasts that the economy will rebound strongly from the spring, largely as a result of the vaccine programme. labour accuses the government of "risking lives" by delaying the introduction of quarantine hotels for high—risk travellers arriving in england. the government insist they're working at pace to get it right. a trial is launched to see whether different covid vaccines could be given to people for the first and second dose. the government is to update the law so that the attorney general suella braverman can take six months' maternity leave. it's announced a bill to formalise the process for ministerial maternity leave, which until now has been at the discretion of the prime minister. 0ur deputy political editor vicki young told us more. this is really quite surprising. i think it goes to the root of the way that cabinet ministers are employed.
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they are appointed by the prime minister, so they do not come under the normal employment law. that's not to say that women who have been ministers in the past are being denied maternity leave, that's not the case. they have been allowed to take it, but as i say, it's been on an informal basis and it is really up an informal basis and it is really up to the prime minister. the on the issue of two elea is different. she issue of two elea is different. she is the attorney general. that means she is a law officer and she also does attend cabinets. in her case, because of her particular responsibilities, they can'tjust be delegated to somebody else for six months or however long she wants to go on to maternity leave. so the government has decided to formalise the whole thing, notjust for ministers, but for those who have particularjobs in the opposition. so the leader of the opposition, for example, and their other posts in the opposition where you would also be allowed to benefit. i think it does show how rare it is for a candidate minister to be someone who
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is having a baby —— cabinet minister. it does mean she can keep herjob and have her maternity leave and she will be paid in full pay for “p and she will be paid in full pay for up to six months.— and she will be paid in full pay for up to six months. vicki young there. the pandemic— up to six months. vicki young there. the pandemic has _ up to six months. vicki young there. the pandemic has resulted - up to six months. vicki young there. the pandemic has resulted in - the pandemic has resulted in thousands of people having their screens for cancer delayed. charities warn that in some cases the disease will have progressed while people were waiting to be seen, and that emotional support is vital for those patients. jane mccubbin has been speaking to one woman who's been helped by a charity. on february the 6th, 2020, minna and kavi were married. a month later she was due to have potentially life—saving surgery for pancreatic cancer. but this was the news on february the 6th. a third person has tested positive for coronavirus here in the uk. the virus had started to spread across the country and the impact on cancer services was devastating. everything was good to go, and then coronavirus. minna's surgery was cancelled.
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so then when i went back in april, the tumour had started growing and it was too late to do the procedure any more. minna speaks to me from her bed at home, where her cancer journey is near its end. people suffer in silence. they don't know how much help there is, and what kind of help there is. in lockdown, facing a terminal diagnosis, she says her impossible situation was made bearable by one woman. a macmillan volunteer called julie, who she has never met, but who was on the end of a phone when she needed her most. we found a special connection. and it was like, you know when they say sometimes it was meant to be? basically, because my mum had passed in 2017 with cancer, i wanted to give something back. people keep saying to you,
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be strong, you will fight it. you will go through it. to a certain point, it is fantastic. but at some point, it's, like, i've had enough. i've heard enough. let me just feel how i feel. you know? you know, let me tell you exactly how i feel without you telling me that i need to be strong. and she was there for that. you must think of her, i guess, often? oh, yeah, absolutely. up to today i didn't know what had happened since my last conversation with her. she is really, really, really, really poorly at the moment. but she did record a message with me to give to you. can i show it to you? yeah, i'd love to see it, yeah. that would be brilliant. let me get it. from the bottom of my heart, julie, your kindness and your caring, and yourjoy...
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your way of seeing life, that carried me through. that carried me through. it's lovely to know that she taught me a lot of lessons about grabbing each day and making the most of it. jane mccubbin with that report. you're watching bbc news. we are used now, we're used to seeing posh spice on the front pages of newspapers, but now a less likely namesake has hit the headlines. a limousin heifer called wilodge poshspice — here she is — has become the uk's most expensive cow, selling for £262,000 at an auction in cumbria. well, posh spice's former owners livestock breeders, christine williams and paul tippets spoke to me earlier and told me they hadn't expected to get so much for her.
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we we re we were both very, very surprised. it was a very mind blowing and surreal moment.— it was a very mind blowing and surreal moment. . ., , ., surreal moment. paul, what were you exectin: ? surreal moment. paul, what were you expecting? we'd _ surreal moment. paul, what were you expecting? we'd like _ surreal moment. paul, what were you expecting? we'd like to _ surreal moment. paul, what were you expecting? we'd like to have - surreal moment. paul, what were you expecting? we'd like to have thought| expecting? we'd like to have thought ma be she expecting? we'd like to have thought maybe she might _ expecting? we'd like to have thought maybe she might have _ expecting? we'd like to have thought maybe she might have made - expecting? we'd like to have thought| maybe she might have made 50,000, but that— maybe she might have made 50,000, but that was a big expectation. she's— but that was a big expectation. she's always been very good, but, yeah _ she's always been very good, but, yeah to— she's always been very good, but, yeah. to get to the figures she did, that was— yeah. to get to the figures she did, that wasjust yeah. to get to the figures she did, that was just unbelievable. is an that wasjust unbelievable. is an extraordinary? _ that wasjust unbelievable. is an extraordinary? what _ that was just unbelievable. t3 ag�*t extraordinary? what happened, do you think? t extraordinary? what happened, do you think? ~' extraordinary? what happened, do you think? ~ ., , ., , , think? i think there was two guys who had their _ think? i think there was two guys who had their hearts _ think? i think there was two guys who had their hearts set - think? i think there was two guys who had their hearts set on - think? i think there was two guys. who had their hearts set on buying her, who had their hearts set on buying her. and _ who had their hearts set on buying her, and they weren't giving and easily _ her, and they weren't giving and easily and _ her, and they weren't giving and easily. and it was whoever gave first _ easily. and it was whoever gave first yeah, _ easily. and it was whoever gave first. yeah, itjust fortunate easily. and it was whoever gave first. yeah, it just fortunate that the places— first. yeah, it just fortunate that the places that she's gone to our very good — the places that she's gone to our very good stock people social have lletter— very good stock people social have better opportunities to hopefully go on for— better opportunities to hopefully go on for a _ better opportunities to hopefully go on for a fair potential. you
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described _ on for a fair potential. you described her _ on for a fair potential. you described her as _ on for a fair potential. ym. described her as extraordinary. christine, why? was extraordinary about her? she christine, why? was extraordinary about her? ,, . , ., . about her? she was unexceptional heifer from _ about her? she was unexceptional heifer from day _ about her? she was unexceptional heifer from day once _ about her? she was unexceptional heifer from day once and - about her? she was unexceptional heifer from day once and she - about her? she was unexceptional heifer from day once and she was| heifer from day once and she was born. she had the x factor, lovely balance, good on her legs. and she also knew and knows that she's good. she's certainly very pretty. i'm seeing pictures of her now, but i've got to ask you about her name. paul, where did posh spice come from? posh sice where did posh spice come from? posh spice normal — where did posh spice come from? posh spice normal act _ where did posh spice come from? posh spice normal act came from her mother — spice normal act came from her mother. her motherwas named spice normal act came from her mother. her mother was named ginger spice _ laughter she was bred by our good friend william _ she was bred by our good friend william smith. posh copy mac spice was an _ william smith. posh copy mac spice was an embryo
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“ so “ 50 we “ so we were very —— so we were very fortunate to come by these — —— so we were very fortunate to come by these genetics via embryo transplant. by these genetics via embryo transplant-— transplant. this is a slightly surreal conversation, - transplant. this is a slightly surreal conversation, i- transplant. this is a slightlyj surreal conversation, i have transplant. this is a slightly i surreal conversation, i have to transplant. this is a slightly - surreal conversation, i have to say. laughter christine, do you think the singers posh and ginger should be proud of these namesakes? t posh and ginger should be proud of these namesakes?— posh and ginger should be proud of these namesakes? i would say so in these namesakes? i would say so in the world of — these namesakes? i would say so in the world of breeding, _ these namesakes? i would say so in the world of breeding, they - these namesakes? i would say so in the world of breeding, they are - these namesakes? i would say so in| the world of breeding, they are both very highly rented. i mean, the reason for naming for posh spice is quite common in pedigree females, so it was a combination of getting the spice from ginger spice, and it was just taking the word posh, because
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that's what she wants. so just taking the word posh, because that's what she wants.— just taking the word posh, because that's what she wants. so you have not five that's what she wants. so you have got five times _ that's what she wants. so you have got five times as _ that's what she wants. so you have got five times as much _ that's what she wants. so you have got five times as much as - that's what she wants. so you have got five times as much as you - got five times as much as you thought you might get for her. how much is that going to change your lives, paul? tlat much is that going to change your lives. paul?— lives, paul? not really thought about it to _ lives, paul? not really thought about it to be _ lives, paul? not really thought about it to be honest. - lives, paul? not really thought about it to be honest. as - lives, paul? not really thought about it to be honest. as every business. _ about it to be honest. as every business, there is always plenty of overheads— business, there is always plenty of overheads and always somebody that needs— overheads and always somebody that needs pain, so, yeah. not sure what we're _ needs pain, so, yeah. not sure what we're going — needs pain, so, yeah. not sure what we're going to do with it, but hopefully we'll get some enjoyment out of— hopefully we'll get some enjoyment out of it— hopefully we'll get some enjoyment out of it one day when we get back to normal— out of it one day when we get back to normal times. | out of it one day when we get back to normal times. i do out of it one day when we get back to normaltimes._ to normaltimes. i do hope so. christine, _ to normaltimes. i do hope so. christine, will _ to normaltimes. i do hope so. christine, will you _ to normaltimes. i do hope so. christine, will you mr? - to normaltimes. i do hope so. christine, will you mr? yes. i to normaltimes. i do hope so. j christine, will you mr? yes. -- to normaltimes. i do hope so. - christine, will you mr? yes. -- will ou miss christine, will you mr? yes. -- will you miss her- _ christine, will you mr? yes. -- will you miss her. but— christine, will you mr? yes. -- will you miss her. but the _ christine, will you mr? yes. -- will you miss her. but the nice - christine, will you mr? yes. -- will you miss her. but the nice thing i christine, will you mr? yes. -- will you miss her. but the nice thing is| you miss her. but the nice thing is we know where _ you miss her. but the nice thing is we know where she _ you miss her. but the nice thing is we know where she is. _ you miss her. but the nice thing is we know where she is. we - you miss her. but the nice thing is we know where she is. we look i we know where she is. we look forward to seeing her in the future and seeing what she produces. christine williams and paul tibbets there. now it's time for a look at
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the weather with sarah keith—lucas. there could be some disruptive snow in the east. but for the here and now, heavy snow is a problem across parts of scotland. we got an amber warning in force from thursday right into saturday. 0ver warning in force from thursday right into saturday. over the higher ground, perhaps 50 cm over the highest hills. anywhere from perth and further south, a bit of a drier picture as we head through into friday. 0vernight, plenty more heavy rain, showers across parts of england, wales, northern ireland. we got this brisk easterly wind driving and further snow for much of scotland. mainly to the north of the central belt, down at lower levels. 0vernight temperature is about two to 7 degrees, so things are turning cooler. gradually through the weekend, colder weather moving in.
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for friday, more hill snow across scotland, some rain at low levels. heavy downpours for northern ireland, parts of northeast of england. some heavy showers falling on saturated ground, so there could be a few flooding issues between the course of friday. heavy showers. it will be largely dried towards the southeast, about 10 degrees. into the weekend, things are turning colderfor all the weekend, things are turning colder for all of the weekend, things are turning colderfor all of us, and the weekend, things are turning colder for all of us, and there will be further snow in places. particularly towards the east on sunday. for saturday, we still got this weather front in the northeast tending to fizzle away, some more snow to come across the higher ground of scotland. some of that falling to lower levels. we start to see snow falling to parts of northern england. to the south of that, we're holding on slightly milder air. that, we're holding on slightly milderair. 0vernight, saturday milder air. 0vernight, saturday night milderair. 0vernight, saturday night into sunday, that's where we will see those blue colours returning across the map. cold air
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moving in on a brisk, cold, easterly wind, so we are expecting some snow on sunday. the exact position detail of the snowfall is still a bit uncertain, it could be the southeast of england, east anglia, perhaps other eastern parts could see most of that snow. do stay tuned to your forecast. some disruption on the way by sunday. bye for now.
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today at six — the vaccine roll out is notjust about fighting the pandemic. the health of the economy depends on it, too. according to the bank of england, every shot in the arm makes a rapid recovery in the economy more likely. i am optimistic that we are now seeing a hugely impressive programme of vaccination and that we are also now beginning to see the positive benefits of it and i think, you know, as we move forward, that should reduce uncertainty. but on the jobs front, the unemployment rate is going to hit nearly 8% this year as the furlough scheme unwinds. also on tonight's programme. the gps working overtime to get the vaccine to those
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who can't leave their homes. a row over the government's plan to have quarantine

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