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tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 7, 2021 4:00pm-4:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines at apm: the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine offers limited protection against mild disease caused by the south african variant of covid—19. but scientists say it will still help to beat the pandemic. we may not be reducing the total number of cases, but there is still protection in that case against deaths, hospitalisations and severe disease. the uk government has no plans to introduce "vaccine passports", according to the vaccines minister, who says the focus should remain on the inoculation programme itself. of course, you have the evidence that you have been vaccinated held by yourgp. if other countries require you to show proof of that evidence, then that is obviously up to those countries. a himalayan glacier collapses,
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sending a wall of water and rock downriver in northern india. at least nine people have died and over 100 are missing. heavy snow could bring significant disruption to the south—east of england in the coming hours, with weather warnings issued by the met office for large parts of the uk. and coming up in half an hour — captain sir tom: we salute you, which documents the story of the fundraising veteran. good afternoon. the scientists behind the oxford astrazeneca coronavirus vaccine say it should still prevent people needing hospital treatment or dying, despite the emerging south african variant. research has found that the jab offers only limited protection
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against mild cases of that variant — although that study hasn't yet been checked by other experts. the government says it is looking at ways to deal with covid variants in the long term. our health correspondent, jim reed, reports. surge testing in the midlands to try and stamp out the latest variant of coronavirus. around 100 cases of a version first found in south africa have been confirmed here to date. the worry is, a specific mutation could make our vaccines less effective. now new trial results from south africa appear to confirm that. a small study of 2,000 people published in full tomorrow has found the oxford astrazeneca jab only offered limited protection against mild and moderate disease caused by the south african variant. there were too few cases of serious disease to measure in the trial, but the developers say separate blood tests suggest the vaccine should still be able to prevent hospital admissions and deaths.
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maybe we won't be reducing the number of cases as much, but we still won't be seeing the deaths, the hospitalisations and the severe disease, and that's really important for health care systems, even if we are having mild and asymptomatic infections. the news today follows similarfindings from other vaccine manufacturers. scientists in oxford are already working to tweak their vaccine and say a new version which can better protect against the south african variant should be available by the autumn. ministers say we may need a differentjab each year to protect the population. we see very much probably an annual or a booster in the autumn and then an annual, in the way we do with flu vaccinations, where you look at what variant of virus is spreading around the world, you rapidly produce a variant of vaccine and then begin to vaccinate and protect the nation. 11 million people have received a vaccine so far in the uk, but a reminder today that even when that programme is complete, it's unlikely
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to mean the end of covid. we may well have to live with this virus for many months if not years to come. jim reed, bbc news. justice became an air, we have had the latest figures for coronavirus. in the 24—hour to sunday, 373 people who had tested positive for covid—i9 within the previous 28 days died. the number of infections recorded up to sunday morning with 15,845. the vaccination programme has pretty much become a seven day a week operation. the latest figures we have, rememberthis operation. the latest figures we have, remember this is the first vaccination of the two they would expect to have, the number who have received their firstjab is received their first jab is 12,014,000.
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received their firstjab is 12,014,000. with infections falling and the roll—out going according to the government's plan, our correspondence came into the studio to talk to us about a out of lockdown. february the 22nd is the date in the diary that we are waiting for. that is when borisjohnson will come to the house of commons and describe where he thinks... a fortnight tomorrow? a fortnight tomorrow. ..where he thinks lockdown will go next. between now and then, the government will be assembling all of the data about how the roll—out is going, if they are going to hit their target of vaccinating all of the over—70s by mid—february, how far they will get with the next groups after that. they will be looking at hospitalisations, mortality rates, whether there are any more variants popping up, how they are suppressing the south african variant. all of that goes into the mix and will determine what the government will announce that week after the parliamentary half term, february 22nd. the other date we do know is that the government wants english schools to be back by march the 8th. that will be part of their thinking
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as well, they will have to weigh up the extent to which that may or may not have an impact on the r rate and transmitability of the virus. so all of that goes into the pot. but we will get a better sense of where lockdown goes next in a couple of weeks' time. what about this debate about vaccine passports? for a lot of people, that is a long way off — the thought of a summer holiday or even travel for work, they are all for the future. but the debate is very lively at the moment on this. it is, and becoming more so. the more people that are jabbed and think they are inching toward freedom, the more we talk about lockdown, the closer we get to summer, the more people are thinking about holidays. the greek government say they would be willing to see british holiday—maers going their way if they can prove they have had the vaccinations. i think the danish and swedish governments have said they will introduce a vaccination passport system very soon. tony blair said recently that he things this would be inevitable in the future world, and that britain should be
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on the front foot trying to do this now. but nadhim zahawi dismissed the idea today, saying it is not in their current thinking at all. partly because vaccines in the uk are not mandatory, so he doesn't think it would be fair to go down the passport route, and it would be discriminatory because you would have one part of the country — at the moment the over—70s — who are jabbed and ready and have to start packing to go on holiday, and others, who are younger, who cannot. he thinks that would be unfair. at least nine people have died and dozens are missing after a crumbling glacier caused flash flooding in northern india. the floods washed away part of a dam in the uttarakhand region of the himalayas. most of those missing are believed to be construction workers. disaster relief forces are trying to reach workers trapped inside a tunnel. 0ur south asia editor, anbarasan ethirajan, has the latest.
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this morning, when people witnessed the deluge of water going through this river, it caused a lot of panic in that area and many people are feared missing. more than 100, and there are unknown numbers of people working at the power plants in this area. the pictures showed one part of this dam being washed away. that raised lots of concerns about the welfare of the workers. a short while ago, the government confirmed that they have rescued around 16 workers who were stuck inside a tunnel very close to this power plant. they have been rescued, that is the positive news. but we don't have any information about dozens of people who are missing, most of them believed to be workers.
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because it is a lean season, there is not much water in the river. state officials say the threat of floods the downstream areas have now reduced. heavy snow is forecast to bring significant disruption to the east and south—east of england later today. snow is moving in and weather warnings have been issued by the met office for large parts of the uk, with predictions of possible travel disruption. vishala sri—pathma reports. the sledges are out in full force, as are the carefully crafted snowmen and rather large snowballs. it might be sub—zero temperatures in parts of britain, but the snow appears to be bringing some of us a little light relief during lockdown. but for parts of the south—east of england, it's not all fun and games, with roads disrupted and trains cancelled. the train company southeastern
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have closed some lines for all of sunday and monday, and are asking passengers to stay at home. in essex, some coronavirus testing sites have been forced to close, with vaccination centres remaining open for now. the met office have issued an amber warning for these parts of england, meaning that travel upheaval and power cuts are expected. and a yellow alert for much of scotland and northern ireland. in the meantime, dogs or human, we all need to be a bit more careful while going on our daily walks. vishala sri—pathma, bbc news. doctors in england are to be paid an extra £10 by the nhs for every person who's housebound that they vaccinate. meanwhile 18 new mass vaccine centres open tomorrow. here's our science correspondent, pallab ghosh
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gp george hobbs is headed out to give around 20 of his patients covid jabs at home. they're too ill or vulnerable to come in a for a vaccination. first up is diana garfield... right, 0k. ..who has heart problems and is also losing her sight. there still is a hope in the back of my mind, however old i am, i still have that hope that... ..something will work out. right, cheerio, bye—bye! it's great because i have been a gp for over 27 years and they know me, so i think when they see someone familiar coming it makes a difference to the experience. but quite a lot of them are quite nervous and then when they see someone they know, that is very reassuring. hello, i am calling - from ashtree surgery. ashtree surgery in carnforth in lancashire is on course to vaccinate its most vulnerable patients by the middle of this month, but that is not the case everywhere. so gps will receive an additional £10 on top of the standard fee for every housebound person they vaccinate. yes, this will be helpful. it does take significantly longer
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to go out and visit someone and to take the necessary time and precautions in each and every visit, that takes people away from a vaccination centre, where they can do more vaccinations in a similar amount of time. so we do need to recognise that and it is good that nhs england have done that and have provided this additional small amount of funding to enable practices to provide vaccinations to this particularly vulnerable group of people as quickly as possible. the latest data shows that more than 11.4 million people have received their first dose. that is a rise ofjust over 494,000 on the previous 24—hour reporting period. at this rate of vaccination, the nhs would need to give jabs to an average ofjust under 393,000 people per day in order to meet the government's target of 15 million 1st doses by the 15th of february. and the scottish government has said that it has met its target to vaccinate the over 80s
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by the 5th of february. there are to be 18 more vaccination sites opening from next week, like the one at blackburn cathedral. the new sites mean the jabs are now available from more than 100 large—scale centres, 1000 local gp services, almost 200 pharmacies and over 250 hospitals. pallab ghosh, bbc news. as the lockdown continues and new covid variants emerge, the government is constantly looking at what restrictions are needed to bring the virus under control. 0ne debate is whether we should return to the tier system after lockdown or whether the same rules should apply england wide. one thing that's so far been ruled out is axing the bubble system — because, for many, bubbles have represented a lifeline during the pandemic. hope bolger has been taking a look at how they've helped.
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it's been a lifeline. i don't know how people are doing without it. the difference it has made it to our quality of life, to her quality of life, is huge. it has actually saved my life. coronavirus has caused many of us to feel isolated at times. during the first lockdown some people spent weeks without any real human contact. alex was one of them. the most meaningful conversation i had was with the lady in the co—op over the road about eggs. it was incredibly isolating, it got really, really lonely. when support bubbles were brought in lastjune, they offered people in similar situations a vital chance to reconnect. it has actually saved my life. had the situation of being on my own, being away from people, gone on for much longer, i don't know what state i would have ended up in. honestly, i owe my friends who said "come over" a world of gratitude. because without them, we might not be having the conversation. the rules across the uk
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differ slightly. in england, wales and scotland, you can form a support bubble if you are the only adult in the house. separately, england has childcare bubbles for families with kids under 14. scotland lets couples who live apart bubble, even if there are other people in their households and in northern ireland two households of any size can form a household bubble. it's even really difficult thinking back to it, just how much of a struggle it was. with a tantruming, really needy two—year—old, it was so, so, so difficult. nessa runs a new business and is a university lecturer, all while looking after her toddler, jacob. she gets help from her mum, pam. it's been a lifeline, i don't know how people are doing without it. my business definitely wouldn't have been able to survive because we are a new business, i do need to go on to site quite often. at a time when schools are closed, shops are shut and pubs are empty
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some have raised concerns that bubbles contribute to the spread of the virus, but would ditching them lead to more problems? in the last few weeks, the government has dismissed rumours it might suspend bubbles. the bubbles that we have in place, the childcare bubbles, the support bubbles, are very important and we are going to keep them. experts say it's a case of weighing up the risks. so it's really important that you form the bubble with the right people to optimise your mental health and at the same time to reduce your chance of contracting the virus. what would you do if we couldn't come round and make yourdinnerforyou? starve. 93—year—old margaret worked in the land army during the second world war. this support bubble has really allowed us to actually keep her independent in her home because the reality is if it didn't exist she'd have to go into a home or she'd have to move in with us, which she vehemently does not want to do.
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as with everything during this pandemic, it's about finding the right balance, but for those in bubbles their importance cannot be overstated. hope bolger, bbc news. we can now speak to kimberly dienes, a lecturer in clinical and health psychology at swansea university. she's researching the impact of lockdown and social distancing on people during the pandemic. thank you very much for being with us. what has your research suggested about the value of the bubble system? thank you for having the first of all. i think social isolation really goes against biological and psychological needs and all of us was up research shows that positive social support groups decreases stress. we have been speaking to people since the start of lockdown, and we have seen the negative mental health impacts as soon as we
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started. increase depression, increased anxiety, especially in groups living alone. it was still 0k during the second wave, but in this third lockdown it is getting worse again. so social support is something that is very important for all of us. we something that is very important for all of us. ~ , all of us. we see in the winter --eole all of us. we see in the winter peeple who — all of us. we see in the winter people who suffer— all of us. we see in the winter people who suffer from - all of us. we see in the winter people who suffer from the i all of us. we see in the winter i people who suffer from the lack all of us. we see in the winter - people who suffer from the lack of sunlight and actually have a real measurable mental health deterioration on a darker, shorter days. the other interesting aspects of this, we also, there is zoom and the other technologies you would not have had even 20 years ago for people who would be trapped in similar situations. people who would be trapped in similarsituations. but people who would be trapped in similar situations. but none of that substitutes touch, does it? a therapist talk to me not long ago about what you describe is a skin hunger. how are people dealing with the fact cannot touch, hug, embrace?
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that is an interesting point you bring up. it has been shown over and over again. and children, bring up. it has been shown over and overagain. and children, it bring up. it has been shown over and over again. and children, it is important for their development. holding someone's hand reduces your reaction to stress. little kids know that. i reaction to stress. little kids know that. ., , ., that. i will never forget my father sa in: that. i will never forget my father saying that _ that. i will never forget my father saying that one — that. i will never forget my father saying that one of— that. i will never forget my father saying that one of his _ saying that one of his brother—in—law's grandchildren, she made two meant hold hands as they walk down the street. he found it quite comforting, that closeness. it must have exaggerated that for children, particularly the elderly, who may be widows or widowers who have not had the physical contact with their children and grandchildren, that have helped keep
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the mentally stable?— the mentally stable? absolutely. i have a 77-year-old _ the mentally stable? absolutely. i have a 77-year-old mother - the mentally stable? absolutely. i have a 77-year-old mother in - the mentally stable? absolutely. i - have a 77-year-old mother in america have a 77—year—old mother in america who i talk to twice a week, and she has been alone since march. she says that she once hug. she has said that over and over again. that she once hug. she has said that overand overagain. —— that she once hug. she has said that over and over again. —— she wants a hug. i think support bubbles do provide that. people who are having this low level depression, this loss of control and agency that they are feeling, especially with the mixed messages, it can be buffered and protected against with something as simple as being around people, and zoom and other things cannot have as big an impact as social support can. hopefully we can see what the overall pattern is of the long—term impact.
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it raises an intriguing thought. with all of the virtual technology, if you could have a digital hug, where you felt as if you are being hugged by somebody, without not be something? if that was such a thing, i would give a hug to catherine in the sports centre. that is the best i can do! they can hug in the rugby. it is unavoidable. not much affection goes into those tackles. there's a battle under way at the principality stadium where the final six nations match of this opening weekend is just re—starting after half time. ireland were 3—0 down after a welsh penalty. after a sending off for the use of an elbow. a red card, but ireland kept themselves in the game, took the lead for the whole —— took the lead just before half—time. in
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the lead just before half—time. in the last few minutes, wales have got themselves right back in it. george north going over with a try 49 minutes in. it is now 11—13, because leigh halfpenny missed that conversion. ireland still holding on to a lead ofjust two points. ireland down to 14 men. that is live on bbc one right now. tottenham ended a run of three defeats as they beat struggling west brom 2—0 in the premier league. harry kane made a surprise early return after ankle problems and scored after nearly an hour's play. not long after, son heung—min completed the win. spurs are up to seventh, but the baggies are 11 points from safety. leicester missed the chance to go level on points with second place manchester united after battling out a goalless draw with wolves at molineaux. leicester had a great chance to snatch victory in added time butjamie vardy headed just wide.
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three more games today. the big game is at 4.30 with defending champions liverpool hosting league leaders manchester city. later at 7.15 bottom side sheffield united play chelsea the scottish premiership's bottom club hamilton academical snatched a late draw at home to title—chasing rangers. steven gerrard's side weren't at their best and needed an own goal from hamilton to take the lead, borna barisic�*s cross turned in by brian easton. but hamilton got their equaliser in the fourth minute of injury time, ryan callachan drew them level. they're now three points behind ross county. rangers are 21 points clear of celtic at the top. there's been a big shock in the women's superleague this afternoon. brighton came from behind to end chelsea's 33—match unbeaten run, stretching back two years. aileen whelan equalised before megan connolly's corner went straight in. manchester united could have gone top — but they lost at home to reading. england have been piling the pressure on india
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in the first test — four wickets for dom bess meant india finished day three 321 runs behind. adam wild rounds up the action. before the play, the plotting. this was england planning an all—round team performance. first with the bat and adding as many possible to their already impressive total. this helped them towards 578 before the clatter of wickets signal the start of phase two of the day's plan. england's bowlers taking early wickets. here wasjofra archer, right on schedule. at lunch, england on top and still revising that strategy. dom bess showing exactly how he intends to trap them. isn't it great when a plan comes together? but you cannot always bank on brilliance, except perhaps when it comes tojoe root.
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already inspirational with the bat, this catch was quite magnificent. if anything, that spurred india on. this approach was less subtle but effective. but nothing can save a batsman from sheer bad luck. this shot ricocheted into the hands of an england fielder. eventually one risk too many, out for 91. india ending still more than 300 behind. another good day for england, after plot another tomorrow. a good day for dom bess, then — well, on the field anyway. how do india stop him? loose advertising boards, maybe? here he is in the post—match press conference, minding his own business. when — whack. luckily no lasting damage, and the england media rep was on hand to prevent
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any more mishaps. that's all the sport for now. we will see you later. this year's super bowl promises to be a classic, with the tampa bay buccaneers taking on the kansas city chiefs. the match will take place before a reduced capacity crowd in florida. only 25,000 fans can attend, and that includes 7,500 vaccinated health care workers who have received free tickets. let's talk to woody nixon — an icu nurse at the moffitt cancer center in tampa — who is going to the game
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after getting a free ticket as a thank you. thank you for talking to us. as you get prepared for the long night in front of the television. i'm sure you can't wait. tell me about how you can't wait. tell me about how you found out you had got your ticket, because it is quite a special story. ticket, because it is quite a special story-— ticket, because it is quite a special story. they had already e-mailed everybody _ special story. they had already e-mailed everybody that - special story. they had already e-mailed everybody that was l special story. they had already - e-mailed everybody that was getting e—mailed everybody that was getting tickets, so i figured i hadn't got one. then i worked on overnight shift 7am i got called into a meeting. i thought i was in trouble, but it turned out it was a message telling me that i had been selected to get a ticket. it was really a special moment. i didn't breakdown and cry, but i was close! for special moment. i didn't breakdown and cry, but i was close!— and cry, but i was close! for those who don't — and cry, but i was close! for those who don't know, _ and cry, but i was close! for those who don't know, rob _ and cry, but i was close! for those who don't know, rob is _ and cry, but i was close! for those who don't know, rob is quite - and cry, but i was close! for those who don't know, rob is quite a - who don't know, rob is quite a personality. he is a big player, a big star, but he is more than that? he is, he is quite the entertainer. i don't know if you will get the chance to meet him after the match, because there is a special concert
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for you guys got amok yes, there is a special concert before the game. and you will be there for that? i will! iwill and you will be there for that? i will! i will be taking off a little bit after this. i have to drive down there, it'll take about an hour. the world talks — there, it'll take about an hour. the world talks about coronavirus and almost nothing else. you must have had a pretty tough time in florida, judging by the reports. how has it been for you and your colleagues working in the icy you —— in the intensive care? it working in the icy you -- in the intensive care?— working in the icy you -- in the intensive care? it is been pretty difficult, intensive care? it is been pretty difficult. but — intensive care? it is been pretty difficult, but we _ intensive care? it is been pretty difficult, but we have _ intensive care? it is been pretty difficult, but we have been - intensive care? it is been pretty| difficult, but we have been more nervous down here. but, day by day, it is tough. but that is why this is such a nice thing, it is wonderful.
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have you been to the super bowl before? i have you been to the super bowl before? ., ., ., . ., ,, , before? i have not. two world series and one stanley _ before? i have not. two world series and one stanley cup. _ before? i have not. two world series and one stanley cup. this _ before? i have not. two world series and one stanley cup. this is - before? i have not. two world series and one stanley cup. this is my - and one stanley cup. this is my first super bowl. for and one stanley cup. this is my first super bowl.— first super bowl. for those who don't know _ first super bowl. for those who don't know it, _ first super bowl. for those who don't know it, we _ first super bowl. for those who don't know it, we can _ first super bowl. for those who don't know it, we can see - first super bowl. for those who don't know it, we can see it - first super bowl. for those who l don't know it, we can see it here first super bowl. for those who - don't know it, we can see it here in the uk, but the time difference, it is the early hours of day morning for us, or it will be. sell it to people. why is it worth watching, evenif people. why is it worth watching, even if you don't follow american football regularly? for even if you don't follow american football regularly?— even if you don't follow american football regularly? for one thing, eve -la football regularly? for one thing, every play is _ football regularly? for one thing, every play is exciting. _ football regularly? for one thing, every play is exciting. the - football regularly? for one thing, every play is exciting. the game | football regularly? for one thing, i every play is exciting. the game can change in an instant. the half—time show is worth it, the commercials are hilarious. that is a big draw for a lot of people.— are hilarious. that is a big draw for a lot of people. what are you most looking _ for a lot of people. what are you most looking forward _ for a lot of people. what are you most looking forward to - for a lot of people. what are you | most looking forward to question mccue have never been in a stadium for the super bowl, and it is the home stadium, and it is your team applying for sub you have got the shirt on there. even if there were
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fewer people, it will be an incredible evening, won't it? what fewer people, it will be an incredible evening, won't it? what i am most looking _ incredible evening, won't it? what i am most looking forward _ incredible evening, won't it? what i am most looking forward to - incredible evening, won't it? what i am most looking forward to is - incredible evening, won't it? what i am most looking forward to isjust i am most looking forward to is just the camaraderie of being at the game. i can scream my head off, but when i met the game and there are people screaming with me, that makes it all the more fun. i may not have a voice tomorrow, i probably won't. you will be happy to hold up signs in the intensive care unit. do you fancy making some sort of prediction on the score? buccaneers 37-33. prediction on the score? buccaneers 37-33- that — prediction on the score? buccaneers 37-33. that would _ prediction on the score? buccaneers 37-33. that would be _ prediction on the score? buccaneers 37-33. that would be quite - prediction on the score? buccaneers 37-33. that would be quite the - prediction on the score? buccaneers| 37-33. that would be quite the night in tam -a if 37-33. that would be quite the night in tampa if that _ 37-33. that would be quite the night in tampa if that was _ 37-33. that would be quite the night in tampa if that was the _ 37-33. that would be quite the night in tampa if that was the score. - in tampa if that was the score. thank you so much, it has been a pleasure to talk to you. thank you for all of the work you and your colleagues are doing. i know how much it is appreciated. we will try to find some always in this country to find some always in this country to say thank you for our health workers, but we can ever said enough, and there are never enough ways to set. so thank you on behalf
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of the bbc for every

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