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tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 8, 2021 3:00am-3:31am GMT

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welcome to bbc news — i'm lewis vaughnjones. our top stories: south africa pulls the oxford—astrazeneca jab from its upcoming vaccine programme after a study shows disappointing results against the country's coronavirus variant. protests against the coup in emr continue and become the country's largest in a decade. —— myanmar. former us secretary of state george shultz whose negotiating helped end the cold war, has died. a breakaway glacier washes away a dam in northern india. the flooding kills at least nine people — more than a hundred are missing. after a three—week delay, a massive logistical mission and a handful of health scares, the australian open finally begins.
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i'm shaimaa khalil, and here in melbourne park, there is a real buzz as play gets under way. after a dramatic and challenging buildup, it's all go for the first grand slam of the year. hello, welcome to the program. south africa is suspending its full rollout of the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine after a study showed disappointing results against the local variant of coronavirus. it comes less than a week after the country's president and senior ministers agreed to the arrival of a million doses of the jab as they arrived at the airport. it is a setback for inoculation efforts that were due to start in the coming days. here's south africa's health minister speaking at a video briefing.
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our scientists must quickly sit together and figure out what approach we are going to use in order to effectively deploy the astrazeneca vaccines. it must be clear when that can be done, what conditions need to be fulfilled, what we need to do about all of that. so that basically is the assignment that has been given to our scientists all together. they'll figure it out, they'll come back to us and say, this is the proposal on the astrazeneca. so it's a temporary issue that we have to hold onto astrazeneca, it is temporary until we figure out these issues, what are the next steps supposed to be. when we know those steps, then of course we'll bring it back. scientists behind the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine say it should still prevent people needing hospital treatment or dying if infected with the south african variant.
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around 100 cases of the variant have been identified in the uk. our medical editor fergus walsh reports on the latest research and the ongoing effort to combat emerging strains of the coronavirus. snow and ice did not stop the vaccination drive in ipswich today. there is now a road, albeit a difficult one, out of the pandemic. but there's concern that current vaccines being used at thousands of centres across the uk might eventually lose some of their potency as coronavirus evolves. the oxford astrazeneca jab works well against the kent variant first seen in september and now dominant in the uk. but a small study of 2,000 young adults in south africa suggests it gives minimal protection against mild and moderate disease caused by the variant there. even so, scientists in oxford are confident that it would still prevent
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serious covid disease. maybe we won't be reducing the number of cases as much, but we still won't be seeing the deaths, the hospitalisations and the severe disease, and that's really important for health care systems. even if we are having mild and asymptomatic infections, to prevent people from going to hospital with covid would have a major effect. coronavirus is constantly mutating. most changes aren't a worry. vaccines use the gene from the spike protein to train the immune system, so if this code mutates, as it has in the variance from south africa, brazil and kent, it may make the virus less visible to antibodies. thankfully, t cells, another part of our immune system, look like they can spot infection, meaning existing vaccines should protect against severe disease. more than 100 cases of the south africa variant has
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been found in the uk, and house—to—house testing in affected areas is under way in a bid to suppress its spread. but it's inevitable that more variants will emerge. the oxford team are creating prototype vaccines against several variants and say they'll be ready, if needed, by the autumn. coronavirus immunisation may become an annual event. we see very much probably an annual or a booster in the autumn, the way we do with flu vaccinations, where you look at what variant of virus is spreading round the world, you rapidly produce a variant of vaccine and then begin to vaccinate and protect the nation. the more coronavirus mutates, the less likely it is that transmission can be stopped. it means covid will probably be a permanent threat. but like other diseases, mostly preventable by vaccination. fergus walsh, bbc news.
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to the latest on the military coup in myanmar now. a nationwide strike is expected today in protest against last week's coup. tens of thousands of people demanding the release of the elected leader aung san suu kyi. all this after sunday saw the largest protest in the country in more than a decade after tens of thousands of people demanding the release of the elected leader aung san suu kyi. from bangkok, our correspondent jonathan head reports. they started marching in the morning, and the numbers just kept growing. if the soldiers who unseated myanmar�*s elected government on monday thought their coup would be unopposed, thousands came out to prove them wrong, filling the streets. chanting. "democracy is our right", they chanted, "ending dictatorship, ourwill". horns honk. the traffic was forced to a crawl and cars sounded their horns, not in anger, but in support, and in defiance of the police, who mutely watched as yangon city centre was taken over.
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many wore or carried the colour red of the national league for democracy, the deposed party of aung san suu kyi. and everywhere, herface. she's still in military custody, but very much the symbol of this growing resistance movement. translation: we don't want to go back to military rule. i we don't want to live in fear. we want mother suu to be freed from being under detention unjustly. translation: they can block the internet and other - communications, but they can't block people's ears, their mouths and their brains. the security forces made no attempt to break up the massive crowd. some traffic police even handed out water. just for a moment, you could forget that a popular leader had been overthrown at the point of a gun.
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but the momentum behind this movement must worry myanmar�*s military rulers. there were similar protests across the country — in the second city, mandalay, a surprisingly big march in remote and mountainous chin state, and even in the military�*s own citadel, the fortress—like capital naypidaw, a noisy rally of protesting motorbike riders. the military may hold all the levers of government, but for now, the streets belong to the people. after an anxious and dispiriting week, there was relief and enjoyment in these protests. but the army has killed thousands before to shore up its power. it may do so again. jonathan head, bbc news. president ronald reagan's long—time secretary of state, george shultz, has died aged 100.
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mr shultz spent most of the 1980s. mr shultz spent most of the 1980s trying to improve relations with the soviet union and forging a course for peace in the middle east. paul hawkins looks back at his life. he is widely credited with helping to and the cold war. thank you very much, mr president and my friend. george shultz served for 6.5 years under ronald reagan. during that time he helped improve relations with the soviet union, striking relationships with gorbachev and his foreign minister, eduard shevardnadze. in negotiations, he refused to make concessions in advance. waiting for them to blink and they usually did. helping us to remove this understanding... because as he well knew, they had become more concerned with problems at home than interference abroad. in 1987, both countries signed a landmark arms control agreement. he was involved in talks
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with iran in the 1980s. the iranians are known as great rug merchants and not for nothing. the iranians are good at this business of smiling and encouraging you on, and then cutting your throat. in total, he served three presidents, dwight eisenhower and richard nixon here. his public service following an impressive academic career which saw him become a distinguished fellow of the hoover institution. its director, condoleeza rice, a former secretary of state herself, called him a "great american statesman and a true patriot." while the current secretary of state said he was a "legend and an ardent champion of diplomacy." george shultz chose words instead of weapons to end the cold war. last december, to celebrate his 100th birthday, he wrote in the washington post, "trust is the coin of the realm. when trust was in the room, good things happened. when trust wasn't, good things did not".
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george shultz who has died aged 100. david priest's senior fellow at george mason university centre for intelligence in a former intelligence officer. regular coming on the program because i think you vladimir. and in credible life and career, what you think it was that he brought to that role as secretary of state? indeed. he brou:ht secretary of state? indeed. he brought to _ secretary of state? indeed. he brought to make _ secretary of state? indeed. he brought to make things - secretary of state? indeed. he brought to make things to - secretary of state? indeed. he brought to make things to that j brought to make things to that role. one was experienced with his international counterparts. this is the only person in modern american history who has held four separate cabinet positions as secretary of labour, secretary of the treasury, the director of the office of management and budget, and then of course as secretary of state for ronald reagan. but he had connections from those previous assignments such as essentially building the group that is now known as the group that is now known as the g7, back when he was secretary of the treasury. that is the first one. the second
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one is the unique set of skills he brought from that experience. he was able to do three things as secretary of state that few secretaries of state that few secretaries of state have done well at the same time. the first is having an excellent relationship with the president himself. second, is to have the full respect and to be able to lead the foreign service of the united states, the actual diplomatic corps. and third, the relationship with his foreign counterparts, ranging from those in the soviet union to western europe. george shultz had a remarkable combination of all three skill sets. �* . combination of all three skill sets. . , ., ., ., sets. and that reputation for trust, sets. and that reputation for trust. what _ sets. and that reputation for trust, what do _ sets. and that reputation for trust, what do you _ sets. and that reputation for trust, what do you think - i sets. and that reputation for l trust, what do you think - how trust, what do you think — how important do you think that was and how important a role to play in those hours of talks and negotiations with the soviet union? absolutely. geora e soviet union? absolutely. george shultz _ soviet union? absolutely. george shultz had - soviet union? absolutely. george shultz had a - soviet union? absolutely. - george shultz had a reputation both in the united states and around the world as being a man of his word. he didn't overpromise things that he
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couldn't deliver but he also didn't try to bamboozle people or try to fall them. that made it difficult because it was often very blunt and direct —— fool them. but also meant when he spoke that he mentored and people understood that. that was a huge aspect of negotiation in the long—term. you may lose out on a short—term opportunity but actually works out well when you are the secretary of state for a stunning 6.5 years, which overlaps with five different national security advisers to ronald reagan. that is remarkable in terms of his staying power. fix, remarkable in terms of his staying power. a remarkable career. david _ staying power. a remarkable career. david priest, - staying power. a remarkable career. david priest, thank. career. david priest, thank you. career. david priest, thank ou. ., . career. david priest, thank ou. ., ., stay with us here on bbc news, still to come: making history again. tom brady hasjust won his making history again. tom brady has just won his seventh super bowl. this time with the tampa bay buccaneers. there's mr mandela, mr nelson mandela, a free man,
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taking his first steps into a new south africa. iran's spiritual leader ayatollah khamenei has said he has passed a death sentence on salman rushdie, the british author of a book which many muslims say is blasphemous. the people of haiti havej flocked to church to give thanks for the ousting - of their former president, ba by doc duvalier. because of his considerable value as a stallion, shergar was kept in a special secure box in the stud farm's central block. shergar was driven away in a horse box the thieves had brought with them. there stepped down from the plane a figure in mourning. elizabeth ii, queen of this realm, and of all her other realms and territories, head of the commonwealth, defender of the faith.
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this is bbc news, the latest headlines: south africa says its suspending its full rollout of the astrazeneca vaccine after a study showed disappointing results against the local variant of coronavirus. reports of a third day of protest on the streets of myanmar as people revolted against week's who. police say at least 100 people are still missing after iglesia broke free and smashed into hydroelectric dam. one witness said a wall of water and rock sped down the river so quickly there was no time to sound the alarm. a massive rescue operation is taking place and survivors have been pulled from the mud and rubble. it happened in uttarakhand state in the district of chamoli. our delhi correspondent rajini vaidyanthan has the latest. this dramatic footage shows
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when the nanda devi glacier in the himalayas burst on sunday morning. as water gushed down the valley, damage and destruction. translation: about 50-100 people were running - for their lives, but couldn't be saved, and they were engulfed by the river. the situation here is still dangerous. people are leaving their homes and are fleeing towards the forest. with floodwaters rising and roads and homes destroyed, an urgent rescue operation was under way. hundreds of members of the indian military and disaster response units have been deployed to the area. translation: approximately 125 people could be missing - as per the estimates, but it could rise because the power company is unable to give the exact figures. everyone is busy in the rescue operations. cheering. a moment of hope, as workers rescued one man from this tunnel, but dozens more are
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still feared trapped. officials say two power plants, employing more than 150 people, were also hit. many of the workers remain unaccounted for. hospitals are on standby. in a tweet, india's prime minister's, narendra modi, said he was constantly monitoring the situation. "india stands with uttarakhand," he said. rajini vaidyanathan, bbc news, delhi. the australian open tennis is underway. it's the most ambitious sporting competition since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic. the event is only happening because australia has been able to control the spread of the virus. our correspondent shaimaa khalil has this update from melbourne it's been a tough ride for the australian open with hotel quarantine dramas. just last week, more than 500 players, officials and staff were forced back into isolation, testing, because of a covid—19
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case in their hotel. there was fear that this might not go ahead but this is day1 and it's very much under way melbourne park has a real buzz about it this morning, we've seen people coming in through the gates all morning, some making their way to the tennis courts to watch the matches, others actually sitting outside, even though it's a little bit chilly, watching on the big screen. and it has been really, really challenging getting to this stage, not without its controversy of course, with some players complaining about quarantining with covid—19 positive cases on their planes, but i think much to the organisers' relief and thrill, players are now on the courts, fans are trickling in and play is now about to start. and what about those fans, because many people in many countries around the world who are locked in their houses at the moment, unable to see family, friends, they will be seeing crowds of people entering. are there any special measures that are being taken there?
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oh, this is all about covid—19 safety. the minute you walk in, there is no doubt that this is a very, very different tournament. on the big screen there are all these rules that are being announced just on loop. when people walk in, they have to sanitise. mask wearing is also advisable if you are not social distancing, you wear masks indoors, not outdoors. all tickets are digital, that is to limit contact but also for contact tracing and the park itself has actually been arranged differently. there are three different zones which means people can't walk freely in the park but that is to limit contact and to help in contact tracing as well. there are really interesting tennis twists on covid rules, so if you walk around there are posters saying, "be an ace, cover your face", or "keep a raquet�*s distance", so people who are coming here are in no doubt that they have to be covid—safe, that they have to social distance but of course melbourne has been under one of the longest and strictest covid—19 lockdowns in the world, so they feel after this time they know how the rest of the world feels but they also want to show
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an example of what it's like to come out after that and be able to enjoy some entertainment and good tennis. let's quickly get onto the tennis, then. who are the favourites? big names obviously there but their preparation is so unusual this time. yeah, many players have been forced into lockdown, some longer than others because of those covid—19 cases on their planes or in hotel quarantine, so they have been complaints that there wasn't enough practice time, but we've just seen naomi osaka walk into the court with big cheers. we got huge names, really, in the sport. naomi osaka, serena williams, ash barty, novak djokovic, australia's nick kyrgios, of course, always provides interesting times on the court. all of them are going to play and again, ithink, you know,
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much has been talked about in terms of financial revenue and whether this is a big risk. i think what people are looking at here is, the world looking to australia to provide an example of what it's like to hold a major international event with huge sporting names, even with the challenges of doing it in the midst of a pandemic but really, also to the locals, because it is going to local tourists of the travel bans and the border closure. it is also about australians, melburnians, who have stuck with that lockdown and now are out and enjoying that big event. other chapter has been added to the legendary career of tom brady. at the age of 43 he has led the tampa bay buccaneers directory in the super bowl, beating the chiefs by 31 points to nine. is the seventh time he has won the title, extending
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own record. let speak now to melissa jacobs. thank you so much for coming on the programme. thank ou for coming on the programme. thank you for having _ coming on the programme. thank you for having me. _ coming on the programme. thank you for having me. tom _ coming on the programme. thank you for having me. tom brady, i you for having me. tom brady, what can _ you for having me. tom brady, what can you say? in his earlyl what can you say? in his early 40s, he left the team he had been with forever, beginning of the season, joins this team that was average at best, no—one was talking about him, and he has won the super bowl again! he is incredible. we have run — again! he is incredible. we have run out _ again! he is incredible. we have run out of— again! he is incredible. - have run out of adjectives to describe brady. maybe we'll start to consider him as a future hall of famer. he is just gold. for this franchise as well, in one year, they did have a lot of pieces in place, mind you, but to see how they evolved over the course of the year, and to win seven super bowl rings is just beyond incredible. bowl rings is 'ust beyond incredible._ bowl rings is 'ust beyond incredible. �* ., incredible. and there are so many good _ incredible. and there are so many good young _ incredible. and there are so i many good young quarterbacks in the league at the moment, we
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can't look far past his opponent today, patrick mahon rs, opponent today, patrick mahon �*s, who won the super bowl last year, they all seem to have such athleticism, strong, powerful arms, and tom brady doesn't have any of that and yes, he wins! doesn't have any of that and yes. he wins!— doesn't have any of that and yes, he wins! this is true. he would like — yes, he wins! this is true. he would like to _ yes, he wins! this is true. he would like to say _ yes, he wins! this is true. he would like to say he - yes, he wins! this is true. he would like to say he has i yes, he wins! this is true. he | would like to say he has some semblance of athleticism, but he has lasted so long by basically any time anyone pressures him, hejust falls basically any time anyone pressures him, he just falls to the ground and doesn't try to scramble. he is definitely an old relic, but it's working! the thing that tom brady really brings that some of these other guys, including patrick mccombs, who is phenomenal and can read the field as well as anyone, tom brady has seen every kind of defence. he knows how to react to any kind of situation, and someone can win a race against him, but you can't quantify how important that is. , that is. some people were sa in: that is. some people were saying it — that is. some people were saying it wasn't _ that is. some people were saying it wasn't the i saying it wasn't the greatest game of american football ever,
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it wasn't the best advert for the sport particularly, but just tell us what it means to the culture and psyche of america. the culture and psyche of america-— the culture and psyche of america. ., , ., ., ., america. there was a lot of h -e america. there was a lot of hype surrounding _ america. there was a lot of hype surrounding this i america. there was a lot of| hype surrounding this game america. there was a lot of i hype surrounding this game but the spectacle of the super bowl transcends the football itself, and their... 7500 vaccinated healthcare workers that were in the stands and honorary captains who were community heroes during covid, there was a lot of honouring of those types of people, so a lot of good fuzzy feelings, no matter who you are rooting for in this game. this who you are rooting for in this came. �* , , who you are rooting for in this ame, �* , , ., ~' game. as we were 'ust talking we saw some _ game. as we were just talking we saw some celebrations i game. as we were just talking we saw some celebrations in l we saw some celebrations in tampa bay, not much social distancing, i don't think. it was a pure coincidence of course that the selection of the stadium where the super bowl was played happened to be the hometown of the tampa bay buccaneers, that was a coincidence but it means that
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people there will get to do some celebrating, socially distance or otherwise. right, and this is — distance or otherwise. right, and this is the _ distance or otherwise. right, and this is the first _ distance or otherwise. right, and this is the first time i distance or otherwise. right, and this is the first time in i and this is the first time in the 55 years that there has been a super bowl that a team has played in its home stadium, tom brady is a very charmed man apparently, but florida, the united states, of all the states has been probably one of the most relaxed in terms of people just generally adhering to all the recommendations as it comes to coronavirus, so hopefully tonight there will be someone telling them to be a care for, but it's a little terrifying to think what might be happening there tonight. we shau be happening there tonight. we shall see, certainly plenty of time brady france very happy right across the country, and who knows, he could well do it again next year at the age of 44, which would be absolutely remarkable. thank you very much for coming on and talking to
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us. that's it, i am that was vaughanjones, this is bbc news. hello. the overriding weather story for all of us week, at least this week will be just how cold it is. subzero wind chill in all parts during the first half of the week. that's going to bring hit and miss snow showers. many in the west will avoid them. hard overnight frosts return this week as the winds feel lighter. but later less cold air will try to push its way as you can see, we've got the easterly winds dominating the cold air for much of the week. but as milder atlantic air tries to push in, that boundary line could bring some snow into the west, but the question mark is how far that boundary gets in? it looks like the cold air will, by and large, win out. and certainly on sunday the cold air brought the snow showers across kent and parts of east anglia. it's these areas right until midday on monday the met office amber weather warning remains in place.
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there will be a covering of snow elsewhere in eastern parts of england. eastern scotland as we start the day from snow showers through the night. fewer in the west, all starts with subzero temperatures and of course the chance of some ice. now into monday, snow showers in the west are few and far between. there will be a few light flurries here and there. eastern areas are most prone, but even here some will stay dry. but we will see those snow showers form into core doors, one through lincolnshire to the peak district, and another one aberdeenshire through to kinross. under those persistent snow could mount up. five to 15 cm of snow blown along by some pretty strong winds. strongest of the winds to the south and east of that will have a big impact on temperature. on the thermometers it has zero to three degrees potentially. it's not going to feel like that outdoors because the wind could feel as cold as around —7 or —8 through the afternoon in east anglia and the southeast. that cold wind—chill then continues into tuesday. further snow flurries coming in. the winds subtly shifting direction, so it might be different areas that see snow flurries. could be a different line particularly for the central
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belt of scotland. one through east anglia and towards the home counties. and we also have got to watch for a weather system just getting close to cornwall and also across into parts of the channel islands, that could bring some sleet and snow here. but another day of subzero wind—chill for all of us. as you go through into wednesday, the winds will ease. notice how the isobars opening out a little bit. that means we will see a very cold start with lighter winds, particularly across the snowfields of scotland we could see temperatures as low as around —13 or —14. the snow showers that we do see want to be driven as far west either. many towards the eastern areas, most though on wednesday will have a dry and bright day. still pretty cold but with less of a
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welcome to bbc news — i'm lewis vaugthones. our top stories: south africa is to delay and review the oxford—astrazeneca jab from its upcoming vaccine programme after a study shows disappointing results against the country's coronavirus variant. it comes less than a week after the country received a million doses and just days before its inoculation program was set to begin. a breakaway glacier washes away a dam in northern india. the flooding kills at least nine people — more than a hundred are missing. and tom brady has extended his record of super bowl wins with a seventh title for himself as the tampa bay buccaneers have beaten last year's champions, kansas city chiefs, 31 — nine, to claim the title. brady was also named the game's most valuable player.
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now on bbc news, it's dateline london.

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