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tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 18, 2021 10:45pm-11:01pm GMT

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you have the situation theories. and you have the situation now with _ theories. and you have the situation now with a _ theories. and you have the situation now with a have effectively overplayed their hand. they wanted to make _ overplayed their hand. they wanted to make this point that news media needs_ to make this point that news media needs facebook within facebook needs them but _ needs facebook within facebook needs them but they have gone ahead a pandemic— them but they have gone ahead a pandemic and blocked vital information to mental health services _ information to mental health services. in australia they have blocked — services. in australia they have blocked info on bushfires and wider health— blocked info on bushfires and wider health services. it really is not a good _ health services. it really is not a good look. — health services. it really is not a good look, and i've been reading these _ good look, and i've been reading these articles all of them talk about— these articles all of them talk about facebook as a bully. really throwing — about facebook as a bully. really throwing their weight around, acting like a _ throwing their weight around, acting like a monopolistic power. improving the point, _ like a monopolistic power. improving the point, really, that facebook does _ the point, really, that facebook does need to have more regulation. interesting — does need to have more regulation. interesting note on which to leave it for the time being. as quebec the financial times because lizzie with your economics hat on, game gamestop traders are being drilled in congress, that saw this astronomical
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surgeon is company where their shares were reaching as high as nearly $500. and talk us through what the financial times, what's happening in congress now. maxine waters, the — happening in congress now. maxine waters, the most _ happening in congress now. maxine waters, the most senior _ happening in congress now. maxine waters, the most senior democrats l happening in congress now. maxine i waters, the most senior democrats in the house of representatives who oversees the financial services industry, she is saying that the volatility that you are talking about, that we witnessed last month around game gamestop was caused by a fear that those six stems are rigged in favour of established investors on wall street. the idea that wall street always wins, and this phenomenon with gamestop with the little man trying to beat wall street. and you had executives from big hedge funds like melvin capitol being quizzed by lawmakers alongside retail investors. and waters message was there needs to be robust
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protections for investors and accountability for wall street. find accountability for wall street. and let's no accountability for wall street. and let's go back _ accountability for wall street. and let's go back to come up with your particle had on sir keir starmer has been given his policy agenda commit was meant to kind of shake—up this to well what will be a post covid world, along the lines of the beverage reforms that we heard about. bonds. yes beverage reforms that we heard about. bonds.— beverage reforms that we heard about. bonds. , , . , about. bonds. yes this was a big day for keir starmer. _ about. bonds. yes this was a big day for keir starmer. he _ about. bonds. yes this was a big day for keir starmer. he is _ about. bonds. yes this was a big day for keir starmer. he is had _ about. bonds. yes this was a big day for keir starmer. he is had some - for keir starmer. he is had some criticism — for keir starmer. he is had some criticism about the kind of lack of vision _ criticism about the kind of lack of vision of— criticism about the kind of lack of vision of the labour party and policy— vision of the labour party and policy announcements. so today he did come _ policy announcements. so today he did come out and do a speech at another— did come out and do a speech at another couple of things. one of the headlines— another couple of things. one of the headlines was really to emphasise the relationship with business, and secondly— the relationship with business, and secondly was around these bonds, and the idea _ secondly was around these bonds, and the idea is— secondly was around these bonds, and the idea is that if labour was in power— the idea is that if labour was in power that— the idea is that if labour was in power that they would have bonds that would allow people who have a committed savings to invest back
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into communities, back into this country— into communities, back into this country for— into communities, back into this country for this bond to. have a higher— country for this bond to. have a higher interest level to the interest— higher interest level to the interest rate levels that they would essentially over time make money but at the _ essentially over time make money but at the same _ essentially over time make money but at the same time invest back into the country. i think in essence is not a _ the country. i think in essence is not a bad — the country. i think in essence is not a bad idea. in this in the sense that it _ not a bad idea. in this in the sense that it helps — not a bad idea. in this in the sense that it helps to build that relationship between state and people — relationship between state and people. and people can feel like they can — people. and people can feel like they can give their money to be rebuilt — they can give their money to be rebuilt back britain better. and it sets is _ rebuilt back britain better. and it sets is not — rebuilt back britain better. and it sets is not a bad idea, the problem was: _ sets is not a bad idea, the problem was, and _ sets is not a bad idea, the problem was, and it— sets is not a bad idea, the problem was, and it have a look at the speech, — was, and it have a look at the speech, it _ was, and it have a look at the speech, it did not really bring out a tot— speech, it did not really bring out a lot of— speech, it did not really bring out a lot of passion, and i think it's struggling _ a lot of passion, and i think it's struggling to really get the headlines and for people to pay attention to what he is saying on this _ attention to what he is saying on this it _ attention to what he is saying on this. it needs more explanation because — this. it needs more explanation because really it's very cheap to borrow — because really it's very cheap to borrow right now for governments to borrow. _ borrow right now for governments to borrow. and — borrow right now for governments to borrow, and to invest. so there's really— borrow, and to invest. so there's really a _ borrow, and to invest. so there's really a question about what's the value _ really a question about what's the value of— really a question about what's the value of having these bonds over
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'ust value of having these bonds over just borrowing to invest in the international markets like governments are doing right now. so ithink— governments are doing right now. so i think there's still some work to be done — i think there's still some work to be done on — i think there's still some work to be done on building this plan for keir starmer and be done on building this plan for keir starmerand the labour be done on building this plan for keir starmer and the labour party. has he _ keir starmer and the labour party. has he done enough to differentiate himself or the government, it's a difficult one we were the leader of the opposition during a global pandemic? i the opposition during a global pandemic?— the opposition during a global andemic? ,, ., ., , pandemic? i think one of the things he was clear— pandemic? i think one of the things he was clear about _ pandemic? i think one of the things he was clear about is _ pandemic? i think one of the things he was clear about is that _ pandemic? i think one of the things he was clear about is that how - he was clear about is that how labour — he was clear about is that how labour at _ he was clear about is that how labour at this point wants to build back in— labour at this point wants to build back in a — labour at this point wants to build back in a very different way. we cannot — back in a very different way. we cannot go— back in a very different way. we cannot go back to business as usual. ithink— cannot go back to business as usual. i think rishi — cannot go back to business as usual. i think rishi sunak and others will try to _ i think rishi sunak and others will try to make the same sort of noises, but witt— try to make the same sort of noises, but will they — try to make the same sort of noises, but will they back it up with policy? _ but will they back it up with policy? we've got a budget coming up soon and _ policy? we've got a budget coming up soon and we _ policy? we've got a budget coming up soon and we will see then. i think this is— soon and we will see then. i think this is a _ soon and we will see then. i think this is a start. i don't think he's this is a start. idon't think he's really— this is a start. i don't think he's really done _ this is a start. i don't think he's really done enough yet to differentiate himself and to lay out a platform but this is a start of something. he will really need to follow-up— something. he will really need to follow—up strongly. something. he will really need to follow-up strongly.— follow-up strongly. interesting notes to enter _ follow-up strongly. interesting notes to enter a _ follow-up strongly. interesting notes to enter a paper - follow-up strongly. interesting notes to enter a paper review i follow-up strongly. interesting l notes to enter a paper review for the time being. thank you both so much, don't go away, stereo screens
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because we will be sending you more of the front pages as and when we get them and we look forward to hearing your thoughts in about half an hour's time for next edition of the papers. thank you for the time being and like i say any comments you would like to make by social media the hashtag is bbc papers and i would see you very shortly. good evening. arsenal still have plenty of work to do in their europa league last 32 tie against benfica. the two sides will meet again in athens in a week's time locked at 1—1. this evening's first leg was played in rome, and it was benfica who took the lead after half time when a cross hit emile smith rowe on the arm. their captain pizzi scored the resultant penalty for the portuguese. arsenal hit back almost straightaway when a neat move ended with a goal for bukayo saka.
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earlier, manchester united eased past real sociedad. the match was being played in turin due to covid restrictions, and it seemed to suit united, as bruno fernandes grabbed a double, which was added to by marcus rashford with this lovely finish into the bottom corner, before danieljames picked up a fourth late on. 4—0 it finished. tottenham cruised through their first leg against austrian side wolfsberger — a match played in budapest. gareth bale set up the first, and then scored the second himself. lucas moura then helped himself to this brilliant solo goal to make it 3—0 at half time. wolfsberger pulled one back before vinicius scored a fourth for spurs late on. the manager said bale did well, but it wasn't an audition for a permanent place in the team. i'm looking to the team performance and not to the individuals. this is not an exam for anyone. the
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tottenham players are good enough for her not to be in exams. europa league is a competition that lots of teams want to win. but we are going to try match after match. and scottish premiership leaders rangers were involved in a thrilling match in belgium — they came from behind twice to beat royal antwerp 4—3. ryan kent scored a brilliant equaliser before a stoppage timer winner from the spot. those four away goals mean steve gerrard's side have a superb chance of reaching the last 16, just as they did last year. elsewhere in the early games, leicester city played out a goalless draw against slavia prague in the czech republic. but for all the latest, head to the bbc sport website. now from the europa league to england's non—league — the season's been declared null and void in the national league north and south. it follows a vote for clubs in the fifth and sixth tier of the english game, with no clear consensus between the clubs. the national league, the fifth tier,
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will continue for now, but the two regional divisions below that have agreed by a majority to stop. it was a tearful farewell for serena williams at this yea r�*s australian open. she was beaten in straight sets byjapan's naomi osaka in the semi—finals. so the 39—year—old's bid to equal margaret court's record of 2a grand slam singles titles has to wait a little longer. the loss led to speculation about her future — and whether it could be the last time williams will appear at the tournament in melbourne. i don't know. if i ever say farewell, i wouldn't tell anyone, so... laughter you were saying about the unforced errors in the match. considering how well you've played to get to this stage, what do you feel caused that? or was itjust one of those bad days at the office? i don't know.
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i'm done. williams' conquerer, osaka, will meetjennifer brady in saturday's final. while in the men's final, novak djokovic will line up against either daniil medvedev or stefanos tsitsipas on sunday. djokovic beat russian qualifier aslan karatsev in straight sets. the russian doubled his career earnings by getting this far in the tournament. djokovic meanwhile will be going for a record—extending ninth title. moeen ali and dawid malan were among a group of england players who've been signed up to compete in this year's indian premier league following today's auction. if those players' teams' reach the latter stages of the tournament it means some could miss england's two test matches against new zealand in june. jonny bairstow, who's been retained for sunrisers hyderabad this season, doesn't think the ipl adversely affects the fortunes of england's test side. i don't believe that there are priorities for them.
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look at our away record, we have won six out of our last seven now. the test matches away from home. you looked at our performances that we've had in the performances we've had in t20 cricket over the last 12, 2a months and those results don't come by prioritising one over the other. all three, four matches of the games have been producing results. the british horse racing authority is to introduce saliva testing to screen jockeys for any banned substances. the results would be immediate — meaning jockeys could be stood down from racing on the day. a pilot is due to begin this spring. no other major sport in britain uses oral swabs to provide on—the—day screening in this manner. now to snooker — and mark williams is through to the quarter finals of the welsh open. he beat hossein vafaei four frames to two. vafaei had knocked out judd trump earlier in the day, but the iranian had no answer to williams, who knocked in breaks of 83, 79 and 90 to seal victory.
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wiliams has won this tournament twice before — the last time back in 1999. and that's all the sport for now. hello there. the weather is going to be turning increasingly wet across western areas of the uk, thanks to an area of low pressure. this area of low pressure, in fact. and this cloud you can see here associated with the low is a weather front, a particularly slow—moving front. it's going to be bringing rain for some for the next couple of days. rainfall totals building up, then, but the wettest weather will always be over high ground — so the moors of southwest england, the brecon beacons, snowdonia, the cumbrian fells, northern ireland generally, and across southern and western scotland, particularly the highlands and the southern uplands. so we could see some localised flooding building in. the rain is beginning to arrive right now and, along with the wet weather some
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strong winds, mild air. temperatures about 8—9 celsius as we start the day on friday. further east it is dry, but it's chillier. temperatures around 3 celsius, most places should be frost—free. now for friday it's a wet and windy starts the day across these areas with gusts of wind potentially running into the low—605 in miles per hour or so in places. there won't be much rain, though, across the northeast of scotland, and not a great deal of rain either across the midlands, east anglia, southeast england. there will be quite large tracts of the day that stay dry and bright, even. as far as further west, the rain pretty relentless. temperatures on the mild side, looking at highs of around 10—12 degrees fairly widely. and then into the weekend — more wet and windy weather to come across western areas. the eastern side of the country brighter and drier and, for some, it could turn very mild indeed for a time. the reason the weather gets a bit milder is the winds are going to start to come from a southerly direction, dragging the air up from north africa, spain, france, and on into central
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and eastern parts of england in particular, though east scotland not doing badly in places. further west on saturday, well, it's a wet and windy day coming up with the rain again very heavy and persistent at times. temperatures, well, around about 12—14 celsius across western areas — which is still mild, but across the east of england we could see temperatures go as high as 17 celsius in one or a few spots. very mild indeed. our weather front is still with us on sunday, but it is tending to fizzle, just a lump of cloud with a few patches of rain left on it by this stage. so more in the way of bright weather for scotland and northern ireland, a bit more sunshine here, temperatures around 10—11 celsius. eastern england still having the highest temperatures, perhaps up to 15—16.
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this is bbc news, with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. confirmed — perserverance is safely on the surface of mars. nasa's most ambitious mission to mars has just landed succesfully on the red planet. this was the moment when the rover called perseverence finally made it. to work through all the adversity that goes, and all the challenges that go with landing a rover on mars, plus the challenges of covid — and just an amazing accomplishment. and this — the first image beamed back by the rover — its shadow clearly seen, as it tweets "i'm safe on mars. perseverance will get you anywhere." also facebook unfriends australia —
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the social networking giant blocks access to news media on its site in a row over paying for content.

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