Skip to main content
Internet Archive's 25th Anniversary Logo

tv   The Papers  BBC News  February 18, 2021 11:30pm-12:01am GMT

11:30 pm
hello there. this is bbc news, the headlines. a nasa rover which left earth seven months ago has successfully landed on mars, completing a journey of nearly half a billion kilometres. it's the most ambitious search for life on the planet since the 1970s. australia's prime minister — scott morrison — has said his government will not be �*intimidated' by facebook blocking news feeds to users. facebook is responding to a proposed law, which would make tech giants, pay for news content on their platforms. nearly seven million people in the us state of texas — have been told to boil tap water — before drinking it — after a deadly winter storm caused power blackouts at treatment facilities. life expectancy in the united states fell by a whole year during the first half of 2020 — to 77.8 years, its greatest fall since world war ii.
11:31 pm
hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are the bloomberg reporter, lizzy burden and political commentator and nonresident fellow at new york university faiza shaheen. tomorrow's front pages starting with... the first image from tonight's mission to mars dominates the front of the times. it also covers journeys closer to home, reporting that ministers are becoming more confident with the prospect of foreign holidays this summer. the i has carried out an opinion poll on lockdown restrictions — saying 52% of people support schools reopening in two weeks�* time. the mail says the uk will offer over—forties a vaccination by the end of next month. the pfizer and oxford vaccines cut
11:32 pm
covid infections by two thirds, according to figures in the telegraph. in an interview with the financial times, the french president says the us and europe should allocate 5% of its vaccine supplies for under—developed nations. the metro covers facebook�*s decision to block news stories from being published on its platform in australia. and it's the same lead on the front fo the guardian, which says the firm is being accused of trying to bully a democracy. as always thank you very much for joining us tonight. we are going to start with the telegraph and vaccine data that the telegraph has with paving the way back to freedom. we have been continuously talking about the past few days, more positive news when it comes to coronavirus in the uk. talk us through the daily
11:33 pm
telegraph perspective on this. is telegraph perspective on this. is very nice to see the statistics that have _ very nice to see the statistics that have good — very nice to see the statistics that have good news can we have all desperately needed it. it seems the vaccines_ desperately needed it. it seems the vaccines are appearing to work really — vaccines are appearing to work really well. cutting transmissions and infections by two thirds. i think— and infections by two thirds. i think one _ and infections by two thirds. i think one of the things that's really— think one of the things that's really important is that it's showing _ really important is that it's showing it wasjust really important is that it's showing it was just one really important is that it's showing it wasjust one dose of the oxford _ showing it wasjust one dose of the oxford or— showing it wasjust one dose of the oxford or pfizer vaccine has such an effect _ oxford or pfizer vaccine has such an effect on _ oxford or pfizer vaccine has such an effect on all — oxford or pfizer vaccine has such an effect on all age groups, and separate _ effect on all age groups, and separate data shows the cases were following _ separate data shows the cases were following most rapidly among the oldest _ following most rapidly among the oldest with care home outbreaks almost _ oldest with care home outbreaks almost in — oldest with care home outbreaks almost in half in a week. this is hugely— almost in half in a week. this is hugely positive news. but i think with this — hugely positive news. but i think with this article goes on to discuss is this— with this article goes on to discuss is this argument coming out from those _ is this argument coming out from those that— is this argument coming out from those that want us to quickly open up those that want us to quickly open up the _ those that want us to quickly open up the economy, and those like in the british—
11:34 pm
up the economy, and those like in the british medical association say need to— the british medical association say need to wait and see and we have far more _ need to wait and see and we have far more people who have taken the vaccines— more people who have taken the vaccines before we can have significant easing of the lockdown restrictions. at the same time matt hancock— restrictions. at the same time matt hancock said recently that he expected britain to enjoy a happy and free — expected britain to enjoy a happy and free summer. so at this is really— and free summer. so at this is really what _ and free summer. so at this is really what the conversation is going — really what the conversation is going to — really what the conversation is going to be about and of the vaccines— going to be about and of the vaccines are working, how quickly can we _ vaccines are working, how quickly can we go— vaccines are working, how quickly can we go back to being out there and seeing — can we go back to being out there and seeing our friends, hugging people — and seeing our friends, hugging people in— and seeing our friends, hugging people in all of the things that we miss so— people in all of the things that we miss so much. especially for business _ miss so much. especially for business and the impact on business. those _ business and the impact on business. those calls— business and the impact on business. those calls on like quicker grow louder as you look at the daily mail�*s front page. over 40s to get jabs by the end of march. again always really difficult to put specific timings on these kind of expectations. but it is looking positive, so by default those who
11:35 pm
would like a lockdown quicker could argue for it. it would like a lockdown quicker could argue for it— argue for it. it shows “ust how well we are argue for it. it shows “ust how well we doing h argue for it. it shows “ust how well we are doing with _ argue for it. it showsjust how well we are doing with the _ argue for it. it showsjust how well we are doing with the vaccine - we are doing with the vaccine roll—out in the uk. as you say come in the mailand roll—out in the uk. as you say come in the mail and the telegraph both want to use this data as evidence that the lockdown should be eased. they want to end these draconian measures that they see as an assault on civil liberties come though to get the economy going again. is really some wrangling within cabinet career reading the papers tomorrow matt hancock is on the team, freedom but the chancellor is more cautious. we know that he is worried about putting the economy through stop starts again. and the telegraph business section is reporting tomorrow that he is planning in the march budget to extend the furlough scheme. so that would indicate he is going to want to support businesses with lockdowns. find
11:36 pm
going to want to support businesses with lockdowns.— with lockdowns. and a lot of parents. _ with lockdowns. and a lot of parents. it's _ with lockdowns. and a lot of parents, it's half— with lockdowns. and a lot of parents, it's half term - with lockdowns. and a lot of parents, it's half term now, | with lockdowns. and a lot of - parents, it's half term now, across most of the country a lot of parents will be interested to know when schools will return. a rather interesting poll, it's found while not quite sure how large the sector of people being asked, but talk us through the whole when it comes to schools and the public�*s verdict on ending the lockdown. thea;r schools and the public's verdict on ending the lockdown.— schools and the public's verdict on ending the lockdown. they found that 52% of peeple — ending the lockdown. they found that 52% of peeple sopport _ ending the lockdown. they found that 52% of people support returns - ending the lockdown. they found that 52% of people support returns to - 52% of people support returns to classrooms. only 20% opposing. that's big news for children to return to the classroom. the educational impacts have been huge, especially in terms of who has access to digital technology. and that has widened in the gaps in education. a lot of people keen to
11:37 pm
get their kids back to school and partly because it's impacted on the ability to work from home. especially women, there has been a clear impact on women's ability to work _ clear impact on women's ability to work. there's moral to relax rules, to allow— work. there's moral to relax rules, to allow households to meet each other _ to allow households to meet each other and — to allow households to meet each other. and the public is still hesitant— other. and the public is still hesitant about opening restaurants. ithink— hesitant about opening restaurants. i think we _ hesitant about opening restaurants. i think we all got burned i would happened last summer when we had rishi sunak make meals half price, eat out— rishi sunak make meals half price, eat out to — rishi sunak make meals half price, eat out to help out and then we saw infections _ eat out to help out and then we saw infections start to pick up again. so i infections start to pick up again. so i think— infections start to pick up again. so i think it's an interesting mix from _ so i think it's an interesting mix from the — so i think it's an interesting mix from the public on this. it seems as if people _ from the public on this. it seems as if people want to prioritise education which makes complete sense, _ education which makes complete sense, it's — education which makes complete sense, it's worth saying of course nearing _ sense, it's worth saying of course nearing 120,000 people dead and nearing120,000 people dead and that's— nearing 120,000 people dead and that's a _ nearing 120,000 people dead and that's a huge toll. a lot of people out there — that's a huge toll. a lot of people out there will have lost loved ones and will _ out there will have lost loved ones and will be — out there will have lost loved ones and will be understandably wary about _ and will be understandably wary about going back to soon stop by
11:38 pm
ethically— about going back to soon stop by ethically important to say that and behind _ ethically important to say that and behind those figures so many families— behind those figures so many families grieving. thank you for making — families grieving. thank you for making that point. also portage as say that— making that point. also portage as say that schools are open for those key workers and that teachers are working _ key workers and that teachers are working very hard to ensure the children— working very hard to ensure the children aren't learning. but interesting, interesting to see the rest of— interesting, interesting to see the rest of this— interesting, interesting to see the rest of this poll result from the eye _ rest of this poll result from the eye the — rest of this poll result from the eye. the caution there, and yet we were _ eye. the caution there, and yet we were hearing about the possibility of the _ were hearing about the possibility of the going to a pub garden over easter? _ of the going to a pub garden over easter? was that we should stop thinking — easter? was that we should stop thinking about?— easter? was that we should stop thinkin: about? ., , , , . thinking about? from the perspective ofthe thinking about? from the perspective of the pubs. — thinking about? from the perspective of the pubs, some _ thinking about? from the perspective of the pubs, some of— thinking about? from the perspective of the pubs, some of them _ thinking about? from the perspective of the pubs, some of them are - of the pubs, some of them are cautious about getting, being allowed to open the beer gardens because that might mean they will lose support from the treasury. business wants clarity and you know, it's not necessarily clear that pups want to just open if it's not fully.
11:39 pm
going back to the schools point, of course lots of people are desperate for their kids to get back to the classrooms, they're missing out on education. people want to get back to work if they don't have childcare when the kids are being home—schooled. also the practical issues of how you do the testing of children. the head teachers union has been asking for them to return to high school, secondary school in stages because they are raising the logistical issues of testing kids unless it is staggered. because otherwise they will be mixing in the classroom before they've been tested. all well and good that people want to go back to school but the government needs to work out how that's going to happen. abs, the government needs to work out how that's going to happen. a, liat the government needs to work out how that's going to happen.— that's going to happen. a lot to consider. _ that's going to happen. a lot to consider, and _ that's going to happen. a lot to consider, and the _ that's going to happen. a lot to consider, and the thought - that's going to happen. a lot to consider, and the thought of. consider, and the thought of administering a test of my children i'm not looking forward to that, although it would be grateful to get although it would be grateful to get a test. emmanuel macron, the paper has an exclusive with the french
11:40 pm
leader. and making the point that's poorer nations are facing vexing inequality. quite an eye—opening amount of money that some african nations are being charged compared to eu nations when it comes to buying and procuring the vaccines. he calls for rich countries in the eu to _ he calls for rich countries in the eu to give — he calls for rich countries in the eu to give vaccine to poorer countries, _ eu to give vaccine to poorer countries, and quite a lot of public support— countries, and quite a lot of public support for— countries, and quite a lot of public support for this kind of movement. it support for this kind of movement. it makes _ support for this kind of movement. it makes complete sense from the point _ it makes complete sense from the point of _ it makes complete sense from the point of view of actually wanting to -et point of view of actually wanting to get back— point of view of actually wanting to get back to normal as soon as possible _ get back to normal as soon as possible. we cannot have a situation where _ possible. we cannot have a situation where some — possible. we cannot have a situation where some countries are vaccinated and the _ where some countries are vaccinated and the rest — where some countries are vaccinated and the rest of the world is not. because — and the rest of the world is not. because the vaccine, covid will simply— because the vaccine, covid will simply mutate. we'll get new variants — simply mutate. we'll get new variants and are vaccines made a hold _ variants and are vaccines made a hold up — variants and are vaccines made a hold up. this is a really important caii~ _ hold up. this is a really important caii~ he _ hold up. this is a really important call. he also talks with the global inequalities and oxfam put out the stats in _ inequalities and oxfam put out the stats in december that highlighted
11:41 pm
thatjust _ stats in december that highlighted thatjust14% of the stats in december that highlighted that just 14% of the population of the richest countries have 53% of the richest countries have 53% of the most — the richest countries have 53% of the most promising vaccines. and so that discrepancy and countries like ourseives — that discrepancy and countries like ourselves in canada and vaccinate everyone — ourselves in canada and vaccinate everyone five times over with the amount— everyone five times over with the amount of— everyone five times over with the amount of vaccines we have ordered. the way— amount of vaccines we have ordered. the way in _ amount of vaccines we have ordered. the way in which we redistribute those _ the way in which we redistribute those vaccines at the speed at which we do _ those vaccines at the speed at which we do it— those vaccines at the speed at which we do it it's — those vaccines at the speed at which we do it it's really fundamental. at one of— we do it it's really fundamental. at one of the — we do it it's really fundamental. at one of the things he also points out, _ one of the things he also points out, this— one of the things he also points out, this is— one of the things he also points out, this is a geopolitical issue because — out, this is a geopolitical issue because working with countries all over the _ because working with countries all over the world right now and hearing from them _ over the world right now and hearing from them that they are getting vaccines— from them that they are getting vaccines from china and russia cheaper~ — vaccines from china and russia cheaper. china and russia reaching out to— cheaper. china and russia reaching out to them. this is a way in which china _ out to them. this is a way in which china and — out to them. this is a way in which china and russia are doing the right thing _ china and russia are doing the right thing but _ china and russia are doing the right thing but also extending their influence. it does look like the west— influence. it does look like the west is— influence. it does look like the west is behind the curve on this. yes _ west is behind the curve on this. yes a _ west is behind the curve on this. yes a iot— west is behind the curve on this. yes a lot to _ west is behind the curve on this. yes. a lot to bear in mind when it comes to that. we are going to leave coronavirus for the time being and look at the times, because it's got
11:42 pm
that first image from nasa's rover that's landed on mars. perseverance. perseverance paid off as the little rover itself tweeted. if you think about it it's quite extraordinary what we are looking at here. i about it it's quite extraordinary what we are looking at here. i don't know if it's — what we are looking at here. i don't know if it's because _ what we are looking at here. i don't know if it's because the _ what we are looking at here. i don't know if it's because the times - what we are looking at here. i don't know if it's because the times as i know if it's because the times as the pepper of record but the times loves a space event. not surprised they have gone big on this. it's a really amazing piece of news. it's the biggest and most sophisticated rover nasa has landed on mars. it's been a decade in the making. the point was to study the planet for ancient life and bring rocks back to earth. but the headline nods to the name, perseverance which the chief engineer handed reflective the technological challenges that nasa has had with the mission. he said it has had with the mission. he said it has often been two steps forward and one step back. but they got there in the end. and it really is a feat of
11:43 pm
physics and engineering which is great news. i physics and engineering which is great news— physics and engineering which is ureat news. ., �* ,, ., i, great news. i don't know if you guys watch the whole _ great news. i don't know if you guys watch the whole process _ great news. i don't know if you guys watch the whole process as - great news. i don't know if you guys watch the whole process as it - great news. i don't know if you guys| watch the whole process as it landed in the seven minutes of terror as this rover was landing, transfer going through the atmosphere of mars. we, what we listen to the cheers and sheerjoy it did feel like something that was quite extraordinary to see you. not least because the scientists were working together during a pandemic, so a lot of them as we heard a little earlier today were working all remotely. abs, today were working all remotely. a lot of the news recovery today is really _ lot of the news recovery today is really about the marvel of science, whether _ really about the marvel of science, whether it — really about the marvel of science, whether it vaccine or a rover ianding _ whether it vaccine or a rover landing on— whether it vaccine or a rover landing on mars. i wasjust reading from _ landing on mars. i wasjust reading from nasa — landing on mars. i wasjust reading from nasa about the goals they have set out _ from nasa about the goals they have set out it's— from nasa about the goals they have set out. it's usually exciting. what they can _ set out. it's usually exciting. what they can do — set out. it's usually exciting. what they can do with very sophisticated
11:44 pm
rover. _ they can do with very sophisticated rover. it _ they can do with very sophisticated rover, it would've thinks i want to do is _ rover, it would've thinks i want to do is determine whether life ever existed _ do is determine whether life ever existed on— do is determine whether life ever existed on mars. the want to characterise the climate of mars. they— characterise the climate of mars. they want — characterise the climate of mars. they want to look at the geology of mars which will tell them a lot about— mars which will tell them a lot about the environment there through the ages. _ about the environment there through the ages, and also to prepare for human— the ages, and also to prepare for human exploration. it's a hugely exciting — human exploration. it's a hugely exciting point and the data they will gather from this will really help us— will gather from this will really help us going forward in terms of ever being — help us going forward in terms of ever being able to get a man on mars, _ ever being able to get a man on mars, or— ever being able to get a man on mars, or a — ever being able to get a man on mars, ora woman ever being able to get a man on mars, or a woman on mars. and the memes have — mars, or a woman on mars. and the memes have started _ mars, or a woman on mars. and the memes have started already, - mars, or a woman on mars. and the memes have started already, i've i memes have started already, i've seen an image of bernie sanders in that photoshop obviously in that image. extraordinary stuff and a lot of teamwork there. let's have a look at the guardian which is looking at the situation with facebook. it's coming under, it has unfriended australia apparently. some of the repercussions, it's about serious and so the news feed that facebook has. at the guardian has picked up on is the other things have been
11:45 pm
blocked as well. some things that offer quite serious support for a particularly vulnerable people. find particularly vulnerable people. and charities particularly vulnerable people. fific charities like save particularly vulnerable people. fific charities like save the children particularly vulnerable people. e'"ic charities like save the children at the australian weather department got blocked. so what facebook was trying to do was to stop australians from being able to view and share news content on its platform, so that it could avoid paying for that content. and this is after the australian parliament passed laws to force social media companies to pay force social media companies to pay for that content. but the fact that facebook has excellently also knocked off sky news, uk and the telegraph shows how clumsy this response was. and how powerful social media companies are. amnesty international were saying it's extremely concerning especially in the middle of a pandemic. and nick clegg who is now the, who does the
11:46 pm
global head of comms for facebook, he's been under personal attack because before saying all he has done his apologise. but notably not all social media companies responded in this way to the new law. google has reached a settlement with news corp. . so this is a much bigger story that the guardian is picking up story that the guardian is picking up on. it's an international story, because it all starts in australia but the uk, eu, the us is going to be watching on. and this is a story about the future of media and how it levels the playing field with the social media platforms. the levels the playing field with the social media platforms.- social media platforms. the uk wantinu social media platforms. the uk wanting to _ social media platforms. the uk wanting to could _ social media platforms. the uk wanting to could be _ social media platforms. the uk wanting to could be policed - social media platforms. the uk| wanting to could be policed like tobacco firms. we are seeing a hashtag delete facebook movement. what's your reckoning just given how many people use facebook all the time? is that going to take off? i
11:47 pm
think... looks, mark zuckerberg has made _ think... looks, mark zuckerberg has made a _ think... looks, mark zuckerberg has made a huge — think... looks, mark zuckerberg has made a huge amount of money during the covid _ made a huge amount of money during the covid pandemic because people have been— the covid pandemic because people have been using facebook like you say, because they can't see each other _ say, because they can't see each other but — say, because they can't see each other. but this has really angered peopie _ other. but this has really angered people because i think one of the ways— people because i think one of the ways in— people because i think one of the ways in which this battle between the australian prime minister and mark— the australian prime minister and mark zuckerberg is playing out, facebook — mark zuckerberg is playing out, facebook is that, it really does look— facebook is that, it really does look like — facebook is that, it really does look like facebook thinks it's boss and that— look like facebook thinks it's boss and that it — look like facebook thinks it's boss and that it is bullying the australian government. and one of the ways— australian government. and one of the ways in— australian government. and one of the ways in which it has been framed is that— the ways in which it has been framed is that facebook is not bigger than democracy— is that facebook is not bigger than democracy and a democratically elected — democracy and a democratically elected government that is putting forward _ elected government that is putting forward a — elected government that is putting forward a policy to address essentially the share of who is between — essentially the share of who is between the media news companies and facebook— between the media news companies and facebook and google and others, and who is— facebook and google and others, and who is getting what share of advertising money. and so it's a really. _ advertising money. and so it's a really. it's— advertising money. and so it's a really, it's really like facebook is
11:48 pm
overplayed their hand here. i think they wanted to show look, this is what _ they wanted to show look, this is what it— they wanted to show look, this is what it would be like without us and you really— what it would be like without us and you really need us, but what they have _ you really need us, but what they have just. — you really need us, but what they have just, what it looks like too many _ have just, what it looks like too many people is that they think that they can _ many people is that they think that they canjust behave many people is that they think that they can just behave anywhere they want to, _ they can just behave anywhere they want to, and it draws on other things— want to, and it draws on other things that they have done in the past in _ things that they have done in the past in a — things that they have done in the past in a way that mark zuckerberg has behaved. and not taken action earlier— has behaved. and not taken action earlier on— has behaved. and not taken action earlier on the lies being spread on facebook — earlier on the lies being spread on facebook. another new thing that's happened _ facebook. another new thing that's happened that makes facebook look quite bad _ happened that makes facebook look quite bad so i think it would deftly have a _ quite bad so i think it would deftly have a pr — quite bad so i think it would deftly have a pr issue here for a while. want _ have a pr issue here for a while. want to— have a pr issue here for a while. want to watch definitely. that's an denial a lovely story can be let's and on max. the springer spaniel max and on max. the springer spaniel max and apart from just being absolutely gorgeous max is quite important and exceptionally brave. he’s gorgeous max is quite important and exceptionally brave.— exceptionally brave. he's been awarded an — exceptionally brave. he's been awarded an animal— exceptionally brave. he's been awarded an animal obe. - exceptionally brave. he's been i awarded an animal obe. because apparently he has lifted the spirits of thousands of people in the
11:49 pm
lockdown. it started off with his owner who had been in a car crash and his mental health suffered, but he's been cheering people up all through the pandemic on social media. and this is an award that usually is reserved for working dogs in recognition of their bravery and service. but it's been decided that max deserves that. and apparently he celebrating with a sausage tonight so i hope he enjoys it. he’s celebrating with a sausage tonight so i hope he enjoys it.— so i hope he en'oys it. he's taking in his stride. — so i hope he enjoys it. he's taking in his stride, and _ so i hope he enjoys it. he's taking in his stride, and his _ so i hope he enjoys it. he's taking in his stride, and his celebratory l in his stride, and his celebratory meal a sausage. let's face it, it's an important message just meal a sausage. let's face it, it's an important messagejust in a meal a sausage. let's face it, it's an important message just in a sense of what max is achieved for people during what has just been an awful time. during what has 'ust been an awful time. �* , , . during what has 'ust been an awful time. �*, , ., ., , ., time. it's been an awful time and i think the story _ time. it's been an awful time and i think the story is _ time. it's been an awful time and i think the story is also _ time. it's been an awful time and i think the story is also about - time. it's been an awful time and i | think the story is also about mental health. _ think the story is also about mental health. and — think the story is also about mental health, and the ability of animals to give _ health, and the ability of animals to give people company and put a smite _ to give people company and put a smite on— to give people company and put a smile on their face and what has been _ smile on their face and what has been a _ smile on their face and what has been a very— smile on their face and what has been a very difficult time especially for people living on their— especially for people living on their own. it's great to have max and a _ their own. it's great to have max and a tot— their own. it's great to have max and a lot of— their own. it's great to have max and a lot of people are very grateful _ and a lot of people are very grateful to their pets over this
11:50 pm
period — grateful to their pets over this eriod. . ~ grateful to their pets over this eriod. ., ,, ., ., period. thanked carrie irving for shafinu period. thanked carrie irving for sharing max's — period. thanked carrie irving for sharing max's story, _ period. thanked carrie irving for sharing max's story, i'm - period. thanked carrie irving for sharing max's story, i'm sure i period. thanked carrie irving for sharing max's story, i'm sure he enjoyed that sausage. thank you for sharing your evening with us and have a lovely rest of the evening. we will see very soon i am sure here in the bbc papers and as always thank you to come up for watching and you can catch up with this on a as well. good evening. arsenal still have plenty of work to do in their europa league last 32 tie against benfica. the two sides will meet again in athens in a week's time locked at 1—1. this evening's first leg was played in rome, and it was benfica who took the lead after half time when a cross hit emile smith rowe on the arm.
11:51 pm
their captain pizzi scored the resultant penalty for the portuguese. arsenal hit back almost straightaway when a neat move ended with a goal for bukayo saka. earlier, manchester united eased past real sociedad. the match was being played in turin due to covid restrictions, and it seemed to suit united, as bruno fernandes grabbed a double, which was added to by marcus rashford with this lovely finish into the bottom corner, before danieljames picked up a fourth late on. 4—0 it finished. tottenham cruised through their first leg against austrian side wolfsberger — a match played in budapest. gareth bale set up the first, and then scored the second himself. lucas moura then helped himself to this brilliant solo goal to make it 3—0 at half time. wolfsberger pulled one back before vinicius scored a fourth for spurs late on. the manager said bale did well, but it wasn't an audition for a permanent place in the team. i'm looking to the team performance
11:52 pm
and not to the individuals. this is not an exam for anyone. the tottenham players are good enough for her not to be in exams. the tottenham players are good enough for not to be in exams. europa league is a competition that lots of teams want to win. but we are going to try match after match. and scottish premiership leaders rangers were involved in a thrilling match in belgium — they came from behind twice to beat royal antwerp 4—3. ryan kent scored a brilliant equaliser before a stoppage timer winner from the spot. those four away goals mean steve gerrard's side have a superb chance of reaching the last 16, just as they did last year. elsewhere in the early games, leicester city played out a goalless draw against slavia prague in the czech republic. but for all the latest, head to the bbc sport website. now from the europa league to england's non—league — the season's been declared null and void in the national league north and south. it follows a vote for clubs
11:53 pm
in the fifth and sixth tier of the english game, with no clear consensus between the clubs. the national league, the fifth tier, will continue for now, but the two regional divisions below that have agreed by a majority to stop. it was a tearful farewell for serena williams at this yea r�*s australian open. she was beaten in straight sets byjapan's naomi osaka in the semi—finals. so the 39—year—old's bid to equal margaret court's record of 2a grand slam singles titles has to wait a little longer. the loss led to speculation about her future — and whether it could be the last time williams will appear at the tournament in melbourne. i don't know. if i ever say farewell, i wouldn't tell anyone, so... laughter you were saying about the unforced errors in the match. considering how well you've played to get to this stage, what do you feel caused that? or was itjust one of those bad days at the office?
11:54 pm
i don't know. i'm done. williams�* conquerer, osaka, will meetjennifer brady in saturday's final. while in the men's final, novak djokovic will line up against either daniil medvedev or stefanos tsitsipas on sunday. djokovic beat russian qualifier aslan karatsev in straight sets. the russian doubled his career earnings by getting this far in the tournament. djokovic meanwhile will be going for a record—extending ninth title. moeen ali and dawid malan were among a group of england players who've been signed up to compete in this year's indian premier league following today's auction. if those players�* teams�* reach the latter stages of the tournament it means some could miss england�*s two test matches against new zealand in june. jonny bairstow, who�*s been retained for sunrisers hyderabad this season, doesn�*t think the ipl adversely affects the fortunes of england�*s test side.
11:55 pm
i don�*t believe that there are priorities for them. look at our away record, we have won six out of our last seven now. the test matches away from home. you looked at our performances that we�*ve had in the performances we�*ve had in t20 cricket over the last 12, 2a months and those results don�*t come by prioritising one over the other. all three, four matches of the games have been producing results. the british horse racing authority is to introduce saliva testing to screen jockeys for any banned substances. the results would be immediate — meaning jockeys could be stood down from racing on the day. a pilot is due to begin this spring. no other major sport in britain uses oral swabs to provide on—the—day screening in this manner. now to snooker — and mark williams is through to the quarter finals of the welsh open. he beat hossein vafaei four frames to two. vafaei had knocked out
11:56 pm
judd trump earlier in the day, but the iranian had no answer to williams, who knocked in breaks of 83, 79 and 90 to seal victory. wiliams has won this tournament twice before — the last time back in 1999. and that�*s all the sport for now. hello there. the weather is going to be turning increasingly wet across western areas of the uk, thanks to an area of low pressure. this area of low pressure, in fact. and this cloud you can see here associated with the low is a weather front, a particularly slow—moving front. it�*s going to be bringing rain for some for the next couple of days. rainfall totals building up, then, but the wettest weather will always be over high ground — so the moors of southwest england, the brecon beacons, snowdonia, the cumbrian fells, northern ireland generally, and across southern and western scotland, particularly the highlands
11:57 pm
and the southern uplands. so we could see some localised flooding building in. the rain is beginning to arrive right now and, along with the wet weather some strong winds, mild air. temperatures about 8—9 celsius as we start the day on friday. further east it is dry, but it�*s chillier. temperatures around 3 celsius, most places should be frost—free. now for friday it�*s a wet and windy starts the day across these areas with gusts of wind potentially running into the low—60s in miles per hour or so in places. outbreaks of rain with many of you for much of the day. there won�*t be much rain, though, across the northeast of scotland, and not a great deal of rain either across the midlands, east anglia, southeast england. there will be quite large tracts of the day that stay dry and bright, even. as far as further west, the rain pretty relentless. temperatures on the mild side, looking at highs of around 10—12 degrees fairly widely. and then into the weekend — more wet and windy weather to come across western areas. the eastern side of the country brighter and drier and, for some, it could turn very mild indeed for a time.
11:58 pm
the reason the weather gets a bit milder is the winds are going to start to come from a southerly direction, dragging the air up from north africa, spain, france, and on into central and eastern parts of england in particular, though east scotland not doing badly in places. further west on saturday, well, it�*s a wet and windy day coming up with the rain again very heavy and persistent at times. temperatures, well, around about 12—14 celsius across western areas — which is still mild, but across the east of england we could see temperatures go as high as 17 celsius in one or a few spots. very mild indeed. our weather front is still with us on sunday, but it is tending to fizzle, just a lump of cloud with a few patches of rain left on it by this stage. so more in the way of bright weather for scotland and northern ireland, a bit more sunshine here, temperatures around 10—11 celsius. eastern england still having the highest temperatures, perhaps up to 15—16.
11:59 pm
12:00 am
this is bbc news. i�*m kasia madera, with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. touchdown confirmed — perserverance is safely on the surface of mars. this is the moment, the perseverance rover — nasa�*s most ambitious mission to mars — landed successfully on the red planet, after a seven—month journey from earth. to work through all the adversity that goes, and all the challenges that go with landing a rover on mars, plus the challenges of covid — and just an amazing accomplishment. within minutes, the first image was beamed back by the rover — its shadow clearly seen — as it tweets, "i�*m safe on mars. perseverance will get you anywhere."

36 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on