Skip to main content
Internet Archive's 25th Anniversary Logo

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  February 19, 2021 6:00am-9:01am GMT

6:00 am
good morning, welcome to breakfast withjon kay and mega munchetty. our headlines today. perseverance pays off for nasa as it successfully lands a rover on the surface of mars. perseverance is safely on the surface of mars. borisjohnson will pledge to give away the majority of the uk's surplus coronavirus vaccines to developing countries when he chairs a virtual meeting of the g7 today. good morning. how much has the pandemic cost the public purse? from furlough to extra support for the nhs, this morning we'll get the latest figures on what's being spent
6:01 am
and borrowed, and what that means for all of us. on a night of european drama, rangers rally late on to edge a seven goal thriller at royal antwerp in belgium with a winner in the 90th minute. and the stables are staying. bbc breakfast viewers help raise more than £1 million pounds to keep young people with disabilities in the saddle. plus, an incredibly mild few days to come, one or two could hit 17 degrees but do not be fooled. plenty of rain around as well. the full forecast coming up. good morning, it's friday, february19th. nasa has successfully landed its most advanced spacecraft yet on mars where it will search for signs of ancient life. the rover called perseverance travelled nearly 300 million miles before navigating a risky landing phase dubbed the "seven
6:02 am
minutes of terror". here's our science correspondent rebecca morelle, whose report contains flashing images. perseverance is going about one kilometre per second. a nerve—racking wait at mission control. perseverance is safely on the surface of mars. then celebrations as a signal is received from mars. it's touchdown for nasa's perseverance rover. and these are its first images, a view of its landing site. the rover has even started tweeting. there really is no good way to describe that moment when it's over, and you hear those words, touchdown confirmed. it's just a remarkable feeling of pride in the team, relief, and, and reallyjoy, thinking forward to this remarkable service mission we have coming up.
6:03 am
it survived a fiendishly difficult landing, burning through the atmosphere at the speed of a bullet, before a complex landing system brought it to the ground. the rover will now be seeking answers to a crucial question. this mission is all about finding signs of life. and the best place to do that is here, thejezero crater. today it's dry and dusty but billions of years ago it was a huge lake, and you can clearly see a river running into it. this gives you an idea of what it would have looked like. if we zoom in a bit more, these green areas on the edge of the crater were once beaches on the lake's shore, and the hope is any microscopic creatures that once lived there are still preserved. perseverance is the most advanced rover that nasa has ever built, and it's jam—packed with instruments. its robotic arm is equipped with a drill to collect rock samples. so what forms of life could they contain?
6:04 am
i'm not talking about martian little green men. probably not even fish. we are looking for microbial life, maybe microbes that have made a little mat or a slime, the sorts that you might find on the bottom of a pond. those are the types of things that are likely to, well, they did exist on earth 3.5 billion years ago. the question is, did they exist on mars at the bottom of lakes? and in a first, nasa's mini mars helicopter will take off. its test flight will be in a few weeks. but getting to the red planet is just the start. now the hard work begins on a mission that could transform our understanding of mars. rebecca morelle, bbc news. it was so good watching it last night, i was watching bbc news. you had onlyjust got your head around the fact that it landed successfully and we could see the pictures, ten or 11 minutes after that, the photos
6:05 am
are there. . , ., or 11 minutes after that, the photos are there. ., , ., ., ., ., are there. can you imagine how long, we were talking _ are there. can you imagine how long, we were talking to _ are there. can you imagine how long, we were talking to a _ are there. can you imagine how long, we were talking to a scientist - we were talking to a scientist yesterday, how long that 11 minutes must have felt. has yesterday, how long that 11 minutes must have felt.— must have felt. has it, hasn't it? the “0 must have felt. has it, hasn't it? the joy on _ must have felt. has it, hasn't it? the joy on their _ must have felt. has it, hasn't it? the joy on their faces, _ must have felt. has it, hasn't it? the joy on their faces, so - must have felt. has it, hasn't it? the joy on their faces, so nice i must have felt. has it, hasn't it? the joy on their faces, so nice to | the joy on their faces, so nice to start with some smiles on the programme. borisjohnson will pledge today to donate the majority of the uk's surplus covid vaccines to developing countries. the prime minister is chairing a virtual summit where he'll encourage other leaders, including president biden, to follow suit. our global health correspondent, naomi grimley reports. more and more britons are getting their vaccine shots. today, the prime minister will be chairing a g7 meeting to talk about those countries which haven't got started. in the global scramble to secure vaccines against covid—19 many wealthy countries which funded a lot of the research, have ended up buying more supplies than they need. new figures from the anti—poverty pressure group, the one campaign, revealed that australia, canada, japan, the uk, the us and the eu have already
6:06 am
secured more than 3 billion doses, 1.2 billion more than they need to give their entire populations two doses. the uk government is now talking about sharing some of its surplus, but campaigners say they want hard facts on how many actual doses it will be donating. there's over a billion excess doses that are being tied up in a pipeline in these countries and we need to make sure that they're not sitting, stockpiled in just a few countries, but indeed they're going back to poorer countries and middle income countries so that we can actually get this virus under control everywhere. the uk has also given half a billion pounds to covax, the un—led programme to get vaccines out to poorer countries. but that project has yet to launch its first vaccinations. so 130 countries in the world haven't administered any shots, leaving health care workers at high risk. naomi grimley, bbc news.
6:07 am
nearly 20 major health care organisations, including the royal college of nursing and the british medical association, are appealing to the prime minister for better protection from coronavirus. they say at least 930 health care workers have now died from covid and that high—grade equipment is needed to prevent the transmission of the virus through the air. they're asking for improved ventilation and more consideration of the risks posed to staff while they work in patients' homes. all primary school children in wales could return to classes by the middle of next month, if covid rates continue to fall. the first minister mark drakeford will set out his plan today for lifting lockdown restrictions and it's expected to start with a gradual re—opening of schools. younger primary children are set to return on monday and older pupils could join them on march 15th.
6:08 am
we will speak to mr drake that in an hour's time. —— to mark drakeford. more than two million people in the uk have been denied a refund for flights they were unable to board because of coronavirus restrictions, according to research by the consumer group which. it found that even though the law prevented travel during lockdown, passengers were not legally entitled to money back or guaranteed a successful insurance claim, because the airline did not cancel the flight. "which" is advising that we wait until the situation is clearer before booking a summer holiday and that we consider package holidays over flight—only trips. we will have the weather in a moment and it will be a mild weekend here but it is different in texas. millions of people in texas have been told to boil their drinking water as severe winter weather continues to cause chaos. many are living without power as temperatures have dropped as low as minus—18 degrees celcius. here's our north america correspondent lebo diseko.
6:09 am
this is one of the richest states in one of the richest countries in the world. around half of texans are experiencing disruptions to water supply. for others, burst pipes and melting snow have caused flooding. last night, we got power, after two days. and we didn't have water, but finally we got water, now we have water everywhere. water companies have battled with frozen wells, treatment plants have been hit by power outages. it's meant 13 million people have been told to boil their water before drinking it. the supply of electricity is slowly being restored, but there are still at least half a million people without it. we will not stop until normalcy is restored to your lives. until that moment comes, though, i ask all texans to continue your efforts to take the proper precautions that are needed to stay
6:10 am
safe and to stay warm. if they manage to do that, and find water, getting food may still be hard. supermarket shelves are running dangerously low on supplies. while ordinary texans were freezing, their senator ted cruz headed for the beaches of mexico. back now after a public outcry over his absence while his state was in crisis. lebo diseko, bbc news, texas. the duke of edinburgh has spent a third night in hospital. prince philip, who's 99, was admitted to london's king edward vii hospital as a precautionary measure on tuesday after feeling unwell. he's said to be in good spirits. his stay is not related to coronavirus. we have been talking a lot about children's mental health, a lot of research has gone into it a lot of concern about how that will come out
6:11 am
in coming months in terms of treatment. young boys who regularly play video games are less likely to become depressed, according to a new study. researchers from university college london say that gaming may actually have some benefits, particularly during a lockdown. there are nuances to this, it is a complex set of results. however, they found that girls who spend more time on social media appear to develop more depressive symptoms. mixed news for parents and kids there. , ' . ., ~ ., there. very difficult making that balance because _ there. very difficult making that balance because for _ there. very difficult making that balance because for how- there. very difficult making that balance because for how long i there. very difficult making that i balance because for how long have parents been told, don't put children in front of screens for too long, watch their social media usage as well. but what are children to do when it is... as well. but what are children to do when it ism— when it is... and all of the lessons are on screen _ when it is... and all of the lessons are on screen as _ when it is... and all of the lessons are on screen as well. _ when it is... and all of the lessons are on screen as well. it _ when it is... and all of the lessons are on screen as well. it has - when it is... and all of the lessons are on screen as well. it has been| when it is... and all of the lessons | are on screen as well. it has been a nightmare half term because they can't go and see their mates and play and do all the things they normally do, so sometimes screens are the only option, they are at
6:12 am
home. ~ ., ., ~ are the only option, they are at home. ~ . ., ~ ., ,, home. we are talking to mark drakeford _ home. we are talking to mark drakeford today _ home. we are talking to mark drakeford today and - home. we are talking to mark drakeford today and james i home. we are talking to mark - drakeford today and james cleverly drakeford today and james cleverly as well, and looking ahead to the road maps being laid out on the 22nd of february so we should be able to bring you some news and dates on when schools may, in a phased manner, return. it is 12 minutes past six. and we need some weather, some extraordinary figures about how mild it is. i was almost sweating in my winter coat. i it is. i was almost sweating in my winter coat-— winter coat. i thought it was 'ust me! what a change! last saturday we saw temperatures, a week ago, around freezing or below for summer. it will be a weekend where we see temperatures in the teens but it is a mixed picture into the weekend. it will be very mild and some will see the sunshine, but lots of heavy rain to come for some. that is a concern. the rain is piling in across the western half of the country, it has been a wet night in northern ireland, pushing into scotland,
6:13 am
wales, western fringes of england. in the eastern areas, dry and a cooler morning than it has been. the south—east will stay dry but the rain is thereabouts all day for some, may be easing away from central and western northern ireland but to the south—west of england and wales, the rain will pile in especially over the hills. and the strength of the wind across the western districts, gusts of up to 50 or 60 miles an hour. really blowing the rain in. further north, the northern half of scotland will get some shelter with someone coming from the south so innovative whiteness in dry weather at times. —— some brightness and dry weather at times. but it gets even milder this weekend and one or two could see highs of 17 celsius. we will see later, thank you. the pandemic has cost the public purse hundreds of billions of pounds in support schemes to help the economy, extra nhs resources
6:14 am
and lost tax revenues. this morning we'll get an update on those figures. sarah's here with more. are talking about public finances today, we have the latest figures out forjanuary at around 7am. they will tell us how much the government is spending and borrowing and it is no surprise the pandemic is having a huge impact. good morning everyone. these are big, big numbers. this matters to all of us because it affects us because it affects how much we all might have to pay in taxes in the future. the government is on target to borrow nearly £400 billion for this financial year, which ends in april. a level not seen in the uk, outside of the two world wars. this huge increase shows the emerging effects of the government's pandemic policies. measures to support jobs and the economy, like the furlough scheme. by the middle of december nearly ten million workers had been furloughed. that cost over £16 billion.
6:15 am
but government has spent billions more to support businesses as well as extra on welfare and support for the nhs. in fact the treasury says it's committed over £280 billion to coronavirus support measures. to put that into some context, that's just over three times what the government normally spends on education in a year. huge numbers here. at the same time the government's main source of revenue — taxes — things like business rates and vat. that income has fallen dramatically. so the government is having to borrow more to balance the books. so is that a problem? here's the view from one analyst. right now in the country we've got record low interest rates. they are likely to stay there for a very long time, that's pretty much what the bank of england has said and has committed to at their meetings recently. and when you've got debt at very low interest rates, that becomes much easier to service,
6:16 am
the ten year gilt yield, for example, which is the uk's main borrowing instrument, is 0.65%. so i think if you've got a personal credit card and you've got an interest rate of less than 1% i think people would be thinking, actually that's not so bad, so you might spend a bit more. that's pretty much what the government is doing. except the government has to do it at the moment because they have to prop up the economy because of the pandemic. so lots of things to consider here. and we should get a better idea of just what the chancellor rishi sunak thinks when he delivers his budget in just under two weeks' time. he's under pressure to extend these emergency support schemes, and do more to protectjobs. but then at the same time members of his own party are demanding he starts fixing the tattered public finances. later this morning we get the latest on what those finances look like. the more the government goes into debt, the greater the pressure on the chancellor to raise taxes or reign in spending in his budget.
6:17 am
the figures are out at 7:00am and i'll bring them as soon as i have them. we will be poring over those numbers. we will be poring over those numbere— we will be poring over those numbers. . , , ., numbers. that is the question, we are all asking _ numbers. that is the question, we are all asking how _ numbers. that is the question, we are all asking how we will pay - numbers. that is the question, we are all asking how we will pay for i are all asking how we will pay for it, which the government has made clear, now is not the time to outline it, in its words. just after quarter past six, thank you forjoining us. let's take a look at some of today's front pages. the telegraph says vaccines appear to cut covid transmissions and infections by two—thirds. its headline reads "vaccine data paves the way back to freedom". the daily mail reports that all over—40s in the uk will get the vaccine by the end of march. the paper says it would be a "huge boost" for the vaccine programme and allow ministers to ease england's lockdown sooner.
6:18 am
that hasn't quite been confirmed by the government, and neither than his. —— neither has this. "hope for overseas holidays" is the headline in the times. the paper says ministers are optimistic that summer will see the return of trips abroad. and the bbc news website has a story about a man whose wedding ring fell into a pile of rubbish, in a 10—foot deep container, at a tip. fortunately forjames ross it was found "caked in grime" by staff at the tip, who sifted through mounds of rubbish to recover it. i think caked in grime is a very nice way of putting it, who knows what it was caked in. that is going to be one very grateful man. he told the bbc that— to be one very grateful man. he told the bbc that he — to be one very grateful man. he told the bbc that he was _ to be one very grateful man. he told the bbc that he was dreading - to be one very grateful man. he told the bbc that he was dreading it, - the bbc that he was dreading it, because it was valentine's day, dreading going dreading that because it was valentine's day, dreading that came to my wife... not my wife, his wife! this dreading that came to my wife. .. not my wife, his wife!—
6:19 am
my wife, his wife! this is going down a whole _ my wife, his wife! this is going down a whole different - my wife, his wife! this is going | down a whole different avenue! my wife, his wife! this is going - down a whole different avenue! they thou~ht down a whole different avenue! they thought they — down a whole different avenue! tue: thought they had down a whole different avenue! tte: thought they had found down a whole different avenue! t"t21: thought they had found a down a whole different avenue! tt21: thought they had found a washer in this kit but it was the ring. let's have a look inside. can you help me? i thought you should keep digging! how obsessed are we about to sleep, we are always talking about it here, louise had won earlier in the week. this says if you get regular amounts of sleep, people who wake up at different times of the day, and you will refute this i know, they are likely to be in a bad mood if you wake up at different times each day, more likely than those who... than those who sleep too little or stay up those who sleep too little or stay up very late. those who sleep too little or stay up very late-— those who sleep too little or stay up very late. you are used to it, i come up — up very late. you are used to it, i come up every — up very late. you are used to it, i come up every once _ up very late. you are used to it, i come up every once in _ up very late. you are used to it, i come up every once in awhile - up very late. you are used to it, i j come up every once in awhile and have to adjust to the early starts. especially with the radio programme, you used to it. you especially with the radio programme, you used to it—
6:20 am
you used to it. you are saying i am never in a — you used to it. you are saying i am never in a bad _ you used to it. you are saying i am never in a bad mood. _ you used to it. you are saying i am never in a bad mood. i _ you used to it. you are saying i am never in a bad mood. i certainly i you used to it. you are saying i am | never in a bad mood. i certainly did not say that! _ never in a bad mood. i certainly did not say that! this _ never in a bad mood. i certainly did not say that! this is _ never in a bad mood. i certainly did not say that! this is in _ never in a bad mood. i certainly did not say that! this is in the - never in a bad mood. i certainly did not say that! this is in the mail- not say that! this is in the mail today, my crocs must be in here somewhere. a crocodile that solid issue. —— that swallowed a shoe. wasn't there, no, a woman who lived in a shoe. ., , ., wasn't there, no, a woman who lived inashoe. ., ., ., ., in a shoe. there was a woman who swallowed — in a shoe. there was a woman who swallowed a _ in a shoe. there was a woman who swallowed a fly? _ in a shoe. there was a woman who swallowed a fly? perhaps - in a shoe. there was a woman who swallowed a fly? perhaps she'll i in a shoe. there was a woman who i swallowed a fly? perhaps she'll die? this had to be a very special shoe because the crocodile is put to sleep and yvette put his hand right inside and retrieves the shoe. it wasn't actually the crocs, it was a trainer. , , u, wasn't actually the crocs, it was a trainer. , , ., trainer. or, they 'ust cared about the crocodile. i i trainer. or, theyjust cared about the crocodile. i was _ trainer. or, theyjust cared about the crocodile. i wasjust - trainer. or, theyjust cared about the crocodile. i was just thinking | the crocodile. i was 'ust thinking about the shoe. i the crocodile. i wasjust thinking about the shoe. look _ the crocodile. i wasjust thinking about the shoe. look at - the crocodile. i wasjust thinking about the shoe. look at you i the crocodile. i was just thinking l about the shoe. look at you loving our about the shoe. look at you loving your animals! _ about the shoe. look at you loving your animals! i— about the shoe. look at you loving your animals! i love _ about the shoe. look at you loving your animals! i love this, - about the shoe. look at you loving your animals! i love this, we i about the shoe. look at you loving your animals! i love this, we have| your animals! i love this, we have not your animals! i love this, we have got grainy — your animals! i love this, we have got grainy images _ your animals! i love this, we have got grainy images from _ your animals! i love this, we have got grainy images from the i your animals! i love this, we have got grainy images from the nasa l got grainy images from the nasa probe on mars this morning, grayscale black and white images,
6:21 am
but look at this. bright colour in the peak district, this is a core called motley. —— this is a macaw. she has trained this macaw to fly free and return to her. so she has trained this macaw to fly free and return to her. 50 it she has trained this macaw to fly free and return to her.— free and return to her. so it is a et? free and return to her. so it is a pet? yes. _ free and return to her. so it is a pet? yes. here _ free and return to her. so it is a pet? yes, here he _ free and return to her. so it is a pet? yes, here he is— free and return to her. so it is a pet? yes, here he is with i free and return to her. so it is a pet? yes, here he is with his. free and return to her. so it is a i pet? yes, here he is with his owner chloe. pet? yes, here he is with his owner chloe- imagine _ pet? yes, here he is with his owner chloe. imagine seeing _ pet? yes, here he is with his owner chloe. imagine seeing that - pet? yes, here he is with his owner chloe. imagine seeing that in i pet? yes, here he is with his owner chloe. imagine seeing that in the l chloe. imagine seeing that in the peak district. _ chloe. imagine seeing that in the peak district, that _ chloe. imagine seeing that in the peak district, that is _ chloe. imagine seeing that in the peak district, that is a _ chloe. imagine seeing that in the peak district, that is a new- chloe. imagine seeing that in the peak district, that is a new one! | chloe. imagine seeing that in thej peak district, that is a new one! i love the picture. i like _ peak district, that is a new one! i love the picture. i like the - peak district, that is a new one! i love the picture. i like the name, j love the picture. i like the name, motle . love the picture. i like the name, motley- we _ love the picture. i like the name, motley. we need _ love the picture. i like the name, motley. we need more _ love the picture. i like the name, motley. we need more animals. | we broadcast a special sos on yesterday's breakfast, "save our stables". it was about a riding centre which helps young people with disabilities but it faced closure unless its supporters could raise a million pounds in just seven days. with your help, they smashed that
6:22 am
target before lunch. fi lamdin was there to see the celebrations. all day, the money just kept coming in. that's really kind of you. by phone, in person, and online. well over tens of thousands of separate donations. that's so kind of you, i must say. they had just seven days to raise the rest of the money, half a million, so they could keep these stables. and unbelievably, by mid—morning, they did it. we did it, we did it, we did it! oh, you arejust amazing. honestly, we did it. dominic, we did it, didn't we? 18—year—old dominic has cerebral palsy. this is the only place where he can exercise.
6:23 am
you know what, wejust didn't expect, we didn't expect that reaction. so when we got closer and closer, we screamed every £10,000, it was just amazing. and then, and then i cried, because it was just so huge. ijust thought, oh, dominic, your life is no longer locked down. and celebrations were soon in full flow. i'm just really overwhelmed, i can't really put it into words. it'sjust, like, we had nothing. we've always got nothing. and very few people believed in us. i can't believe it, that we've made it. and we've still got a few days to spare. well done, everybody! and it wasn't long before word got out. and soon, celebrities were also sending their congratulations. with a week to go, they have raised over £1 million, it might lift your heart,
6:24 am
make you want to chip in to guarantee the future of this very special place for all the people to whom it means the world. people like louis, who is autistic. he says this place has stopped him from having panic attacks. i feel so happy that we'll be able to be here forever, without having to worry about moving. does it feel like christmas? it feels better than christmas. and for hannah, who is visually impaired, she's kept herjob. i feel totally elated at the moment. that we get to keep the horses' house, and we get to stay in the community forever. and even though they reached the target... oh, thank you so much! people kept on giving. i'm so happy. i'm over the moon. when i saw it go, i was like, yay! the stables are saved forever!
6:25 am
the horses are saved forever! and so instead of being rehomed, these horses and those who love them so much can now definitely stay together. fiona lamdin, bbc news. of the 0f thejobs of the jobs you have, that we have all had over the last 12 months or so, you especially out on the road, thatis so, you especially out on the road, that is the story. she must have had such a great time, fiona, and she was there all day. i such a great time, fiona, and she was there all day.— was there all day. i think she had thou~ht was there all day. i think she had thought she _ was there all day. i think she had thought she had _ was there all day. i think she had thought she had finished - was there all day. i think she had i thought she had finished yesterday, then they raised the target and she had to go back because they raise the target. had to go back because they raise the taruet. v had to go back because they raise the taruet. �*, ., ., ., ., ~' had to go back because they raise the taruet. �*, ., ., ., the target. let's have a look at it now. the target. let's have a look at it now- nearly _ the target. let's have a look at it now. nearly £1,156,000. - the target. let's have a look at it now. nearly £1,156,000. so - the target. let's have a look at it| now. nearly £1,156,000. so they the target. let's have a look at it i now. nearly £1,156,000. so they have extra to keep them going. that now. nearly £1,156,000. so they have extra to keep them going.— extra to keep them going. that is auoin to extra to keep them going. that is going to be _ extra to keep them going. that is going to be the — extra to keep them going. that is going to be the challenge, - extra to keep them going. that is going to be the challenge, one i extra to keep them going. that is l going to be the challenge, one very big thing to buy the stables, but then keeping it going is a concern with all of the care and the animals as well. �* ., ., ~ ., as well. and we are talking to
6:26 am
robert itryden _ as well. and we are talking to robert bryden later, - as well. and we are talking to robert bryden later, who i as well. and we are talking to | robert bryden later, who lives as well. and we are talking to i robert bryden later, who lives near the stables, he has an affinity with them so he will talk to us about what it means to the community. a joyous morning. you're watching bbc breakfast. still to come on the programme. texans are suffering another freezing night right now. the lone star state has been colder than alaska this week. we'll be getting the latest from a dallas—based weatherman injust over ten minutes. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tarah welsh. key workers suffering from long covid who are no longer be able to work should be compensataed. that's according to the british medical association and a group of mps who have written to the prime minister.
6:27 am
this week researchers found up to 20% of patients are reporting symptoms weeks after becoming ill. the government has said it will invest £18.5 million into studies looking at long term effects of covid. monthly tests have found no traces of coronavirus in air samples and swabs of london's tube trains, buses and stations. extra cleaning through the pandemic has helped combat the spread. but the researchers at imperial college say that doesn't mean passengers can let down their guard, and commuters should continue to wear facemasks. as the prime minister is due to set out his road map on how we leave lockdown next week, london landlords are warning of complete disaster if the government opens up the industry too soon. many were forced to close their doors back in december, which left some closing for good. a treasury statement said the hospitality sector was receiving "significant support".
6:28 am
at least try and take us out of lockdown, but again, don't do what they've done before. don't take us out too soon, but do it as soon as possible. that the worst case scenario would be that if they take, in my opinion, take us out of lockdown too soon and have to close us down again, that would be a complete disaster. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. 0n the roads — its slow on the a2 coming into london, that's through the roadworks at danson. now the weather with sara thornton. good morning to you. it is a cooler start this morning across london and the south east than we have seen through this week. temperatures well down in low single figures. so some pockets of ground frost around at the very least, but it's a fine start to the day. as we go through its largely going to be dry, the winds are picking up
6:29 am
from the south and west. there is some cloud pushing in as well all the time. might see some light showers just out towards the west but mostly dry and temperatures once more in low double figures. now through the night tonight we're going to keep some warmer airjust moving in and that's going to be with us through the weekend, so it won't be as chillier night to come as the nightjust gone. and we'll start tomorrow morning with temperatures in high single figures, if not around 10 degrees in a couple of spots. and then the big talking point for the weekend will be these temperatures — low to mid teens. some dry weather as well and possibly some sunshine at times. looks like we could see some showery rain around on sunday but it will feel like spring. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back tojon and naga. bye for now.
6:30 am
hello this is breakfast withjohn kay and naga munchetty. coming up on breakfast this morning. was there life on mars? we're one step closer to knowing after nasa successfully landed its most ambitious mission yet to the red planet. we'll speak to one of the team who helped to plan the seven—month voyage. the ducks are quacking but they are not in a row. it would be lovely to think they could jump in the pond and off they go. we'll hear from the actor hugh bonneville about his hopes for a new downton abbey movie and his latest film role, playing the children's author roald dahl. and we'll be meeting max the springer spaniel and social media star, who has just received the animal equivalent of an 0be for cheering us up during the lockdown.
6:31 am
see how chilled he looks. that is his job. if you were watching tv last night you might have seen a covid vaccine campaign video featuring british celebrities from ethnic minority backgrounds. they were trying to bust some myths about the jab. romesh ranganathan, who we spoke to yesterday, was among those taking part. let's hear what one of our regular gps thought of it. dr mohit mandiratta joins us from birmingham. good morning. good morning, how are ou? ve good morning. good morning, how are you? very well- _ good morning. good morning, how are you? very well. what _ good morning. good morning, how are you? very well. what did _ good morning. good morning, how are you? very well. what did you - good morning. good morning, how are you? very well. what did you make i good morning. good morning, how are you? very well. what did you make of| you? very well. what did you make of this campaign. — you? very well. what did you make of this campaign. the — you? very well. what did you make of this campaign, the film _ you? very well. what did you make of this campaign, the film shown - you? very well. what did you make of this campaign, the film shown on i this campaign, the film shown on terrestrial television to get to as wide an audience as possible to urge those who have hesitancy when it comes to the vaccine? it is great, we have known _ comes to the vaccine? it is great, we have known for— comes to the vaccine? it is great, we have known for some - comes to the vaccine? it is great,
6:32 am
we have known for some time i we have known for some time unfortunately that are bame communities are affected and getting on well. it is amazing these celebrities have but the time and effort in. i would urge a note of caution in that we are very easy to label bame as one homogenous group and we know there are so many cultures, individuals and communities and the reason for hesitancy might be multifold in these communities. it is important that these public health campaigns in multi—languages are important. we need to get to the nitty—gritty of what the hesitancy is and try to address it. what the hesitancy is and try to address it— address it. that is difficult, reaching — address it. that is difficult, reaching different - address it. that is difficult, i reaching different communities address it. that is difficult, - reaching different communities are making those in those communities, feel as though they are not being lumped into one problematic group. however, saying that, there is an important message about, and we have seen it in some of the papers this
6:33 am
morning, if you have the vaccine, your transmissibility of the virus is two thirds less. it is getting through the medical facts as well as debunking some of those myths people are hearing second, third orfourth hands or through the internet? i completely agree. we want people, if they are hesitant and uncertain, come forward and have a conversation with trusted individuals. as gps, we are this far down the line in terms of the incredible effort going on. we have information and data and we have lists of patients and we are looking through these lists to see if there are trends to particular ethnic backgrounds, communities who don't want the vaccine and there is an opportunity going forward to pick up an opportunity going forward to pick up the phone and speak to these people and ask how i can help them. what is the most common resistance, or reason for resistance you have
6:34 am
had? , �* ., ., ., had? there isn't an individual one. it has had? there isn't an individual one. it has been — had? there isn't an individual one. it has been well _ had? there isn't an individual one. it has been well publicised - had? there isn't an individual one. it has been well publicised there i it has been well publicised there was concerns from a religious aspect as to whether there was animal products. people thought the vaccine causes covid. is it safe? the data we have had from israel and the millions of people across the country who have had it, it is incredibly safe and the use of it reducing transmission. it is making sure those messages get out there, there isn't one single, hesitant reason or myth out there. talk there isn't one single, hesitant reason or myth out there. talk to me how ou reason or myth out there. talk to me how you feel — reason or myth out there. talk to me how you feel about _ reason or myth out there. talk to me how you feel about this. _ reason or myth out there. talk to me how you feel about this. gp - reason or myth out there. talk to me how you feel about this. gp records | how you feel about this. gp records show that three out of ten care home staff in england haven't been vaccinated yet. when you think of care home staff, you think of people who obviously have some sense of medical training and understanding because of the work they do. when you think of this hesitancy and you
6:35 am
hear about conversations from certain providers who say, if they haven't got the vaccine, we will consider moving them to different areas of thejob, consider moving them to different areas of the job, how do you think that should be approached? it is a very important _ that should be approached? it is a very important point. _ that should be approached? it is a very important point. we - that should be approached? it is a very important point. we saw i that should be approached? it is a very important point. we saw the | very important point. we saw the difficulties we all went through earlier in the pandemic when we saw across the care homes. it is the most vulnerable group, age is the biggest risk factorfrom most vulnerable group, age is the biggest risk factor from covid. most vulnerable group, age is the biggest risk factorfrom covid. it is something we need to address and it is exploring why people are hesitant. i want everybody to be vaccinated across the country and from a priority, we want our care home staff and patients to be vaccinated. locally, in ourarea home staff and patients to be vaccinated. locally, in our area we haven't had that concern but nationally, i am aware it is. again, exploring why they haven't had it, we need to make sure many people are protected. tote we need to make sure many people are rotected. ~ ., ., ~
6:36 am
we need to make sure many people are rotected. ~ ., ., ,, ., , protected. we are talking about this ho eful protected. we are talking about this hopeful pathway _ protected. we are talking about this hopeful pathway out. _ protected. we are talking about this hopeful pathway out. unfortunately | hopeful pathway out. unfortunately there has been a lot of talk about there has been a lot of talk about the backlog of certain treatments because of the pressure is the nhs has been under. but also what has come out of this pandemic in terms of the mental health legacy and what that means going forward. can you give me some insight into what you are seeing and what you are concerned about in terms of future treatment and how that will filter down into future work?— down into future work? mental health, it is — down into future work? mental health, it is something - down into future work? mental health, it is something i i down into future work? mental health, it is something i am i down into future work? mental i health, it is something i am seeing increasingly regularly on the ground. the intensive care beds are no longer full of patients full of covid and that is when the legacy of this pandemic will be felt, in terms of treatment. i am seeing young adults with mental health issues, stress, anxiety and depression. we are aware thatjob losses, financial difficulties, bereavement, isolation and loss of social networks, individual things that can adversely
6:37 am
affect mental health and so many have had that as a collection across our population and that is seeping through and presenting as mental health problems. children, as part of the development need social interaction to grow and learn, in terms of interaction and development and they are not getting that. my real pleat would be, if you are struggling, you are not alone, everybody is going through this and nobody has gone through this before. talk to a loved one, raise your concern, there is a lot of mental health support available, helplines, child and adolescent mental health services, the samaritans do excellent work. we are here as gps and there is a sense of hope coming forwards in terms of the vaccination programme, the days are getting longer, case numbers are coming down. although we are not out of the woods, if you need help, get in touch and we will be there to help you and hopefully better days will come. . ~' you and hopefully better days will come. ., ~ i. you and hopefully better days will come. ., ~ ,, y you and hopefully better days will come. ., ~ i. , . ., you and hopefully better days will
6:38 am
come. ., ~' i., , . ., ., come. thank you very much, have a aood come. thank you very much, have a good day- — come. thank you very much, have a good day- you _ come. thank you very much, have a good day- you as — come. thank you very much, have a good day. you as well, _ come. thank you very much, have a good day. you as well, thank i come. thank you very much, have a good day. you as well, thank you. l good day. you as well, thank you. bus good day. you as well, thank you. itusy days — good day. you as well, thank you. itusy days for _ good day. you as well, thank you. busy days for him. _ mike is here with the sport and a busy night for clubs in europe? yes, nice to do a little jaunt around europe. matches taking place all over, five british clubs involved and some in neutral venues because of travel restrictions. so it is confusing when you play a spanish club in italy, for example. let's start our tour in belguim. and a great night for rangers, who are running away with the scottish premiership and looking confident in europe too. they were behind twice at royal antwerp in this first leg, but they scored twice in the last seven minutes for a lt—3 victory. ryan kent with a superb equaliser. and then borna barisic scoring his second penalty of the night, as they headed into injury time. those away goals give steve gerrard's side a great chance of reaching the last 16, just as they did last year. manchester united are almost certain to go through, after a 4—0 thrashing
6:39 am
of real sociedad, who've been flying high, in the spanish top flight. bruno fernandes had another great game, scoring twice in the match held in turin in italy, and marcus rashford got another. i thought we found ourselves a little bit tonight. i thought the boys had got a little bit of that zip in their legs again. so it was important, you have to be able to take some players off, still rotated the team. gareth bale inspired tottenham to a 4—1win against wolfsburger of austria — setting up one goal and scoring and scoring another — this match staged in hungary and tottenham manager said they had one foot in the next round. arsenal have a tougher task... they drew 1—1 with benfica in rome, bukayo saka with the equaliser, but they'll probably play the second leg in athens. the other premier league side in action, leicester, drew 0—0 at slavia prague.
6:40 am
the crystal palace forward, wilfried zaha, says he will no longer, take the knee before matches. premier league players have been making the gesture at kick—off, in every match since football re—started in the summer, but zaha says it's lost its meaning, and is not making a difference. taking the knee is great and stuff because. growing up, my parents let me know that i should be proud to be black, no matter what. and i just feel like we should just stand tall. it's becoming something that wejust do now, you know? that's not enough for me. i'm not going to take the knee, i'm not going to wear black lives matter in the back of my... ..because it feels like it's a target. we're isolating ourselves, we're trying to say we're equal but we're isolating ourselves with these things that aren't even working anyway. joe salisbury has won the battle of the brits at the australian open tennis. he and rajeev ram are the defending champions and beatjamie murray and bruno soares to reach the final.
6:41 am
salisbury is on court again now, alongside the american desirae krawczyk, attempting to make it into the mixed doubles final. sometimes he goes under the radar, the shadow ofjamie murray, but he hasjust the shadow ofjamie murray, but he has just beaten the shadow ofjamie murray, but he hasjust beaten him the shadow ofjamie murray, but he has just beaten him and the shadow ofjamie murray, but he hasjust beaten him and he did win the australian doubles last year. you look for the big names and you love seeing the big names because you are familiar with them but when these ones come from under the radar and they are the ones we will be talking about in years to come. i have spoken tojoe salisbury in the past and he is frustrated he sometimes doesn't get the recognition he deserves, so we will give him that this morning. also, underthe give him that this morning. also, under the radar means less pressure. yes, that comes with the territory. fairly mild here, in comparison to last week.
6:42 am
but the us state of texas is having anotherfreezing night. parts of it have been colder than alaska this week — causing power cuts and food shortages. joining us now is dan henry — who is chief meteorologist at fox four news in dallas. good morning. i never thought! would cross live to texas and cease now, so much snow?— now, so much snow? neither did i come to be _ now, so much snow? neither did i come to be honest. _ now, so much snow? neither did i come to be honest. we _ now, so much snow? neither did i come to be honest. we are i now, so much snow? neither did i come to be honest. we are not i come to be honest. we are not accustomed to dealing with this. heat, absolutely. but freezing cold weather and snow? we are not equipped and we had to get out the garden shovel earlier todayjust equipped and we had to get out the garden shovel earlier today just to shovel off the walkway and the driveway. we are going on day ten of
6:43 am
this freezing cold weather. we have literally been below freezing for the better part of ten days here. the temperature bottomed out at minus two fahrenheit which is —19 celsius a few mornings ago, which is the second coldest temperature ever in north texas, in the dallas fort worth area and it was the coldest morning in over 70 years. what worth area and it was the coldest morning in over 70 years. what are ou morning in over 70 years. what are you saying — morning in over 70 years. what are you saying to _ morning in over 70 years. what are you saying to your _ morning in over 70 years. what are you saying to your viewers, - morning in over 70 years. what are you saying to your viewers, what i morning in over 70 years. what are l you saying to your viewers, what are you saying to your viewers, what are you explaining? first you saying to your viewers, what are you explaining?_ you explaining? first of all, you t to you explaining? first of all, you try to give _ you explaining? first of all, you try to give them _ you explaining? first of all, you try to give them a _ you explaining? first of all, you try to give them a little - you explaining? first of all, you try to give them a little hope i you explaining? first of all, you. try to give them a little hope and we do have warmer weather coming our way this weekend and into next week. but we are just not used to dealing with this. just to give you an example, we live in a home that goes back to the 19305, which is old by american standards. so it is old plumbing and we worry about frozen
6:44 am
pipes, so we have heaters literally directed at the plumbing. every single tap in the house is dripping, so you try to pass on tips to your viewers and how they can prevent frozen pipes. but in the park cities, which is a neighbourhood about seven miles north of downtown dallas, one in every eight homes has had busted plumbing in their house. we profiled one family in an apartment earlier today that had busted pipes, it literally soaked the entire contents of their home and they had to throw out all of their furniture. and they had to throw out all of theirfurniture. so and they had to throw out all of their furniture. so the damage and they had to throw out all of theirfurniture. so the damage is just incredible. in their furniture. so the damage is just incredible.— their furniture. so the damage is just incredible. in the uk we often aet just incredible. in the uk we often get frustrated _ just incredible. in the uk we often get frustrated when _ just incredible. in the uk we often get frustrated when we _ just incredible. in the uk we often get frustrated when we get i just incredible. in the uk we often j get frustrated when we get severe winter weather that we are not prepared and the trains don't run, pipes burst and that kind of thing. but i guess in texas, you really are not prepared for this, so infrastructure, the way the whole state operates has just been hammered? state operates has 'ust been hammeredah
6:45 am
state operates has 'ust been hammered? ., , . hammered? that is exactly right. we are not prepared _ hammered? that is exactly right. we are not prepared for _ hammered? that is exactly right. we are not prepared for this. _ hammered? that is exactly right. we are not prepared for this. you i hammered? that is exactly right. we are not prepared for this. you have i are not prepared for this. you have probably done stories on it, but we were literally minutes away from a catastrophic power grid fairly here in north texas. they were so much demand that couldn't be met, they had to begin rolling blackouts. 0nce had to begin rolling blackouts. once they did that, the system became so unstable that those that had their power turned off the left. in some cases, it went on for five and six days. so people were struggling to stay warm in their homes. temperatures inside the home were dropping down to about a0 fahrenheit. people are dressing in layers, just like i am now, to stay warm inside their homes. there has been a shortage of food, when grocery stores to open up they are
6:46 am
immediately ransacked within a matter of a few hours. we have a fuel shortage now so it is hard to find gasoline for your cause. that is if you want to venture out on the roadways. they are extremely treacherous, like sheets of glass, like ice. very, very tricky travel conditions as well.— like ice. very, very tricky travel conditions as well. dan, thank you for “oininu conditions as well. dan, thank you forjoining us. _ conditions as well. dan, thank you forjoining us, it _ conditions as well. dan, thank you forjoining us, it is _ conditions as well. dan, thank you forjoining us, it is late _ conditions as well. dan, thank you forjoining us, it is late in - conditions as well. dan, thank you forjoining us, it is late in the i forjoining us, it is late in the night there so we appreciate you staying up and especially going outside in the cold. we had to get better soon when the warm weather comes in. you might want to switch off your phone because we are about to hear of weather for the off your phone because we are about to hear of weatherfor the uk off your phone because we are about to hear of weather for the uk and off your phone because we are about to hear of weatherfor the uk and it is much better than yours. sorry. take care. talk about piling pressure on to that. usually he delivers. but i know it is tough out there. the pictures were amazing. now when you come off the back of that you think,
6:47 am
i have got to raise my game. but instead, our lovely that has given us the dullest sky he can muster up. but his tie looks great. much milder than texas over the next few days. but there will be quite a bit of rain around. especially across the western half of the country. rainfall totals will be totting up. 0ver country. rainfall totals will be totting up. over the next two days, not much rain across a part of eastern england but darker blue colours and over the hills of south—west wales, cumbrian fells, into south of scotland, this is where the greatest risk of flooding could be. the weatherfront where the greatest risk of flooding could be. the weather front on the satellite, huge amount of cloud around, a few breaks towards the east, bit of a chill but this is where the rain is at the moment across the western areas of the uk, just pushing its way northwards and will continue to do so. it's not
6:48 am
just the rain, cross the western half of the country, to go with the wet weather it is also windy. we have winds gusting 50, maybe 60 mph for some. the east is always drier and brighter. let me take you through the day, we will see a few glimpses of hazy sunshine but notice how the rain goes across the isle of man, wales and west in ireland might be dry and brighter times this whatever you are, rain or not, temperatures are where they should be for the time of year, ten to 12 degrees. they will be up a notch or two higher over the weekend. most of the reign of south—west england, wales, running up towards north—west england and the far south of scotland. north west england and the far south of scotland. north—western half of the country and south—east we could see something drier and clearer. as we go into saturday, it is an east, west split. it is in the
6:49 am
west, more wind and rain but in eastern areas, if you get some sunshine it will feel very mild. look at the forecast, some parts of northern scotland start dry and sunny but the cloud and rain continues across many western areas. it is across parts of lincolnshire, best chances of hazy sunshine and it is here we could see temperatures peaking at 16 or 17 celsius. even with the rain and the breeze in the west, we could see temperatures above where they should be. the run of southerly wind still with us into sunday and the weather front edges further eastwards and fades. scotland, northern ireland, brighter day for you and sunday. england and wales, still plenty of cloud with spots of rain but not as wet as it will have been on saturday. temperatures above where they should be. back to you. i was waiting for another picture. he hasjust under i was waiting for another picture. he has just under delivered all morning. look at his face, he was
6:50 am
really annoyed then. i am here all morning. my morning. my work is not yet done. we know that dogs have helped millions of us to get through the last year or so, but you don't necessarily have to own one to feel the calming benefits of man's best friend. max the springer spaniel has been sharing his walks with the world via social media. now he's become the first pet dog to receive a very special award for his efforts — as breakfast�*s tim muffett reports. max lives with his owner in the lake district but has fans across the world. the 13—year—old springer spaniel belongs to kerry irving, who has been live streaming their walks during lockdown. you all right, maxy?
6:51 am
we started living live feeds on our daily walks, because we have got the lake district here, this is our home, this is where we can walk and exercise but some people are trapped in cities, tower blocks. max's walks with fellow springer spaniels paddy and harry have brought comfort to hundreds of thousands of people, and max's companionship to kerry has been life changing. following a road traffic accident 15 years ago, he was suffering from severe depression. the anxiety it caused me to walk out of a door on my own and not have somebody with me was, for me, a terrifying experience. every step i took, max was with me. and every time i stopped and faltered, he stopped with me as well. the psa order of merit awards animals that show outstanding contribution to society. you can see how max has not only had a massive
6:52 am
impact on kerry's life, but his activities, all the stuff that kerry has been filming with him, have reached the lives of hundreds of thousands of people right across the world. four—year—old evelyn is one of them. happy birthday to max! kerry and max's videos have been an absolute godsend to us during lockdown. helping with stress relief at the end of the day, make every day during lockdown a fresh start. evelyn suffers from febrile convulsions, seizures that can happen at any time. her mum, hannah, believes max has had a profoundly positive impact. when you see max's videos, how does max make you feel? happy! the impact that dogs have both on mental well—being and on general well— being is fantastic. the animal equivalent of an 0be. richly deserved. tim muffett, bbc news.
6:53 am
hand something. lovely max. i have loved having a dog the last year. i have considered getting one. i cannot get one, i haven't got the time to look after it and it wouldn't be fair. but i do envy people. i latch onto my friends who have dogs and do socially distanced faults. sometimes ijust walk behind them. leave me alone, i said no. you can click on those walks with max. he was lord grantham in downton abbey and mr brown in the paddington films. now hugh bonneville is playing one of the most famous children's authors of all time — roald dahl. �*to 0livia' deals with the traumatic period of dahl�*s life when his daughter died at the age of seven from measles. hugh's been speaking
6:54 am
to our entertainment correspondent, colin paterson. my name is roald dahl. some of you may know my books. well done forjohnny and the giant... pineapple. thank you. hugh bonneville, if someone thinks, "ah, there's a new roald dahl film, let's get the kids round and watch it together!" they could be in for a bit of a shock. tell us about to 0livia. yes, it's not quite about how james and the giant peach came to be written, i'm afraid. it's a very sobering and adult story about a tragedy that befell roald dahl and his first wife patricia neal, who was a celebrated film and stage actor, when they had three children. the eldest of them, 0livia, succumbed to measles in the early 19605. this was before a vaccine for measles was available widely. we had two daughters, olivia and tessa. livvy? but a story can have many pages. the film is a portrait of grief and you made it not long
6:55 am
after a real period of loss in your family. how much did that infuse your performance? 0h, without a doubt, actually. i've lost family members in the last few years and anyone who's experienced grief will know that it's a roller—coaster. and so i think this is why the film really chimed with me. and strangely the resonance of it, that none of us could have anticipated when we made the film, to do with this tragic loss at a time when a vaccine wasn't available, and roald and patricia both became very vocal advocates of the vaccine programme when it emerged in the mid—�*605 and onwards. and we are in the middle of this situation we are now in. we've all been bereaved in some way, either literally by losing someone we love, or in terms of our own lives in missing... we've had a whole chunk of our lives ripped out. and to try and find a way forward, well, you know, there is the vaccination programme, it's there, and there is light at the end of the tunnel. well, you've been doing your part,
6:56 am
you've been volunteering as a vaccine marshal. how's that been working out? it's been great, frankly, it's been great to get out of the house. morning, good morning, good morning. lovely to see you, welcome. well done! so, i've been lucky enough to do a shift a week, and looking forward to doing a lot more. it's great, the sense of actually just being part of the team that are hopefully beginning to get on and get us on the right path, and obviously, the people who are coming through the doors are seeing a glimmer of hope as well so that's wonderful. are you enjoying wearing the fluorescent tabard? absolutely, i think i'm going to have to buy one. because it's my calling in life to go, "oi, no!" i could do valet parking, i reckon. now, there are a couple of sequels being talked about. when i say it, it sounds like a football score. downton abbey 2, paddington 3. which is going to happen first, do you think? hull kingston rovers! we would love to do a downton movie. there is this bug in
6:57 am
the way, let's face it. there is a script, and as i keep saying, the ducks are quacking but they're not in a row. it would be lovely to think they could all get in a row and jump in the pond and off they go. because i think for the downton fans, to have a film in a cinema, when cinemas are ready to be reopened, would be really lovely and the tone of it would be spot on. and to bring the bear out of retirement, if we can get him out of his trailer and put down his marmaladejar, that would be just as much fun. hugh bonneville, thank you very much for speaking to us. thank you so much, colin, all the best. i have realised how good his technology is. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc
6:58 am
london, i'm tarah welsh. as the prime minister is due to set out his road map on how we leave lockdown next week, london landlords are warning of complete disaster if the government opens up the industry too soon. many were forced to close their doors back in december, which left some closing for good. a treasury statement said the hospitality sector was receiving "significant support". at least try and take us out of lockdown, but again, don't do what they've done before. don't take us out too soon, but do it as soon as possible. that the worst case scenario would be that if they take, in my opinion, take us out of lockdown too soon and have to close us down again, that would be a complete disaster. monthly tests have found no traces of coronavirus in air samples and swabs of london's tube, buses and stations. extra cleaning through the pandemic
6:59 am
has helped combat the spread. but the researchers at imperial college say that doesn't mean passengers can let down their guard, and commuters should continue to wear facemasks. as16—65 year olds with pre—exsisting conditions are being vaccinated, we've followed one of our we've followed one of ourjournalists, meghan 0wen, as she goes for the jab. you can see it on our instagram and facebook. i'm about to get the vaccine. i got the text last week because i'm eligible. and i'm feeling a little bit nervous. i have just arrived. i can't believe i'm just about to get the vaccine we're covering every day on the news but i'm excited. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. there are delays on the aa06 westbbound between staples corner and neaden due to a broken down lorry blocking one lane.
7:00 am
now the weather with sara thornton. good morning to you. it is a cooler start this morning across london and the south east than we have seen through this week. temperatures well down in low single figures. so some pockets of ground frost around at the very least, but it's a fine start to the day. as we go through its largely going to be dry, the winds are picking up from the south and west. there is some cloud pushing in as well all the time. might see some light showers just out towards the west but mostly dry and temperatures once more in low double figures. now through the night tonight we're going to keep some warmer airjust moving in and that's going to be with us through the weekend, so it won't be as chillier night to come as the nightjust gone. and we'll start tomorrow morning with temperatures in high single figures, if not around 10 degrees in a couple of spots. and then the big talking point for the weekend will be these temperatures — low to mid teens. some dry weather as well and possibly some sunshine at times. looks like we could see some showery rain around on sunday but it will feel like spring.
7:01 am
at last! i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. good morning, welcome to breakfast withjon kay and naga munchetty. 0ur headlines today. perseverance pays off for nasa as it successfully lands a rover on the surface of mars. touchdown confirmed! perseverance is safely on the surface of mars. ready to begin seeking the signs of past life. borisjohnson will pledge to give away the majority of the uk's surplus coronavirus vaccines to developing countries when he chairs a virtual meeting of the g7 today. wales plots its way out of lockdown. primary school children
7:02 am
could return from mid—march. good morning. how much has the pandemic cost the public purse? in the next few minutes the latest government finance figures are out. they're expected to show record borrowing in january as coronavirus costs continue to mount. bale bites back and proves he's hungry in hungary, scoring twice as spurs take a giant step into the next round of the europa league. plus, some incredibly mild conditions this weekend, one or two could hit 17 degrees but don't be pulled, not sunshine all the way. heavy rain for some of you as well. i will have all of the details on breakfast. good morning, it's friday, february19th. we start with some good news! nasa has successfully landed its most advanced spacecraft yet on mars where it will search for signs of ancient life. the rover called perseverance travelled nearly 300—million miles
7:03 am
before navigating a risky landing phase dubbed the "seven minutes of terror". here's our science correspondent rebecca morelle, whose report contains flashing images. perseverance is going about one kilometre per second. a nerve—racking wait at mission control. perseverance is safely on the surface of mars. then celebrations as a signal is received from mars. it's touchdown for nasa's perseverance rover. and these are its first images, a view of its landing site. the rover has even started tweeting. there really is no good way to describe that moment when it's over, and you hear those words, touchdown confirmed. it's just a remarkable feeling of pride in the team, relief, and, and reallyjoy,
7:04 am
thinking forward to this remarkable service mission we have coming up. it survived a fiendishly difficult landing, burning through the atmosphere at the speed of a bullet, before a complex landing system brought it to the ground. the rover will now be seeking answers to a crucial question. this mission is all about finding signs of life. and the best place to do that is here, thejezero crater. today it's dry and dusty but billions of years ago it was a huge lake, and you can clearly see a river running into it. this gives you an idea of what it would have looked like. if we zoom in a bit more, these green areas on the edge of the crater were once beaches on the lake's shore, and the hope is any microscopic creatures that once lived there are still preserved. perseverance is the most advanced rover that nasa has ever built, and it's jam—packed with instruments.
7:05 am
its robotic arm is equipped with a drill to collect rock samples. so what forms of life could they contain? i'm not talking about martian little green men. probably not even fish. we are looking for microbial life, maybe microbes that have made a little mat or a slime, the sorts that you might find on the bottom of a pond. those are the types of things that are likely to, well, they did exist on earth 3.5 billion years ago. the question is, did they exist on mars at the bottom of lakes? and in a first, nasa's mini mars helicopter will take off. it's a new way to view the planet. its test flight will be in a few weeks. but getting to the red planet is just the start. now the hard work begins on a mission that could transform our understanding of mars. rebecca morelle, bbc news. isaid it i said it was positive news, it has been pointed out to me that if there
7:06 am
is an army of little green men up there who are less than friendly, it might be not good news. but on that front, nothing spotted yet. imilieu front, nothing spotted yet. when that was said, _ front, nothing spotted yet. when that was said, don't _ front, nothing spotted yet. when that was said, don't assume i front, nothing spotted yet. when that was said, don't assume that| that was said, don't assume that they are going to be hostile, the little green whatever�*s. they could be friendly, perhaps. keep little green whatever's. they could be friendly, perhaps.— be friendly, perhaps. keep fingers crossed for— be friendly, perhaps. keep fingers crossed for the _ be friendly, perhaps. keep fingers crossed for the weekend. - be friendly, perhaps. keep fingers crossed for the weekend. it i be friendly, perhaps. keep fingers crossed for the weekend. it is i be friendly, perhaps. keep fingers l crossed for the weekend. it is seven minutes past six. it’s crossed for the weekend. it is seven minutes past six.— minutes past six. it's not, it is six minutes — minutes past six. it's not, it is six minutes past _ minutes past six. it's not, it is six minutes past seven. i minutes past six. it's not, it is six minutes past seven. you i minutes past six. it's not, it is i six minutes past seven. you are auoin to six minutes past seven. you are going to on _ six minutes past seven. you are going to on that _ six minutes past seven. you are going to on that as _ six minutes past seven. you are going to on that as well! - six minutes past seven. you are going to on that as well! people \ six minutes past seven. you are - going to on that as well! people set their da s going to on that as well! people set their days by _ going to on that as well! people set their days by us _ going to on that as well! people set their days by us and _ going to on that as well! people set their days by us and i _ going to on that as well! people set their days by us and i have - going to on that as well! people set their days by us and i have got - going to on that as well! people set their days by us and i have got it. their days by us and i have got it wrong so many times. it is their days by us and i have got it wrong so many times.— wrong so many times. it is six minutes past _ wrong so many times. it is six minutes past seven! - borisjohnson will pledge today to donate the majority of the uk's surplus covid vaccines to developing countries. the prime minister is chairing a virtual summit where he'll encourage other leaders, including president biden, to follow suit. our global health correspondent, naomi grimley reports. more and more britons are getting their vaccine shots. today, the prime minister will be chairing a g7 meeting to talk about those countries
7:07 am
which haven't got started. in the global scramble to secure vaccines against covid—i9 many wealthy countries which funded a lot of the research, have ended up buying more supplies than they need. new figures from the anti—poverty pressure group, the one campaign, revealed that australia, canada, japan, the uk, the us and the eu have already secured more than 3 billion doses, 1.2 billion more than they need to give their entire populations two doses. the uk government is now talking about sharing some of its surplus, but campaigners say they want hard facts on how many actual doses it will be donating. there's over a billion excess doses that are being tied up in a pipeline in these countries and we need to make sure that they're not sitting, stockpiled in just a few countries, but indeed they're going back to poorer countries and middle income countries so that we can actually get this virus
7:08 am
under control everywhere. the uk has also given half a billion pounds to covax, the un—led programme to get vaccines out to poorer countries. but that project has yet to launch its first vaccinations. so 130 countries in the world haven't administered any shots, leaving health care workers at high risk. naomi grimley, bbc news. our political correspondent alex forsyth is in westminster. good morning to you. we are talking about this and looking, and obviously making sure that the world is helped, but in the meantime, there are lots of countries who were nowhere near reaching their domestic vaccine targets. nowhere near reaching their domestic vaccine targete— vaccine targets. that's completely ri . ht, this vaccine targets. that's completely right. this is _ vaccine targets. that's completely right. this is a _ vaccine targets. that's completely right, this is a global— vaccine targets. that's completely right, this is a global pandemic i vaccine targets. that's completely l right, this is a global pandemic and while some countries like the uk are really making progress with their vaccine roll—outs, some countries haven't even started and that's because there is this issue would supply. so there is real pressure with the money and the means to
7:09 am
access these vaccines to make sure that other countries that can't, can get hold of them as well so we will hear from get hold of them as well so we will hearfrom boris get hold of them as well so we will hear from borisjohnson when he addresses this virtual meeting of g7 leaders, he will say the uk will give it access vaccine supply to other nations. we don't know how much that will be or when because the priority is still getting the brits vaccinated, i'm told. but it will also urge the other countries to fund distribution programme to get the vaccine rolled out. resident macron of france has said this morning that countries in europe should give 5% of their vaccines now. presidentjoe biden has pledged to donate [i now. presidentjoe biden has pledged to donate 1! billion us dollars to the programme to make sure the vaccines are shared out. it is not a good look for wealthier nations to be hoarding vaccines, and the uk —— the leaders know that. there is no point in getting their own countries vaccinated if the virus is still
7:10 am
spreading and mutating elsewhere so there is a real international pressure building up on this, i think. ., ~ pressure building up on this, i think. . ~ , ., , pressure building up on this, i think. . ~ i, , . the welsh government will announce more details today on how it plans to lift lockdown restrictions. the first minister mark drakeford is expected to start with a gradual re—opening of schools from monday. tomos morgan is in cardiff. what other hints are you getting about what this unlocking could mean in wales? i about what this unlocking could mean in wales? ~ �* , about what this unlocking could mean inwales? ~ �*, , , in wales? i think it's probably auoin to in wales? i think it's probably going to be — in wales? i think it's probably going to be a _ in wales? i think it's probably going to be a little _ in wales? i think it's probably going to be a little bit - in wales? i think it's probably going to be a little bit slower| in wales? i think it's probably - going to be a little bit slower than what we may hear from borisjohnson on monday with regards to easing in england but what the first minister will set out in wales today is that he will hope that if things keep moving in the right direction that the rest of primary age schoolchildren could return on the 15th of march, and some older children in high school, probably those in the exam grades, could also return. when he says things moving in the right direction, what he
7:11 am
means is that the number of people vaccinated continues at the same paceit vaccinated continues at the same pace it is at the moment, wales is currently leading the way in vaccinations in the four uk nations. the case rate has fallen in wales considerably. in the period before christmas, it was the highest of the uk nations, now it is the lowest. also the number of people in hospital with coronavirus is decreasing. all these things mean that mark drakeford has been able to make this decision and saying that more children could get back on the 15th of things going back —— if things keep going back that way. nonessential shops and hairdressers and beauty services could open on the 15th, and there could be some easing in areas of tourism by easter but that is still to be confirmed, based on those factors going forward. ., , based on those factors going forward. ._ , ., based on those factors going forward. ., ,, based on those factors going forward. ._ , ., ., forward. the way you said that, it sounds like _ forward. the way you said that, it sounds like you _ forward. the way you said that, it sounds like you were _ forward. the way you said that, it sounds like you were waiting - forward. the way you said that, it sounds like you were waiting for. forward. the way you said that, it i sounds like you were waiting for the hairdressers in particular, yes? i
7:12 am
hairdressers in particular, yes? i cannot wait. we _ hairdressers in particular, yes? i cannot wait. we are _ hairdressers in particular, yes? i cannot wait. we are so - hairdressers in particular, yes? i cannot wait. we are so with - hairdressers in particular, yes? i j cannot wait. we are so with you! hairdressers in particular, yes? i l cannot wait. we are so with you! if i have to style _ cannot wait. we are so with you! if i have to style my _ cannot wait. we are so with you! if i have to style my hair _ cannot wait. we are so with you! if i have to style my hair one - cannot wait. we are so with you! if i have to style my hair one more . i have to style my hair one more time in a different way, i will go crazy. time in a different way, i will go cra . ~ , , , ., ~ time in a different way, i will go cra .~ , ,, ., ~ crazy. we will be speaking to mark drakeford about _ crazy. we will be speaking to mark drakeford about headdresses - crazy. we will be speaking to mark drakeford about headdresses andl drakeford about headdresses and other things... the drakeford about headdresses and other things. . .— drakeford about headdresses and other things. .. the first question! no, it other things. .. the first question! no. it won't _ other things. .. the first question! no, it won't be. _ other things. .. the first question! no, it won't be. -- _ other things. .. the first question! no, it won't be. -- hairdressers l other things. .. the first question! i no, it won't be. -- hairdressers and no, it won't be. —— hairdressers and other things. millions of people living in texas are still without power and clean drinking water as the us state continues to battle against severe winter weather. days of sub—zero conditions have killed at least 2a people put a huge strain on utilities and local hospitals — with some residents also struggling to access food. temperatures this week have fallen as low as minus—18 degrees celsius in places, the coldest in more than 30 years. it is actually colder than alaska, would you believe. be pleased it is over there. we have been being told how lovely it is
7:13 am
over here, matt, some brilliant pictures in texas, so matt has raised his game. i know what you have done. raised his game. i know what you have done-— thought i'd bring you a beautiful sunrise. just a short while ago here in london. this is what is happening in london. this is what is happening in many places, most of us have some cloud, and there is wet and windy weather coming especially in the west. that is where we start with it absolutely throwing it down at the moment across wales, western england, southern and western scotland, the overnight rain is easing away from northern ireland and we will see skies fighting appear today. and we will see skies fighting appeartoday. further and we will see skies fighting appear today. further east, a little of sunshine at times which will continue, some of it will be on the hazy side. it will be a windy day by an large, wherever you are. towards the west, it's fairly relentless,
7:14 am
especially on the hills. wind gusts of 50 to 60 miles an hour, whipping up of 50 to 60 miles an hour, whipping up some gales. lighter in northern scotland and it will be brighter here with some sunshine at times. temperatures uk wide, above where we should be for the time of year, it should be for the time of year, it should be for the time of year, it should be seven to eight, and it will be nine to 11, it will get milder as we go into the weekend. still someone to come in england and wales, showery in northern ireland and scotland. temperatures —— still some rain to come in england and wales. double figures as we start the day tomorrow, there could be temperatures up to 17 degrees in some places in the south—east, but there will be more rain and it will be windy. thank you for the picture as well, much appreciated. i thank you for the picture as well, much appreciated.— thank you for the picture as well, much appreciated. i thought it would be. on monday, we should have a clearer
7:15 am
idea of how and when england's lockdown will be gradually lifted. well, we hope so! the prime minister is expected to announce that schools will start to re—open to all pupils from march 8th at the earliest but he says the government will be taking a "data not dates" approach to easing restrictions. joining us now is the epidemiologist, doctor mike tildesley, and nicola mason, who's the head of a secondary school in staffordshire. good morning to both of you. let's start with you, nicola, what is start with you, nicola, what going through your mind this friday as we approach the announcement on monday, what are you hoping, wanting and expecting to hear?— expecting to hear? firstly, it has been really _ expecting to hear? firstly, it has been really nice _ expecting to hear? firstly, it has been really nice to _ expecting to hear? firstly, it has been really nice to have - expecting to hear? firstly, it has been really nice to have half- expecting to hear? firstly, it has| been really nice to have half term and not have announcements a week before half time, so that has been really nice for teachers not have to worry about remote learning this week. next week it would be very nice to have a clear timeline and some information about a couple of
7:16 am
things that are on my mind, the testing programme and whether we are expected to test all of our children all at once. that is quite a big logistical issue. also it takes away our largest space, our sports hall, so some of our curriculum would not be able to go ahead as normal if we were testing all children. the other part is the exams, and how we are generating grades for the children in year 11 and 13, and ten and 12 who are on exam courses. those are the things that are on my mind and causing quite a bit of stress for the coming weeks. 50 causing quite a bit of stress for the coming weeks.— the coming weeks. so if boris johnson says _ the coming weeks. so if boris johnson says on _ the coming weeks. so if boris johnson says on monday, - the coming weeks. so if boris l johnson says on monday, right, the coming weeks. so if boris - johnson says on monday, right, march the 8th, secondary schools can go back, are you able to do that? can you cope? irate back, are you able to do that? can you cope?— back, are you able to do that? can oucoe?~ ., you cope? we can, we hope that the date... you cope? we can, we hope that the date- -- he — you cope? we can, we hope that the date--- he says— you cope? we can, we hope that the date... he says he _ you cope? we can, we hope that the date... he says he is— you cope? we can, we hope that the date... he says he is going - you cope? we can, we hope that the date... he says he is going to - you cope? we can, we hope that the date... he says he is going to use i date... he says he is going to use the data which will drive how quickly the children come back. we can cope with children coming back but if there are things like social
7:17 am
distancing in place, that will depend on how many children come back. we have nearly 11100 children in our school, if we have all of them back, social distancing is not possible across the school day. we will make sure that there are lots of safety measures in place, sanitising and hand washing, lots of structures in classrooms so children are not moving, but we need to reduce numbers to be able to do things like social distancing so i am awaiting the detail. the devil will be in the detail.— will be in the detail. doctor mike tyldesley. _ will be in the detail. doctor mike tyldesley. we — will be in the detail. doctor mike tyldesley, we have _ will be in the detail. doctor mike tyldesley, we have spoken - will be in the detail. doctor mike j tyldesley, we have spoken many will be in the detail. doctor mike - tyldesley, we have spoken many times in this programme, thank you for joining us again. when we hear the government will be following a data not dates approach, what data will be looked at and what do we need to see, as everyone is keen to know about this pathway to easing restrictions?— about this pathway to easing restrictions? ~ , ,., , ., restrictions? absolutely, there are a number of _ restrictions? absolutely, there are a number of issues, _ restrictions? absolutely, there are a number of issues, the _
7:18 am
restrictions? absolutely, there are a number of issues, the number i restrictions? absolutely, there are j a number of issues, the number of data that _ a number of issues, the number of data that we need to look at. things that tend _ data that we need to look at. things that tend to be in the news are the lack r_ that tend to be in the news are the lack r numberand that tend to be in the news are the lack r number and the total number of cases. _ lack r number and the total number of cases, but we need to look at trends, — of cases, but we need to look at trends, do — of cases, but we need to look at trends, do we have evidence that cases— trends, do we have evidence that cases are — trends, do we have evidence that cases are coming down, the pressure is coming _ cases are coming down, the pressure is coming off— cases are coming down, the pressure is coming off of the hospitals and the number of people sadly dying are coming _ the number of people sadly dying are coming down? all of these metrics are coming — coming down? all of these metrics are coming down but they are still relatively— are coming down but they are still relatively high. we know any form of reopening _ relatively high. we know any form of reopening will cause the r number to id reopening will cause the r number to go up _ reopening will cause the r number to go up so _ reopening will cause the r number to go up so that needs very carefully monitoring. now we have another thing _ monitoring. now we have another thing we — monitoring. now we have another thing we are looking at what is vaccination. the vaccination campaign _ vaccination. the vaccination campaign is going very well, far better, — campaign is going very well, far better, to — campaign is going very well, far better, to be honest, than i thought was achievable back in january. better, to be honest, than i thought was achievable back injanuary. it has been — was achievable back injanuary. it has been a — was achievable back injanuary. it has been a very good positive that we can— has been a very good positive that we can say— has been a very good positive that we can say that. but where we need to be _ we can say that. but where we need to be careful is, if we open to quickly— to be careful is, if we open to quickly and don't allow the vaccination programme to help us along _ vaccination programme to help us along the — vaccination programme to help us along the way, we run the issue of things—
7:19 am
along the way, we run the issue of things re—emerging a little bit. the question— things re—emerging a little bit. the question of— things re—emerging a little bit. the question of schools, i totally understand the need to get children back into _ understand the need to get children back into the classroom, it has been a really— back into the classroom, it has been a really rotten year and i'm sure people — a really rotten year and i'm sure people like nicola are desperate to .et people like nicola are desperate to get the _ people like nicola are desperate to get the children back. the key thing for me _ get the children back. the key thing for me is, _ get the children back. the key thing for me is, we need to do it in a way that schools — for me is, we need to do it in a way that schools do not have to close again _ that schools do not have to close again. that's why a lot of us have been _ again. that's why a lot of us have been advocating doing it in a bit of a stepwise — been advocating doing it in a bit of a stepwise approach, similar to the models _ a stepwise approach, similar to the models that seem to be followed in scotland _ models that seem to be followed in scotland and northern ireland, monitor— scotland and northern ireland, monitor what that does to the r number, — monitor what that does to the r number, and if it states low, we can take the _ number, and if it states low, we can take the next step and get all of our children back. gf take the next step and get all of our children back.— our children back. of course, children are _ our children back. of course, children are not _ our children back. of course, children are not being - our children back. of course, - children are not being vaccinated, there is no talk of yet of teachers being prioritised in the vaccination process as we go through phases one to nine, so that is where a lot of the data is going to be indicative in terms of reopening the rest of the country. in terms of reopening the rest of the country-—
7:20 am
in terms of reopening the rest of the country. in terms of reopening the rest of the count . ~ ,,., , , ., the country. absolutely, in terms of the country. absolutely, in terms of the vaccination _ the country. absolutely, in terms of the vaccination and _ the country. absolutely, in terms of the vaccination and prioritisation, i the vaccination and prioritisation, a lot— the vaccination and prioritisation, a lot of— the vaccination and prioritisation, a lot of the — the vaccination and prioritisation, a lot of the data that is coming out early— a lot of the data that is coming out early on _ a lot of the data that is coming out early on was about preventing severe symptoms _ early on was about preventing severe symptoms. it's really important when we have _ symptoms. it's really important when we have limited supply to make sure that the _ we have limited supply to make sure that the most vulnerable people in society— that the most vulnerable people in society are vaccinated. there is an argument. — society are vaccinated. there is an argument, what we have got through the key— argument, what we have got through the key age groups, to then look at potentially targeting a lot of our key workers, not just teachers but all of _ key workers, not just teachers but all of our — key workers, not just teachers but all of our key workers on the front line, _ all of our key workers on the front line. and — all of our key workers on the front line, and potentially to prevent them _ line, and potentially to prevent them from developing severe symptoms and enable _ them from developing severe symptoms and enable them to stay in school or stay in _ and enable them to stay in school or stay in whatever key worker role they are — stay in whatever key worker role they are in _ stay in whatever key worker role they are in. it does need to be part of the _ they are in. it does need to be part of the roll—out. it's really important that if we do want to keep opening _ important that if we do want to keep opening safely, important that if we do want to keep opening safety, we encourage as many people _ opening safety, we encourage as many people as _ opening safety, we encourage as many people as possible to take up the vaccine, — people as possible to take up the vaccine, whether they are vulnerable or not _ vaccine, whether they are vulnerable or not. these vaccines are not 100% protective _ or not. these vaccines are not 100% protective and the only way we can protect _ protective and the only way we can protect society is if we get as many people _ protect society is if we get as many people as _ protect society is if we get as many people as possible to take up the vaccine — people as possible to take up the vaccine. fits people as possible to take up the vaccine. �* , ., ., people as possible to take up the vaccine. �* , . ., people as possible to take up the vaccine. �* , . . , ., vaccine. as a head teacher, you were sa inc ou vaccine. as a head teacher, you were saying you were _ vaccine. as a head teacher, you were saying you were hoping _ vaccine. as a head teacher, you were saying you were hoping to _ vaccine. as a head teacher, you were saying you were hoping to get - vaccine. as a head teacher, you were saying you were hoping to get some l saying you were hoping to get some clarity and answers, some dates for
7:21 am
your diary on monday when boris johnson speaks. but as we have been reflected, he is talking about data, not dates. 0n reflected, he is talking about data, not dates. on monday you might get an ambition but nothing you can put firmly on the calendar on the wall. what will be your reaction if it is a bit more vague than you want? i a bit more vague than you want? i think as long as we get a road map that we have been promised, we know what we are working towards. one of the most important thing are making sure the children get their great and we have a clear plan for that, that's the really the most urgent for them. that's the really the most urgent forthem. —— get that's the really the most urgent for them. —— get their grades. that's the really the most urgent forthem. —— get their grades. i would like to know what the plan is regardless of when it happens, so that we can plan for it. and i think the doctor is completely right, the last thing we want is to close again so it's really important that we can stage things and make things safe at every step. stage things and make things safe at eve ste. , .., .,
7:22 am
stage things and make things safe at eve ste. , ., every step. sorry, nicola, those year11 every step. sorry, nicola, those year 11 and _ every step. sorry, nicola, those year 11 and 13 _ every step. sorry, nicola, those year 11 and 13 students, - every step. sorry, nicola, those year 11 and 13 students, gcses l every step. sorry, nicola, those i year 11 and 13 students, gcses and a—levels, what are they telling you right now about the state of mind, not quite knowing, exams, tests, assessments, gradings, and how it will work in a few months? i assessments, gradings, and how it will work in a few months?- will work in a few months? i think some of them _ will work in a few months? i think some of them feel _ will work in a few months? i think some of them feel a _ will work in a few months? i think some of them feel a little - will work in a few months? i think some of them feel a little bit i some of them feel a little bit forgotten. because the government have known about the lockdown for a long time, we have known about the lockdown for a longtime, we knew that this was a potential thing that could happen to us and to these children and the year ten and year 12 students have also missed nearly a years worth of direct face—to—face education in terms of the whole of the lockdown. for some, the remote learning is working really well, they have engaged really well and beat every single lesson so there is big discrepancy between some children and others and how much support they are able to access. we tried as a profession to work really hard to mitigate, but it is still present. and i think the children just need
7:23 am
some answers so that we can say to them, this is what we're doing, this is how we are going to work to get your grades so that we do not have children missing out on progression routes, they can get into sixth form and colleges and universities. that is what they need reassurance on. every time i have a lesson with my year 11 students, they ask what is going on with exams and it is hard to say, we don't have any answers for you. to say, we don't have any answers for ou. ., to say, we don't have any answers for ou. . ., ,~/ for you. half term over, en'oy your last da , for you. half term over, en'oy your last day, thankfi for you. half term over, en'oy your last day, thank you i for you. half term over, en'oy your last day, thank you very i for you. half term over, enjoy your last day, thank you very much i for you. half term over, enjoy your i last day, thank you very much indeed and we will speak to both soon. the re—opening of schools will also be on the agenda in wales today, as the first minister mark drakeford sets out his plan for lifting the lockdown. hejoins us now from cardiff. good morning, mark drakeford. good morninu. i good morning, mark drakeford. good morning. iwonder_ good morning, mark drakeford. good morning. iwonder if— good morning, mark drakeford. good morning. i wonder if you _ good morning, mark drakeford. good morning. i wonder if you had - good morning, mark drakeford. good morning. i wonder if you had the i morning. i wonder if you had the teacher who _ morning. i wonder if you had the teacher who was _ morning. i wonder if you had the teacher who was just _ morning. i wonder if you had the teacher who wasjust speaking, i morning. i wonder if you had the i teacher who wasjust speaking, based teacher who was just speaking, based in england but the message was really clear, i think. that he wants
7:24 am
to be in a position where she can tell students —— because she wants to be in a position where she can tell students the pathway out of this, those who are concerned about how they are going to be assessed and offer them some assurance in terms of the timeline so they have a guideline. i5 terms of the timeline so they have a auideline. , ., ,.,,, , ., guideline. is that possible for teachers now? _ guideline. is that possible for teachers now? well, - guideline. is that possible for teachers now? well, i- guideline. is that possible for teachers now? well, i will. guideline. is that possible for teachers now? well, i will be| teachers now? well, i will be confirming today that children aged between three and seven will be back in school in wales as of monday of next week. and in three weeks' time, provided all goes well, our aim will be to have all of primary age children and examination aged students in secondary school back in the classroom from the 15th of march. ~ , ., the classroom from the 15th of march. ~ i. _ ., the classroom from the 15th of march. ~ ., ., , march. when you say if all goes well, march. when you say if all goes well. what _ march. when you say if all goes well, what are _ march. when you say if all goes well, what are you _ march. when you say if all goes well, what are you going - march. when you say if all goes well, what are you going to i march. when you say if all goes well, what are you going to be l well, what are you going to be looking at? you have made clear as the prime minister borisjohnson has that you are looking at data, not dates. ~ , ., ., ~' that you are looking at data, not dates. ~ , ., dates. well, we will be looking at
7:25 am
the number _ dates. well, we will be looking at the number of _ dates. well, we will be looking at the number of people _ dates. well, we will be looking at the number of people falling i dates. well, we will be looking at the number of people falling ill i the number of people falling ill with coronavirus in wales to continue to fall. we will be looking at positivity rates continuing to fall. the r rate in wales is below one, that needs to continue. we look at our hospital sector to make sure the number of people in hospital beds continue to decline. all of those things are currently going on the right direction here in wales. we will need to see whether bringing some children back into school has any impact on that. provided things continue to going the right direction, then the whole of primary age children, plus examination student at secondary school, back in the classroom from the 15th of march. 50 the classroom from the 15th of march. ., ' ., . march. so from the 15th of march, if all aoes march. so from the 15th of march, if all goes well. _ march. so from the 15th of march, if all goes well, as _ march. so from the 15th of march, if all goes well, as you _ march. so from the 15th of march, if all goes well, as you have _ march. so from the 15th of march, if all goes well, as you have said, i march. so from the 15th of march, if all goes well, as you have said, and | all goes well, as you have said, and the follows the trends that i hope to be established, will teachers from the 15th of march then be able to give clear timelines to their students, particularly examination students, particularly examination students who are concerned, as i started this interview, about
7:26 am
assessments, about the grading and progression to the next stage? melt. progression to the next stage? well, luckil , all progression to the next stage? well, luckily. all of— progression to the next stage? well, luckily, all of that _ progression to the next stage? well, luckily, all of that in _ progression to the next stage? well, luckily, all of that in wales _ progression to the next stage? well, luckily, all of that in wales is - luckily, all of that in wales is already agreed. we were the first part of the united kingdom to say that they would have no conventional examinations in wales in the summer this year, so we have had a group headed by teachers themselves drawing together an alternative assessment method for us here in wales, that is already known in schools, teachers know what they have to do. students will be able to be informed about that. so i hope that will be a real assistance to people in the classroom. i heard what your head teacher said, and very much agree that the greater clarity they have, the better they will be able to do theirjob and i'm glad we have been able to give them that clarity already here in wales. and there is enough time for them to meet the criteria in terms of hours
7:27 am
of teaching?— of teaching? well, look, our teachers _ of teaching? well, look, our teachers have _ of teaching? well, look, our teachers have faced - of teaching? well, look, our teachers have faced a - of teaching? well, look, our| teachers have faced a really, of teaching? well, look, our- teachers have faced a really, really tough time, as have all of our young people. an enormous amount of work has gone on to provide online learning, blended learning, and now in wales, we hope a great deal more face—to—face learning. we have been in very challenging times and our teachers have done an extraordinary job to try to overcome the difficulties that teaching in different ways and in different circumstances have posed for them.. have they got enough time, in a school teaching hours to achieve those targets?— school teaching hours to achieve those taraets? , , , . those targets? yes, because we have reorganised — those targets? yes, because we have reorganised the _ those targets? yes, because we have reorganised the way _ those targets? yes, because we have reorganised the way in _ those targets? yes, because we have reorganised the way in which - those targets? yes, because we have reorganised the way in which that i reorganised the way in which that learning time can be used. we won't be having conventional examinations, we will be relying more on teacher assessment, but peer reviewed by other teachers, to make sure there is some rigour in the system.
7:28 am
assessment routines that our examination board will provide to assist teachers in the way that they will do that. it will be different, coronavirus is changing all of our worlds, but it will still be possible, it will still be fair, and it will still be rigorous. flan possible, it will still be fair, and it will still be rigorous.— it will still be rigorous. can we talk about _ it will still be rigorous. can we talk about your _ it will still be rigorous. can we talk about your road _ it will still be rigorous. can we talk about your road map, i it will still be rigorous. can we talk about your road map, the | talk about your road map, the announcement you are going to be making? is it going to focus on nonessential retail, when will that sector reopen? i am thinking about gyms, hairdressers and barbers, etc. i will set out today some discussions that we will have with nonessential retail over the next couple of weeks to see how we might begin the reopening of nonessential retail. i don't believe it will be a wholesale reopening. we will do things in the way that sage and the who recommend, carefully,
7:29 am
step—by—step, always assessing the impact of any actions we take. but if it is possible from the 15th of march to begin the reopening of some aspect of nonessential retail and personal services such as hairdressing, that is of course what we would want to do. but it will be, as i say, in that careful, step—by—step way, and always making sure that we are carefully monitoring the impact of any lifting of restrictions on the circulation of restrictions on the circulation of the virus. of restrictions on the circulation of the virus— of restrictions on the circulation of the virus. ' ., a, . , ., of the virus. the 15th of march is a ossible of the virus. the 15th of march is a possible date _ of the virus. the 15th of march is a possible date for _ of the virus. the 15th of march is a possible date for reopening - of the virus. the 15th of march is a possible date for reopening of- possible date for reopening of nonessential businesses. so can we talk about tourism? obviously great economic generator in terms of wales's output. when will, do you think, visitors be allowed back in wales? can people in england, scotland book or begin to think about booking some time away, in wales, say, for easter?—
7:30 am
wales, say, for easter? well, i think begin _ wales, say, for easter? well, i think begin to _ wales, say, for easter? well, i think begin to think _ wales, say, for easter? well, i think begin to think is - wales, say, for easter? well, i think begin to think is not - wales, say, for easter? well, i think begin to think is not a i wales, say, for easter? well, i | think begin to think is not a bad assessment of where we are. i met our tourism task force in it yesterday, people who work in the sector. what we will work on with them is the possibility, and it is only that, of some limited reopening around easter, of self—contained accommodation only. places where people don't mix with other people, whether or not shared facilities. that is how we began the reopening of tourism —— where there are not shared facilities. that is how we began the reopening of tourism in the last opening doctor. if we can bring that to easter, it will bring a lot of relief to many families. begin to think is a good place to start, six weeks is a longtime in the business of dealing with coronavirus, so we will have to make that final assessment much closer to the time. so that final assessment much closer to the time. , the time. so they will get three weeks notice? _
7:31 am
the time. so they will get three weeks notice? well, _ the time. so they will get three weeks notice? well, three i the time. so they will get three i weeks notice? well, three weeks would be the _ weeks notice? well, three weeks would be the most _ weeks notice? well, three weeks would be the most notice - weeks notice? well, three weeks would be the most notice we i weeks notice? well, three weeks i would be the most notice we would weeks notice? well, three weeks - would be the most notice we would be able to, we are on a three—week cycle here, as we have been throughout. and in three weeks' time, we will review our regulations again and there will be another review right at the very end of march. ~ ., ~ review right at the very end of march. ~. ~ , ., ~ ., , march. mark drakeford, first minister of— march. mark drakeford, first minister of wales, _ march. mark drakeford, first minister of wales, thank i march. mark drakeford, first minister of wales, thank you j march. mark drakeford, first i minister of wales, thank you for your time this morning.- minister of wales, thank you for your time this morning. thank you. it is 'ust your time this morning. thank you. it isiust after— your time this morning. thank you. it isjust after half— your time this morning. thank you. it isjust after half past _ your time this morning. thank you. it isjust after half past seven. - time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tarah welsh. as the prime minister is due to set out his road map on how we leave lockdown next week — london landlords are warning of complete disaster if the government opens up the industry too soon. many were forced to close their doors back in december, which left some closing for good. at least try and take us out of lockdown, but again,
7:32 am
don't do what they've done before. don't take us out too soon, but do it as soon as possible. that the worst case scenario would be that if they take, in my opinion, take us out of lockdown too soon and have to close us down again, that would be a complete disaster. a treasury statement said the hospitality sector was receiving "significant support". monthly tests have found no traces of coronavirus in air samples and swabs of london's tubes, buses and stations. extra cleaning through the pandemic has helped combat the spread. but the researchers at imperial college say that doesn't mean passengers can let down their guard, and commuters should continue to wear facemasks.but this does not mean none is circulating or commuters can let as 16—65 year olds with pre—exsisting conditions
7:33 am
are being vaccinated— we've followed one of our jouranalists, meghan owen, as she goes for the jab. i'm about to get the vaccine. i got the text last week because i'm eligible. and i'm feeling a little bit nervous. i have just arrived. i can't believe i'm about to get the vaccine we're covering every day on the news but i'm excited. you can see more of that on our instagram and facebook. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on most tube lines this morning exepct for on the bakerloo line that's part suspended between queens park and harrow & wealdstone. on to the roads, and there are queues tunnel, northbound. now the weather with sara thornton. good morning to you. it is a cooler start this morning across london and the south east than we have seen through this week. temperatures well down in low single figures. so some pockets of ground frost around at the very least,
7:34 am
but it's a fine start to the day. as we go through its largely going to be dry, the winds are picking up from the south and west. there is some cloud pushing in as well all the time. might see some light showers just out towards the west but mostly dry and temperatures once more in low double figures. now through the night tonight we're going to keep some warmer airjust moving in and that's going to be with us through the weekend, so it won't be as chillier night to come as the nightjust gone. and we'll start tomorrow morning with temperatures in high single figures, if not around 10 degrees in a couple of spots. and then the big talking point for the weekend will be these temperatures — low to mid teens. some dry weather as well and possibly some sunshine at times. looks like we could see some showery rain around on sunday but it will feel like spring. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. hello, this is breakfast
7:35 am
withjon kay and naga munchetty. more than 16 million people in the uk have had their first covid jab — and now attention is turning towards helping the developing world. the prime minister will commit to donating vaccines that we don't need to poorer countries. he'll make that commitment when he hosts a virtual meeting of world leaders today and will ask them to do the same. we're joined now by foreign office ministerjames cleverly. thanks forjoining us. let's talk about the surplus vaccines. nearly 70 million people living in the uk and we have ordered 400 million doses of vaccine, what will happen to the stuff we do not need? we made the decision — to the stuff we do not need? we made the decision earlier _ to the stuff we do not need? we made the decision earlier on _ to the stuff we do not need? we made the decision earlier on in _ to the stuff we do not need? we made the decision earlier on in this - the decision earlier on in this pandemic to spread our risk and by vaccine doses from a number of
7:36 am
vaccine doses from a number of vaccine providers. that means we know we are going to have surplus, we don't know exactly when and we can't say exactly how many because that will dependent on how many vaccines get the green light from the regulators. but it does mean that we will be able to both protect british people, which is ourfirst duty, but also be a good player on the international stage and be a real source of the good and help to make sure we are collectively, internationally, vaccinating as many people as possible to keep us all say. i people as possible to keep us all sa . ~ ., , ., people as possible to keep us all sa. ~ ., ., people as possible to keep us all sa. «a, ., , people as possible to keep us all say. i know you cannot give us a recise say. i know you cannot give us a precise date _ say. i know you cannot give us a precise date and _ say. i know you cannot give us a precise date and that _ say. i know you cannot give us a precise date and that will - say. i know you cannot give us a | precise date and that will depend say. i know you cannot give us a i precise date and that will depend on the roll—out here, but can you give us a vague ambition about when that might begin, when we might start to give all surplus stocks to developing nations? it give all surplus stocks to developing nations?- give all surplus stocks to developing nations? it is so tempting — developing nations? it is so tempting to _ developing nations? it is so tempting to speculate - developing nations? it is so tempting to speculate on i developing nations? it is so i tempting to speculate on this, developing nations? it is so - tempting to speculate on this, but the simple truth is, as with all things to do with viruses and their vaccinations, we have two adaptive
7:37 am
circumstances as present themselves. we know that we have been very effective in the roll—out of our vaccination programme, one of the most speedy and effective in the world and we can be incredibly proud of that. that means we will probably be one of the first countries that are able to do this. but we cannot say exactly when and as i say, the numbers involved will be determined by how many of the vaccine producers get the approval from the vaccine regulators. the get the approval from the vaccine regulators— get the approval from the vaccine reuulators. ., ,., ., ., ,~' regulators. the reason i am asking ou regulators. the reason i am asking you when. — regulators. the reason i am asking you when, there _ regulators. the reason i am asking you when, there are _ regulators. the reason i am asking you when, there are some - regulators. the reason i am asking l you when, there are some countries that have started to ship out some vaccines to developing countries that may need them more. oxfam have said that it is a great ambition to say he will give these vaccines ultimately, but we should start thinking about doing that right now, it is wrong to sit on stock or even to prioritise our own people
7:38 am
exclusively. isn't there a moral argument that we should start helping those other countries immediately? we helping those other countries immediately?— helping those other countries immediately? helping those other countries immediatel? . ., ., , immediately? we have already taken very significant _ immediately? we have already taken very significant steps _ immediately? we have already taken very significant steps in _ immediately? we have already taken very significant steps in terms - immediately? we have already taken very significant steps in terms of- very significant steps in terms of international vaccinations. we hosted the vaccine summit last year where $8.8 billion was committed by the international community for vaccinations of people in the poorest countries in the world. we are already a very active player in the international vaccination programmes. but the international vaccination programmes— the international vaccination rorrammes. �* , programmes. but those countries don't want _ programmes. but those countries don't want summits, _ programmes. but those countries don't want summits, they - programmes. but those countries don't want summits, they want i don't want summits, they want vaccines? it don't want summits, they want vaccines? , , , ., don't want summits, they want vaccines?— vaccines? it is because of the decisions _ vaccines? it is because of the decisions we _ vaccines? it is because of the decisions we made, - vaccines? it is because of the decisions we made, because | vaccines? it is because of the i decisions we made, because of vaccines? it is because of the - decisions we made, because of the effective decisions made that we have been consistently right at the forefront of vaccine research, vaccine production and getting vaccines agreed by the regulators. because of our fast actions, we will be able to, in the future, help make
7:39 am
the world say. ultimately, ourfirst priority must be for the protection of british people, as the british government, that is ourjob. but we are making sure we help vaccinate the world and we are doing it in the fairest way which is to a multilateral organisation that can assess on need rather than on some short—term international diplomatic leverage. fin short-term international diplomatic levera . e. ., ., leverage. on the roll-out here in the uk, leverage. on the roll-out here in the uk. we _ leverage. on the roll-out here in the uk, we mentioned _ leverage. on the roll-out here in the uk, we mentioned the - leverage. on the roll-out here in i the uk, we mentioned the numbers, leverage. on the roll-out here in - the uk, we mentioned the numbers, 16 million people, lots of very impressive figures, speculation about who will get it next and when that might be. headlines on the front page of the daily mail, they are saying over 40s will get the jobs by the end of march, is that right? ——jabs. the jobs by the end of march, is that right? "jabs— jobs by the end of march, is that right? --jabs. right? -- 'abs. the short answer is, i cannot right? -- jabs. the short answer is, i cannot say — right? -- jabs. the short answer is, i cannot say if— right? -- jabs. the short answer is, i cannot say if it _ right? -- jabs. the short answer is, i cannot say if it is _ right? -- jabs. the short answer is, i cannot say if it is right. _ right? -- jabs. the short answer is, i cannot say if it is right. the - i cannot say if it is right. the broader point is our vaccination roll—out programme has been fantastic. really quickly, that has
7:40 am
rolled out. hopefully we will be able to get to those less priority, lower priority groups earlier than anticipated. but i cannot give you certainty on that, sorry.— anticipated. but i cannot give you certainty on that, sorry. there does seem to be — certainty on that, sorry. there does seem to be a _ certainty on that, sorry. there does seem to be a lot _ certainty on that, sorry. there does seem to be a lot of— certainty on that, sorry. there does seem to be a lot of speculation i certainty on that, sorry. there does seem to be a lot of speculation at l seem to be a lot of speculation at the moment, we understand you cannot give precise details, but there does seem to be a bit of a vacuum which is allowing the speculation to gather. is it time for the government to lay out very clearly who, when and which groups to stop that speculation? igrate who, when and which groups to stop that speculation?— that speculation? we have. we have laid that out. — that speculation? we have. we have laid that out, we _ that speculation? we have. we have laid that out, we have _ that speculation? we have. we have laid that out, we have made - that speculation? we have. we have laid that out, we have made it - [aid that out, we have made it clear, our prioritisation. we are abiding by that prior attention programme and we are doing that very well. it is completely understandable that people want to know, is this going so well that we can move to these other groups quicker? i get that. but, speculation really isn't helpful and i am not going to add to the
7:41 am
speculation. we have got our priorities and we are working through those priority groups very quickly and effectively and we are all proud of that. but it wouldn't be useful to speculate on when and who, we are guided by the science and that is what remain. the trouble is, and that is what remain. the trouble is. families — and that is what remain. the trouble is, families across _ and that is what remain. the trouble is, families across the _ and that is what remain. the trouble is, families across the country - and that is what remain. the trouble is, families across the country are i is, families across the country are having to speculate about what this means for them, not least as far as summer holidays are concerned. maybe even easter holidays. we had from mark drakeford farah, first minister in wales and he has been open with us this morning, talking about allowing self catering cottages and this self catering open up in wales. can you say to the vital tourism businesses in england as well, will they get the same opportunities this easter? the they get the same opportunities this easter? ~ , , easter? the prime minister will be settin: out easter? the prime minister will be setting out exactly _ easter? the prime minister will be setting out exactly what _ setting out exactly what restrictions we are able to ease. in
7:42 am
as much detail as he is able. we cannot give guarantees because that is not how viruses work. our vaccination programme, our current set of restrictions have been affected. we know that, we are currently assessing how affected and what the situation might be with certain options. ultimately, we want to open up society and the economy as much as we are able, but only on the condition that it is safe to do so. we are looking at the figures at the moment and the prime minister will be making his announcement on what will be changing and he will be doing that on monday. mark drakeford said, as far doing that on monday. mark drakeford said. as far as — doing that on monday. mark drakeford said, as far as wales _ doing that on monday. mark drakeford said, as far as wales is _ doing that on monday. mark drakeford said, as far as wales is concerned, i said, as far as wales is concerned, that people can begin to think about tourism, begin to think about some options in a limited way at easter. can businesses related to tourism in england begin to think about the
7:43 am
easter holidays now? i get england begin to think about the easter holidays now?— easter holidays now? i get how frustrating _ easter holidays now? i get how frustrating this _ easter holidays now? i get how frustrating this is. _ easter holidays now? i get how frustrating this is. it _ easter holidays now? i get how frustrating this is. it is - frustrating this is. it is completely natural, we all want to get a break from this. but it would be wrong for me to start speculating now. we are assessing the numbers, we are making a judgment based on the science and we will be making an announcement on monday. i cannot go further than that. i would love to, but it would be wrong to guess and speculate, because that is what it would be. the prime minister, the scientific advisers and his team are crunching numbers at the moment and they will be making an announcement very soon. they will be making an announcement ve soon. �* , ., they will be making an announcement ve soon. 2 ., ., they will be making an announcement ve soon. �*, ., ., ., , they will be making an announcement ve soon. �*, ., ., , ., very soon. let's go to a couple of thins very soon. let's go to a couple of things that _ very soon. let's go to a couple of things that might _ very soon. let's go to a couple of things that might be _ very soon. let's go to a couple of things that might be more - things that might be more straightforward and tied to your brie. to start with facebook in australia, condemnation globally of how they have handled access to news on facebook, what do you think of what they have done? istate on facebook, what do you think of what they have done?— what they have done? we have
7:44 am
ultimately. _ what they have done? we have ultimately, we _ what they have done? we have ultimately, we have _ what they have done? we have ultimately, we have got - what they have done? we have ultimately, we have got to, i what they have done? we have ultimately, we have got to, as| ultimately, we have got to, as governments in our own countries, we have got to find a way of dealing what is now a very, very well established, very important part of people's lives, social media and these big social media companies. but we have to do so in a way that balances that with businesses. also, ensures that tax revenues are derived and that kind of stuff. is derived and that kind of stuff. is the uk government prepared to stand up the uk government prepared to stand up to facebook like the australian government says it is prepared to do? . , ., ., , ., do? ultimately, all governments have not to deal do? ultimately, all governments have got to deal with _ do? ultimately, all governments have got to deal with this _ do? ultimately, all governments have got to deal with this circumstance. - got to deal with this circumstance. we are good friends and allies with the australians and we will listen very carefully to the points they are making. ultimately, we will need to find ways of making sure the commercial relationship with these big tech giants work. that is what all governments will look to and the uk government will look to do that
7:45 am
as well. , , ., uk government will look to do that as well. g , ., .,, uk government will look to do that as well. , , ., .,, i uk government will look to do that as well-— i do i as well. just one last thing... i do have to get _ as well. just one last thing... i do have to get across _ as well. just one last thing... i do have to get across to _ as well. just one last thing... i do have to get across to another - have to get across to another interview on another channel, i do apologise. interview on another channel, i do a olouise. ., apologise. 0k, we will leave it there. thank _ apologise. 0k, we will leave it there. thank you _ apologise. 0k, we will leave it there. thank you for _ apologise. 0k, we will leave it there. thank you for speaking | apologise. 0k, we will leave it l there. thank you for speaking to apologise. 0k, we will leave it - there. thank you for speaking to us, james cleverly. 7.45. i think that was his cut out. they go to different broadcasters and outlets, the bbc and outside the bbc. we have our allocation. he has a producerfrom another bbc. we have our allocation. he has a producer from another channel going... if we ever run, they overrun and it causes chaos. absolutely. as i was saying. sorry, we have run out of time, mike. we do want to celebrate some uk team is doing really, really well in europe.
7:46 am
yes. gareth bale is back after a frustrating time in the premier league. does he want to play? is he having an influence on the team to make them feel like that big team again? he has returned to his best, and the evidence of last night at least. it was the perfect european stage. away in hungary for gareth bale to get his taste for goals back again. back in the team, he inspired tottenham to a 4—1 win against wolfsburger of austria — setting up one goal and scoring another in this first leg of their europa league, tie, staged in budapest due to covid—i9 travel restrictions, but bale's manager says he shouldn't now get carried away, thinking about his chances in the side. i'm looking to the team performance, and not to the individuals. this is not an exam for everyone. i took gareth off, because i know that in this process, it's not so easy for him to play
7:47 am
the 90 minutes because the team at the time needed a little bit more of a freshness. manchester united are almost certain to go through, after a 4—0 thrashing of real sociedad, who've been flying high, in the spanish top flight. bruno fernandes had another great game, scoring twice in the match held in turin in italy. and marcus rashford also got on the scoresheet. arsenal have a tougher task, they drew 1—1 with benfica in rome, bukayo saka with the equaliser — but they'll probably play the second leg in athens. the other premier league side in action, leicester, drew 0—0 at slavia prague. and rangers won a seven—goal thriller at royal antwerp — they were behind twice but two goals in the last seven minutes gave them a 4—3 victory. ryan kent with a superb equaliser. and then borna barisic scoring his second penalty of the night, as they headed into injury time.
7:48 am
world snooker champion ronnie o'sullivan, is still very much on track for a record—equalling fifth welsh open title. he's through to the semi—finals after beating, zhou yuelong — he did drop a frame, in winning 4—1, but it's first one he's lost of the 17 he's played this week. o'sullivan faces ali carter next. joe salisbury has won the battle of the brits at the australian open tennis. he and rajeev ram are the defending champions and beatjamie murray and bruno soares to reach the final. salisbury is on court again now, alongside they have been beaten. i shouldn't big anyone up and overplay their chances. but he still has a chance in the men's double. i would take the risk, because we love your enthusiasm. joe salisbury
7:49 am
has may be gone under the radar in the past. not any more. thanks, mike. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. you have been bringing us some brilliant pictures. you have upped your game. lucky for those who stayed in bed a little bit longer. lovely sunrise in bridlington. but red sky in the morning, shepard's morning. rain across western areas this morning. along with strong winds and that will last into tomorrow. the rainfall totals will be mounting up as we go through to the end of saturday. the darker blue indicates where the heaviest and most persistent rain will be on the biggest totals will be over the hills in the west. over 100 millimetres of rain falling. there could be flooding. try pushing up from the mid—atlantic at the moment and it will sit in the same areas
7:50 am
all day long. if it is tipping down with you at the moment, it could be, even by the end of the day. turning drying parts of northern ireland and eastern part of england and the far north—east of scotland, you have the morning sunshine. the breeze is lighter than it is in the west. windy day to come, gusts of 50 may be 60 miles at times. that when coming from the south means the hills facing the southerly direction will see the heaviest of the rain. it means parts of northern scotland will stay dry and bright through the day and some towards central england will see a huge amount if any rain at all. hazy sunshine here and there, but with the winds from the south, rain or not, it is going to be mild day for the stage in february, temperatures around 11 or 12. they should be around seven or eight. tonight, dry and clear conditions at times for northern ireland and north and west scotland. stay is cloudy through the bulk of england, into wales, further rain at
7:51 am
times, especially over the hills but not much rain towards the south east corner. 10 degrees there into the weekend. a mild weekend, saturday, rain and wind again in the west, eastern areas with the best chance of hazy sunshine breaking through and the highest of the temperatures. bright start to northern part of scotland. outbreaks of rain across much of scotland, northern ireland, western half of england and wales. most persistent on the hills. hazy sunshine towards the eastern corner of england, 14 to maybe 17 celsius. 8 degrees or more warmer than we should be this time of year because we have the southerly winds. they are with us into sunday but the weather front moves eastwards. it dies a little bit and they won't be as much rain around, but northern and western part of england and wales likely see rain. northern ireland, a brighter day on sunday. brightness hanging on in the south east corner and temperatures into the mid teens. turning fresh from the mid teens. turning fresh from the west. but still much milder than
7:52 am
it should be this time of the year. incredibly mild. enjoy it. the government borrowed nearly £9 billion — a record amount. this could impact how much we all pay on taxes in the future. good morning everyone, these figures from the office for national statistics are forjanuary and they have been released in the last hour and they relate to the month and the whole of the uk was back in lockdown. the government borrowed £8.8 billion. the highestjanuary government borrowed £8.8 billion. the highest january borrowing since records began back in 1993. i think this really shows how much the pandemic is weighing down on the
7:53 am
economy. these are huge numbers, so it is useful to understand the detail. the government is on target to borrow nearly £400 billion for this financial year which ends in april. a level not seen in the uk outside of the two world wars. this huge increase shows the emerging effects of the government's pandemic policies. measures to supportjobs in the economy like the fellow scheme and in december, nearly 10 million workers had been furloughed. that cost over £45 billion. the government spent billions more to support businesses as well as extra on welfare and support for the nhs. and then there is the cost of buying vaccines and ppe. the treasury says that at the last count, it committed over £280 billion to coronavirus support measures. and to put that into some kind of context, that is just over three times what the
7:54 am
government normally spends on education in a year. at the same time, the government's main source of revenue, taxes and things like business rates and vat, that income has fallen dramatically. in january, they received almost £1 billion less income. the government is having to borrow more to balance the books. we should get a better idea ofjust what the chancellor, rishi sunak, plans to do to tackle all of this when he delivers his budget injust two weeks' time. members of his own party are demanding that he starts fixing the tattered public finances, but economists are divided over how we should see tax rises as part of the government's response. rishi sunak is a conservative _ the government's response. i si sunak is a conservative and there the government's response. i 311 sunak is a conservative and there is a lot of fiscal conservatives in his party, so he has to nod his hat to them in some way. but some tax rises will be minimal. when you are trying
7:55 am
to grow back from a decline, this is not the time to hike chances and rishi sunak will know that and he will be looking at other options to grow the economy. tax rises when you are trying to dig yourself out of a hole will just are trying to dig yourself out of a hole willjust push you deeper into that hole. . , ~ hole willjust push you deeper into that hole. ., , ,, ., that hole. last week we learned the economy shrank _ that hole. last week we learned the economy shrank by _ that hole. last week we learned the economy shrank by nearly _ that hole. last week we learned the economy shrank by nearly 1096 - that hole. last week we learned the economy shrank by nearly 1096 lastl economy shrank by nearly 10% last year. today's figures really underlined the chancellor's problems ahead of the march budget. he is under pressure to extend emergency support like furlough, the uplift in universal credit and the business rates holiday beyond the spring. but at the same time, he is under pressure to rein in spending at some point and the big question here is how all of this is paid for? one interesting figure to get from the release this morning is the government spent £5 billion on job support schemesjust in government spent £5 billion on job support schemes just in january. there is —— these are huge numbers and the chancellor is under pressure
7:56 am
to rein in spending. thanks very much. it's time now for our "lockdown life" series — when we ask some familiar faces for their help in keeping our spirits up while we're stuck at home. mr motivator has been a big part of that and he joins us once again with another workout set to a tv theme tune. what have you got for us today, mr motivator? good morning mr motivator. how are you feeling? i good morning mr motivator. how are you feeling?— you feeling? i am feeling good, i am here with my — you feeling? i am feeling good, i am here with my wife _ you feeling? i am feeling good, i am here with my wife and _ you feeling? i am feeling good, i am here with my wife and i _ you feeling? i am feeling good, i am here with my wife and i am - you feeling? i am feeling good, i am here with my wife and i am the - here with my wife and i am the luckiest man in the world. everyone of us have been under an unusual level of pressure for the past year. let me give you some quick tips on how you can reduce stress, even if it is only for a moment. you could say no, be prepared to say no as often as you are prepared to say yes. increase the amount of things you delegate and find opportunities to relax. stop worrying, because it
7:57 am
cannot change the past but it can ruin the present. it is pointless to worry about something you have no control over. take control, but both hands on the steering wheel to control where you are going. have a break, getting away from the computer and the tv will recharge your batteries and that will make your batteries and that will make you feel better when you get back. walk away when it all seems too much. talk to someone, because a problem shared is a problem halved, a success doubled. seeking help doesn't mean you have failed, it just means you are not alone. read, feed your mind and lose yourself in the chapter of love, adventure and bent take up a hobby, doing something different will give you a place to escape to. but remember, too little, too much can change and cause you stress. be positive, sometimes good things full apart so that better things come full together. finally, exercise. a wonderful, physical activity which warms up your muscles, strengthens your body and releases the hormones that make you feel good. talking
7:58 am
about exercise, let's get going. you are sitting up straight, you don't even have to get out of the chair. take your hands out to the side and push the backs of your hands away towards the wall behind you. feel the stretch across that chest. give me some small circles with your arms are like so, just warming it up. every time you feel slightly stressed in your shoulders, gentle exercise to beautiful music will take you to a place you didn't think you could go to. reach forward and back, like so. that is really good, keep swinging forward. take your shoulders, the right shoulder and pushit shoulders, the right shoulder and push it up to your ear and let it drop down. your left shoulder, up and drop it down. both shoulders, take it up, drop it down. rotate the body left and right. keep looking straight ahead. feel the blood flowing around the body. you are starting to feel so good and starting to feel so good and starting to feel so good and starting to smell because all of a sudden you think, you own the world!
7:59 am
remember, all these exercises, it doesn't have to be intense, just gentle like this to some beautiful music and that will help to take you on holiday. isn't that wonderful, we can look forward to that. big circles again. if you are in the chair, you can squeeze your thighs together, shoulders up to your ears. for much more motivated, you have got to check me out on instagram, the real mr motivator and we will give you more tips on how to exercise and feel good about yourself. have a great weekend, be happy. you have one life, look after it and it will last a lifetime. it has been a pleasure being in your company today. if i has been a pleasure being in your company today-— company today. if i didn't have a cu of company today. if i didn't have a cup of coffee _ company today. if i didn't have a cup of coffee in _ company today. if i didn't have a cup of coffee in my _ company today. if i didn't have a cup of coffee in my hand, - company today. if i didn't have a cup of coffee in my hand, i - company today. if i didn't have a| cup of coffee in my hand, i would have been doing all those exercises! the downton abbey theme tune, never thought i would relax to that. i wish we could get those t—shirts as well. why not? it
8:00 am
i wish we could get those t-shirts as well. why not?— as well. why not? it can be arranged- _ as well. why not? it can be arranged. thank _ as well. why not? it can be arranged. thank you - as well. why not? it can be arranged. thank you very i as well. why not? it can be - arranged. thank you very much indeed, have _ arranged. thank you very much indeed, have a _ arranged. thank you very much indeed, have a great _ arranged. thank you very much indeed, have a great day. - stay with us, headlines coming up. good morning, welcome to breakfast withjon kay and naga munchetty. our headlines today. perseverance pays off for nasa as it successfully lands a rover on the surface of mars.
8:01 am
touchdown confirmed! perseverance is safely on the surface of mars. ready to begin seeking the signs of past life. borisjohnson will pledge to give away the majority of the uk's surplus coronavirus vaccines to developing countries when he chairs a virtual meeting of the g7 today. and the stables are staying. bbc breakfast viewers help raise more than £1 million to keep young people with disabilities in the saddle. earning his spurs again. gareth bale gets a fresh taste for goals in hungary as tottenham take a big step towards the next round of the europa league. and it has been incredibly —— it will be incredibly mild for some of you this weekend, 17 the potential high, but there is lots of rain also on the cards. i will have all the details later. it's friday, february 19th. our top story.
8:02 am
the most technically advanced spacecraft ever to land on mars is searching the red planet for evidence of ancient life this morning after a successful touchdown last night. nasa says its rover, called perseverance, takes us one step closer to humans travelling the 300 million miles reaching mars. here's our science correspondent rebecca morelle, whose report contains flashing images. perseverance is going about one kilometre per second. a nerve—racking wait at mission control. perseverance is safely on the surface of mars. then celebrations as a signal is received from mars. it's touchdown for nasa's perseverance rover. and these are its first images, a view of its landing site. the rover has even started tweeting. there really is no good way to describe that
8:03 am
moment when it's over, and you hear those words, touchdown confirmed. it's just a remarkable feeling of pride in the team, relief, and, and reallyjoy, thinking forward to this remarkable service mission we have coming up. it survived a fiendishly difficult landing, burning through the atmosphere at the speed of a bullet, before a complex landing system brought it to the ground. the rover will now be seeking answers to a crucial question. this mission is all about finding signs of life. and the best place to do that is here, thejezero crater. today it's dry and dusty but billions of years ago it was a huge lake, and you can clearly see a river running into it. this gives you an idea of what it would have looked like.
8:04 am
if we zoom in a bit more, these green areas on the edge of the crater were once beaches on the lake's shore, and the hope is any microscopic creatures that once lived there are still preserved. perseverance is the most advanced rover that nasa has ever built, and it's jam—packed with instruments. its robotic arm is equipped with a drill to collect rock samples. so what forms of life could they contain? i'm not talking about martian little green men. probably not even fish. we are looking for microbial life, maybe microbes that have made a little mat or a slime, the sorts that you might find on the bottom of a pond. those are the types of things that are likely to, well, they did exist on earth 3.5 billion years ago. the question is, did they exist on mars at the bottom of lakes? and in a first, nasa's mini mars helicopter will take off. it's a new way to view the planet. its test flight will be in a few weeks. but getting to the red planet is just the start. now the hard work begins on a mission that could transform our understanding of mars.
8:05 am
rebecca morelle, bbc news. it was astonishing last night how quickly those images got back, 11 minutes after landing, we get grainy pictures is start with butjust amazing to get those images. longest 11 minutes! it — amazing to get those images. longest 11 minutes! it must _ amazing to get those images. longest 11 minutes! it must have _ amazing to get those images. longest 11 minutes! it must have been, - amazing to get those images. longest 11 minutes! it must have been, the - 11 minutes! it must have been, the nasser! -- — 11 minutes! it must have been, the nasser! -- before _ 11 minutes! it must have been, the nasser! -- before nasser! - borisjohnson will pledge today to donate the majority of the uk's surplus covid vaccines to developing countries. the prime minister is chairing a virtual summit where he'll encourage other leaders, including president biden, to follow suit. our political correspondent alex forsyth is in westminster. the uk have over ordered, we have millions potentially of doses of vaccine that we are not going to need by the end of the year. our other leader is going to be as willing to share theirs as boris johnson is for his supply? this willing to share theirs as boris johnson is for his supply? this is a
8:06 am
ulobal johnson is for his supply? this is a global pandemic, _ johnson is for his supply? this is a global pandemic, and _ johnson is for his supply? this is a global pandemic, and while - johnson is for his supply? this is a l global pandemic, and while wealthy country like the uk are really progressing with their vaccine roll—out programmes, there are some countries who just haven't started yet and that is because they cannot access the supply. and so there is real pressure from campaigners who say campaigners who have the money and the means to stock up on vaccines like the uk, but also in developed nations, should be making sure those vaccines are given out around the world. borisjohnson will address this meeting of the g7 today and say in the uk will give its surplus vaccines apply to other countries. there is no clarity as to how much that might be and when that might be anjames cleverly said the uk vaccinations would still be the priority. we uk vaccinations would still be the riori . ~ ., , uk vaccinations would still be the riori . ~ . , , priority. we have been very effective — priority. we have been very effective in _ priority. we have been very effective in the _ priority. we have been very effective in the roll-out - priority. we have been very effective in the roll-out of. priority. we have been very i effective in the roll-out of our effective in the roll—out of our vaccination programme, one of the most _ vaccination programme, one of the most speedy and effective in the world _ most speedy and effective in the world. we can be incredibly proud of that _ world. we can be incredibly proud of that and _ world. we can be incredibly proud of that. and that means that we will probably— that. and that means that we will
8:07 am
probably be one of the first countries that are able to do this. but we _ countries that are able to do this. but we cannot say exactly when, and as i say, _ but we cannot say exactly when, and as i say, the — but we cannot say exactly when, and as i say, the numbers involved will reatiy— as i say, the numbers involved will really be _ as i say, the numbers involved will really be determined by how many of the vaccine _ really be determined by how many of the vaccine producers get the approval— the vaccine producers get the approval from the vaccine regulators. approval from the vaccine regulators-_ approval from the vaccine reuulators. , ~.,. ., approval from the vaccine reuulators. , ., ., regulators. president macron of france says _ regulators. president macron of france says the _ regulators. president macron of france says the us _ regulators. president macron of france says the us and - regulators. president macron of france says the us and europel regulators. president macron of- france says the us and europe should give 5% of their supplies now, joe biden, president of the us, has pledged 4 billion for the programme distributing vaccines so world leaders are clearly conscious this is an issue they have to respond to. in the uk, there are still questions about what the speedy pace of vaccine roll—out means for unlocking. there is speculation about summer holidays, about what might happen over the easter weekend, butjames cleverly, the foreign office minister, saying that is alljust foreign office minister, saying that is all just speculation foreign office minister, saying that is alljust speculation and it is understood that downing street is still working on the road map which will set out what the next stages of unlocking might look like. we will hear more from the prime minister on monday. thank you very much indeed. we will stay with that subject of unlocking
8:08 am
the various nations. all children aged between three and seven in wales will be back in the classroom from next monday. first minister mark drakeford confirmed the plans to us a short time ago as he outlined his hopes for easing the lockdown. our reporter tomos morgan is in cardiff. you are hearing that interview, lots to ask him about. some speculation, but some hints perhaps, some firmer hints? , ~ ., , hints? yes, i think what the first minister was _ hints? yes, i think what the first minister was saying, _ hints? yes, i think what the first minister was saying, as - hints? yes, i think what the first minister was saying, as we - hints? yes, i think what the first minister was saying, as we were | minister was saying, as we were saying all along, is that he wants things to be moving in the right direction before he starts making decisions. the key factors and measures he bases that decision on, the rate of vaccinations, currently at the highest level yet in terms of the number of people who have done vaccinated, the highest in the four nations. the number of people who have coronavirus in wales, again, lowest of the four nations. and the number of people in hospital, it
8:09 am
continues to decrease, and the r rate is also decreasing. because there is moving in the right direction, the first minister has said today and will say in his press conference, he is looking ahead to what can be eased next. they will not be any big changes on stay at restrictions, but there will be the potential for children, the restrictions, but there will be the potentialfor children, the rest of primary school children to be coming back to the classroom on the 15th, and some high school children, probably exam grades like gcses, that kind of age group. there is also talk about nonessential shops opening, he did say phased reopening, so it will be interesting to see if there is some clarity on the press conference. and also beauty aspects will be open, so hairdressers. he also touched upon the tourism sector and said if things move in the right direction, some aspect of tourism could open before easter as well.— before easter as well. begin to think is not _ before easter as well. begin to think is not a _ before easter as well. begin to think is not a bad _ before easter as well. begin to think is not a bad assessmentl before easter as well. begin to l think is not a bad assessment of
8:10 am
where _ think is not a bad assessment of where we — think is not a bad assessment of where we are. i met our tourism task force _ where we are. i met our tourism task force in _ where we are. i met our tourism task force in wales yesterday, the people who work_ force in wales yesterday, the people who work in— force in wales yesterday, the people who work in the sector. what we will work on _ who work in the sector. what we will work on with— who work in the sector. what we will work on with them is the possibility, and it is only that, of some _ possibility, and it is only that, of some limited reopening around easter of self—contained accommodation only _ of self—contained accommodation only. places where people don't mix with other— only. places where people don't mix with other people, whether or not shared _ with other people, whether or not shared facilities. that is how we began _ shared facilities. that is how we began the — shared facilities. that is how we began the reopening of tourism in wales— began the reopening of tourism in wales last — began the reopening of tourism in wales last year. if we can bring that forward to easter, if conditions allow, i know that will be a conditions allow, i know that will he a huge — conditions allow, i know that will be a huge relief to many, many hundreds— be a huge relief to many, many hundreds and thousands of families in wales _ hundreds and thousands of families in wales. 50 hundreds and thousands of families in wales. ., a, ._ i. , in wales. so on monday, the youngest rima in wales. so on monday, the youngest primary school — in wales. so on monday, the youngest primary school ages, _ in wales. so on monday, the youngest primary school ages, those _ in wales. so on monday, the youngest primary school ages, those from - primary school ages, those from three to seven—year—olds, will be backin three to seven—year—olds, will be back in the classroom. in the first minister and the vast government will look and see what impact that has on case rates before making a definite decision on the next phase we have just been speaking about. thank you very much. more than two million people in the uk have been denied a refund
8:11 am
for flights they were unable to board because of coronavirus restrictions. that's according to research by the consumer group which, found that passengers were not legally entitled to money back or guaranteed a successful insurance claim because the airline did not cancel the flight. the duke of edinburgh has spent a third night in hospital. prince philip, who's 99, was admitted to london's king edward vi! hospital as a precautionary measure on tuesday after feeling unwell. he's said to be in good spirits. his stay is not related to coronavirus. the impact of that freezing weather on the southern states in the us continues. millions of people in texas have been told to boil their drinking water as severe winter weather continues to cause chaos. many are living without power as temperatures have dropped as low as minus—18 degrees celcius. here's our north america correspondent lebo diseko. this is one of the richest states
8:12 am
in one of the richest countries in the world. around half of texans are experiencing disruptions to water supply. for others, burst pipes and melting snow have caused flooding. we've literally now been below freezing for the better part of ten days here. in north texas, our temperatures bottomed out at minus two fahrenheit, which is —19 celsius, a few mornings ago, which is the second coldest temperature ever in north texas, in the dallas fort worth area. and it was the coldest morning in over 70 years, just incredible. water companies have battled with frozen wells, treatment plants have been hit by power outages. it's meant 13 million people have been told to boil their water before drinking it. the supply of electricity is slowly being restored, but there are still at least half a million people without it. we will not stop until normalcy
8:13 am
is restored to your lives. until that moment comes, though, i ask all texans to continue your efforts to take the proper precautions that are needed to stay safe and to stay warm. if they manage to do that, and find water, getting food may still be hard. supermarket shelves are running dangerously low on supplies. while ordinary texans were freezing, their senator ted cruz headed for the beaches of mexico. back now after a public outcry over his absence while his state was in crisis. lebo diseko, bbc news, texas. so much snow. the pictures, when you hear texas and see the snow. it doesn't quite compute, does it. of course, matt can make it make sense.
8:14 am
that is gorgeous behind you. beautiful, pimlico in london, but at one point in the usa, this week, three quarters of it was covered in snow. . , . , three quarters of it was covered in snow. ., , . , , . three quarters of it was covered in snow. ., , . , ,. ., snow. that is incredible, such a rari . snow. that is incredible, such a rarity- and _ snow. that is incredible, such a rarity. and the _ snow. that is incredible, such a rarity. and the average - snow. that is incredible, such a rarity. and the average depth i snow. that is incredible, such a j rarity. and the average depth is around six _ rarity. and the average depth is around six inches, _ rarity. and the average depth is around six inches, imagine - rarity. and the average depth is around six inches, imagine that| around six inches, imagine that here? six centimetres would be pushing it. no snow around this morning, a lovely mild start. a beautiful sunrise in some areas. that is the good news but here is the other side, lots of wet and windy weather to come for the vast majority which will continue into tomorrow. this is where the rain is this morning, tipping it down into the far west of wales, scotland, the rain easing round into northern ireland. turning dry here was slightly more showery conditions. the very far north—east of scotland has a few showers, and some in east anglia and the southeast region could stay dry.
8:15 am
rain will start to get a bit closer into the afternoon and the winds will continue to be a feature. particularly across the western half of the country, these are the maximum gusts, 50 or 60 miles an hour which could whip up some really rough seas. not as strong winds to the north and east, and because it is a southerly direction, gets to the north of higher ground, particularly across the north of mainland scotland, and you will see some brightness. temperatures above where they should be the time of year, a few degrees warmer than it should be. and they are not good to drop much tonight, a mild night for england and wales. further cloud, outbreaks of rain in the west. there will be more rain at times in western areas, the south—east corner could get to 17. more details in half an hour. we don't really need to warm the cockles of your hearts with whether that wild! but we have a
8:16 am
heart—warming story for you. it's an update on a special sos — "save our stables", we broadcast on yesterday's breakfast. park lane stables in south london has been helping young people with disabilities for the past 12 years, but it faced closure unless £1 million could be raised in just seven days. when we covered this story yesterday, the fundraising total was atjust over £500,000. fi lamdin is back there to tell us what happened next. it wasn't looking great, despite all those kind donations. but this morning there are big smiles at the stables, and fi lamden is there, i'm not sure you will get a smile at him but you can smile for him! what not sure you will get a smile at him but you can smile for him!- but you can smile for him! what a difference 24 _ but you can smile for him! what a difference 24 hours _ but you can smile for him! what a difference 24 hours left. - but you can smile for him! what a difference 24 hours left. this - but you can smile for him! what a l difference 24 hours left. this horse doesn't have any teeth, because he is 40 years old, he is eating his mash, i have carried for him. but good news, 24 stables were indebted jeopardy here, and the future also
8:17 am
unknown. within hours, they reached half £1 million in his home, the stables, and are safe. we were here as it happened, joining in on the excitement. all day, the money just kept coming in. that's really kind of you. by phone, in person, and online. well over tens of thousands of separate donations. that's so kind of you, i must say. they had just seven days to raise the rest of the money, half a million, so they could keep these stables. and unbelievably, by mid—morning, they did it. we did it, we did it, we did it! oh, natalie, you arejust amazing. honestly, we did it. dominic, we did it, didn't we? 18—year—old dominic has cerebral palsy. this is the only place where he can exercise. you know what, wejust
8:18 am
didn't expect, we didn't expect that reaction. so when we got closer and closer, we screamed every £10,000, it was just amazing. and then, and then i cried, because it was just so huge. ijust thought, oh, dominic, your life is no longer locked down. and celebrations were soon in full flow. i'm just really overwhelmed, i can't really put it into words. it'sjust, like, we had nothing. we've always got nothing. and very few people believed in us. i can't believe it, that we've made it. and we've still got a few days to spare. well done, everybody! and it wasn't long before word got out. and soon, celebrities were also sending their congratulations. with a week to go, they have raised over £1 million, it might lift your heart, make you want to chip in to guarantee the future
8:19 am
of this very special place for all the people to whom it means the world. people like louis, who is autistic. he says this place has stopped him from having panic attacks. i feel so happy that we'll be able to be here forever, without having to worry about moving. does it feel like christmas? it feels better than christmas. and for hannah, who is visually impaired, she's kept herjob. i feel totally elated at the moment. that we get to keep the horses' house, and we get to stay in the community forever. and even though they reached the target... oh, thank you so much! people kept on giving. i'm so happy. i'm over the moon. when i saw it go, i was like, yay! the stables are saved forever! the horses are saved forever!
8:20 am
and so instead of being rehomed, these horses and those who love them so much can now definitely stay together. i have to be honest, as we came off air yesterday at 9am, i said to her, fingers crossed we could be back within a week reporting the good news. little did i know we would be back within a matter of hours. it happened so quickly.— back within a matter of hours. it happened so quickly. yeah, it was totally unbelievable. _ happened so quickly. yeah, it was totally unbelievable. we - happened so quickly. yeah, it was totally unbelievable. we still - happened so quickly. yeah, it wasj totally unbelievable. we still keep thinking we're going to wake up, we can't believe it is happened, we are so grateful to every single person that took the time to pledge for us. so many people went out of their way to help us. and now we are stable, excuse the pun, but we are safe! something that many people wouldn't know, you only told me yesterday thatjust hours before the money came in, you are negotiating a bank loan. , . , came in, you are negotiating a bank loan. , ,, ., , came in, you are negotiating a bank loan. , ,, ., i, loan. yes, i was desperately begging the bank to lend _ loan. yes, i was desperately begging the bank to lend us _ loan. yes, i was desperately begging the bank to lend us the _ loan. yes, i was desperately begging the bank to lend us the money. - loan. yes, i was desperately begging the bank to lend us the money. and | loan. yes, i was desperately begging| the bank to lend us the money. and i
8:21 am
stayed up the night before writing a business focused to try to secure the loan. and now we don't need it any more so we are really happy we can rip it up and move on and hopefully get some sleet one day soon. , , hopefully get some sleet one day soon. g , , ., ., ., hopefully get some sleet one day soon. , , ., ., ., ., ., soon. just before we go on to our next lovely _ soon. just before we go on to our next lovely guests, _ soon. just before we go on to our next lovely guests, just - soon. just before we go on to our next lovely guests, just to - soon. just before we go on to our next lovely guests, just to show i soon. just before we go on to our. next lovely guests, just to show you some of the things coming in, champagne for the adults, apples and carrots for the horses. the whole time we have been here, just this morning, the binmen drove past and were like, congratulations. the whole community is so behind you. let's come over to stacey and dominic. stacey, thank you for coming this morning, i know you are here the whole time with the horses with dominic. tell us, for your family, why it is vital that this place stays open.— family, why it is vital that this place stays open. oh, my gosh. dominic is _ place stays open. oh, my gosh. dominic is too _ place stays open. oh, my gosh. dominic is too disabled - place stays open. oh, my gosh. dominic is too disabled for- place stays open. oh, my gosh. i dominic is too disabled for normal wedding _ dominic is too disabled for normal wedding for disabled, he used to be able to— wedding for disabled, he used to be able to lrut— wedding for disabled, he used to be able to but then he had problems with his _ able to but then he had problems with his hips. —— normal riding for disabled — with his hips. —— normal riding for disabled. we had nothing until we can came — disabled. we had nothing until we can came here until we disabled. we had nothing until we can came here untilwe —— disabled. we had nothing until we can came here until we —— and
8:22 am
disabled. we had nothing until we can came here untilwe —— and he can .et can came here untilwe —— and he can get his— can came here untilwe —— and he can get his wheelchair onto the carriage, so he can have the full experience, the hooves, the smells, it isiust _ experience, the hooves, the smells, it isjust incredible. it is riding for him. — it isjust incredible. it is riding for him, and it is his world, really _ for him, and it is his world, really so— for him, and it is his world, really. so that isjust how incredible it was. really. so that is 'ust how incredible it was._ really. so that is 'ust how incredible it was. ., , incredible it was. there have been many tears _ incredible it was. there have been many tears in _ incredible it was. there have been many tears in your _ incredible it was. there have been many tears in your family, - incredible it was. there have been many tears in your family, so - incredible it was. there have been i many tears in your family, so happy. many tears in yourfamily, so happy. yes, many tears, ijust can't get over— yes, many tears, ijust can't get over it, _ yes, many tears, ijust can't get over it, it's— yes, many tears, ijust can't get over it, it's so incredible!- over it, it's so incredible! thank ou. over it, it's so incredible! thank you- let's _ over it, it's so incredible! thank you. let's come _ over it, it's so incredible! thank you. let's come over— over it, it's so incredible! thank you. let's come over to - over it, it's so incredible! thank you. let's come over to verity, | over it, it's so incredible! thank. you. let's come over to verity, you are a coach. over 350 families like dominic and stacey use at the stables, it is so vital for them. it is so important. the great thing is, we get to see such a massive difference and it is so vitally important for their mental health, their emotional health, their well—being. and we get to see the joy well—being. and we get to see the joy it brings to not only the people who come to us but also the families as well, you get to see an amazing and dramatic difference that it
8:23 am
makes. so thank you to everyone, because it really makes such a difference to everyone else in the community when they come to us on a regular basis. community when they come to us on a regular basis-— regular basis. thank you, verity. i think we have _ regular basis. thank you, verity. i think we have a _ regular basis. thank you, verity. i think we have a very _ regular basis. thank you, verity. i think we have a very special- regular basis. thank you, verity. i think we have a very special guestj think we have a very special guest now who has been supporting the campaign right from the start. we do, don't go away, because i know this guest may well have a lovely message to those there at the stables. rob brydonjoins us, good morning. stables. rob brydon 'oins us, good morninu. stables. rob brydon 'oins us, good mornin., ., stables. rob brydon 'oins us, good morningi we - stables. rob brydon 'oins us, good morningi we were l morning. good morning. we were catchin: a morning. good morning. we were catching a sneaky _ morning. good morning. we were catching a sneaky peak _ morning. good morning. we were catching a sneaky peak of - morning. good morning. we were catching a sneaky peak of you're l catching a sneaky peak of you're listening to that interview, and just smiling at how chuffed everyone is. you live in the area and although you might not have direct relationships with the stables, it is part of your daily life and you have been walking, tell us about that. . , have been walking, tell us about that. ., , , ., , , ., that. yeah, well, these stables are enchanting- _ that. yeah, well, these stables are enchanting. they _ that. yeah, well, these stables are enchanting. they are _ that. yeah, well, these stables are enchanting. they are in _ that. yeah, well, these stables are enchanting. they are in a - that. yeah, well, these stables are enchanting. they are in a suburban streets, near bushy park, so during lock and we have done a lot of walks
8:24 am
to —— lockdown we have done a lot of walks to bushey park. and as you come down the cis bourbon street, here it is stable. there is always a horse with its head out of the stable door right onto the pavement, and you can go and stroke it. and then i heard the story of what was happening, and the trouble they were in, and it struck me as such a terrible shame. because when i heard about the good work that it is doing, for all sorts of people, it just seems, you know, with the pandemic and everything, it seems, oh, something else. itjust seemed wrong. so i did a few tweets about it and they asked... there is another breakfast news channel on another breakfast news channel on another channel. ila. another breakfast news channel on another channel.— another channel. no, there isn't! inconsequential, _ another channel. no, there isn't!
8:25 am
inconsequential, inferior, - another channel. no, there isn't! inconsequential, inferior, that'sl inconsequential, inferior, that's the... unpleasant. anyway, iwent on that last week. and if i'm very honest, i went on that and we were a long way off and in all honestly, i didn't think we would get to this figure. but i thought it was a noble thing to try and do. so then when i heard yesterday, i was just, you know, bowled over. it's such a wonderful good news story. it really is. so wonderful good news story. it really is- so what — wonderful good news story. it really is- so what you _ wonderful good news story. it really is. so what you are _ wonderful good news story. it really is. so what you are saying _ wonderful good news story. it really is. so what you are saying is, - wonderful good news story. it really is. so what you are saying is, you i is. so what you are saying is, you went on another programme and they failed to hit the target, but when bbc breakfast yesterday covered this story, that they are not only reached their target, they busted right through. reached their target, they busted right through-— reached their target, they busted riaht throuuh. , ., ., , right through. there is no doubting our right through. there is no doubting your journalistic _ right through. there is no doubting yourjournalistic background. - right through. there is no doubting yourjournalistic background. i - your journalistic background. i think yourjournalistic background. i think that everybody, across the spectrum, has done their bit. and hearing that report, i must say, and hearing that report, i must say, and hearing natalie, what a remarkable person. the work she's done is amazing. hearing her saying that she was composing a business plan for the banks, i think this has the
8:26 am
making of a hollywood film. there ou co. making of a hollywood film. there you go- and _ making of a hollywood film. there you go- and i— making of a hollywood film. there you go. and i will— making of a hollywood film. there you go. and i willjust _ making of a hollywood film. there you go. and i willjust say - making of a hollywood film. there you go. and i willjust say now, i making of a hollywood film. there| you go. and i willjust say now, let you go. and i will 'ust say now, let me aet you go. and i will 'ust say now, let me net in you go. and i will 'ust say now, let me get in and — you go. and i will 'ust say now, let me get in and pitt]— you go. and i willjust say now, let me get in and put my _ you go. and i willjust say now, let me get in and put my cards - you go. and i willjust say now, let me get in and put my cards on - you go. and i willjust say now, let me get in and put my cards on the | me get in and put my cards on the table, i would love, with this face, to be considered for playing one of the horses. to be considered for playing one of the horses-— to be considered for playing one of the horses. ~ , , the horses. well, may i say, rubber, ou the horses. well, may i say, rubber, you obviously— the horses. well, may i say, rubber, you obviously saw— the horses. well, may i say, rubber, you obviously saw that _ the horses. well, may i say, rubber, you obviously saw that horse - the horses. well, may i say, rubber, you obviously saw that horse there, | you obviously saw that horse there, it might involve sympathetic but he didn't have any teeth. maybe something for you. there you go, a great addition. —— a great audition. do you want to say something? because our correspondent fi lamden is listening in, do you want to say something to the guys there? it made a difference to you, do you want to send a little message that she can tell them? i send a little message that she can tell them? , ., ., , tell them? i 'ust want to send them m tell them? i just want to send them my congratulations, _ tell them? i just want to send them my congratulations, all— tell them? i just want to send them my congratulations, all my - tell them? i just want to send them my congratulations, all my best - my congratulations, all my best wishes, because they pulled off the impossible. when i saw how much they needed to raise, i thought, well, it's too much. this is a little
8:27 am
stable in teddington. but i think when people heard the story, that's why i got involved initially. i thought, maybe if enough people hear about it, they would want to help. because it's a sort of no—brainer in that sense. it's a thing that brings so much joy to so many people. that sense. it's a thing that brings so muchjoy to so many people. and i thought the world would be a worse place without it and a better place with it. and natalie, for all that hard work you have done, well done and the next time i am strolling by on my daily walks, i will knock on the stable door and say hello. thank ou so the stable door and say hello. thank you so much — the stable door and say hello. thank you so much for— the stable door and say hello. thank you so much forjoining _ the stable door and say hello. thank you so much forjoining us. - the stable door and say hello. thank you so much forjoining us. thank. you so much forjoining us. thank you so much forjoining us. thank you for helping them. it is a wonderful story. a movie sounds great, we will speak to you again. we have put that audition on tape, we will_ we have put that audition on tape, we will keep it for you. let�*s we have put that audition on tape, we will keep it for you.— we will keep it for you. let's go back to fi _ we will keep it for you. let's go back to fi lamden _ we will keep it for you. let's go back to fi lamden at _ we will keep it for you. let's go back to fi lamden at the - we will keep it for you. let's go | back to fi lamden at the stable, what they make of that, this prospect of a film, he hollywood potential!
8:28 am
prospect of a film, he hollywood otential! ., , ., ., ., ., potential! yeah, you have got to listen to this _ potential! yeah, you have got to listen to this response. - potential! yeah, you have got to listen to this response. i - potential! yeah, you have got to listen to this response. i said, i listen to this response. i said, this is a hollywood film. and she said... i this is a hollywood film. and she said... ., ., ., , ., this is a hollywood film. and she said... ., ., ., ., , said... i want cameron diaz to play me! they are _ said... i want cameron diaz to play me! they are massively _ said... i want cameron diaz to play me! they are massively up - said... i want cameron diaz to play me! they are massively up for - said... i want cameron diaz to play me! they are massively up for it. i said... i want cameron diaz to play. me! they are massively up for it. he can -la me! they are massively up for it. he can play himself- — they were just saying, he was saying what a remarkable thing, he didn't think we would pull it off. he was just so delighted. you have got to be so... i just so delighted. you have got to be so... , , ., be so... i 'ust bleed from the start, i be so... ijust bleed from the start, i knew _ be so... ijust bleed from the start, i knew that _ be so... ijust bleed from the start, i knew that i _ be so... ijust bleed from the start, i knew that i had - be so... ijust bleed from the start, i knew that i had no . be so... ijust bleed from the - start, i knew that i had no choice, failure _ start, i knew that i had no choice, failure was — start, i knew that i had no choice, failure was not an option, i had to do this— failure was not an option, i had to do this for— failure was not an option, i had to do this for all the people that needed — do this for all the people that needed us. i didn't entertain failure — needed us. i didn't entertain failure for any point sol needed us. i didn't entertain failure for any point so i believed we could — failure for any point so i believed we could do it. and then people just .ot we could do it. and then people just got behind _ we could do it. and then people just got behind me, and a great team of people. _ got behind me, and a great team of people, some amazing volunteers. and we made _ people, some amazing volunteers. and we made it— people, some amazing volunteers. and we made it happen and here we are
8:29 am
forever~ _ we made it happen and here we are forever. ., ., ., , forever. you cannot get rid of us now. it forever. you cannot get rid of us now- it really — forever. you cannot get rid of us now. it really is _ forever. you cannot get rid of us now. it really is forever. - forever. you cannot get rid of us now. it really is forever. in - forever. you cannot get rid of us now. it really is forever. in case| now. it really is forever. in case anyone was wondering, i said that he doesn't have any teeth, and i gave him a carrot, i thought, oh, my goodness. he is apparently sucking on them like a cigar, maybe that can get into the film as well. that's it from us here.— get into the film as well. that's it from us here. thank you, everyone. this is now — from us here. thank you, everyone. this is now these _ from us here. thank you, everyone. this is now these horses _ from us here. thank you, everyone. this is now these horses and - from us here. thank you, everyone. this is now these horses and these l this is now these horses and these people's forever home. i did this is now these horses and these people's forever home.— people's forever home. i did worry about the character _ people's forever home. i did worry about the character so _ people's forever home. i did worry about the character so i'm - people's forever home. i did worry about the character so i'm very - about the character so i'm very pleased that he sucks the juice out of them and has his own personal cigar. if cameron diaz is playing a role, you are going to have a key role, you are going to have a key role in this, as well, so who would you like to play you? ila. role in this, as well, so who would you like to play you?— role in this, as well, so who would you like to play you? no, no, no, i will ask you. _ you like to play you? no, no, no, i will ask you, who _ you like to play you? no, no, no, i will ask you, who will— you like to play you? no, no, no, i will ask you, who will play - you like to play you? no, no, no, i will ask you, who will play me? . you like to play you? no, no, no, i| will ask you, who will play me? i'm not part of this!—
8:30 am
not part of this! gwyneth paltrow? there ou not part of this! gwyneth paltrow? there you go. _ not part of this! gwyneth paltrow? there you go. you _ not part of this! gwyneth paltrow? there you go, you can _ not part of this! gwyneth paltrow? there you go, you can take - not part of this! gwyneth paltrow? there you go, you can take that! i there you go, you can take that! cameron diaz and gwyneth paltrow, here we go. find cameron diaz and gwyneth paltrow, here we go-— cameron diaz and gwyneth paltrow, here we no. �* .,, �* , ., ., here we go. and rob brydon will have a -aassin here we go. and rob brydon will have a passing well. _ here we go. and rob brydon will have a passing well, audition _ here we go. and rob brydon will have a passing well, audition tapes - here we go. and rob brydon will have a passing well, audition tapes are - a passing well, audition tapes are ready. thank you so much forjoining us. let's have a look at the fundraising total now. when they were on this time yesterday, it was 580's they were halfway there, maybe a week or two. now1.16 million, are were halfway there, maybe a week or two. now 1.16 million, are not going anywhere, they say. that two. now1.16 million, are not going anywhere, they say.— anywhere, they say. that is the feel-good _ anywhere, they say. that is the feel-good story _ anywhere, they say. that is the feel-good story we _ anywhere, they say. that is the feel-good story we only - anywhere, they say. that is the feel-good story we only did - anywhere, they say. that is the| feel-good story we only did this feel—good story we only did this friday morning. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tarah welsh. as the prime minister is due to set out his road map on how we leave lockdown next week, london landlords are warning of complete disaster
8:31 am
if the government opens up the industry too soon. many were forced to close their doors back in december, which left some closing for good. at least try and take us out of lockdown, but again, don't do what they've done before. don't take us out too soon, but do it as soon as possible. that the worst case scenario would be that if they take, in my opinion, take us out of lockdown too soon and have to close us down again, that would be a complete disaster. a treasury statement said the hospitality sector was receiving "significant support". monthly tests have found no traces of coronavirus in air samples and swabs of london's tubes, buses and stations. extra cleaning through the pandemic has helped combat the spread. but the researchers at imperial college say that doesn't
8:32 am
mean passengers can let down their guard, and commuters should continue to wear facemasks. as 16—65 year olds with pre—exsisting conditions are being vaccinated— we've followed one of our jouranalists, meghan owen, as she goes for the jab. i'm about to get the vaccine. i got the text last week because i'm eligible. and i'm feeling a little bit nervous. i have just arrived. i can't believe i'm about to get the vaccine we're covering every day on the news but i'm excited. you can see more of that on our instagram and facebook. let's take a look at the travel situation now... the bakerloo line, part suspended between queens park and harrow & wealdstone and there are minor delays on the circle line. queues on the a406 north circular westbound from edmonton to palemrs green. now the weather with sara thornton. good morning to you.
8:33 am
it is a cooler start this morning across london and the south east than we have seen through this week. temperatures well down in low single figures. so some pockets of ground frost around at the very least, but it's a fine start to the day. as we go through its largely going to be dry, the winds are picking up from the south and west. there is some cloud pushing in as well all the time. might see some light showers just out towards the west but mostly dry and temperatures once more in low double figures. now through the night tonight we're going to keep some warmer airjust moving in and that's going to be with us through the weekend, so it won't be as chillier night to come as the nightjust gone. and we'll start tomorrow morning with temperatures in high single figures, if not around 10 degrees in a couple of spots. and then the big talking point for the weekend will be these temperatures — low to mid teens. some dry weather as well and possibly some sunshine at times. looks like we could see some showery rain around on sunday but it will feel like spring. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london
8:34 am
newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello this is breakfast withjohn kay and naga munchetty. morning live follows breakfast on bbc one. gethin and shirley can tell us what's in store. hello tell us what's in store. to you both, what have you for hello to you both, what have you got for us today. look at you sitting up straightjust because shirley is in the room. absolutely true. i said, how is my posture? she said, not bad. she will be keeping me on the straight and narrow this money. lovely to have you. i narrow this money. lovely to have ou. ., ., , you. i am delighted to be here aaain. you. i am delighted to be here again. scientists _ you. i am delighted to be here again. scientists are _ you. i am delighted to be here again. scientists are on - you. i am delighted to be here again. scientists are on the i you. i am delighted to be here i again. scientists are on the hunt for volunteers _ again. scientists are on the hunt for volunteers willing _ again. scientists are on the hunt for volunteers willing to - again. scientists are on the hunt for volunteers willing to be - for volunteers willing to be infected with coronavirus for the first covid trial. would you be
8:35 am
willing to catch covid to help find the cure? irate willing to catch covid to help find the cure? ~ ., ., ., ., i. the cure? we would love to hear your thouuhts the cure? we would love to hear your thoughts on — the cure? we would love to hear your thoughts on this, _ the cure? we would love to hear your thoughts on this, so _ the cure? we would love to hear your thoughts on this, so send _ the cure? we would love to hear your thoughts on this, so send them - the cure? we would love to hear your thoughts on this, so send them in - thoughts on this, so send them in now _ thoughts on this, so send them in now. ~ :: thoughts on this, so send them in now. ~ 1: ., , ., , now. with the next 70 million people now. with the next 70 million people now eli . ible now. with the next 70 million people now eligible for _ now. with the next 70 million people now eligible for the _ now. with the next 70 million people now eligible for the jab, _ now. with the next 70 million people now eligible for the jab, the - now eligible for the jab, the vaccination roll—out is in full swing. but what happens when you cannot physically get to an appointment? we will be meeting some of the volunteers helping out. also our gardening guru will be here and showing us how we can make our own ecosystem at home, even without a garden? ecosystem at home, even without a carden? . , ecosystem at home, even without a carden? ., , , , garden? that is right. this is said to be one of _ garden? that is right. this is said to be one of the _ garden? that is right. this is said to be one of the biggest - garden? that is right. this is said to be one of the biggest plant - to be one of the biggest plant trends — to be one of the biggest plant trends of— to be one of the biggest plant trends of 2021. _ to be one of the biggest plant trends of 2021. they- to be one of the biggest plant trends of 2021. they can - to be one of the biggest plant trends of 2021. they can havej to be one of the biggest plant i trends of 2021. they can have a to be one of the biggest plant - trends of 2021. they can have a huge price tag _ trends of 2021. they can have a huge price tag but — trends of 2021. they can have a huge price tag but i — trends of 2021. they can have a huge price tag but i can— trends of 2021. they can have a huge price tag but i can show— trends of 2021. they can have a huge price tag but i can show you - trends of 2021. they can have a huge price tag but i can show you to - trends of 2021. they can have a huge price tag but i can show you to makej price tag but i can show you to make a budget— price tag but i can show you to make a budget want— price tag but i can show you to make a budget want any— price tag but i can show you to make a budget want any botanist - price tag but i can show you to make a budget want any botanist will - price tag but i can show you to make a budget want any botanist will be i a budget want any botanist will be proud _ a budget want any botanist will be proud of — a budget want any botanist will be roud of. �* , , ., ., proud of. and denise van out-turn has revealed _ proud of. and denise van out-turn has revealed why _ proud of. and denise van out-turn has revealed why she _ proud of. and denise van out-turn has revealed why she and - proud of. and denise van out-turn has revealed why she and her- has revealed why she and her boyfriend have been gone to relationship therapy, to get the tips that — relationship therapy, to get the tips that can help you. he better than anyone _ tips that can help you. he better than anyone to _ tips that can help you. he better than anyone to talk _ tips that can help you. he better than anyone to talk through - tips that can help you. he better than anyone to talk through our| than anyone to talk through our strictly fitness routine, dianne
8:36 am
buswell. i hope you will go easy on her? ., , ., ., , buswell. i hope you will go easy on her? .,, ., ., , ,.,, her? nope, no, no. keep the posture anoin. i her? nope, no, no. keep the posture going- i did — her? nope, no, no. keep the posture going- i did see _ her? nope, no, no. keep the posture going. i did see you _ her? nope, no, no. keep the posture going. i did see you leaning - her? nope, no, no. keep the posture going. i did see you leaning back- going. i did see you leaning back and slacking _ going. i did see you leaning back and slacking and _ going. i did see you leaning back and slacking and then _ going. i did see you leaning back and slacking and then shirley - going. i did see you leaning back. and slacking and then shirley gave you a little bit of side i and then you a little bit of side i and then you just ripped yourself back up. he did, didn't he. love _ you just ripped yourself back up. he did, didn't he. love the _ you just ripped yourself back up. he did, didn't he. love the way - you just ripped yourself back up. he did, didn't he. love the way she - did, didn't he. love the way she 'ust did, didn't he. love the way she just gives _ did, didn't he. love the way she just gives a _ did, didn't he. love the way she just gives a slight _ did, didn't he. love the way she just gives a slight nod _ did, didn't he. love the way she just gives a slight nod and - did, didn't he. love the way she just gives a slight nod and that. did, didn't he. love the way she | just gives a slight nod and that is enough. i just gives a slight nod and that is enouah. ~' ., , enough. i know, iwill be well behaved and _ enough. i know, iwill be well behaved and my _ enough. i know, iwill be well behaved and my posture - enough. i know, iwill be well behaved and my posture will| enough. i know, iwill be well. behaved and my posture will be better. . . behaved and my posture will be better. ., ., ., behaved and my posture will be better. ., ., , ., ., i, we know that dogs have helped millions of us to get through the last year or so but you don't necessarily have to own one to feel the calming benefits of man's best friend. max the springer spaniel has been sharing his walks with the world via social media. now he's become the first pet dog to receive a very special award for his efforts. we'll meet max and his owner kerry in a moment. first, breakfast�*s tim
8:37 am
muffett has the story. max lives with his owner in the lake district but has fans across the world. the 13—year—old springer spaniel belongs to kerry irving, who has been live streaming their walks during lockdown. you all right, maxy? we started living live feeds on our daily walks, because we have we started doing live feeds on our daily walks, because we have got the lake district here, this is our home, this is where we can walk and exercise but some people are trapped in cities, tower blocks. max's walks with fellow springer spaniels paddy and harry have brought comfort to hundreds of thousands of people, and max's companionship to kerry has been life changing. following a road traffic accident 15 years ago, he was suffering from severe depression. the anxiety it caused me to walk out of a door on my own and not have somebody with me was, for me, a terrifying experience. every step i took, max was with me.
8:38 am
and every time i stopped and faltered, he stopped with me as well. the psa order of merit awards animals that show outstanding contribution to society. you can see how max has not only had a massive impact on kerry's life, but his activities, all the stuff that kerry has been filming with him, have reached the lives of hundreds of thousands of people right across the world. four—year—old evelyn is one of them. happy birthday to max! kerry and max's videos have been an absolute godsend to us during lockdown. helping with stress relief at the end of the day, make every day during lockdown a fresh start. evelyn suffers from febrile convulsions, seizures that can happen at any time. her mum, hannah, believes max has had a profoundly positive impact. when you see max's videos, how does max make you feel?
8:39 am
happy! the impact that dogs have both on mental well—being and on general well— being is fantastic. the animal equivalent of an 0be. richly deserved. tim muffett, bbc news. max and his owner kerry irving join us now from the lake district. good morning to both of you. getting a lovely cuddle as well. congratulations, you must be really proud. i congratulations, you must be really roud. ~' ., congratulations, you must be really roud, ~' ., ., , �* congratulations, you must be really roud. ~ ., ., ,�* proud. i think prout doesn't really cover the feeling. _ proud. i think prout doesn't really cover the feeling. i _ proud. i think prout doesn't really cover the feeling. i don't - proud. i think prout doesn't really cover the feeling. i don't think - proud. i think prout doesn't really| cover the feeling. i don't think the words are invented yet. i don't think it has sunk in. obviously, max just takes it in his stride. he looks like — just takes it in his stride. he looks like he is dealing with it in quite a cool way. is that him
8:40 am
naturally? just a calming influence? this is what you get with max. he is just so calm all the time. no matter where we take him and in whatever situation we have been in, this is what he does. he would normally be asleep and snoring, but we have told him to stay awake and bribed him with some treats. he him to stay awake and bribed him with some treats.— him to stay awake and bribed him with some treats. he looks so great. what does that _ with some treats. he looks so great. what does that dog _ with some treats. he looks so great. what does that dog mean _ with some treats. he looks so great. what does that dog mean to - with some treats. he looks so great. what does that dog mean to you, . with some treats. he looks so great. what does that dog mean to you, he j what does that dog mean to you, he is your dog a new share him with the well, but what does he mean to you? everything. to try and encapsulate how dogs make you feel, they give you companionship, their loyalty and their love. spaniels are incredible, they have this incredible zest for life and that is what it is about. it is about getting outside, enjoying things and getting on with
8:41 am
it. we can all be more spaniel and get out there and enjoy life. that get out there and en'oy life. that is such a good h get out there and enjoy life. that is such a good phrase, we could all be more spaniel. we will show pictures of the walks you have posted on social media. tell me, the page you put it on on facebook has more than 180,000 followers. what is the feedback you have been getting from people who perhaps don't have a dog or cannot get out and live in beautiful places to be able to get out to the lake district, what have those videos meant to those people? i think it is a sense of normality, where people can look at an image of a place they use to visit when they were younger or if they have been ill, just a feel—good factor. i think at the moment, we are going through such a phase in life where we need something positive. that is what max, paddy and harry all do,
8:42 am
they are out there enjoying a normal life. the messages we get are from people who are lonely, who are struggling with mental health. much more serious issues, too, believe that bereavement or illness. it is our little way of giving something back. to get the pdsa order of merit for that is incredible. it is absolutely amazing. for that is incredible. it is absolutel amazinu. �* ., absolutely amazing. also, you have met soldiers _ absolutely amazing. also, you have met soldiers who _ absolutely amazing. also, you have met soldiers who have _ absolutely amazing. also, you have met soldiers who have served - absolutely amazing. also, you have met soldiers who have served in . met soldiers who have served in afghanistan who say they have looked at max's page just to remind them afghanistan who say they have looked at max's pagejust to remind them of home. it is touching people in more ways than many would realise? irgfe ways than many would realise? we used to ways than many would realise? - used to get messages when the conflict was on and we have met quite a lot of those people, they have come and joined us on the walks. they have just talked, that is the beauty of what max does, he is the beauty of what max does, he is an opening to a bigger story. max
8:43 am
do that, they will meet him and they will start telling you how bad things have been for them. it is an open, whether it is a conversation about depression, ptsd, we get a message every day and how max, paddy and harry are helping people. it is unbelievable for what a dog can do for humans. it unbelievable for what a dog can do for humans-— for humans. it is a big responsibility - for humans. it is a big responsibility for - for humans. it is a big responsibility for you, j for humans. it is a big - responsibility for you, getting these messages and knowing what to say and to help people. this must be taking up a lot of your time, however much you embrace it, it must take over? it however much you embrace it, it must take over? ., , �* ~' take over? it does. but i think it -la s an take over? it does. but i think it plays an important _ take over? it does. but i think it plays an important part. - take over? it does. but i think it plays an important part. if- take over? it does. but i think it plays an important part. if we i take over? it does. but i think it. plays an important part. if we can do something to help other people, i think it is important. if we can do that through the vassal of dogs, then so be it. it is what we can do to help other people. —— vassal. max
8:44 am
help me from recovering from depression, if people can smile, then bring it on, it is the best feeling in the world to know that you can help people. from around the other side of the world, we can make people smile, laugh and enjoy their life better. theyjust enlighten life better. theyjust enlighten life itself, dogs. that will become more apparent as this pandemic clears, but the mental health scars don't and that is what we need to look at. helping people using dogs to enrich their lives. fiuch look at. helping people using dogs to enrich their lives.— to enrich their lives. such powerful words and it _ to enrich their lives. such powerful words and it is _ to enrich their lives. such powerful words and it is lovely _ to enrich their lives. such powerful words and it is lovely to _ to enrich their lives. such powerful words and it is lovely to see - to enrich their lives. such powerful words and it is lovely to see the i words and it is lovely to see the bond between you, it is a special connection and we thank you for your time and the work you are doing. flan time and the work you are doing. can i 'ust sa , time and the work you are doing. can ijust say, we want to dedicate i just say, we want to dedicate this, there is a lot of people out there in our community... i'm getting a bit emotional. can we say
8:45 am
thank you to everybody for this, this is for everybody. it is for the pdsa and their front line vets for what they have done and for every dog out there helping other people right now. it is a great thing to have and thank you. you right now. it is a great thing to have and thank you. you should be reall , have and thank you. you should be really. really _ have and thank you. you should be really, really proud _ have and thank you. you should be really, really proud of _ have and thank you. you should be really, really proud of yourselves. l really, really proud of yourselves. this means so much to you. we have spoken a lot about max, butjust being able to be in a position where it has made a difference and obviously you understand, the stresses and strains and how it can affect you are mentally and emotionally in life. this is personal to you as well, isn't it? very much so. that is why we want to help others, give a voice and use their dogs to do that. you can't help but get emotional when the dog has helped you so much and it is how we can repay them. this award is
8:46 am
mind blowing. thank you.- we can repay them. this award is mind blowing. thank you. thank you so much, mind blowing. thank you. thank you so much. guys- _ mind blowing. thank you. thank you so much, guys. kerry, _ mind blowing. thank you. thank you so much, guys. kerry, max - mind blowing. thank you. thank you so much, guys. kerry, max and - mind blowing. thank you. thank you | so much, guys. kerry, max and max's friends, thank you for sharing your story. look after yourselves. thank ou ve story. look after yourselves. thank you very much- _ story. look after yourselves. thank you very much. someone _ story. look after yourselves. thank you very much. someone who - story. look after yourselves. thank l you very much. someone who needs story. look after yourselves. thank - you very much. someone who needs no more encouragement _ you very much. someone who needs no more encouragement to _ you very much. someone who needs no more encouragement to be _ you very much. someone who needs no more encouragement to be more - more encouragement to be more spaniel. i am more springer door. a cross between springer spaniels under labrador. i got my dog just before the first lockdown, it has been incredible. how would we describe gareth bale in dog terms? he has got his springer spaniels back in him. a terrier? yes, hungry, like all dogs are. gareth bale finally showed, what he can offer spurs, as he got his taste for goals
8:47 am
back in hungary. inspring, tottenham to a 4—1win against wolfsburger of austria — setting up one goal, and scoring another in this first leg of their europa league, tie, staged in budapest due to covid—19 travel restrictions. like spurs, manchester united, are on course, to get through to the next round, afterthrashing real sociedad 4—0 — bruno fernandes had another great game, scoring twice in the match held in turin. it's all to play for, for leicester and arsenal, who drew theirfirst legs in prague and rome. bukayo saka with the equaliser, for arsenal against benfica and they're now looking at a trip to athens for the second leg. and rangers won a seven—goal thriller at royal antwerp — and this one was actually staged in belguim. two goals in the last seven minutes gave them a 4—3 victory. ryan kent with the pick of the goals. and then borna baric scoring his second penalty of the night, as they headed into injury time. the crystal palace forward, wilfried zaha, says he will no longer, be taking the knee before matches. premier league players, have been making the gesture,
8:48 am
at kick—off, in every match since football re—started in the summer, but zaha says it's lost its meaning, and is not making a difference. growing up, my parents let me know that i should be proud to be black, no matter what. and i just feel like we should just stand tall. it's becoming something that wejust do now, you know? that's not enough for me. i'm not going to take the knee, i'm not going to wear black lives matter in the back of my... ..because it feels like it's a target. we're isolating ourselves, we're trying to say we're equal but we're isolating ourselves with these things that aren't even working anyway. the second men's semi—final at the australian open is about to get under way it's daniil medv—edev against stefanos, tsitsipas — they're seeded fourth and fifth, so we're expecting a close match. the winner will face novak djokovic for the title. and formula 1 at silverstone tomorrow. you are not in a car. no, due to restrictions but talking
8:49 am
to lando norris and how he has been helping people due to the restrictions. i am helping people due to the restrictions. iam here helping people due to the restrictions. i am here with rachel tomorrow, because you and charlie are in saturday kitchen tomorrow. will you be cooking? no, not allowed to cook. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. hope you are well. sunrise in scarborough here. all parts of the uk now have the sunset after five o'clock in the evening. it is getting lighter. that is good news because grey skies for many today. wet and windy to come for western areas, notjust today. wet and windy to come for western areas, not just today today. wet and windy to come for western areas, notjust today but also tomorrow. most will be mild but just rainfall totals over the weekend. this is where the letters
8:50 am
will be, over 100 millimetres falling in the hills in the west. that is due to the cloud pushing all the way from the mid—atlantic, bringing the mild air but plenty of rain as well. tipping it down across much of western england, wales and southern scotland. the rainy season from northern ireland, dry spells with decent bursts of rain as we go through the day. to go with the rain in the west, which could cause some flooding over the next few days, we have got some strong winds. winds gusting from anywhere between 50 and 70 miles an hour in the west. whipping up some rough seas. not all doom and gloom, the brightness developing in the west of northern ireland later an eastern part of england. hazy sunshine at times and not a huge amount of rain in the north of mainland scotland. and for all of you, rain or not, temperatures above the seven to nine average we have at this time of year, it is actually ten to 13 degrees for the most part. some places not seen temperatures drop
8:51 am
much england wales, further cloud and rain at times in the west. scotland and northern ireland, temperatures might drop into low single figures. but most, have an incredibly mild star to saturday. wet day, wind in the west, eastern areas a bit brighter and here, pretty mild. we start with some sunshine, you can see the rain is still there and it will come and go all day long across the west. hazy sunshine in the eastern half of england and it is here where we can see highs of 13 to 17 celsius. last saturday we had a wind—chill of minus ten. so that is a massive, massive turnaround. with the wind coming from the south ahead of this weather front, coming from the south ahead of this weatherfront, it means coming from the south ahead of this weather front, it means we continue with the ma there as we going to sunday. sunday, not much rain around that damper cross and part of england and wales. bright skies between the south and east and northern ireland. enjoy your weekend.
8:52 am
perseverance will get you anywhere. that was the first tweet from nasa's space rover called perseverance after it landed on mars last night. in a moment we'll speak to one of the senior scientists on the project. first let's take a moment to consider nasa's epic achievement.
8:53 am
we'rejoined now from nasa'sjet propulsion laboraory in california by ken farley, who is one of the scientists leading the mission. hello to you, ken. excuse the pun, but have you come back down to earth yet in terms of euphoria? h0.
8:54 am
but have you come back down to earth yet in terms of euphoria? ha. i but have you come back down to earth yet in terms of euphoria?— yet in terms of euphoria? no, i have been here all— yet in terms of euphoria? no, i have been here all day _ yet in terms of euphoria? no, i have been here all day for— yet in terms of euphoria? no, i have been here all day for the _ yet in terms of euphoria? no, i have been here all day for the last - yet in terms of euphoria? no, i have been here all day for the last 12 - been here all day for the last 12 hours since we landed and it has been absolutely spectacular. i wish ou could been absolutely spectacular. i wish you could see _ been absolutely spectacular. i wish you could see my _ been absolutely spectacular. i wish you could see my smile. _ been absolutely spectacular. i wish| you could see my smile. obviously, you could see my smile. obviously, you have to wear a mask in the laboratory where you are, absolutely fine, but we can hear you. we have spoken about this this morning, those 11 minutes, that 11 minute delay, you are sitting there and thinking, it should have landed. if it hasn't broken. then what would the 11 minutes light while you are waiting for the pictures to come through? it waiting for the pictures to come throu . h? . , waiting for the pictures to come throurh? .,, ,., ., waiting for the pictures to come throurh? .,, ., . ., waiting for the pictures to come throth? .,, ., . ., ., through? it was so hard. we have two clocks and one — through? it was so hard. we have two clocks and one says _ through? it was so hard. we have two clocks and one says what _ through? it was so hard. we have two clocks and one says what is _ clocks and one says what is happening on march and one tells us when we will hear about it. it was painful waiting. the whole process played outjust like it was supposed to. it was a wonderful success. halli! to. it was a wonderful success. half ofthe to. it was a wonderful success. half of the missions _ to. it was a wonderful success. half of the missions to _ to. it was a wonderful success. half of the missions to mars that have taken place having got that far, they failed in the last stages, so
8:55 am
it was so crucial and so touch and go. how confident where you, be honest with us, now it has landed and you know it is fine, where you show it was to happen? i am and you know it is fine, where you show it was to happen?— show it was to happen? i am a scientist. _ show it was to happen? i am a scientist. i _ show it was to happen? i am a scientist, i work _ show it was to happen? i am a scientist, i work with - show it was to happen? i am a i scientist, i work with engineers, they built the thing and designed they built the thing and designed the thing. it is like being in an aeroplane when it is going to land and you just assume the guys up front know what they are doing. because it is not going to help you to assume anything else. this because it is not going to help you to assume anything else.— because it is not going to help you to assume anything else. this is the landin. to assume anything else. this is the landing- you — to assume anything else. this is the landing. you see _ to assume anything else. this is the landing. you see the _ to assume anything else. this is the landing. you see the parachute - to assume anything else. this is the l landing. you see the parachute going up. it was awesome to watch. i cannot imagine what it was like to be there. i guess the work is only now beginning, this is where you start to gather the research, the data and information that will help us understand the universe a bit better? ~ , , ., ., better? absolutely, we landed in a lace better? absolutely, we landed in a place where _ better? absolutely, we landed in a place where there _ better? absolutely, we landed in a place where there was _ better? absolutely, we landed in a place where there was once - better? absolutely, we landed in a place where there was once an - place where there was once an enormous lake, a leg that was 40 kilometres across and hundreds of
8:56 am
kilometres across and hundreds of kilometres deep about 3.5 billion years ago. we think it is an excellent place to look for evidence that life might have existed on mars at the time. irgfe that life might have existed on mars at the time. ~ ., ., ., ~' that life might have existed on mars at the time-— at the time. we are looking at pictures. _ at the time. we are looking at pictures. of— at the time. we are looking at pictures, of what _ at the time. we are looking at pictures, of what the - at the time. we are looking at pictures, of what the rover - at the time. we are looking at pictures, of what the rover is l pictures, of what the rover is sending back now, and you have obviously seen pictures of what it is sending back, so what are you looking for, how good quality are the pictures? to my untrained eye, my immature eye, i have no idea what we're looking at and what detail you can from there. but you tell me. what is out there right now, most of it is very low resolution and some of the images were taken before we took the lens cap off the cameras, because we wanted to protect them until we were sure everything was safe. in the last 12 hours we have been getting absolutely fabulous images coming back. they will be released over the course of the next
8:57 am
few days. one of the things everybody should be looking forward to is there where a collection of cameras mounted on different parts of the spacecraft as it went through the atmosphere and a microphone. all of that is going to come back and it is going to be a wonderful multimedia experience. notjust animation, the real deal. i am looking forward to seeing that. we have started to see little pieces of that coming down, but it will take a few more days to get back together. one question, what does it sound like on mars? do you know yet? and two, do you think there will be evidence of life out there? first question. _ evidence of life out there? first question. we — evidence of life out there? first question, we think _ evidence of life out there? first question, we think we - evidence of life out there? i11i question, we think we will hear something, but the atmosphere is very different than on earth so we may be surprised by what we hear. we will undoubtedly hear the noise the river makes, but often we will hear wind. so we will have to see. will we find evidence of life? i am
8:58 am
pretty optimistic in the sense that we are looking in what appears to be, by every measure that we know about, a place where life on earth could have existed. in other words, we don't have to invent some special kind of life to live there. it is a very habitable place and on earth, have until —— habit places are inhabitable. have until -- habit places are inhabitable.— have until -- habit places are inhabitable. , ., inhabitable. some people are saying, this is the story _ inhabitable. some people are saying, this is the story we _ inhabitable. some people are saying, this is the story we needed _ inhabitable. some people are saying, this is the story we needed to - inhabitable. some people are saying, this is the story we needed to have i this is the story we needed to have in the pandemic, it is escapist and it is brilliant. other people are saying, we have enough problems on earth, why are we worrying about this? what would you say to the latter group there, why we should care? i latter group there, why we should care? ., , ., ., , care? iwould tell you, i really think we have _ care? iwould tell you, i really think we have to _ care? iwould tell you, i really think we have to be _ care? iwould tell you, i really think we have to be doing - care? i would tell you, i really. think we have to be doing things like this. this is what makes us human. exploring is something humans always do and always should do. we
8:59 am
are learning wonderfully important things. ijust think, this is something that everybody can look too and i personally am proud to be part of something with a large group of people from around the world, who got together to do something special. got together to do something secial. ., ,,., ., ., got together to do something secial. ., ., ., ., special. professor, we have to leave it there. special. professor, we have to leave it there- we — special. professor, we have to leave it there. we can _ special. professor, we have to leave it there. we can see _ special. professor, we have to leave it there. we can see your _ special. professor, we have to leave it there. we can see your smile, - it there. we can see your smile, despite the mask. thank you. there you go, we saw it. you're watching bbc breakfast. it's 8.59.
9:00 am
this is bbc news with the latest headlines nasa's perseverance rover begins looking for signs of ancient life on mars, as it sends back its first pictures of the planet's surface touchdown confirmed! this is the moment the robot safely touched down despite all the odds — successfully navigating a risky landing phase known as the 'seven minutes of terror�* borisjohnson will pledge to donate the majority of the uk's surplus covid vaccines to developing countries and encourage fellow leaders to do the same, as he chairs a virtual g7 summit today do you think wealthier countries should donate vaccines now, rather than wait until they have a surplus? let me know what you think on this and our other
9:01 am
top stories on twitter.

48 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on