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tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 25, 2021 8:00pm-9:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines at eight. teachers will decide gcse and a—level grades in england this summer, to avoid a repeat of last year's exams chaos — no algorithms will be used and students will be sent their results earlier than usual. the uk's chief medical officers move the covid—19 alert level from the highest level of five down to four. lady gaga is reportedly offering half a million dollars in reward for the return of two dogs — they were stolen by a gunman who shot her dog—walker in la. coming up — we'll be hearing from radio 2 dj jo whiley�*s family, after her younger sister's hospitalisation for coronavirus. the uk government now promises that
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all adults on the learning disability register will be prioritised for vaccine. and india thrash england by ten wickets in an bizarre third test to take a 2—1 series lead. good evening and welcome to bbc news. after last year's exam fiasco, when grades were decided by an algorithm, this year the government has opted to pass the responsibility of gcse and a—level grades on to teachers. with so much term time lost and exams cancelled, pupils in england will be assessed only on what they've been taught. there are several ways in which teachers will be able to determine grades — from mock exams, coursework, essays and optional tests provided by exam boards.
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results will be published earlier in august to allow more time for the extra appeals that are expected. today's announcement follows similar moves in scotland, wales and northern ireland, but there are concerns about the fairness of the approach, and that vexed issue of grade inflation. our education editor branwen jeffreys reports from ashton—under—lyne. schools will be testing all pupils when they return — but for covid, not their grades. check in the mirror that you're going to the right place. when year 11s are back, any work could count. a lot of pressure has been put on all of us... this is the crucial gcse year for elliott and elizabeth. it would let me get into the colleges and universities i want to go to. relief today that teachers will decide what counts towards their grades.
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i find it a lot better, because i get under pressure a lot more in exams, so i think, whilst i'm comfortable in my lessons, i think it's a lot better for me. i'm perfectly fine with it, because i'm comfortable with my teachers and i know them well, and i know that the work i've done in lessons should get me a good grade. this is the least worst option, mps were told today. our approach in the face of the worst disruption to education since the second world war has been to protect the progress of pupils and students. now, for the first time, he said he trusts teachers. i can't help wondering why he only trusts teachers when there's a chance to make them responsible for what happens with exams. if grades go up a lot this year, then teenagers who benefit and their families aren't likely to complain immediately. but if they're massively out of line with other years, then they won't hold their value in the long term, and of course not everyone will get the results they want, leaving schools to tread a very tricky, difficult path.
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for each pupil, in every subject, they have to look at the evidence — where more is needed, this school will use extra exam questions provided. for some students, these questions that are being set nationally will have greater weighting, because we need them. but for some students it won't be such a great weighting, so if we can work on both the gcse grade and their progression, then it should ease that challenge. but yes, i do worry that it is a bit of a hospital pass from government. a—level students, at home around the country, told us they want a level playing field. i'm more concerned as to whether some colleges inflate grades whereas others do not, and i think that could lead to a lot of discrepancies. this was probably the fairest way for us to be assessed, _ just because of the stress exams will have caused us. _ the regulator told me it will be different
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from the chaos of last year. teachers knew that the proposed grades were going to be put into a giant mixing pot and spiced up with a mysterious algorithm, and of course, as you know, the algorithm isn't going to be used this year, so teachers will recognise that the grades they recommend are the grades that students will end up getting. schools do have their work cut out, welcoming back every year group, and byjune telling pupils what they'll use to work out grades. branwen jeffreys, bbc news, manchester. with me is vic goddard, head teacher at passmores academy in harlow. and also i'm joined by ros mcmullen, a former head teacher who now advises school leaders. i know it is a busy period for use so thanks very much both forjoining us. vic, let us start with you. how have your teaching staff, how have you reacted to this notion the city is going to be up to the teachers to
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decide the fate of your peoples? it is rare that i feel sorry for the government around its decisions around education but i think this is probably one of those cases where to try and make something fair for all young people when they have all had such different experiences over the course of the last 18 months, really, but certainly the last year, i feel for them and really, but certainly the last year, ifeel for them and i am not really, but certainly the last year, i feel for them and i am not sure thatis i feel for them and i am not sure that is better option so i think the prime minister probably was right in saying this is the best compromise in a very difficult situation. my smack that do you agree that this is the fairest option, realistically you don't want to see the chaos that happened last year? is this the fairest way to do it? absolutely, it is, considering _ fairest way to do it? absolutely, it is, considering where _ fairest way to do it? absolutely, it is, considering where we - fairest way to do it? absolutely, it is, considering where we are - fairest way to do it? absolutely, it is, considering where we are now. i fairest way to do it? absolutely, it | is, considering where we are now. i personally— is, considering where we are now. i personally believe they should have been some thoughts put into this immediately following last year were - iven immediately following last year were given where we are now this is the best thing — given where we are now this is the best thing to do, yes. 30 given where we are now this is the best thing to do, yes.— given where we are now this is the best thing to do, yes. so how do you
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make sure. — best thing to do, yes. so how do you make sure. vic. _ best thing to do, yes. so how do you make sure, vic, that _ best thing to do, yes. so how do you make sure, vic, that those _ best thing to do, yes. so how do you make sure, vic, that those grades i make sure, vic, that those grades are fair, that the teachers, of course they are professional and they want the best from the children but they do greater children according to their abilities? i think schools are good at motivating and standardising results and i think back to our process last summer whether staff did all their assessments and looked all young people had got over the course of a couple of years gave them a final grade. —— schools are good monitoring. to make sure it was no unconscious bias and it wasn'tjust the quiet ones who got the best grades all of those grades are given to myself and i looked at every grade for every student and they removed all the names, ethnicity, gender, everything, i didn't know who each child was but what i could see was a list of subjects, list of grades that they are received through assessments and other things to the times and i saw the grade and if they made sense and correlated then that was ok and if they didn't we went back and looks at it again. i'm not quite certain where the grade inflation fixation comes from within the government, i will be
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honest. i mean, we have to accept the fact that this year a group of young people is leading a different life. we should not be needing to compare than the previous years. we need to do what is right for them because one of what they've had to do. because one of what they've had to do, , ., because one of what they've had to do. , because one of what they've had to do. so, in your capacity know you are advising _ do. so, in your capacity know you are advising school _ do. so, in your capacity know you are advising school leaders. - do. so, in your capacity know you are advising school leaders. how| do. so, in your capacity know you i are advising school leaders. how do you ensure, let's touch upon grade inflation because there has been so much spoken about it. how to ensure that that doesn't happen. pare much spoken about it. how to ensure that that doesn't happen.— that that doesn't happen. are you concerned about _ that that doesn't happen. are you concerned about it? _ concerned about it? no, _ concerned about it? no, i'm _ concerned about it? no, i'm not concerned about it at all. no, i'm not concerned about it at alt the _ no, i'm not concerned about it at all. the thing is that exams and teachers — all. the thing is that exams and teachers can assess based on a set of criteria _ teachers can assess based on a set of criteria and they have tonnes of evidence, — of criteria and they have tonnes of evidence, portfolios of evidence and vic is _ evidence, portfolios of evidence and vic is taking you through exactly how teachers and head teachers can use that _ how teachers and head teachers can use that to — how teachers and head teachers can use that to remove unconscious bias. that is— use that to remove unconscious bias. that is hot— use that to remove unconscious bias. that is not of— use that to remove unconscious bias. that is not of the schools. what school — that is not of the schools. what school can — that is not of the schools. what school can do and this is what exams the way— school can do and this is what exams the way that— school can do and this is what exams the way that we is they cannot stratify — the way that we is they cannot stratify according to national performance in serving that the nationat— performance in serving that the national percentage of each rate stays _ national percentage of each rate stays the — national percentage of each rate stays the same and that is really
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what _ stays the same and that is really what exams have been doing. they have been— what exams have been doing. they have been stratify in as well as looking — have been stratify in as well as looking at— have been stratify in as well as looking at how the students perform so this— looking at how the students perform so this year— looking at how the students perform so this year what will happen as it will be _ so this year what will happen as it will be much more according to the criteria _ will be much more according to the criteria of— will be much more according to the criteria of what, how the students have _ criteria of what, how the students have performed with whole portfolios of evidence. it doesn't concern me about— of evidence. it doesn't concern me about grade inflation at all because i about grade inflation at all because i know— about grade inflation at all because i know that the schools, the teachers. _ i know that the schools, the teachers, the head teachers, the moderation, against a set of criterion. _ moderation, against a set of criterion, will be very vigorous. and _ criterion, will be very vigorous. and wherr— criterion, will be very vigorous. and when it _ criterion, will be very vigorous. and when it comes to some of the questions, like i say, we have had so many questions and anybody that wants to get in touch with the bbc the hashtag is and we do our best to put this question is too expert such as our esteemed guests now. hashtag is #bbcyourquestions. one question is #bbcyourquestions. one question is will teachers use the whole year's work knowing that some children only perform well close at exam time. we all know what it is like when you have got a deadline you start focusing on an exams focus
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your mind on that so how will teachers be monitoring that? the uuidance teachers be monitoring that? the guidance is _ teachers be monitoring that? iie: guidance is quite teachers be monitoring that? tie: guidance is quite clear. we are not predicting grades, we're not saying if we carried on teaching and this is where we think they would have got to. we are basing it on what they have done, what they know what they have done, what they know what they have done, what they know what they have shown so from that perspective that will remove a lot of the issue, that will remove a lot of the issue, that will remove a lot of that. ourjob is to give them the best opportunity to show the best of themselves and the reality is that some young people in my school every year, three, four, five young people don't turn up from the to their exams or they come from a family that thinks the moment they turn 16 they should be at work and those young people would have got us or xs. this year they will get actual rates. i don't know what vested interest they think we having inflating grades because what happens next an extra offset comes along and say you cannot live up to those grades and you have got it wrong. there is no vested interest in was inflating grades because those young people believe and we
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will still be on the job and have to answer questions. i understand it is answer questions. i understand it is a concern that it is a nonstory for me. we have to do what is right for education as well as our young people and we will. it is education as well as our young people and we will.— people and we will. it is really interesting — people and we will. it is really interesting to _ people and we will. it is really interesting to see _ people and we will. it is really interesting to see both - people and we will. it is really interesting to see both of- people and we will. it is really interesting to see both of you | people and we will. it is really - interesting to see both of you just five years he didn't see when vic was talking about grade inflation, rose very much nodding her head in accord with this grade inflation suggestion that it is a nonstarter, it won't happen. suggestion that it is a nonstarter, it won't happen-— it won't happen. absolutely. the -roblem it won't happen. absolutely. the problem is _ it won't happen. absolutely. the problem is that _ it won't happen. absolutely. the problem is that if _ it won't happen. absolutely. the problem is that if people - it won't happen. absolutely. the problem is that if people are - problem is that if people are hitting — problem is that if people are hitting a _ problem is that if people are hitting a standard, if children are hitting _ hitting a standard, if children are hitting a — hitting a standard, if children are hitting a standard, if children are hitting a standard ad we can look at across— hitting a standard ad we can look at across all— hitting a standard ad we can look at across all their performance, cross testsi _ across all their performance, cross tests, across essays, across everything we know about them, and we know _ everything we know about them, and we know they have hit that standard, that is _ we know they have hit that standard, that is not _ we know they have hit that standard, that is not a — we know they have hit that standard, that is not a problem. that's not grade _ that is not a problem. that's not grade inflation. what exam boards have done — grade inflation. what exam boards have done and what the system has been constructed to do in recent years— been constructed to do in recent years is— been constructed to do in recent years is to — been constructed to do in recent years is to say, well, we're only going _ years is to say, well, we're only going to — years is to say, well, we're only going to allow a certain percentage
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of students to get in a star, and a, b, c— of students to get in a star, and a, b. cso— of students to get in a star, and a, b. cso on. — of students to get in a star, and a, b, c so on, and i don't necessarily agree _ b, c so on, and i don't necessarily agree or— b, c so on, and i don't necessarily agree or think that that is at all helpful— agree or think that that is at all helpful because, actually, exams aren't— helpful because, actually, exams aren't really, for me, for the purpose _ aren't really, for me, for the purpose of— aren't really, for me, for the purpose of specifying a cohort, they are for— purpose of specifying a cohort, they are for the — purpose of specifying a cohort, they are for the purpose of young people being _ are for the purpose of young people being awarded for what they know and what they— being awarded for what they know and what they can do and what they have demonstrated, and that is what teachers — demonstrated, and that is what teachers know best and can do at a-level, — teachers know best and can do at a-level, as — teachers know best and can do at a—level, as i was talking about, and also gcse — a-level, as i was talking about, and also gcse. . ~ a-level, as i was talking about, and also gcse. ., ,, i. ., also gcse. 0k, thank you for clarifying _ also gcse. 0k, thank you for clarifying that _ also gcse. 0k, thank you for clarifying that and _ also gcse. 0k, thank you for clarifying that and i - also gcse. 0k, thank you for clarifying that and i know - also gcse. 0k, thank you for| clarifying that and i know that also gcse. 0k, thank you for - clarifying that and i know that they had were concentrating on the grade inflation so it is really good just to get your privacy on that. mike is asking a particular question and let us put it to you. it is regarding key workers and vulnerable children and weather, this is quite an interesting one, whether they had been at an advantage because they have had full lessons at school is on pupil teacher ratio. —— full lessons at school with a low pupil teacher ratio. schools opening for
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everyone from the 8th of march but schools have been open throughout. should they be judged to a different benchmark? laughter no, because what you will find is that young people who have had to go into school in order to support our nhs and all of our critical workers and our vulnerable have been following the same programme as the kids who are at home, often. you know, the work that has been done live online, the young people sitting in a school are doing that. we are offering supervision in those situations and to say that they have been advantage when they look out of the window and they see the sun outside and they are stuck in a classroom i think is, yeah, just beyond ridiculous. these young people have not had advantage. in fact, you know, mental health wise they may have had some advantage by being amongst others but they have had some disadvantaged by being singled out to be treated differently so that is far from being a concern. i differently so that is far from being a concern.— differently so that is far from being a concern. i think pretty clear there, _ being a concern. i think pretty clear there, mike, _ being a concern. i think pretty clear there, mike, i— being a concern. i think pretty clear there, mike, i hope - being a concern. i think pretty clear there, mike, i hope that| clearthere, mike, i hope that answers your question. she is asking
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so let's put this to you, what is the situation for external exam candidates. firstly, what does sheila mean by external exam candidates, for those who don't understand that particular aspect of this? ., ., .., ., , understand that particular aspect of this? ., ., ., , ., this? external exam candidates are students who _ this? external exam candidates are students who are _ this? external exam candidates are students who are not _ this? external exam candidates are students who are not registered - this? external exam candidates are students who are not registered at| this? external exam candidates are | students who are not registered at a school, _ students who are not registered at a school, people taking exams externally, and i have got to be quite _ externally, and i have got to be quite honest, i haven't read the guidance — quite honest, i haven't read the guidance on that because i have been involved in looking — because i have been involved in looking at— because i have been involved in looking at what schools are going to do but _ looking at what schools are going to do but that — looking at what schools are going to do but that is guidance on that. i don't _ do but that is guidance on that. i don't know. _ do but that is guidance on that. i don't know, vic, have you looked at that _ yet, the clumsy run that is quite difficult because we do have external exams at our school. —— the clarity and that is quite difficult. we have had a phone call from somebody who left school many years ago but wanted to sip their maths exams will be coming in just facilitator exam safer than but obviously that doesn't mean we know them or have any knowledge base on them or have any knowledge base on them so that is a very good question and i think one that probably still need answering. ladle and i think one that probably still need answering.—
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and i think one that probably still need answering. we will have to get back to you — need answering. we will have to get back to you on _ need answering. we will have to get back to you on that _ need answering. we will have to get back to you on that one. _ back to you on that one. #bbcyourquestions for the time being. thank you very much for taking the time to talk with us as i know you are busy. now let's take a look at the latest official coronavirus figures for the uk. there were 9,985 new infections recorded it means that on average of 10,189 new cases were recorded per day the number of people in hospital with coronavirus is falling — currently it's 16,059. in the last 2a hours , 323 deaths have been recorded — that's people who died within 28 days of a positive covid test. on average,
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383 deaths were announced every day in the past week. the total number of people who've died is 122,070. now on to the vaccination programme — nearly 449,000 people had their first dose of a vaccine in the latest 24—hour period. this means nearly 18.7 million people have now had their first vaccination. well, the uk's coronavirus alert level has today been lowered, from level five to level four, in all four nations. our health editor hugh pym has more. this is the uk's chief medical officers together giving their assessment of the level of risk. the system was set up in may last year and for much of the summer and early autumn it was level three, then a move up to level four in september as cases began to really take off, and onjanuary the 4th this year, the day that england went into a new lockdown and the uk's other nations were making similar moves, it was a move up to level five, and that is defined
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by the uk's medical officers feeling there was a material risk of the nhs being overwhelmed within three weeks if no action was taken. well, now the move is back to level four because, as the cmos, chief medical officers, say, hospital numbers have been consistently declining and there is no further immediate risk to the nhs, but they say people will have to remain vigilant as there is still pressure on health care services. that was our health editor there. of course there is much more on our website. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport center i think ithinki i think i know what you're going to lead with. i'm going to lead with football, surprise surprise. good evening. arsenal have moved through to the last 16 of the europa league thanks to a late pierre emerick—aubameyang goal. the portuguese side were ahead on aggregate when rafa silva took advantage of sloppy arsenal defending to make it 2—2
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on the night, but the gunners skipper aubameyang picked up a second while sending his side through 4—3 on aggregate in their home match played in greece due to covid restrictions. rangers also went through but with a bit more ease against royal antwerp — alfredo morelos gave the scottish side the lead afterjust nine minutes, and two goals shortly after half time, the second from ryan kent made it a touch more comfortable for steven gerrard's side as they won 5—2 on the night and 9—5 on aggregate. elsewhere tonight in the eight o'clock kick—offs manchester united are at home to real sociedad having a big lead from the opening leg while leicester city and slavia prague is much tighter after the first leg finished goalless. i can tell you sociedad have missed a penalty, though, in the early stages. onto cricket where england have lost the third test
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against india by ten wickets. defeat came inside two days in ahmedabad as india chased down the 49 runs needed for victory. it was england's lowest test score against india, another batting collapse coming on a pitch favouring the spinners and becoming increasingly tough to bat on. england pulled themselves back into it when india were bowled out for 145. skipperjoe root — really only a part time bowler took five wickets forjust eight runs, while jack leach claimed four but the tourists collapsed to 81 all out in reply. axar patel with five wickets and ravi ashwin with four. ifeel like we have rather a missed opportunity, more so in the first innings than anything when you look at the position we found ourselves in at 71—2, we had a good chance to, in hindsight, if we had even got 200, you know, that would have been a very good score on that wicket, and the game would look completely different. so it is something we've got to learn from, we've got to get better and we've got to keep looking at finding a way of scoring runs on surfaces like this,
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but it is very challenging. scotland's game with france in the six nations on sunday has been postponed, after another positive case in the french squad taking the number of players with the virus to 11. training has been suspended with the entire group in isolation. organisers say a new date will be arranged in due course but scotland could be without a number of their regulars if the game is moved to a date outside of the international window. former scotland international johnnie beattie, who's based in france, thinks it's important the match goes ahead. french media are saying potentially the week after france— wales, the last six nations game, and then july, so on the end of the top 1a season over here which could finish mid june, so looking at latejune, earlyjuly, but that also clashes with summer tours, british lions tours, as there are lots of things in place so it is not going to be easy but i think everyone just want to see this game finished properly. nobody wants to see a 28—0 victory for scotland. everyone wants to see
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the game played. george north will win his 100th wales cap when they play england in cardiff on saturday as they go for the triple crown. he's been recalled to the starting line—up, after missing the win over scotland with a foot injury. centerjonathan davies is also back from injury for wales who've won both their matches played... hookerjamie george returns to the england starting line—up after being dropped following the defeat to scotland in their opening match. there's a blow for eddiejones though — lock courtney lawes is out with a chest injury. ireland skipperjohnny sexton returns for their match against italy along with vice—captainjames ryan — they've both recovered from head injuries. ireland make seven changes for the match in rome after their worst ever start to a six nations campaign. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. that's bbc.co.uk/sport. i will say that i must admit i was
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expecting you to lead with a cricket which shows how little i know! thank you so much. conspiracy, cover—up and corruption — just some of the allegations and accusations being flung around the scottish parliament today. both labour and the conservatives have rounded on first minister nicola sturgeon, raising questions over when she first knew about the sexual harassment claims against her one—time friend, mentor and predecessor alex salmond — and whether she misled the parliament about key dates. our scotland editor sarah smith reports. when alex salmond gives evidence tomorrow in public in front of a holyrood enquiry he will make absolutely explosive allegations claiming there was a high—level plot, a high—level conspiracy to destroy him and accusing nicola sturgeon of lying to parliament, something she completely denies. today in parliament, she was facing allegations her government's trying to conceal evidence. two old friends, who are now calling each other liars. mr salmond has set out his version
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of events in written evidence to a holyrood enquiry, some parts of which have now been removed for legal reasons, including his claim that nicola sturgeon is not telling the truth about when she first learned of sexual harassment complaints against him. scottish conservatives think they smell conspiracy. does the first minister understand why the public, to the public, this looks like a cover—up, when the exact evidence that has redacted is the most damaging to her personally? nicola sturgeon firmly denies any kind of government interference with evidence submitted to the holyrood enquiry. the scrutiny of me is, as i said earlier, it is important, necessary, entirely legitimate. what is not legitimate is to pursue a conspiracy theory, a scorched earth policy, that threatens the reputation and integrity of scotland's independentjustice institutions, just because you happen to dislike this government.
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nicola sturgeon originally told parliament that the first she knew of harassment complaints against alex salmond was on the 2nd of april 2018 when he told her at a meeting in her home. she later had to admit she had forgotten about another meeting on the 29th of march with salmond's former chief of staff, in which he says the complaints were discussed. and then admit she'd been told about separate allegations of sexual misconduct by mr salmond in november 2017. if it is determined that she's misled parliament, she will be expected to resign. certain paragraphs of alex salmond's written evidence have been edited out because the prosecution service said they had grave concerns that they could identify one of the women who accused alex salmond of sexual assault. opposition parties are suspicious because these are also paragraphs in which alex salmond accuses nicola sturgeon of not telling the truth. we have seen this week- that there is something rotten at the core of the snp. and it is poisoning our.
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democratic institutions. what is poisoning our democratic institutions, in my view, are politicians standing up and hurling assertions and accusations without a shred of evidence... applause ..to back them up. nicola sturgeon says she doesn't believe alex salmond will be able to produce any evidence to prove his claims when he appears before the holyrood enquiry tomorrow. she will give evidence next week. sarah smith, bbc news, glasgow. to the us now — where pop superstar lady gaga, is reportedly offering half a million dollars in reward for the return of two dogs. they were stolen by a gunman who shot her dog—walker in los angeles. this is where the shooting took place in hollywood — just before 6am local. the dog walker is being treated in hospital and is apparently recovering well. we think that the french bulldog on the right was stolen. and that the blag dog in the picture — called miss asia —
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managed to escape. it's not clear whether lady gaga's dogs were specifically targeted in the attack. french bulldogs are a sought—after breed in the us. let's speak to our correspondent in los angeles, peter bowes. hejoins in is live now. so, brings up—to—date, peter, especially in terms of the actual condition of the dog walking himself.— dog walking himself. well, yes, we know that he _ dog walking himself. well, yes, we know that he was _ dog walking himself. well, yes, we know that he was shot _ dog walking himself. well, yes, we know that he was shot multiple - dog walking himself. well, yes, we i know that he was shot multiple times in the chest, he was taken to hospital with serious injuries. we haven't actually had an update on the last few hours regarding his condition. some reports suggest he will survive those gunshot wounds but clearly it was a very violent attack by, again reports vary on this, by one or two people. certainly he was shot by at least one man who, according to reports, was carrying a semiautomatic handgun, so a violent attack, as you say. one of the dogs managed to
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escape but the attackers got away with two of the other dogs, which has prompted this reported half $1 million award from lady gaga for any information, no questions asked, with leading to the return of these dogs. we know that she is very very close to these animals. she has been photographed with the many times and sometimes takes in with them out of the country and is actually out of the country at the moment shooting a movie in rome but by all accounts is very distressed by all accounts is very distressed by this. do by all accounts is very distressed b this. ,., by all accounts is very distressed b this. ~ ., ., , by this. do we know if the dogs were tar: eted by this. do we know if the dogs were targeted because _ by this. do we know if the dogs were targeted because it _ by this. do we know if the dogs were targeted because it was _ by this. do we know if the dogs were targeted because it was obvious - by this. do we know if the dogs were targeted because it was obvious that j targeted because it was obvious that they were lady gaga's but is it the reed itself it is particularly sought after in the us? that reed itself it is particularly sought after in the us? that is the key question _ sought after in the us? that is the key question and _ sought after in the us? that is the key question and we _ sought after in the us? that is the key question and we don't - sought after in the us? that is the key question and we don't know i sought after in the us? that is the l key question and we don't know the answer to that question. whether these dogs were targeted because they were the dogs of lady gaga or, in what seems perhaps more likely because it has happened before, that these dogs were targeted because they are french bulldogs, they are very much in demand, they are very
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expensive, anything from 2000 for a puppy, expensive, anything from 2000 for a puppy. and expensive, anything from 2000 for a puppy, and that is largely because this particular breed is very difficult to breed. artificial insemination is required to get the female pregnant and to deliver the puppy female pregnant and to deliver the puppy is normally a c—section is involved and that is because of the physical characteristics of this particular breed. —— anything from $2000 from a puppy. they have got very large shoulders and a white head which mean that the birth is difficult which all adds to the vet costs involved and consequently the price tag on a puppy. costs involved and consequently the price tag on a puppy-_ price tag on a puppy. thank you for brinuain is price tag on a puppy. thank you for bringing is up-to-date. _ price tag on a puppy. thank you for bringing is up-to-date. our- bringing is up—to—date. our correspondence in la. the supermarket chain asda says it has begun consulting with workers over a major restructuring of the business which could put about 5,000 jobs at risk, including 3,000 supportjobs. the company says the restructuring has been driven by the "structural shift" in shopping habits
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during the pandemic. proposed cuts would include in areas such as cash management, where there is less work as more people shop online. the company says it plans to create 4,500 jobs as it expands its online offering. well, let's talk to catherine shuttleworth, who's the founder and chief executive of the retail analyst firm, savvy marketing. what you make of this decision, this restructuring decision by asda and talk us with the specificjobs that they are focusing on. i talk us with the specific “obs that they are focusing on._ talk us with the specific “obs that they are focusing on. i don't think it is a greats _ they are focusing on. i don't think it is a greats shock, _ they are focusing on. i don't think it is a greats shock, vary, - they are focusing on. i don't think it is a greats shock, vary, but - they are focusing on. i don't think it is a greats shock, vary, but as i j it is a greats shock, vary, but as i at having to reshape the business. to give some context of this we have just done some research and we have seen that 60% of adults have bought food online in the last 12 months and... percent of adults in the country have shut with asda. as there is based on having a stall to state that serve people in supermarket but through the pandemic we have wanted to change the way that we shot particularly for food and that has continued at a massive pace and as we are now saying today
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what we need to do is change some of the jobs what we need to do is change some of thejobs in the what we need to do is change some of the jobs in the shops and make those jobs more online focused so jobs like driving delivery vans, picking people's shopping for them in stores, as opposed to jobs whether you to cash in supermarkets. those that need it as much as they used to be. white like we are talking about thousands ofjobs. what is the overall proportion in terms of the number of employees asda has? as replies 100,000 people, very big business, one of the biggest businesses in the uk, so this is a relatively small proportion but of course that does not matter if you will are one of the people that is put at risk. they are hoping that it will even out and make the same amount ofjobs. what they are doing is making positions redundant and saying they need different kinds of jobs for the future because retail is changing at an end and speed. i think the never before have we seen the pace of change change so much. —— changing at an enormous speed. as
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to have increased their online shopping by around 90% through the last year and that is a huge change to the structure of their business. and when it comes to the potential of retraining do you think that is something that is relatively easy lead on? it is usually traumatic if you are facing this position but is it something that people can look towards? �* , ., towards? and yet, there are alternative _ towards? and yet, there are alternative roles _ towards? and yet, there are alternative roles that - towards? and yet, there arej alternative roles that people towards? and yet, there are - alternative roles that people can move towards. it doesn't suit everybody but i think what they are hoping to do is redeploy people across the businesses they can, that will be the first choice, and make sure that they save as many people as possible. this isn't about losing jobs, it is aboutjust changing the kind ofjobs and it is possible to retain the right. the kind of jobs and it is possible to retain the right.— kind of jobs and it is possible to retain the right. the company is havin: a retain the right. the company is having a bit _ retain the right. the company is having a bit of— retain the right. the company is having a bit of a _ retain the right. the company is having a bit of a time _ retain the right. the company is having a bit of a time for- retain the right. the company is having a bit of a time for it. - retain the right. the company is| having a bit of a time for it. they had that failed sainsbury�*s takeover and of course a pandemic. what you think the future is for the brand name of asda? it think the future is for the brand name of asda?_ think the future is for the brand name of asda? , ., . name of asda? it is quite a exciting time faster— name of asda? it is quite a exciting time faster because _ name of asda? it is quite a exciting time faster because they _ name of asda? it is quite a exciting
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time faster because they did - name of asda? it is quite a exciting time faster because they did have l name of asda? it is quite a exciting time faster because they did have a failed bid to sainsbury�*s but they are now having two british brothers who are taking as demand, moving away from walmart and it is going to be a change. these are brothers who own most of the forecourt businesses on petrol stations in the uk so i think we can see some change at asda but some real strength in terms of how we're going to develop and change the shape of their business is showing today for a more modern way of shopping because there are some things in the pandemic that are not not going to change back in one of them is going to be that our petite for online shopping is going to continue to grow and grow. —— our appetite for online shopping. good to net our appetite for online shopping. good to get your insight, _ appetite for online shopping. good to get your insight, found a savvy marketing. back now to the news that borisjohnson has described plans for gcse and a—levels grades to be decided by teachers in england as a " good com promise" last summer thousands of a—level students had their results downgraded by a controversial algorithm, prompting a major u—turn. but concerns have been raised that the measures will result in grade inflation. but let's speak now to a student who's worried she won't get
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the grades she needs. daisy whymark joins us from norfolk with her dad, paul. thank from norfolk with her dad, paul. you very much bo have thank you very much both lovely to have you both on. daisy talk us through your concerns with your particular situation.— particular situation. basically, i am hoping _ particular situation. basically, i am hoping to — particular situation. basically, i am hoping to study _ particular situation. basically, i am hoping to study japanese i particular situation. basically, ij am hoping to study japanese at am hoping to studyjapanese at oxford in september and to do that, i need three a's and i'm really concerned that i want to get those grades basically because i did my marks in december, i'm really worried that those will be taken into account particularly the lower grades which might pull down my whole great essentially. because i was preparing for oxford at that point, they were not a fair reflection and i was doing a lot of preparation for oxford and i did not have time to study as much as i have done. i have time to study as much as i have done. , .,
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have time to study as much as i have done. i. ., ., �*, done. i feel your pain and that's because my _ done. i feel your pain and that's because my predicted _ done. i feel your pain and that's because my predicted grades i done. i feel your pain and that's i because my predicted grades were terrible and made me focus on the exams. when you had the opportunity to talk to teachers, do you understand how it will work with coursework and how you will be able to pick up on that? to coursework and how you will be able to pick up on that?— to pick up on that? to be honest, and know my _ to pick up on that? to be honest, and know my teachers _ to pick up on that? to be honest, and know my teachers seemed i and know my teachers seemed relatively uncertain too and makes the situation so much more stressful. the uncertainty has been going on for so long now and itjust makes things so much more difficult than they already are if learning online wasn't hard enough, this makes it ten times worse. it is an unpredictable _ makes it ten times worse. it is an unpredictable time _ makes it ten times worse. it is an unpredictable time and _ makes it ten times worse. it is an unpredictable time and firstly - makes it ten times worse. it is an | unpredictable time and firstly paul it is a difficult time but i have to say congratulations, incredibly inspiring daughter who will be reading japanese at oxford. wow, amazing stuff. but talk us through because you must be as anxious as daisy when it comes to the next moves and a future process going forward. . , moves and a future process going forward. ., , ., , forward. yeah, it is really nerve-racking. _ forward. yeah, it is really nerve-racking. i- forward. yeah, it is really nerve-racking. ifeel- forward. yeah, it is really - nerve-racking. i feel especially nerve—racking. ! feel especially guilty— nerve—racking. i feel especially guilty because i said to her back in
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december— guilty because i said to her back in december when she was about to do her mock— december when she was about to do her mock exams, don't worry about your marks, — her mock exams, don't worry about your marks, you've got your interviews — your marks, you've got your interviews with oxford in a few days and in _ interviews with oxford in a few days and in a _ interviews with oxford in a few days and in a couple days' time, she had her marks— and in a couple days' time, she had her marks on— and in a couple days' time, she had her marks on the 4th of december in one subject — her marks on the 4th of december in one subject and interviews on the ninth _ one subject and interviews on the ninth and — one subject and interviews on the ninth and 10th of december with oxford _ ninth and 10th of december with oxford so — ninth and 10th of december with oxford so i said concentrate on getting — oxford so i said concentrate on getting ready for that. and by the way, _ getting ready for that. and by the way, we — getting ready for that. and by the way, we just watch the education secretary— way, we just watch the education secretary gavin williamson on tv assuring — secretary gavin williamson on tv assuring us that you are going to be doing _ assuring us that you are going to be doing real— assuring us that you are going to be doing real exams next year injune. and he _ doing real exams next year injune. and he kept— doing real exams next year injune. and he kept on giving that assurance i’ilht and he kept on giving that assurance right up— and he kept on giving that assurance right up beyond and through christmas and then out of the blue says. _ christmas and then out of the blue says. "no. — christmas and then out of the blue says, "no, we change the system." and then _ says, "no, we change the system." and then she — says, "no, we change the system." and then she started to worry that her nfarks— and then she started to worry that her marks which she didn't do badly end. her marks which she didn't do badly end she _ her marks which she didn't do badly end. she got a c in one of them but
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did absolutely no revision partly because — did absolutely no revision partly because i— did absolutely no revision partly because i said they are marks, there is a clue _ because i said they are marks, there is a clue in _ because i said they are marks, there is a clue in the title. to then have it turn— is a clue in the title. to then have it turn around and say well we are actually _ it turn around and say well we are actually going to use some of the nfock_ actually going to use some of the mock result to determine your grade, it is like _ mock result to determine your grade, it is like she _ mock result to determine your grade, it is like she has been conned. we've — it is like she has been conned. we've been conned. we feel very angry— we've been conned. we feel very angry about it and very worried because — angry about it and very worried because she contacted the school today— because she contacted the school today and — because she contacted the school today and the deputy head teacher replied _ today and the deputy head teacher replied saying they still don't know and gave _ replied saying they still don't know and gave some idea that we might know— and gave some idea that we might know more — and gave some idea that we might know more by easter on what the portfolio — know more by easter on what the portfolio of evidence will be. and that's— portfolio of evidence will be. and that's an — portfolio of evidence will be. and that's an appalling situation to be in at the — that's an appalling situation to be in at the end of february when they've — in at the end of february when they've had so many months to sort this out _ they've had so many months to sort this out we — they've had so many months to sort this out. ~ .., they've had so many months to sort this out. ~ ., , , they've had so many months to sort thisout. i, , this out. we can absolutely sense our this out. we can absolutely sense your frustration. _ this out. we can absolutely sense your frustration. and _ this out. we can absolutely sense your frustration. and as _ this out. we can absolutely sense your frustration. and as any - this out. we can absolutely sense | your frustration. and as any parent can feel the pain that you would advise this but you were going along
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the lines of what the government at that point was a saying, paul. daisy you had to submit essays to oxford. what that get taken into consideration, will your teachers be able to see that? i consideration, will your teachers be able to see that?— consideration, will your teachers be able to see that? i hope so because i ut a lot able to see that? i hope so because i put a lot of— able to see that? i hope so because i put a lot of effort _ able to see that? i hope so because i put a lot of effort and _ able to see that? i hope so because i put a lot of effort and work- able to see that? i hope so because i put a lot of effort and work into i i put a lot of effort and work into them, and i used quite a lot of my time that i wasn't able to spend revising. but they have not told us and i do not think that the teachers know to be fair on them and there has been really no clarity on what will be and won't be used and what choice we have. there is so much uncertainty. choice we have. there is so much uncertainty-— choice we have. there is so much uncertain . . ., , , , , uncertainty. and we absolutely sense our uncertainty. and we absolutely sense your frustration _ uncertainty. and we absolutely sense your frustration and _ uncertainty. and we absolutely sense your frustration and disappointment, | your frustration and disappointment, paul, dizzy, glisten as and when things go forward, we will have to come back to find out how this all works. congratulations daisy for your study to read japanese at oxford. what a fantastic
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achievement. all you must be very proud, thank you forjoining us. very much so, thank you. european leaders are meeting to work out how to speed up the roll—out of vaccines across the continent. the european commission has been heavily criticised for taking longer than some nations to orderjabs. this is what the president of the european council charles michel had to say. our priority now is speeding up the production and delivery of vaccines and vaccinations across the european union. and it's why we support the commission's efforts to work with industry to identify and guarantee supply chains and scale up production. and we want more predictability and transparency to ensure that pharmaceutical companies comply with their commitments. at a hearing at the european parliament, the ceo of astrazeneca, explained why vaccine production is taking longer than expected. it's to do with a lower yield, lower productivity
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than we expected, unfortunately. some sites have ramped up very quickly, and other sites have been a little slower. and so this question of yield has impacted our ability to deliver the volume we were looking forfor the eu. last week we reported on the plight of princess latifa who says she is being held captive by her father sheikh mohammed, the ruler of dubai. now, in a letter obtained by the bbc, she has appealed to uk police to re—investigate the kidnapping of her older sister — princess shamsa — from a cambridge street more than 20 years ago. a police investigation at the time was closed — and there have been questions about why that happened. our correspondent nawal al—maghafi has been following the story. sheikh mohammed rashid al maktoum — the billionaire ruler of dubai and one of the most powerful men in the middle east.
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last week, the bbc released secret recordings of his daughter, princess latifa. i'm a hostage, and this villa has been converted into a jail, all the windows are barred shut, i can't open any window... in them, she claims he is responsible for her abduction and imprisonment. the messages sparked international concerns. but latifa is not the only daughter of sheikh mohammed to try to escape. 20 years ago, her sister shamsa ran away from the family estate in surrey. in 2000, my sister shamsa, while she was on holiday in england, she was 18 years old, going on 19, she ran away. so, yeah, after two months, they found her. the police launched an investigation, but it hit a dead end. now the bbc has obtained an exclusive letter written by princess latifa from her captivity. in it, a plea to reopen her sister's case. the letter, delivered
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by her friends yesterday to cambridgeshire police, says... cambridgeshire police have told us the letter will be considered in their ongoing review of shamsa's case. we have pieced together shamsa's extraordinary story. she was a passionate horse rider and loved spending summers at her father's estate in the surrey countryside. shamsa was cheeky, liked to push all the boundaries. and she wasn't what you would call "a princess", you know? she was full of life and adventure. she dreamt of going to university but says that her father wouldn't allow it. so in the summer of the year 2000, she drove a black range rover to the edge of the estate, and she ran away.
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after shamsa escaped her father's estate in longcross, she lived as a free woman for around two months. she then checked into this hotel in cambridge. suddenly, herfather�*s operatives arrived, and she was captured. by sam the next morning, she was on a helicopter to northern france, where she was transferred to a private jet that took her to dubai. six months later, from her captivity in dubai, shamsa managed to get word of what happened to her to a lawyer in the uk who contacted the police. dci david beck received the news. it's not every day that| an allegation involving a head of state lands - on a police officer's desk. in 2001, dc! david beck needed to go to dubai to speak to shamsa. he applied through the crown prosecution service. and that's effectively where my investigation came to an end, i because a short while later, i was informed that my- request had been declined. he was later told by a senior
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colleague that the investigation had some significant sensitivities. the london office of the princess's father, sheikh mohammed al maktoum, had contacted the fco about this. the foreign office told us that the investigation was conducted by cambridgeshire police. and that they had no role in the investigation or its outcome. but they declined to answer any of our questions about the communication between them and sheikh mohammed al maktoum's office. shamsa was kept locked up for the next eight years. she was then released from confinement, but her life remained heavily controlled. we spoke to someone who had regular contact with after she was released. she was tranquillised all the time. everything she did was controlled. there was no spark in shamsa any more. there was no fight in her. and i understand that people can't get their head around it. theyjust see some rich girl. it's not like that at all.
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it's horrific. the uae government maintain that shamsa and latifa are cherished and adored by their family. they are yet to prove that they are still alive and well. nawal al—maghafi, bbc news. the head of network rail has warned that the old pattern of five days of peak commuter travel may not return. sir peter hendy was speaking at the national rail recovery conference today. he said around 10% fewer train services should run once the country opens up again, compared to the pre—pandemic timetable. as many would—be commuters are still working from home. he suggested commuter traffic could return to 80% of pre—pandemic level and instead, leisure travel might boost weekend traffic, especially if limits on international travel continue. rail minister, chris heaton—harris, also acknowledged that commuting was not going to return to previous levels quickly. he said that this is the new normal and train services need to fundamentally change.
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mr heaton—harris added that without a concerted cross—industry effort passengers might not return. welljoining me now is philip haigh, rail writer and former deputy editor of rail magazine. good to have you with us. so anybody who has been on an overcrowded train unable to get a seat, is that all a thing of the past on this 10% cut services at the way forward? certainly overcrowded trains at the moment are a thing of the pass, about 15% of people travelling compared to pre—covid. i think it would take time for rail passengers to return so that the railways as a result of all of this does not need to run so many trains, and if it does that and if it can trim the number down, the remaining trains, the 90% say that are left should run
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more punctually and that is something the rail industry has been looking to do for a very long time. so do you consider that we will never have those huge platforms of people just overcrowded trying to get onto a train? more people will be working from home? because we heard from the goldman sachs boss earlier saying remote working as a new normal is something that isn't normal, things will eventually return to normal eventually. i suspect they might. goldman sachs say one thing, of the big companies, i think are going to continue encouraging people to work from home but i think over time we will see commuter numbers return. i think in the shorter term there is a real pent—up demand for leisure travel escaping to see friends and relatives, going to the seaside, whatever it is. people will be keen to escape from the four walls that they have been staring at for the
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past few months. leisure travel should bounce back sharply. ii rare should bounce back sharply. if we are talking _ should bounce back sharply. if we are talking about _ should bounce back sharply. if we are talking about leisure travel, what about those season tickets, what about those season tickets, what will happen with those, people who spent a fortune to get into work? ii who spent a fortune to get into work? , ., ., ,, who spent a fortune to get into work? , ., ., ., ., who spent a fortune to get into work? , ., ., ,, ., ., work? if they are working from home, the won't work? if they are working from home, they won't need _ work? if they are working from home, they won't need to _ work? if they are working from home, they won't need to season _ work? if they are working from home, they won't need to season ticket - work? if they are working from home, they won't need to season ticket at i they won't need to season ticket at all. if they are going in forjust a couple of days a week for example, they may have to pay a much higher daily rate and buy a day return toward the rail industry could get around to developing part—time season tickets which is a something it has been talking about for an awful long time but has never actually managed to deliver it particularly and has not really convinced the department for transport and the treasury that it is a cost—effective option from the taxpayers perspective. it is is a cost-effective option from the taxpayers perspective.— taxpayers perspective. it is the ticket that _ taxpayers perspective. it is the ticket that pays _ taxpayers perspective. it is the ticket that pays for _ taxpayers perspective. it is the ticket that pays for the - taxpayers perspective. it is the ticket that pays for the service | taxpayers perspective. it is the i ticket that pays for the service so if fewer people are using and how will the chain services finance themselves?—
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will the chain services finance themselves? , ., _ themselves? they will grow by -- rely more — themselves? they will grow by -- rely more heavily _ themselves? they will grow by -- rely more heavily on _ themselves? they will grow by -- rely more heavily on taxpayers i rely more heavily on taxpayers because at the moment they it is a mix of taxpayers and subscribers in ordinary years who pay. at the moment it is almost entirely taxpayers paying. the railway will need to attract people back, shift that bounce away from taxpayers. but i think ultimately, the rail network in britain will always rely on some level of taxpayers support. stand in britain will always rely on some level of taxpayers support.- level of taxpayers support. and if ou are level of taxpayers support. and if you are talking — level of taxpayers support. and if you are talking about _ level of taxpayers support. and if you are talking about getting - level of taxpayers support. and if you are talking about getting people back to using trance say at weekends, what is going to happen with those legendary infamous weekend engineering works? that will have to shift. weekend engineering works? that will have to shift-— have to shift. yes, network rail are auoin to have to shift. yes, network rail are going to have _ have to shift. yes, network rail are going to have to _ have to shift. yes, network rail are going to have to find _ have to shift. yes, network rail are going to have to find another - have to shift. yes, network rail are going to have to find another time | going to have to find another time of the week to do this work. it may be midweek, maybe wednesday nights, thursday nights. do it then instead to keep the tracks clear and open for people to travel at the weekend.
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it is quite a fundamental change and it will take quite a bit of effort from network rail to achieve this. certainly one to watch the new normal. philip haigh, railwriter, thank you so much. the pharmaceutical giant boots, has announced plans to cut hundreds more jobs from its nottingham headquarters. the firm blames changing consumer habits because of the impact of covid—19. from nottingham, nicola gilroy report. it is the latest book first step at a high street staple hit hard by changing habits caused by the pandemic. back injuly the company said they would need to cut 4000 jobs winning a retail revolution on covid—19. and now it for the 300 jobs are at risk here at head office affecting support office staff, reducing roles there by 10%. and it all centres around how the pandemic has changed the way we shop will stop despite good online sales performance commas group sales have
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it bite nearly 17% betweenjune and august and football has remained significantly lower. in a statement, boots managing director told us "the events of last year have change consumer behaviours forever and we must adapt our business to meet these newton means. this means investing in our digital business, serving customers more efficiently and above are becoming more swifter and above are becoming more swifter and more agile." no store, pharmacy or optician jobs and more agile." no store, pharmacy or opticianjobs will be and more agile." no store, pharmacy or optician jobs will be cut during the restructuring and a 45 day consultation period is not expected to take place. but unions say it is devastating news for staff and are calling for talks to make sure their voices are heard during the process. overall, the aim is that nottingham —based boots can keep up with a rapidly evolving retail landscape. nicola gilroy, bbc east midlands today, nottingham.
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the struggle young adults with learning disabilities face has been in the spotlight this week, after the radio 2 dj jo whiley shared her anguish when her younger sister was admitted to northampton general with covid—19. frances — who has a rare genetic disorder wasn't on the priority list for the vaccine, despite her condition. data from public health england suggests young adults with learning difficulties — like frances — are 30 times more likely to die with covid, than other healthy young adults. frances has now recovered, with the government promising all adults on the learning disability register will now be prioritised. the family have been speaking to helen mulroy. she'd nearly knocked somebody over, knocked a load of equipment over, you know, just fighting everything. lay prone on the floor and freaked some of the patients out there. they were trying to get her to wear, you know, the nasal cannula and that just comes straight out immediately.
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then they tried, like, the normal oxygen mask, but, again, she just throws it away. christine whiley explaining the struggles her daughter frances faced as she was treated last week at northampton general hospitalfor covid—19. there we were, her on the bed, me on one of those hospital chairs, leaning over her, you know, holding this mask or trying to hold this mask. ijust kept asking, "well, what's another alternative "to try and get oxygen in?" "surely there's more than just a mask?" and they went no. christine praised the nurses and doctors but was shocked by the lack of provision more widely across the nhs when it came to treating those with learning disabilities who present challenging behaviour. and they, sort of, were saying to me that really frances wouldn't be able to cope with going into intensive care. you know, just because of the way she was, and i understood that, but it was sort of...a blow because they couldn't
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offer anything else. so, we could send her home with palliative care. i was just dumbfounded when they said that. you know, i couldn't take it in. ijust said, "are you saying she's going to die?" i mean, ijust sobbed and sobbed. and in the morning her sisters and said we're not going to have that, we're going to fight for her as much as we can, and then they tried to make up a sort of an oxygen tent. well, she rang up great ormond street, birmingham hospital, a museum even, you know, trying to find something, and there just wasn't anything. a public health england report last year showed people with a learning disability are six times more likely to die from covid—19, and those aged 18 to 34 were 30 times more at risk. frances' story came to prominence after her sister, radio 2 dj jo wiley, was offered the covid vaccine before her, despite the fact that frances lives in residential care and has diabetes. her campaign led to the government
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and the jvci changing their stance yesterday. now, 150,000 people with severe disabilities will be offered the jab. fortunately, it's a happy ending for frances, who spoke with me earlier and was making a good recovery. nice to meet you. she said, are you happy to be home? yeah! but christine feels access to the vaccine alone isn't enough and hopes sharing their experience will highlight the health inequalities faced by those with learning disabilities. it's not going to be enough. as i say, it does need change in hospitals. the nursing staff were absolutely fantastic, but when it got to, you know, what other treatment we could give out, it just wasn't there. it was my worst nightmare that she was there because i knew of the problems that would come. helen mulroy, bbc news. good to see she is making a full recovery and
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following on from that — we have a statement from the nhs... "we are continuing to support people with a learning disability requiring "hospital care for covid—19, including alternatives for those "who struggle with oxygen masks. "supporting people with a learning disability "is a priority for the nhs — during the pandemic we have made "sure that learning disability experts can continue "to provide quality care". zookeepers have compiled the world's largest collection of thermal images of elephants — which show the animals as they play, eat and hang out in their enclosure at whipsnade zoo. the 30,000 photographs are part of a conservation project to help save the lives of both endangered elephants and humans. helen briggs reports. elephants posing for photos at whipsnade zoo. but they look very different through a thermal camera. 30,000 selfies that are notjust incredible to look at, but a vital conservation tool. it is truly an elephantcam. it's made by elephants themselves. they've taken the photo
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with us, and it now works. it detects elephants confidently at a certain distance. and we want to get this into the field now, and actually put it in the wild, helping wild elephants and communities live side by side. the images are being used to train a camera to recognise the shape of an elephant from its body heat. it'll be able to identify when an elephant�*s close by, even in the dark, and send an alert. humans and elephants are being forced into ever closer contact, as the human population grows and wild habitat disappears. this can end in trashed crops, damaged property and the loss of lives. elephants are struggling internationally in numbers, both in asia and africa and we find ourselves with ever decreasing numbers, and when it comes to human, elephant conflict, this is only likely to increase due to climate change and if you are a subsistence farmer bordering a protected area, an elephant coming in at night and destroying your livelihood for the next year is fairly dramatic.
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it's hoped the new technology will be an affordable solution to helping wildlife and humans live in harmony, and help protect endangered species. helen briggs, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. hello there. hello there, it's been another mild day across the uk. however compared with yesterday where we had that extreme heat for february when temperatures got to pretty crazy levels, really, with highs up to 18 celsius — well, today, it has been fresher. temperatures down to about 12 celsius which is still about three or 4 degrees celsius above average for the time of year. now that change was brought about by this area of cloud, this area of light patchy rain. it's a weather front, a cold front. and behind that, the air has been fresher. seen a few showers for scotland and northern ireland, many of us have seen some sunshine as well. so, the temperatures have only just been above normal across parts of england
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byjust a few degrees celsius. across europe meanwhile, the deeper the reds show you where the really unusual warmth is and it's been pretty widespread. over recent days, a number of cities have set all—time records for february. the weather has been very unusual there. overnight tonight, pressure is going to build across the uk. that means for many of us, the winds will be light and there be clear skies. it's a recipe for turning pretty cold indeed. there will be some patches of frost around, particularly in the countryside but notice northern scotland, frost free. around 5 celsius in stornoway, about 6 in lerwick overnight and the reason for that is you've got thicker cloud and this weather front is going to bring some rain here towards the end of the night and at first on friday as well. now, that rain will tend to push out of the way, the clouds will thin and break up and turn quite a bit brighter. for most of the uk though after a cold and locally frosty start to the day, for many there will be pretty much sunshine from dawn till dusk. it will be a glorious kind of day. and again, mild.
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temperatures 10—12 celsius which is similar to what we had today. now beyond that on into the weekend forecast, this area of high pressure going nowhere very far very fast but we do have weak weather fronts just crossing into this area of high pressure bringing slightly thicker cloud with it across parts of scotland, northern england. could squeeze out a few spots of light patchy rain from that but many again will have more fine weather with for the sunshine to go around. temperatures not really changing very much day by day. again, 10—12 says is fairly wide way, perhaps 14 with some sunshine across the warmest parts of the country in the south—east. beyond that through sunday and into next week, it stays, well, very quiet really. with high pressure in charge, there will be a lot of dry weather. it'll stayjust on the mild side of things. that's your weather.
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this is bbc news — europe is lagging way behind in the vaccine roll—out — so what's the eu to do? first it was issues over supply. now, it's a question of co—ordination. european leaders meet to try and figure out how to speed up the vaccine roll—out, and overcome some people's reluctance to take the astrazeneca jab. i get may four, five, six e—mails every day of nurses, even medical doctors saying they don't want the astrazeneca vaccine, they refuse and they want to wait for a better vaccine. president biden marks america's 50 millionth coronavirus vaccine shot — but it's difficult to persuade people in the hardest—hit communities to take it as a new variant spreads here in new york city.

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