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tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 25, 2021 10:45pm-11:00pm GMT

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putting it, workers when they're working from home in fact they are working from home in fact they are working even harder because you you don't take those breaks, you just work through your lunch, you eat at your desk or you'rejust work through your lunch, you eat at your desk or you're just working, working. where is your gut instinct there? are we ever going to return back if we get over this whole health scenario, if we do get back to normal, will we have those office blocks filled once again? what to normal, will we have those office blocks filled once again?— blocks filled once again? what your instant? it's — blocks filled once again? what your instant? it's so _ blocks filled once again? what your instant? it's so hard _ blocks filled once again? what your instant? it's so hard to _ blocks filled once again? what your instant? it's so hard to say - blocks filled once again? what your instant? it's so hard to say because it does seem to be people are so adamant that i'm not going back. then you speak to more people and they're just desperate to get back. it's very difficult to predictjust what kind of level of normality we will see return. i do think younger people, i would've thought surely there desperate to get out there and mix with people in an office environment or whatever environment they are in. i would've thought it's kind of human nature, isn't it too want to get out there and not be set
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in your bedroom on a laptop. surely to get out and mix with people. from a network real mum who in this story is based on in the telegraph he is predicted up to 40% reduction in commuter levels. and perhaps that is 40s or 50s and you think you've done enough years packed on it train like a sardine paying thousands a pound for the privilege. you may think that's it i'm working from home forever. i think younger people are hungry and desperate to get out there. �* , ., hungry and desperate to get out there. �*, ., . ., . there. it's the element of choice and having _ there. it's the element of choice and having a _ there. it's the element of choice and having a mixture, _ there. it's the element of choice and having a mixture, as- there. it's the element of choice and having a mixture, as well. l there. it's the element of choice i and having a mixture, as well. not having it necessitated. certainly want to watch. the guardian, despair of mask. let's have a look. this is ed teacherjames talking about mask and also test rules without peoples going back. those returning back of course schools have been consistently open for key workers
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but the idea that teachers will be testing and parents to a certain extent testing children for covid. i think this is a really interesting story— think this is a really interesting story and — think this is a really interesting story and a really difficult issue thars— story and a really difficult issue that's been highlighted here for teachers — that's been highlighted here for teachers as they are getting to schooh — teachers as they are getting to schooh if _ teachers as they are getting to school. if you can't make masks compulsory, you're going to feel not terribly— compulsory, you're going to feel not terribly comfortable with being in front of— terribly comfortable with being in front of the class for the kids. and we know_ front of the class for the kids. and we know that facemasks are really important — we know that facemasks are really important when it comes to protecting other people. it's not 'ust protecting other people. it's not just protecting yourself, wearing a facemask— just protecting yourself, wearing a facemask to stop what you're actually — facemask to stop what you're actually doing is protecting other people _ actually doing is protecting other people from what you are breathing out. people from what you are breathing out its— people from what you are breathing out. it's very difficult. and they can't _ out. it's very difficult. and they can't make _ out. it's very difficult. and they can't make him compulsory. and that's— can't make him compulsory. and that's what— can't make him compulsory. and that's what this story is highlighting. the inability to make the testing compulsory. that is the problem _ the testing compulsory. that is the problem for schools here. it�*s problem for schools here. it's interesting. _ problem for schools here. it�*s interesting, isn't it? it's the parents to decide as a parent, i
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know it's going to be interesting to get, yet another thing for a child to do on their way to school, in school. and just encouraging children to wear those mask. not exactly comfortable either. i guess not. it exactly comfortable either. i guess not- it seems _ exactly comfortable either. i guess not. it seems like _ exactly comfortable either. i guess not. it seems like there _ exactly comfortable either. i guess not. it seems like there is - exactly comfortable either. i guess not. it seems like there is high - not. it seems like there is high levels of complaints and among younger children it seems they are adapting quite well to mask and social distancing and all that stuff. maybe it's more when you get to teenage levels and they're a bit more rebellious that you might struggle more. filth. more rebellious that you might struggle more.— more rebellious that you might struggle more. 0h, always those teenagers- _ struggle more. 0h, always those teenagers- we — struggle more. 0h, always those teenagers. we will _ struggle more. 0h, always those teenagers. we will state - struggle more. 0h, always those teenagers. we will state with - struggle more. 0h, always those| teenagers. we will state with the guardian but we will look at climate change. james, the headline is that we are risking triggering a tipping point this century. this is according to a co—author of a study about the fears of what climate change is doing. if about the fears of what climate change is doing.— about the fears of what climate change is doing. if you look at the science and _ change is doing. if you look at the science and if _ change is doing. if you look at the science and if you _ change is doing. if you look at the science and if you look _ change is doing. if you look at the science and if you look at - change is doing. if you look at the science and if you look at the - science and if you look at the climate — science and if you look at the climate science what we are being
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told, _ climate science what we are being told. and — climate science what we are being told, and this is science, this is not speculation it is scientific research _ not speculation it is scientific research that is showing us this that we — research that is showing us this that we are going to see some extreme — that we are going to see some extreme events. what this story is talking _ extreme events. what this story is talking about is a change in the atiantic— talking about is a change in the atlantic weather system. and the result _ atlantic weather system. and the result of— atlantic weather system. and the result of that will be to make britain's _ result of that will be to make britain's winter and off a lot colder _ britain's winter and off a lot colder. we've just been through this really— colder. we've just been through this really nasty — colder. we've just been through this really nasty cold snap. what were talking _ really nasty cold snap. what were talking about is britain looking something more like canada with warmer— something more like canada with warmer summers perhaps colder winters — warmer summers perhaps colder winters i— warmer summers perhaps colder winters. i think thisjust underlines the point that the climate _ underlines the point that the climate crisis is every bit as serious _ climate crisis is every bit as serious as— climate crisis is every bit as serious as the covid crisis. and it's going — serious as the covid crisis. and it's going to be a slower burn but it's going to be a slower burn but it's going — it's going to be a slower burn but it's going to be a slower burn but it's going to be a slower burn but it's going to be with us for a lot longer — it's going to be with us for a lot loner. ~ it's going to be with us for a lot [on . er. ~ ., it's going to be with us for a lot loner. ~ . , , it's going to be with us for a lot loner. . . , , ., longer. we hear experts say that it will be even _ longer. we hear experts say that it will be even more _ longer. we hear experts say that it will be even more difficult - longer. we hear experts say that it will be even more difficult to - longer. we hear experts say that it will be even more difficult to get . will be even more difficult to get over the coronavirus when it comes to these extreme weather conditions. that this is being generated, the changes in the climate that we are
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experiencing. changes in the climate that we are exneriencing-_ changes in the climate that we are exneriencing-— experiencing. yeah, we're 'ust not built for it experiencing. yeah, we're 'ust not buntforrtasfi experiencing. yeah, we're 'ust not built for it as a h experiencing. yeah, we're 'ust not built for it as a country, h experiencing. yeah, we're just not built for it as a country, are - experiencing. yeah, we're just not built for it as a country, are we? l experiencing. yeah, we're just not built for it as a country, are we? i | built for it as a country, are we? i think we've seen from the research that actually for a country like britain that i guess we would find ways to adapt in the end. but we don't want to get to that point. and for poorer countries they will struggle to adapt to these big shots and weather conditions. and it will leave poorer people even, a terrible state. itjust kind of clarifies how action is needed. this state. itjust kind of clarifies how action is needed.— action is needed. as james was sa in: action is needed. as james was saying it's _ action is needed. as james was saying it's the _ action is needed. as james was saying it's the science. - action is needed. as james was saying it's the science. these i saying it's the science. these studies they are. that's our first edition of the papers. we are out of time. as always thanks so much. don't go too far because we will bring you up—to—date with some of the other papers that are coming through and will catch up with you and about half an hour. james, sam thank you. i hope that you all will join us when we get some more of the
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papers has had bbc. hello, i'm tulsen tollett and this is your sports news where we start with the europa league and leicester city have been knocked out by slavia prague in the round of 32. after a goalless first leg last week the opener came five minutes after half time when lukas provod got on the end of a nice cross and then the match was put beyond doubt when abdallah sima struck a long range effort past kasper schmeichel taking the czech republic side through to the last 16 with a 2—0 win. apologies we seem to be having technical issues at the bbc sport center. we are trying to get his audio. as you can see, it wasn't
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quite working. huge apologies for that. but we will try and get back to the team up in bbc sport center. now let's just to the team up in bbc sport center. now let'sjust bring you to the team up in bbc sport center. now let's just bring you up—to—date with something that's happening here in the uk. the pharmacists pseudocode giant boots is plans to cut hundreds ofjobs from its nottingham headquarters. the changing consumer habits because of the impact of covid—i9. from nottingham here's our report. it's the latest blow for his staff and a high—speed staple hit hard by changing habits caused by the pandemic. back injuly the company said there need to cut around for a thousand jobs blaming a retail revolution on covid—i9. and now a further 300 jobs are at risk here at head office. affecting support office staff reducing rose by 10%. and it all centres around how the pandemic has change the way we shop. despite good online sales
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performance group sales have dipped by nearly i7% betweenjune and august. and footfall has remained significantly lower. in a statement boots managing director said james told us the advance of last year had change consumer behaviours forever. and we must adapt our business to meet these new needs. this means investing in our digital business, serving our customers more efficiently and above all, becoming much swifter and more agile. no store pharmacy or optician jobs will be cut during the restructuring and a 45 day consultation. period is now expected to take place. but unions say it's devastating news for staff and are calling for talks to make sure there voices are heard during the process. 0verall sure there voices are heard during the process. overall the aim is that nottingham base boots can keep up with a rapidly evolving retail landscape. the struggle that young
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adults with learning disabilities face has been in the spotlight in recent days after the radio to dj joe whiteley shared her anguish when her younger sister was admitted to hospital with covid—i9. francis who has a genetic disorder wasn't on the priority list for the vaccine despite her condition. data from public health england suggest that young adults with learning difficulties like a francis how are 30 times more likely to die with covid than other healthy young adults. francis has not recovered with the government promising that all adults on the learning disability register will now be prioritised to stop the family have been speaking to helen mulroy. she nearl been speaking to helen mulroy. sue: nearly knocked somebody been speaking to helen mulroy. sie: nearly knocked somebody over. just fighting everything. lying, crying on the floor. they were trying to get her tojust came her to just came straight out
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immediately.— her to just came straight out immediately. her to just came straight out immediatel . . ., , , immediately. then again she 'ust threw it away. i immediately. then again she 'ust threw it away. christine �* immediately. then again she justl threw it away. christine explaining the problem is her daughterface as she was treated last week at northampton general for covid—i9. there was her on the bed me on one of the hospital chairs leaning over her. holding this mask or trying to hold a mask. ijust kept asking what's the alternative to trying get oxygen. surely there's more than just a mask?— oxygen. surely there's more than just a mask? christine praised the nurses but was _ just a mask? christine praised the nurses but was shocked _ just a mask? christine praised the nurses but was shocked by - just a mask? christine praised the nurses but was shocked by the - just a mask? christine praised the| nurses but was shocked by the lack of provision more widely across the nhs when it came to treating those with learning disabilities to present challenging behavior. timer;r present challenging behavior. they were exniaining — present challenging behavior. they were explaining to _ present challenging behavior. tie: were explaining to me that present challenging behavior. tiez1: were explaining to me that —— you know, just because the way she was.
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i understood that. but it was sort of because they could not find anything else. we can send her home. i wasjust dumbfounded anything else. we can send her home. i was just dumbfounded when they said that. i couldn't take it in. i was afraid she was going to die. they came in and said were going to fight as much as we can. and then tried to make and draw up an oxygen tent. well, she rang up great 0rmond street, birmingham hospital, a museum even, you know, trying to find something, and there just wasn't anything. a public health england report last year showed people with a learning disability are six times more likely to die from covid—i9, and those aged 18 to 3a were 30 times more at risk. frances' story came to prominence after her sister, radio 2 dj jo wiley, was offered the covid vaccine before her, despite the fact that frances lives in residential care and has diabetes.
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her campaign led to the government and the jvci changing their stance yesterday. now, 150,000 people with severe disabilities will be offered the jab. fortunately, it's a happy ending for frances, who spoke with me earlier and was making a good recovery. nice to meet you. she said, are you happy to be home? yeah! but christine feels access to the vaccine alone isn't enough and hopes sharing their experience will highlight the health inequalities faced by those with learning disabilities. it's not going to be enough. as i say, it does need change in hospitals. the nursing staff were absolutely fantastic, but when it got to, you know, what other treatment we could give out, it just wasn't there. it was my worst nightmare that she was there because i knew of the problems that would come. helen mulroy, bbc news. following on from that — we have a statement from the nhs: "we are continuing to support people with a learning disability requiring hospital care for covidi9,
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including alternatives for those who struggle with oxygen masks. supporting people with a learning disability is a priority for the nhs — during the pandemic we have made sure that learning disability experts can continue to ?provide quality care." experts can continue to ?provide here's the weather with chris fawkes. hello there. it's been another mild day across the country but not as ridiculous as the temperatures we had yesterday. indeed, yesterday in santon downham, we got up to 18 celsius. well, today it was 12 — still quite a way above average but just not as ridiculously warm as it was yesterday. the extreme heat for february is now more concentrated over into europe. now, looking at the weather picture overnight tonight, high pressure's building in. so the winds will fall lighter, and we'll have clear skies developing widely away from northern scotland where there will be thicker cloud and a little bit of rain. now, that's why the temperatures here will stay above freezing.
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the weather southwards, though, there is a risk of some patches of frost developing just about anywhere, really. it will be a cold night and a cold start to the day on friday for many of us. now, the rain in shetland will tend to move away with brighter skies working in later on. for many though, sunshine from dawn till dusk and after that cold start to the day, we're looking at temperatures of around 10—12 celsius which on the face of it is similar to what we had today. that's your latest weather.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. eu leaders try to speed up their much criticised vaccine programme with the commission president making a bold promise. at the end of the summer, we will have offered to 70% of the population the vaccination, the adult population. with almost a third of people now vaccinated in the uk, queen elizabeth talks for the first about having the coronavirus jab. it is obviously difficult for people if they've never had a vaccine because they want to think about other people rather than themselves. president biden marks america's 50 millionth coronavirus vaccine shot, but some communities remain reluctant to take it.

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