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tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 25, 2021 11:00pm-11:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. eu leaders try to speed up their much criticised vaccine programme with the commission president making a bold promise. at the end of the summer, we will have offered to 70% of the population the vaccination, the adult population. with almost a third of people now vaccinated in the uk, queen elizabeth talks for the first about having the coronavirus jab. it is obviously difficult for people if they've never had a vaccine because they want to think about other people rather than themselves. president biden marks america's 50 millionth coronavirus vaccine shot, but some communities remain reluctant to take it. we have a report from new york city.
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and he's back, as the much loved sitcom �*frasier�* is set to get a reboot. we take a look at a few other shows that are set to get a second life. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. i'm kasia madera. european leaders have agreed to take steps to speed up the vaccination programme and get millions more eu citizens vaccinated. the eu has been criticised for its slow vaccine rollout compared to the us and the uk. 29 million people in the region have had at least one jab so far, just 8% of the adult population. leaders also discussed proposals for a basic vaccine passport to help revive the tourist industry. the european commission president,
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ursula von der leyen, struck an optimistic note about speeding up the rollout programme. we are confident that we are able to reach our goal that at the end of the summer, we will have offered to 70% of the population the vaccination, the adult population. these are 255 million people in the european union, and if we look at the plan figures, this is a goal we're confident we'll reach. as well as supply, some frontline medical workers in france and germany have been reluctant to take the astrazeneca vaccine. this was after germany's medicines agency declined to approve it for use on the over—65s, citing a lack of trial evidence that it was effective on that age—group. but now, the french president emmanuel macron has offered his backing to the astrazeneca vaccine,
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saying he would gladly have the jab himself. our europe correspondent jean mackenzie reports. none of the queues they planned for. inside, chairs sit empty. belgium's largest vaccination centre finally opened last week, but there's barely a person in sight. they have the capacity to vaccinate 5,000 people a day, but today they say they have only done 200, and in the hour that we've been here, we've seen just one person arrive for their vaccination. no, it's a pity that there are not many people. this afternoon it's very quiet, because there are not enough vaccines at this moment in time. it is quite shocking to arrive and see such a huge vaccination centre, and to see it totally empty. is that not disappointing for you? yes, of course it is, but what do you want me to say? of course it's disappointing, but i cannot do anything about it. countries are struggling
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with a shortage of vaccines. many have decided not to use the astrazeneca jab because of the last of evidence causing some, including health care workers, to accuse the vaccine. after a summit with eu leaders, the french presidentjohn�*s to its defence —— jumped. translation: my turn will come. if it were the vaccine — my turn will come. if it were the vaccine i— my turn will come. if it were the vaccine i offered me, i would take it. . . �*, ., ~ , vaccine i offered me, i would take it. france's health minister has even had his _ it. france's health minister has even had his jab— it. france's health minister has even had his jab live _ it. france's health minister has even had his jab live on - it. france's health minister has - even had his jab live on television. some health care workers are unconvinced still. i get maybe four, five, _ six e—mails every day, of nurses, even medical doctors, | saying they don't want the astrazeneca vaccine, - they refuse, and they want to wait for a better vaccine, l which is a bit strange, because that's not really based on solid evidence, or science. it's really based on -
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perception and rumours. mixed messages by governments are partly to blame, governments will have to work hard to get rid of doubts. jean mackenzie, bbc news. in the uk, more than 18 million people have had a first vaccine dose, equivalent to one in three adults here.0ueen elizabeth has spoken for the first time about having it. she urged others to do the same, saying anyone who is nervous should think of others. 0ur royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports. they both had their vaccinations last month, and though the duke is now in hospital being treated for a non—covid infection, the queen, unperturbed, it would seem, by her husband's absence, was earlier this week on a video conference with health officials from across the uk. the vaccination programme had stirred memories. well, having lived in the war, it's very much like that. you know, when everybody had the same idea.
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and i think this has rather sort of inspired that, hasn't it? but how had the queen found her own vaccination? as far as i can make out, it was quite harmless. it was very quick, and i've had lots of letters from people who have been very surprised by how easy it was to get the vaccine. and the jab was very, it didn't hurt at all. there was understanding for people who are nervous of the vaccination, but a reminder that everyone has a responsibility to have it. it is obviously difficult for people if they have never had a vaccine, but they ought to think about other people rather than themselves. and there was a message to the scientist who developed the vaccines, and all the staff who are administering them. it is remarkable how quickly the whole thing has been done, and so many people have had the vaccine already. so you have to keep up the good work. nicholas witchell, bbc news.
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president biden has held a ceremony to mark the vaccination of 50 million americans against the coronavirus. he said the us was weeks ahead of schedule on the path to immunising 100 million people in his first 100 days in office, a key promise he made before his inauguration. but he also said the real challenge will come when the lines outside vaccine centres have evaporated, and supply outstrips demand. the time is coming, may be 60 to 90 days, when the supply is adequate and not enough people can access the shot. to address that, we will launch a massive campaign to educate people about vaccines, that they are safe and where to go to get the shots in the first place. in new york city, once the global epicentre
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of the pandemic, vaccination rates are lowest in the communities where the most people died. and now that a new variant of the virus has been discovered in new york, the effort to persuade people to take the vaccine has intensified. but many people have questions about the science. laura trevelyan reports from the bronx. wanda and her niece sadia have very different views on the coronavirus vaccine. i'm still on the fence about taking the vaccine... wanda's trying to get an appointment, while sadia is wary. it usually takes over two years for a vaccine to be made, and it's been, like, how many months and boom, we have a vaccine. so i just feel like it's too fast for me. wanda is hearing this from her niece and many others, but as a community organiser in the bronx, wanda feels a sense of responsibility. i don't want to be a guinea pig but i also have seen more than 500,000 americans have died of this and it's also important that if i do community work and i'm in the community in the front line, that i also set an example.
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the bronx is reeling from the impact of the pandemic. families have lost loved ones and jobs, and after this turbulent year, doctors are finding people have many questions about the vaccine. well, there's a lot of concern about what is this, how is it going to affect me? is this the government's way of doing something to us? so, that's really the main concern that i find amongst patients. the bronx is the new york city borough with the highest coronavirus death rate. black and hispanic new yorkers here died in disproportionate numbers. yet even though the bronx was hardest hit by coronavirus, it's lagging behind when it comes to people getting the vaccine. so, this mass—vaccination centre at the iconic yankee stadium is an attempt to increase vaccination rates among communities of colour. you have to make an appointment online to be vaccinated here, you can'tjust show up. 80—year—old anthony doesn't
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have a computer and he's been turned away eight times. now i have to go all the way back home and explain to whoever... that i couldn't get an appointment, and that i got to try again. because so many seniors are having difficulty with online appointments, there's a mobile vaccination unit in the bronx that takes the doses directly to elderly people in public housing. but this week, there was a new problem. why are you not vaccinating today? we don't have the supply, and that's a problem _ across the entire state and country. there's lack of supply. if we had the supply, - we would be out vaccinating, not only today, every single day- in public housing around the bronx. wanda's also having trouble getting a vaccination appointment, but she's persisting. i'm a big woman! and i also get high blood pressure, and i could get sick any time, and i don't know if i get sick if i'm going to make it.
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the vaccination effort in the bronx is taking time to get going as concern about vaccine safety, difficulty getting appointments and supply problems, a community which has suffered so much is still struggling. laura trevelyan, bbc news, the bronx. to australia now, where international and domestic pressure is mounting for the country's conservative government to adopt a net—zero carbon target by the middle of the century. but strong opposition remains in parliament to any constraints put on fossil fuel use and exports in australia. president biden�*s climate envoy, john kerry, has publicly acknowledged "differences" between the us and australia in tackling the climate crisis, calling for a faster exit from coal—fired power. australia has been criticised for setting targets that ignored scientific advice, but prime minister scott morrison has always defended his climate policies. let's speak to economics
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professorjohn qwigin from the university of queensland in australian city of brisbane. good to have you with us. just talk us through this struggle for australia to take on net zero targets when it comes to carbon emissions. is there something the country can ever get across? weill. country can ever get across? well, in technical — country can ever get across? well, in technical terms, _ country can ever get across? well, in technical terms, it's _ country can ever get across? well, in technical terms, it's certainly i in technical terms, it's certainly feasible. we have the capacity due to carbonised our supply quite rapidly. and we don't have a power industry... the problems are really political. in industry... the problems are really olitical. . .. , industry... the problems are really olitical. . , ., , political. in that case, as it... what needs — political. in that case, as it... what needs to _ political. in that case, as it...
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what needs to happen - political. in that case, as it... what needs to happen for- political. in that case, as it... what needs to happen for the political climate to step over at? when it comes to public opinion following the bushfires last year, i feel like that's —— it feels like that's new dawn. it’s feel like that's -- it feels like that's new dawn.— that's new dawn. it's really a matter of— that's new dawn. it's really a matter of sufficient - that's new dawn. it's really a matter of sufficient externall matter of sufficient external pressure from president biden and john kerry and other meetings to overcome the resistance of the climate. , ., , , , �* , climate. john kerry, the president's climate. john kerry, the president's climate in void, _ climate. john kerry, the president's climate in void, described _ climate. john kerry, the president's climate in void, described as - climate in void, described as differences between the us and australia —— climate envoy. you talk about the political aspect, are those differences, what kind of pressure does the us need to put on australia had to get things moving? i think the ultimate step is the imposition of tariffs on
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australians. by not reducing carbon emissions, and i think the proposal that country should do this, should be the corresponding price. as that emerges, for australia to... we talk about the emerges, for australia to. .. we talk about the political— emerges, for australia to... we talk about the political opposition. - emerges, for australia to... we talk about the political opposition. what| about the political opposition. what about the political opposition. what about cultural issues? is there something that is also holding back the moving forward on this? figs something that is also holding back the moving forward on this? fissi the moving forward on this? as i sa , the the moving forward on this? as i say. the same — the moving forward on this? as i say, the same kind _ the moving forward on this? " i say, the same kind of culture was that we've seen in the united states. the shift of the trump administration was very strong against the action on climate. people aligned with that position, so it's cultural opposition. there are issues associated like coal
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mining, but those issues have been addressed much more successfully countries like germany.— countries like germany. always really good _ countries like germany. always really good to _ countries like germany. always really good to get _ countries like germany. always really good to get your - countries like germany. always i really good to get your expertise. i'm sure we'll speak to you again. thank you. i'm sure we'll speak to you again. thank yon-— stay with us on bbc news, still to come: as much loved hits like the sitcom frasier are set to get a reboot — we take a look at why top 90's shows are making a comeback. prince charles has chosen his bride. the prince proposed to lady diana spencer three weeks ago. she accepted, she says, without hesitation. as revolutions go, this had its fair share of bullets. a climax in the night outside the gates of mr marcos�* sanctuary, the name itself symbolising one of the cruelest regimes of modern asia. the world's first clone has been produced of an adult mammal. scientists in scotland have produced a sheep called dolly using a cell from another sheep. warren beatty and faye dunaway
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announced to the world - that the winner of best film was la la land. . the only trouble was it wasn't. the mistake was only put right in the middle of- gushing speeches by the team behind the modern musical. . not for 20 years have locusts been seen in such numbers in this part of africa. some of the swarms have been ten miles long. this is the last time the public will see this pope. very soon, for the sake of the credibility and authority of the next pope, benedict xvi will, in his own words, be hidden from the world for the rest of his life. this is bbc news, the latest headlines... european union leaders have agreed to take steps to speed up the authorisation, production and distribution of covid—i9 vaccines. president biden has held a ceremony to mark the vaccination of 50 million americans against the coronavirus.
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the united nations has called for the urgent rescue of dozens of rohingya refugees, it says, are stranded at sea. they've left refugee camps in bangladesh, where they've been confined after escaping persecution in their home country. last year alone, more than 200 rohingya refugees lost their lives this way. 0ur south asia correspondent rajini vaidyanathan reports. a perilous journey on the high seas. for months thousands of rohingya muslims, women and children have risked everything, leaving the refugee camps for a better life in east asia. this footage shows one such journey last year, dozens crammed onboard. now, there are fears for 90 others who are stranded in indian waters after their boat's engine failed. we were sent this desperate phone message by an activist who says it is from a refugee.
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today five people died, he says in the recording. people are dying. if nobody reaches us soon, more will die. these dramatic images from last year show a boat full of refugees back on shore, after attempting a similar journey. they returned dehydrated and malnourished. the head of the united nations in region told me he is calling i think already after two weeks exposure in the high seas and this boat has been adrift, i think it is a race against time, and the longer we take the probability of more loss of life, i think is increasing, by the day, by the hour. for families living in the world's largest refugee camp, in bangladesh,
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it is a heartbreaking wait. thousands of muslims came here in one, fleeing persecution in myanmar. this woman's parents saw their daughter three weeks' ago. saw their daughter three weeks ago. she is ia. her parents told us they paid more than $400s to a trafficker, hoping she would have a better life in malaysia. they believe she is on the boat which is stranded. i heard she reached close to india but i don't know whether she is dead or alive. i heard the indian government gave them some food but i hope they save them. if they don't rescue them all, they will die at sea. - if they don't rescue them all, they will die at sea. this is just the latest struggle for the rohingya. the world's largest stateless population. three years since they fled violence
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in myanmar in their masses. they are still on the move. and with the ongoing military coup in myanmar their chances of going home soon are slimmer. the un's calling on the world do more to help them, right now, that means urgently rescuing those stranded at sea. during lockdown, many if us have been binge watching tv shows. maybe a new series or perhaps a return to an old favourite? well, fans of the 90s comedy frasier will be celebrating that the series is making a return to the small—screen. and it's not the only classic show being brought back to life. tiffany sweeney reports. it seems like it shows from the 90s are making a comeback. the latest to return is the comedy series frazier, which will launch on the new
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screaming platform —— screening platform. he went on to from audiences around the world. the series ended 17 years ago, but remains one of america's most successful tv sitcoms, winning 37 emmy awards. successful tv sitcoms, winning 37 emmy awarde— successful tv sitcoms, winning 37 emmy awards. successful tv sitcoms, winning 37 emm awards. , , ~ ., emmy awards. every episode is like a farce that was — emmy awards. every episode is like a farce that was brought _ emmy awards. every episode is like a farce that was brought by _ emmy awards. every episode is like a farce that was brought by the - farce that was brought by the characteristics by frasier. he would get himself into all these trouble. very few details have been released, but one thing we know for sure is kelsey grammar will reprise his starring role as frasier. the robot is a 90s tv shows and seems to be a growing trend. frasier is following in the footsteps of iconic comedy series sex in the city, which is being brought back on hbo max. this time, the revival will follow three main characters as they can navigate
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love and friendship in their 50s. forfans, it will love and friendship in their 50s. for fans, it will be a surprise that kim control will not be returning. the actress that she has no desire to return to the role that one her a golden globe. why are shows like frasier and sex in the city being brought back. it’s frasier and sex in the city being brought back-— brought back. it's more about content decision _ brought back. it's more about content decision then - brought back. it's more about content decision then and - brought back. it's more about. content decision then and artistic one. i can't wait to see what they do with it. one. i can't wait to see what they do with it-— do with it. fans around the world now aet do with it. fans around the world now get excited _ do with it. fans around the world now get excited for _ do with it. fans around the world now get excited for some - do with it. fans around the world now get excited for some tv - now get excited for some tv nostalgia coming soon. tiffany sweeney, bbc news. i'm joined now by caroline framke, chief tv critic for variety. caroline, have you. are you excited about the return of frasier i7 caroline, have you. are you excited about the return of frasier 17 years after it was first out? yes about the return of frasier 17 years after it was first out?— after it was first out? yes and no. it's an exciting _ after it was first out? yes and no. it's an exciting idea, _ after it was first out? yes and no. it's an exciting idea, and - after it was first out? yes and no. it's an exciting idea, and i'm - it's an exciting idea, and i'm interesting to see what they will do with it and what frasier will be up to now, but as your report said, we
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don't know whether the rest of the cast will be back. the only actor who's been confirmed is kelsey grammar, and to me, frasier doesn't feel like frasier.— feel like frasier. what are they doinu feel like frasier. what are they doin: it? feel like frasier. what are they doing it? what _ feel like frasier. what are they doing it? what your _ feel like frasier. what are they - doing it? what your understanding of why they're doing it? it’s doing it? what your understanding of why they're doing it?— why they're doing it? it's no coincidence _ why they're doing it? it's no coincidence that _ why they're doing it? it's no coincidence that it - why they're doing it? it's no coincidence that it was - why they're doing it? it's no - coincidence that it was announced during cbs�*s big presentation for the launch of paramount plus, especially alongside other reboot revivals such as rug rats. they're turning a lot of movies and television shows like fatal extraction this is them trying to get people to sign up —— fatal attraction. to see a property they already know they like. it’s attraction. to see a property they already know they like.— attraction. to see a property they already know they like. it's a sure thin , already know they like. it's a sure thing. you — already know they like. it's a sure thing, you mentioned _ already know they like. it's a sure thing, you mentioned one - already know they like. it's a sure thing, you mentioned one of- already know they like. it's a sure thing, you mentioned one of my i thing, you mentioned one of my favourite films. how can you make that better by redoing it? our
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people out of ideas or is it generally something they feel they can improve?— generally something they feel they can imrove? ~ , ,, can improve? well, this time i guess the 're can improve? well, this time i guess they're saying _ can improve? well, this time i guess they're saying it's — can improve? well, this time i guess they're saying it's different _ they're saying it's different because it's a ten episode series, so it will have to be different than a movie, but i think at this time, yes, it's more of a sure thing. you see this a lot. you see peacock did saved by the bell. someday they will have a friend's reunion. these are things they know people want to tune into, so i don't know if it's necessarily about making it better so much as making it.— necessarily about making it better so much as making it. making indeed. you touched — so much as making it. making indeed. you touched on _ so much as making it. making indeed. you touched on sex _ so much as making it. making indeed. you touched on sex and _ so much as making it. making indeed. you touched on sex and the - so much as making it. making indeed. you touched on sex and the city - so much as making it. making indeed. you touched on sex and the city. - you touched on sex and the city. frasier, it's only frasier himself. it is this a remake or what? technically, i think we would call this a revival. if it was a reboot, it would be an entirely new actor
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playing frasier, just a whole new cast. technically, ithink playing frasier, just a whole new cast. technically, i think we can call these revival.— cast. technically, i think we can call these revival. this aspect of the revival. _ call these revival. this aspect of the revival, is _ call these revival. this aspect of the revival, is that _ call these revival. this aspect of the revival, is that going - call these revival. this aspect of the revival, is that going to - call these revival. this aspect of the revival, is that going to be l the revival, is that going to be successful? i know that's the million—dollar question, but is this going to be a winner? so many fans just adore this programme. i going to be a winner? so many fans just adore this programme.- just adore this programme. i think it de ends just adore this programme. i think it depends on _ just adore this programme. i think it depends on who _ just adore this programme. i think it depends on who you're - just adore this programme. i think it depends on who you're asking. i j it depends on who you're asking. i don't know. it depends on what they do, who they're bringing on. i don't think the grade of 60 —— creative team includes any frasier original writers. es. team includes any frasier original writers. �* ' . ., writers. a different metric of success. _ writers. a different metric of success, that's _ writers. a different metric of success, that's tantalising. l writers. a different metric of - success, that's tantalising. really good to have you with us and thanks for explaining us lots more on our
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website. you can read about the revivals on our website. you can reach me on twitter — i'm @ bbckasiamadera. hello there, it's been another mild day across the uk. however compared with yesterday where we had that extreme heat for february when temperatures got to pretty crazy levels, really, with highs up to 18 celsius — well, today, it has been fresher. temperatures down to about 12 celsius which is still about three or four degrees celsius above average for the time of year. now that change was brought about by this area of cloud, this area of light patchy rain. it's a weather front, a cold front. and behind that, the air has been fresher. seen a few showers for scotland and northern ireland, many of us have seen some sunshine as well. so, the temperatures have onlyjust been above normal across parts of england byjust a few degrees celsius. across europe meanwhile, the deeper the reds show you where the really unusual warmth is and it's been pretty widespread.
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0ver recent days, a number of cities have set all—time records for february. the weather has been very unusual there. 0vernight tonight, pressure is going to build across the uk. that means for many of us, the winds will be light and there be clear skies. it's a recipe for turning pretty cold indeed. there will be some patches of frost around, particularly in the countryside but notice northern scotland, frost free. around five celsius in stornoway, about six in lerwick overnight and the reason for that is you've got thicker cloud and this weather front is going to bring some rain here towards the end of the night and at first on friday as well. now, that rain will tend to push out of the way, the clouds will thin and break up and turn quite a bit brighter. for most of the uk though after a cold and locally frosty start to the day, for many there will be pretty much sunshine from dawn till dusk. it will be a glorious kind of day. and again, mild. temperatures 10—12 celsius which is similar to what we had today. now beyond that on into the weekend forecast, this area of high pressure going nowhere very far very fast but we do have weak weather fronts
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just crossing into this area of high pressure bringing slightly thicker cloud with it across parts of scotland, northern england. could squeeze out a few spots of light patchy rain from that, but many again will have more fine weather with further sunshine to go around. temperatures not really changing very much day by day. again, 10—12 says is fairly wide way, perhaps 1a with some sunshine across the warmest parts of the country in the south—east. beyond that through sunday and into next week, it stays, well, very quiet really. with high pressure in charge, there will be a lot of dry weather. it'll stayjust on the mild side of things. that's your weather.
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this is bbc world news, the headlines. european union leaders have agreed to take steps to speed up the authorisation, production and distribution of covid— 19 vaccines. the leaders held a video conference and want to ensure that border restrictions don't block supply chains. queen elizabeth has spoken for the first time about having her covid—19 vaccination jab and has urged the public to do the same, saying anyone who is nervous should think of others. president biden has held a ceremony to mark the vaccination of fifty million americans against the coronavirus. he said the us was weeks ahead of schedule on the path to immunising one—hundred million people. the un has called on india to urgently rescue a boat it says is stranded at sea with dozens of rohingya refugees on board.

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