Skip to main content

tv   The Papers  BBC News  February 25, 2021 11:30pm-12:01am GMT

11:30 pm
european union leaders have agreed to take steps to speed up the authorisation, production and distribution of covid— 19 vaccines. the leaders held a video conference and want to ensure that border restrictions don't block supply chains. queen elizabeth has spoken for the first time about having her covid—19 vaccination jab and has urged the public to do the same, saying anyone who is nervous should think of others. president biden has held a ceremony to mark the vaccination of fifty million americans against the coronavirus. he said the us was weeks ahead of schedule on the path to immunising one—hundred million people. the un has called on india to urgently rescue a boat it says is stranded at sea with dozens of rohingya refugees on board.
11:31 pm
hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are james moore, chief business commentator at the independent and sam lister, deputy political editor at the daily express. let's take a look at tomorrow's front pages, starting with... most of the papers lead on the queen's first public remarks on covid vaccination — including the telegraph. it reports that the queen told senior officers overseeing the delivery of the vaccine across all four uk nations that people who refuse the vaccine should think of other people. the metro picks the story for its lead too. it quotes the queen saying that the injection was harmless and her remarks about how quickly the rollout had happend. the mail also has the story
11:32 pm
on its front page: describing it as �*an astonishing intervention�* aside from the queen, the mirror's front page features music mogul simon cowell on his recovery from back surgery. a photo of lady gaga dominates a number of papers including the independent. it's after the singer's dogwalker was shot and her two french bulldogs stolen. the i leads with the news that nhs workers will not receive a pay rise in next month's budget. the paper reports that the chancellor, rishi sunak won't make a decision on salaries in the public sector until may. the times leads with a preview of the budget too. it describes rishi sunak�*s plans as a �*tax raid on pensioners�*, as he seeks to repair britain's finances after the pandemic. news that the weather system that brings warm and mild weather to europe has weakened, leads the guardian. the paper says climate breakdown is the probable cause,
11:33 pm
and it could mean colder winters in the uk. so let's begin... as always thanks very much for being back with us sam and james. let's start with the daily mirror. lots of the papers focusing on this video call with her majesty the queen. speaking to those medical officers who were rolling out the vaccination programme across the uk. but quite extraordinary when it comes to her intervention with this. talking openly about herself being vaccinated.— openly about herself being vaccinated. , , vaccinated. yes. it's a very robust and straightforward _ vaccinated. yes. it's a very robust and straightforward intervention l and straightforward intervention from the queen. we know the royals like to keep their health matters private. they obviously update us on going to hospital and things like that. but privacy and health matters
11:34 pm
is an important thing. the queen has been known to have the jab of her to come out and say publicly that people should consider other people and have the jab themselves. it is in an unusual intervention. just shows how the royal family are wanting to do their bit and trying to persuade people who are hesitant about the vaccine to have it. obviously, the queen wouldn't be having anything that's not say. i think she wants the nation to know that. . , a, think she wants the nation to know that. . , ., ~ ., , that. the daily mail also like many ofthe that. the daily mail also like many of the papers _ that. the daily mail also like many of the papers focusing _ that. the daily mail also like many of the papers focusing on - that. the daily mail also like many of the papers focusing on this - of the papers focusing on this james. the headline that picks up on was one of the things that the queen was one of the things that the queen was saying. it's selfish not to have the job. was saying. it's selfish not to have thejob. very much was saying. it's selfish not to have the job. very much taking was saying. it's selfish not to have thejob. very much taking an opinion and in an extremely strong plea next to i she's right. i
11:35 pm
and in an extremely strong plea next to i she's right-— to i she's right. i think she's absolutely _ to i she's right. i think she's absolutely right _ to i she's right. i think she's absolutely right to - to i she's right. i think she's absolutely right to do - to i she's right. i think she's absolutely right to do this. i j to i she's right. i think she's - absolutely right to do this. i had the jab — absolutely right to do this. i had the jab myself. it's quick, it's easy, — the jab myself. it's quick, it's easy, it — the jab myself. it's quick, it's easy, it doesn't hurt. and you're notiust— easy, it doesn't hurt. and you're notjust protecting easy, it doesn't hurt. and you're not just protecting yourself you're protecting other people. and the point _ protecting other people. and the point about the vaccination programme that were doing is that it only really— programme that were doing is that it only really is effective if we get mask_ only really is effective if we get mask coverage. and we have very good take out _ mask coverage. and we have very good take out i_ mask coverage. and we have very good take out. i was looking at the figures — take out. i was looking at the figures this morning for the column i figures this morning for the column lwrole _ figures this morning for the column i wrote today. we had very good take-up, — i wrote today. we had very good take—up, 90%, something like that as opposed _ take—up, 90%, something like that as opposed to _ take—up, 90%, something like that as opposed to something which the government thought we would get which _ government thought we would get which was 75%. which is more typical for vaccination programs. that's great _ for vaccination programs. that's great but — for vaccination programs. that's great but we got to keep it up. as people _ great but we got to keep it up. as people like me i'm classified as clinically— people like me i'm classified as clinically extremely vulnerable which — clinically extremely vulnerable which is — clinically extremely vulnerable which is why i got the jab. i have type _ which is why i got the jab. i have type one — which is why i got the jab. i have type one diabetes. it's when you get down _ type one diabetes. it's when you get down from _ type one diabetes. it's when you get down from people like me who are perhaps— down from people like me who are perhaps less vulnerable who see themselves as less at risk from getting — themselves as less at risk from getting something seriously nasty as a result_ getting something seriously nasty as a result from covid, we still need
11:36 pm
those _ a result from covid, we still need those people to have the jab. for in a vaccine _ those people to have the jab. for in a vaccine nation to be effective for mass _ a vaccine nation to be effective for mass coverage without any intervention like this has to be welcome _ intervention like this has to be welcome. we intervention like this has to be welcome. ~ . intervention like this has to be welcome-— intervention like this has to be welcome. ~ ., ., , welcome. we are looking at this vaccination _ welcome. we are looking at this vaccination and _ welcome. we are looking at this vaccination and it's _ welcome. we are looking at this vaccination and it's just - welcome. we are looking at this vaccination and it'sjust really i vaccination and it's just really interesting to see how the papers all carried theirs. the times as well has the queen on the front page. but while were talking about vaccination the paper also focusing on vaccination passports. sam, the papers saying that they will be here by the summer. this is quite, not everyone agrees with this when it comes to having that kind of document that says you had the passport. a lot of issues with this one. ~ ., , passport. a lot of issues with this one. ~ ., y y one. we have quite the hokey pokey from the government _ one. we have quite the hokey pokey from the government on _ one. we have quite the hokey pokey from the government on passports. | from the government on passports. it's all on the next minute, it's definitely not happening. i think there are ethical issues with the a vaccine passport. as much is we do
11:37 pm
want it it's the daily express we very much want it to encourage people to take the vaccine if you're operative. but it's not possible for everyone to have it. pregnant are advised not to i believe take the vaccine at the moment. there is an element that if you introduced vaccine passports are people going to be discriminated against? what happen here is the unity did not eu say they want some kind of document to travel. and certainly you could foresee a circumstance where we would also perhaps have a document for travel. would also perhaps have a document fortravel. but would also perhaps have a document for travel. but whether we had run for, i think the government very very keen not to get into the scenario where you would need a passport, vaccine passport to go into a shop or pumper that kind of thing. they've been very clear that they really don't like that idea. for international travel it's more on the cards, i think. for international travel it's more on the cards, ithink.— for international travel it's more on the cards, i think. indeed it's a aood on the cards, i think. indeed it's a good point- _ on the cards, i think. indeed it's a good point. there _ on the cards, i think. indeed it's a
11:38 pm
good point. there are _ on the cards, i think. indeed it's a good point. there are countries i on the cards, i think. indeed it's a l good point. there are countries that really rely on tourism greece, spain that are pushing for this what spain is talking about in eu wide passport. because they absolutely just need to kick—start their tourism. just need to kick-start their tourism. , ., , , ., just need to kick-start their tourism. , ., , tourism. yes, tourism is a massive art of tourism. yes, tourism is a massive part of their _ tourism. yes, tourism is a massive part of their economy. _ tourism. yes, tourism is a massive part of their economy. it's - tourism. yes, tourism is a massive part of their economy. it's a - tourism. yes, tourism is a massive part of their economy. it's a huge i part of their economy. it's a huge part of their economy. it's a huge part of— part of their economy. it's a huge part of the — part of their economy. it's a huge part of the spanish economy and the popular— part of the spanish economy and the popular tourist destinations. the same _ popular tourist destinations. the same is — popular tourist destinations. the same is true of greece. it's understandable that both these countries are thinking very hard to -et countries are thinking very hard to get something like this. they want to get— get something like this. they want to get tourism flowing again. and you're _ to get tourism flowing again. and you're only— to get tourism flowing again. and you're only really going to do that if you _ you're only really going to do that if you find — you're only really going to do that if you find a way to allow people to travel _ if you find a way to allow people to travel without having to get things like tested, things i quarantine. it's perhaps not surprising that these — it's perhaps not surprising that these countries are pushing very hard _ these countries are pushing very hard for— these countries are pushing very hard for her in eu perspective and getting _ hard for her in eu perspective and getting a — hard for her in eu perspective and getting a document like this arranged and approved. it getting a document like this arranged and approved. it will be interesting _ arranged and approved. it will be interesting to _ arranged and approved. it will be interesting to see _ arranged and approved. it will be interesting to see how— arranged and approved. it will be interesting to see how that - arranged and approved. it will be interesting to see how that goes | interesting to see how that goes moving forward. we will stay with the times. we will focus on rishi sunak and of course a lot of talk
11:39 pm
about what will be unveiled in the budget next week. talk us through what this aspect, the raid on pensioners. what's the chance been accused of doing? it’s pensioners. what's the chance been accused of doing?— accused of doing? it's that time in accused of doing? it's that time in a olitical accused of doing? it's that time in a political career _ accused of doing? it's that time in a political career when _ accused of doing? it's that time in a political career when their - accused of doing? it's that time in a political career when their issue | a political career when their issue of stealth taxes were yourself. it looks as if he's looking at targeting pensioners. if you put into a pension you get a lifetime allowance of up to £1 million. and beyond that point you do reach quite punitive penalties. he's looking apparently at putting a freeze on this limit for the rest of parliament for 2020 for. i think i could raise about 250 million a year. 224. el could raise about 250 million a year. 224. £1 million sound like an awful lot. so if you want to do
11:40 pm
something quite, that doesn't hit people directly in the pockets and people directly in the pockets and people think it doesn't really affect them, this is quite a clever way of doing it. because it's a million pound part. it's not something you would notice in your day today spending at the moment. and it is the classic way of getting around the horrible kind of big income tax rise. or the rise that they committed not to impose. it’s they committed not to impose. it's in allowance on pensioners that was introduced back in 2006 by george osborne and has been reduced over the years. systematically over the years. the years. systematically over the ears. ~ , ., ., the years. systematically over the ears. ~ ., ., ., , years. well you do have to remember about this is — years. well you do have to remember about this is if _ years. well you do have to remember about this is if you've _ years. well you do have to remember about this is if you've got _ years. well you do have to remember about this is if you've got a _ years. well you do have to remember about this is if you've got a part - about this is if you've got a part of that— about this is if you've got a part of that side you're probably going to he _ of that side you're probably going to be paying top rate tax. the benefit — to be paying top rate tax. the benefit of _ to be paying top rate tax. the benefit of a tax free, getting money tax free _ benefit of a tax free, getting money tax free and being able to put it into a _ tax free and being able to put it into a pension is substantial. what we are _ into a pension is substantial. what we are talking about here is only a freeze _ we are talking about here is only a freeze the — we are talking about here is only a freeze. the other problem you got to
11:41 pm
remember_ freeze. the other problem you got to remember facing rishi sunak is he doesn't _ remember facing rishi sunak is he doesn't have that much room to manoeuvre _ doesn't have that much room to manoeuvre it when it comes to tax. the tory _ manoeuvre it when it comes to tax. the tory manifesto ruled that income tax rises _ the tory manifesto ruled that income tax rises so _ the tory manifesto ruled that income tax rises so he can't do that. we heard _ tax rises so he can't do that. we heard that — tax rises so he can't do that. we heard that there is going to be no vat rise — heard that there is going to be no vat rise. really can't at the moment contemplate a vat rise because the economy— contemplate a vat rise because the economy can't cope with it. again tory— economy can't cope with it. again tory mps — economy can't cope with it. again tory mps really don't like that. your— tory mps really don't like that. your left — tory mps really don't like that. your left like something like this or corporation tax rises which is the other— or corporation tax rises which is the other one being talked about. we seen something about up to 25%. i don't _ seen something about up to 25%. i don't think— seen something about up to 25%. i don't think it will come in at that. perhaps _ don't think it will come in at that. perhaps a — don't think it will come in at that. perhaps a softening up exercises up probably— perhaps a softening up exercises up probably might raise in stages up to 23%. probably might raise in stages up to 23%~ that— probably might raise in stages up to 23%. that could raise a lot of money — 23%. that could raise a lot of money. but if you see what we're seeing _ money. but if you see what we're seeing in — money. but if you see what we're seeing in these reports is the temperature, the political temperature, the political temperature is rising quite a lot. and the — temperature is rising quite a lot. and the times piece says bars are
11:42 pm
told if— and the times piece says bars are told if they— and the times piece says bars are told if they vote against the budget they will— told if they vote against the budget they will have the whip removed. he's done — they will have the whip removed. he's done this before on the brexit move _ he's done this before on the brexit move it _ he's done this before on the brexit move. itjust shows he's done this before on the brexit move. it just shows the he's done this before on the brexit move. itjust shows the steaks he's done this before on the brexit move. it just shows the steaks that we are _ move. it just shows the steaks that we are seeing now. well move. itjust shows the steaks that we are seeing now. well something that will raise _ we are seeing now. well something that will raise the _ we are seeing now. well something that will raise the political - that will raise the political temperature is something that the i has picked up that we won't hear on next week budget. nhs staff will not get a pay rise at least it won't be announced next week.— get a pay rise at least it won't be announced next week. yes, it would be in incredibly _ announced next week. yes, it would be in incredibly popular— announced next week. yes, it would be in incredibly popular but - be in incredibly popular but extremely expensive move. we know the chancellorjust doesn't have any room for maneuver. he hasn't got the money to splash around. i think all the focus will be on spending the money he does have on sporting businesses for summer. labour have been very quick to react to this tonight. and this will be a concern for chancellor and the wider government. because within half an
11:43 pm
hour of this story breaking they put out a statement saying this is a kick in the teeth to front—line workers. and obviously because of thursday night all the way through this contrasted that the prime minister, chancellor nhs workers on thursday night one of that you going to do for them and their pay buckets?— to do for them and their pay buckets? �* , ,. , ., , ., buckets? it's described as an exclusive _ buckets? it's described as an exclusive in _ buckets? it's described as an exclusive in the _ buckets? it's described as an exclusive in the i. _ buckets? it's described as an exclusive in the i. the - buckets? it's described as an exclusive in the i. the paper| buckets? it's described as an - exclusive in the i. the paper also quoting unions asking for a £2000 a yearflat increase. so quoting unions asking for a £2000 a year flat increase. so again as we touched upon it will be a political hot potato. touched upon it will be a political hot potato-— touched upon it will be a political hot otato. ., ., �* ., ., ., hot potato. yeah. you've also got to remember. — hot potato. yeah. you've also got to remember, this _ hot potato. yeah. you've also got to remember, this is _ hot potato. yeah. you've also got to remember, this is the _ hot potato. yeah. you've also got to remember, this is the sort - hot potato. yeah. you've also got to remember, this is the sort of- hot potato. yeah. you've also got to remember, this is the sort of thing i remember, this is the sort of thing that will— remember, this is the sort of thing that will he — remember, this is the sort of thing that will be really popular with the public _ that will be really popular with the public if _ that will be really popular with the public. if you're trying to sell hard — public. if you're trying to sell hard medicine or you're trying to heat _ hard medicine or you're trying to beat richie sunak spin quoted in these _ beat richie sunak spin quoted in these pieces that he wants to be honest— these pieces that he wants to be honest with the public about what
11:44 pm
needs— honest with the public about what needs to — honest with the public about what needs to be done down the line about restoring _ needs to be done down the line about restoring the public finances. one smart— restoring the public finances. one smart way— restoring the public finances. one smart way of dealing with that, of adding _ smart way of dealing with that, of adding a _ smart way of dealing with that, of adding a spoonful of sugar to make the medicine go down is giving nhs workers _ the medicine go down is giving nhs workers a _ the medicine go down is giving nhs workers a pay rise. i think that would — workers a pay rise. i think that would he — workers a pay rise. i think that would be universally popular. i'd also think— would be universally popular. i'd also think it's well deserved was up if you _ also think it's well deserved was up if you hear— also think it's well deserved was up if you hear some of the stories of what _ if you hear some of the stories of what what — if you hear some of the stories of what what they've been through, what the nurses— what what they've been through, what the nurses serving on covid boards have _ the nurses serving on covid boards have to _ the nurses serving on covid boards have to live — the nurses serving on covid boards have to live with. goodness me, they deserve _ have to live with. goodness me, they deserve arise. come on, they deserve arise _ deserve arise. come on, they deserve arise. �* , ., , ., ., arise. let's turn to the guardian which is looking _ arise. let's turn to the guardian which is looking at _ arise. let's turn to the guardian which is looking at happy - arise. let's turn to the guardian which is looking at happy news. | which is looking at happy news. climate impact is another devastating situation when it comes to climate change. just talk us through the survey, the study that is being quoted when it comes to the atlantic ocean and the weather changes because of climate change. i
11:45 pm
changes because of climate change. i have to confess, the science is beyond me. buti have to confess, the science is beyond me. but i think it essentially boils down to the fact that climate, if we don't tackle climate change then much greater, more extreme weather events are coming our way across europe. and we will have hotter summers and colder winters. although how summers may sound initially pleasing i think we all realise that actually this is very serious warning if we don't take action now than there are serious consequences down the line. it says extreme weather is in our area that was seeing even what we're watching in the us, what's happening in texas at the moment. it's that extreme weather that climate change is leading to that is extremely worrying. is leading to that is extremely wor inc. ~ ., ., is leading to that is extremely war in._ . ., ., ., ~' is leading to that is extremely wor inc. ., ., ., ~ worrying. what we are talking about here is the gulf _ worrying. what we are talking about here is the gulf stream. _ worrying. what we are talking about here is the gulf stream. what - worrying. what we are talking about here is the gulf stream. what the i here is the gulf stream. what the gulf stream does is keep us warmer than we _ gulf stream does is keep us warmer than we might otherwise be in winter — than we might otherwise be in winter. without it you're looking at something — winter. without it you're looking at something like canada. thisjust
11:46 pm
goes _ something like canada. thisjust goes to— something like canada. thisjust goes to show you just want a big and serious _ goes to show you just want a big and serious problem that the climate crisis _ serious problem that the climate crisis is — serious problem that the climate crisis is. you often hear when people — crisis is. you often hear when people talk about the measures we need to— people talk about the measures we need to reduce emissions of 0 comments can be too expensive. i would _ comments can be too expensive. i would argue that it's the other way. it's would argue that it's the other way. it's too _ would argue that it's the other way. it's too expensive not to do anything _ it's too expensive not to do anything. an increasingly companies, institutional investors are realising this. because they can see the potential economic impact of this _ the potential economic impact of this it _ the potential economic impact of this. it will make the economic crisis _ this. it will make the economic crisis we — this. it will make the economic crisis we are in at the moment look like a _ crisis we are in at the moment look like a walk— crisis we are in at the moment look like a walk in— crisis we are in at the moment look like a walk in the park, frankly. let's _ like a walk in the park, frankly. let's state _ like a walk in the park, frankly. let's state with the guardian. going back to masks. an interesting take from a head teachers who are looking at in a week's time the 8th of march reopening of schools. but this idea that children, pupils will need to wear a mask. also the teachers and parents as well will need to test children for coronavirus was up it's quite an interesting conundrum that schools are facing now when it comes
11:47 pm
to what they have to offer to their students. it’s to what they have to offer to their students. �* , ., , .., students. it's the logistical challenge _ students. it's the logistical challenge of _ students. it's the logistical challenge of getting - students. it's the logistical challenge of getting all - students. it's the logistical - challenge of getting all schools in the eight children back. and when you throw testing into the mix, throw facemask into the mix itjust makes it all up more complicated. but i think there is definitely a real desire among schools to make this work as much as possible. i think parents are obviously pretty keen to get kids back. with a bit of will people will try and make this work on all sides. it’s will people will try and make this work on all sides.— work on all sides. it's the point that it's picked _ work on all sides. it's the point that it's picked up _ work on all sides. it's the point that it's picked up in _ work on all sides. it's the point that it's picked up in the - work on all sides. it's the point that it's picked up in the paper| that it's picked up in the paper that it's picked up in the paper that it's picked up in the paper that it's not compulsory. it's left up that it's not compulsory. it's left up to parents to decide.- that it's not compulsory. it's left up to parents to decide. thanks for that. up to parents to decide. thanks for that- yeah- — up to parents to decide. thanks for that. yeah. there's _ up to parents to decide. thanks for that. yeah. there's a _ up to parents to decide. thanks for that. yeah. there's a lot— up to parents to decide. thanks for that. yeah. there's a lot of- up to parents to decide. thanks for that. yeah. there's a lot of us - up to parents to decide. thanks for that. yeah. there's a lot of us in i that. yeah. there's a lot of us in that— that. yeah. there's a lot of us in that position. it's being left to us.
11:48 pm
that position. it's being left to us i_ that position. it's being left to us ithink— that position. it's being left to us. i think schools have been put in a position— us. i think schools have been put in a position as — us. i think schools have been put in a position as well. i think private schools— a position as well. i think private schools can _ a position as well. i think private schools can insist on things like mask— schools can insist on things like mask wearing and insist on things like testing. state schools as they stand _ like testing. state schools as they stand cannot. it must make life very. _ stand cannot. it must make life very. very— stand cannot. it must make life very, very difficult for teachers it when _ very, very difficult for teachers it when you've got a class full of teenagers and they are acting as teenagers and they are acting as teenagers sometimes do, and we know they do _ teenagers sometimes do, and we know they do and _ teenagers sometimes do, and we know they do. and the poor teacher trying to say— they do. and the poor teacher trying to say look. — they do. and the poor teacher trying to say look, please put your mouse on, to say look, please put your mouse on. it's— to say look, please put your mouse on. it's not— to say look, please put your mouse on, it's notjust each other you're protecting — on, it's notjust each other you're protecting it's me too.— protecting it's me too. yes, a stron: protecting it's me too. yes, a strong message _ protecting it's me too. yes, a strong message will- protecting it's me too. yes, a strong message will the - protecting it's me too. yes, a strong message will the kids| protecting it's me too. yes, a - strong message will the kids listen? a bit of light relief. the daily star going its own way when it comes to front pages. not quite sure what to front pages. not quite sure what to make of this. help me out with us. i mentioned a hot potato earlier on. ~ us. i mentioned a hot potato earlier on, �* ., ., ., , us. i mentioned a hot potato earlier on. ~ ., ., ., , ., ., on. mr potato head is no longer auoin to on. mr potato head is no longer going to beat — on. mr potato head is no longer going to beat mr— on. mr potato head is no longer going to beat mr potato - on. mr potato head is no longer
11:49 pm
going to beat mr potato head. i | on. mr potato head is no longer - going to beat mr potato head. i kind of attempt to be more inclusive. i can't help but think this is some sort of publicity stunt, to be honest. it seems slightly baffling and i think they found a good way to get it on the front pages. it’s get it on the front pages. it's frustrating. _ get it on the front pages. it's frustrating, isn't it that we don't have the rest of the paper. you because you can read the full story on page 11 but all we know is that mr potato head is going gender neutral. , ., ., ., neutral. they do say that no ublici neutral. they do say that no publicity is _ neutral. they do say that no publicity is bad _ neutral. they do say that no | publicity is bad pleasantness neutral. they do say that no - publicity is bad pleasantness would not publicity. this is great advertising for hasbro. massive free advertising. hasbro sales might go up advertising. hasbro sales might go up off— advertising. hasbro sales might go up off the — advertising. hasbro sales might go up off the back of this if it is about— up off the back of this if it is about inclusion, i would say what's wrong _ about inclusion, i would say what's wrong with— about inclusion, i would say what's wrong with a bit of inclusion? a nice wrong with a bit of inclusion? nice way to put it. was there eight mrs potato head? there is. i'm being bombarded by my colleagues in my air
11:50 pm
are telling me there was a mrs potato head. it's potato head from now on. we needed to end on a bit of light relief and we certainly did. thanks to the daily star. thank you very much have a very good rest of your thursday evening thank you for spending your time with us tonight. and you can get in touch if you would like and let me know about mrs potato head. goodbye for now. hello, i'm tulsen tollett and this is your sports news where we start with the europa league and leicester city have been knocked out by slavia prague in the round of 32. after a goalless first leg last week the opener came five minutes after half time when lukas provod got on the end of a nice cross and then the match was put beyond doubt when abdallah sima
11:51 pm
struck a long range effort past kasper schmeichel taking the czech republic side through to the last 16 with a 2—0 win. three other british teams are through. arsenal had a scare i had on aggregate rafale silver took a sloppy arsenal defend to make 82 —— one on the night. but the gunners hit back. before skipper picked up his second to send his side through fourth on aggregate on their home match played in greece due to covid restrictions. match played in greece due to covid restrictions. manchester united were as good as through having beaten real sociedad last week and their best chance came when alex tuenzebe looked to have scored his first goal for the club only to see it ruled out by var and victor lindelof given a yellow card for his earlyjump and foul. after a close first leg in belgium — rangers had no issues in the return fixture against royal antwerp — alfredo morelos gave the scottish side the lead afterjust 9 minutes
11:52 pm
and two goals shortly after half time, the second from ryan kent made it a touch more comfortable for steven gerrard's side as they won 5—2 on the night and 9—5 on aggregate. it was a remarkable finish to the third test in ahmedabad, a match england lost by ten wickets. often relied upon to secure the runs, joe root starred with the ball taking five wickets to lead an english fightback. but a second innings batting collapse left india needing just 49 runs for victory, a win wrapped up inside two days. asjoe wilson reports. all traces of batsmen removed. is it not even reason dusted away. when england began needed wicked jack leach struck. if only they had another spin bowler. while they do, it's joe root. another spin bowler. while they do, it'sjoe root. root part fell to the captains first ball. it couldn't get better until it dead. route to washington sundowner. look back in
11:53 pm
anguish. england won 35 and all out. joe root took five wickets. remember strictly speaking? he's not even a bowler. will back quick with your bat. in the battle of who scores last england then excelled. crawley fell with the score nine. the shiny pink ball slid in deceived ben stokes and joe root fell like so many. gender draught went to pope well, do i play that? england and second innings 8i well, do i play that? england and second innings 81 all out. it meant india needed 49 to win. and joy unless you had tickets for friday. sharma hit the winning run with maximum impact. especially on the bowler. england's captain. it’s maximum impact. especially on the bowler. england's captain. it's been tou~h ou bowler. england's captain. it's been tough you can _ bowler. england's captain. it's been tough you can see. _ bowler. england's captain. it's been tough you can see. it's _ bowler. england's captain. it's been tough you can see. it's been - bowler. england's captain. it's been tough you can see. it's been tough i tough you can see. it's been tough tough you can see. it's been tough to their guys as well. they are more
11:54 pm
used to these conditions as two then we are. we keep trying to find a way keep trying to experiment. root said the authority — keep trying to experiment. root said the authority should _ keep trying to experiment. root said the authority should decide - keep trying to experiment. root said the authority should decide if- keep trying to experiment. root said the authority should decide if this . the authority should decide if this pitch was fit for purpose. there is a week to prepare for the final testing to try to forget this one. scotland's game with france in the six nations on sunday has been postponed, after another positive case in the french squad taking the number of players with the virus to eleven. training has been suspended with the entire group in isolation. organisers say a new date will be arranged in due course but scotland could be without a number of their regulars if the game is moved to a date outside of the international window. former scotland international johnnie beattie, who's based in france thinks it's important the match goes ahead. french media are seeing potentially the week after france wins. after france wins. wales, the last six nations game, and thenjuly, so on the end of the top 14 season over here which could finish mid june,
11:55 pm
so looking at latejune, earlyjuly, but that also clashes with summer tours, british lions tours, as there are lots of things in place so it is not going to be easy but i think everyone just want to see this game finished properly. nobody wants to see a 28—0 victory for scotland. everyone wants to see the game played. george north will win his 100th wales cap when they play england in cardiff on saturday as they go for the triple crown. he's been recalled to the starting line—up, after missing the win over scotland with a foot injury. centrejonathan davies is also back from injury for wales who've won both their matches played. hookerjamie george returns to the england starting line—up after being dropped following the defeat to scotland in their opening match. there's a blow for eddiejones though — lock courtney lawes is out with a chest injury. ireland skipperjohnny sexton returns for their match against italy along with vice—captainjames ryan — they've both recovered from head injuries. ireland make seven changes for the match in rome after their worst ever start
11:56 pm
to a six nations campaign. to snooker where ronnie o'sullivan is safely through to the semi—finals of the players championship. the rocket was in trademark quickfire form as he raced past jack lisowski taking it six frames to one in milton keynes. he'll face barry hawkins in the last four while earlier, kyren wilson beat neil robertson. of course more on that and everything else you can head to the bbc sport website. but that is all yours sport for now. hello there. it was another mild day on thursday with temperatures typically around 10—12 celsius, so not as high as they were on wednesday when of course we got up to 18 celsius in parts of suffolk. those temperatures about ten degrees above average more like the temperatures we would see in late may or earlyjune. no, instead thursday was fresher because we had this cold front that
11:57 pm
worked across the countryjust bringing a few patches of rain across parts of eastern england, fresher air off the atlantic extending in across all parts of the uk. this chart, remember the deeper reds show you where the air has been really unusually mild. so, we were just a bit above normal with that atlantic air working its way in. the extreme heat for february really concentrated across europe and i have to say, there have been many cities across europe that has seen record—breaking february temperatures over the last few days. enough about that, on into friday's forecast. high pressure is building from the south west. we've got this weather front further north, so it's going to be a cold start to the date for many of us with some patches of frost throughout. however for scotland into the shetland isles, it will be a cloudy start with some rain. temperatures starting off at around six celsius here. now that rain will clear out of the way and the weather will brighten up but for most of us, it's a glorious day, the winds will stay light and there will be sunshine for many from dawn till dusk. not a great deal going on really weather—wise. temperatures staying at around 10—12 celsius. so, again, we are above average for the time of year.
11:58 pm
now, as we look at the forecast into this weekend, could see a little weather front, a very weak one just poking into the high pressure. essentially that high pressure stays center smack bang over the top of the british isles. so, again for most of us, no great changes. that weak weather front, that said, could bring an odd spot of rain into scotland and northern england not amounting to much at all and even here, there will probably be quite a few of you that stay completely dry. most of us will have fine weather with further sunshine and again temperatures 10—12 celsius, no great changes there. mightjust eek out a 14 towards the south—east of england giving some decent sunshine. perhaps some mist and fog patches to start the day on sunday. sunday is another quiet day weather—wise. the higher pressure still with us. further spells of sunshine in the forecast and those temperatures, not really changing a great deal day by day. 10—12 celsius. well, that's around about three or four celsius above average for this stage of the year. now looking beyond that into the new week, well high pressure is still there. however, we've got a bit more
11:59 pm
troughing coming up from the south and that will probably introduce some thicker cloud from the south, perhaps with a few patches of rain. now, any rain that does manage to fall more likely to be across england and wales will be light and not everyone will see it. it'sjust something to bear in mind. further north you go, northern ireland and scotland, probably northern england, you're more likely to stay dry with some further spells of sunshine. but where we do have some thicker cloud, those temperatures coming down a little bit closer to the seasonal norms for the time of year. now, take a look at the jet stream pattern beyond that delving deep into the new week and things still looking very, very blocked really with often ridges in the jet stream working over in the top of the uk. so, it's going to be a quite settled spell of weather. no real cold air around, the coldest air is there in scandinavia diving into west russia, it's nowhere near us. so temperatures staying near and around ten, 11, i2 celsius. so, when i think back to february and all that really cold air, the massive falls of snow that we had, even episodes of very heavy rain. looking at the forecast
12:00 am
over the next few days, it's going to be nothing like that. it's going to be very benign and on the mild side of things. this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. i'm kasia madera. eu leaders try to speed up their much—criticised vaccine programme, with the commission president making a bold promise. at the end of the summer, we will have offered to 70% of the population the vaccination, the adult population. with almost a third of people now vaccinated in the uk, queen elizabeth talks for the first about having the coronavirus jab. it is obviously difficult for people if they've never had a vaccine, but they ought to think about other people rather than themselves. president biden marks america's 50 millionth coronavirus vaccine shot, but some communities remain
12:01 am
reluctant to take it.

7 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on