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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  February 26, 2021 6:00am-9:01am GMT

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. our headlines today... "think of other people" — the message from the queen as she encourages everyone to get the covid vaccine. once you've had the vaccine you have a feeling of, you know, you're protected, which is, i think, very important. as far as i can make out it was quite harmless. from political allies to bitter enemies — alex salmond is set to give evidence accusing nicola sturgeon of misleading the scottish parliament. in memory of martyn — a new law aimed at tightening security at events in the light of the manchester arena bombing, moves a step closer.
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good morning. the chancellor's big balancing act — as he prepares to lay out his tax and spending plans in the budget next week, can he make the numbers add up to pay for the pandemic? good morning. huge relief for arsenal as a late goal keeps alive their only hope of a trophy this season, as they stay in the europa league. and a welcome spell of dry weather is now with his across the uk. while we see some sunshine by day, get ready for some chilly nights. details here on breakfast. good morning. it's friday, the 26th of february. our top story. the queen has said people who are hesitant about getting a covid jab should think of others rather than themselves. in a rare display of personal opinion, she made the comments during a video call to health leaders in charge of the vaccine roll—out. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports. they both had their vaccinations
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last month, and though the duke is now in hospital being treated for a non—covid infection, the queen, unperturbed, it would seem, by her husband's absence, was earlier this week on a video conference with health officials from across the uk. the vaccination programme had stirred memories. well, having lived in the war, it's very much like that, you know, when everybody had the same idea. and i think this has rather sort of inspired that, hasn't it? it's a bit like a plague, isn't it? because it's not only here that we've got the virus, but it's everywhere. so, it's a strange battle that everybody�*s actually fighting. but how had the queen found her own vaccination? well, once you've had the vaccine, you have a feeling of, you know, you're protected, which is, i think, very important. as far as i can make out
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it was quite harmless. it was very quick. and i've had lots of letters from people who've been very surprised by how easy it was to get the vaccine. and the jab was very — it didn't hurt at all. there was understanding for people who are nervous of the vaccination, but a reminder that everyone has a responsibility to have it. it is obviously difficult for people if they've never had a vaccine. they ought to think about other people rather than themselves. and there was a message to the scientists who developed the vaccines, and all the staff who are administering them. it is remarkable how quickly the whole thing has has been done. so many people have had the vaccine already, so you have to keep up the good work. nicholas witchell, bbc news. the former first minister of scotland, alex salmond, will be questioned by members of the scottish parliament today, over his claims of a "malicious and concerted"
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conspiracy against him. it's part of an inquiry into the mishandling of sexual harassment complaints about him, which were later disproven in court. the current first minister, nicola sturgeon, a former ally of alex salmond, has dismissed his claims. our political correspondent nick eardley reports. for years, this was the closest relationship in scottish politics, alex salmond and his protege, nicola sturgeon. now, though, they're bitter enemies. he accuses her of failing to tell the truth. she says he is living in an alternative reality. this is mr salmond outside the high court in edinburgh last year. he had just been cleared of sexual assault. there is certain evidence that i would have liked to have seen led in this trial, but for a variety of reasons we were not able to do so. at some point, that information, that facts and that evidence, will see the light of day. now it's nicola sturgeon and her government that's under the spotlight. its investigation into mr salmond
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was found to be unlawful and tainted by apparent bias. mr salmond is coming here to the scottish parliament to make some extraordinary claims. mr salmond claims nicola sturgeon has misled the scottish parliament. that she's guilty of several breaches of the ministerial code. and that people around her, including her husband and her chief of staff, engaged in a malicious campaign to damage his reputation, even to the extent of having him imprisoned. it's a row which has caused an earthquake in scottish politics, with claims that holyrood is struggling to hold the government to account. parts of mr salmond's evidence have been taken down, after prosecutors said they could be in contempt of court and identify his accusers. opposition parties have suggested taking the evidence down is part of a cover—up. miss sturgeon has denied breaking the ministerial code, and says there's no evidence
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of a conspiracy. what is not legitimate is to pursue a conspiracy theory, a scorched earth policy, that threatens the reputation and the integrity of scotland's independentjustice institutions, just because you happen to dislike this government. and to sacrifice all of that, if i may say so. presiding officer, on the altar of the ego of one man. this explosive row is now reaching its climax. miss sturgeon will give evidence next week, as two first ministers, two colossal figures in scotland, make their case to parliament. nick eardley, bbc news, holyrood. plans to toughen up security in public places following the manchester arena terrorattack, have taken a step forward. a consultation on the proposals, which would legally require venues to improve safety measures, begins today. it follows a campaign by the mother of one of the 22 people murdered in the bombing in 2017.
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our north of england correspondent judith moritz reports. figen murray has made it her mission to improve counter—terrorism security in the uk. she doesn't want any other parent to feel pain like her, caused by the murder of her son, martyn hett, one of the 22 people killed in the bombing at manchester arena in 2017. if something happens, if we get an attack... figen has long campaigned for a law in martyn�*s name, to force public places to be prepared for terror attacks and improve protection. now the government is inviting owners and operators of venues to consult on legislation. this will mean a significant change, a significant change in terms of public protection, but also enhanced public safety measures. this is now about developing through this consultation, legislation, legislation in the future, post—consultation, working with venues, but also working with the security,
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counter—terrorist police as well, so that we can strengthen any gaps that we feel may be out there. venues large and small would all be bound by the law, though they wouldn't all be expected to introduce exactly the same measures. there's no one size fits all. and each venue and each space has the opportunity to make those assessments, and put in measures that are going to be proportionate. now, clearly, venues come in all sorts of different sizes. and, you know, i do have some sympathy for larger arena or stadia—based venues, where you're managing a number of in and out, if you like, doorways and openings and spaces. and i think that that could present some challenges. the consultation will last for 18 weeks, and will run alongside the manchester arena public inquiry, which will also make recommendations about counter—terrorism security.
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judith moritz, bbc news, manchester. we'll be speaking to figen murray at around ten past seven. about her hopes for that long. and we will speak to the justice secretary later in the programme too. people from pakistani and bangladeshi backgrounds were more likely to die from coronavirus, compared with other ethnic groups, during the second wave of the pandemic, according to a new government report. the risk was reduced for black communities, which saw high death rates in the early stages of the outbreak last year. our community affairs correspondent adina campbell reports. we would have a cup of tea and we'd just sit together and, you know, talk for a few minutes every morning. i miss that. remembering her mum three weeks on since she died from coronavirus. it felt cruel, you know. she suddenly deteriorated.
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and from that point to the following morning... ..and, eh, yeah, it'sjust been difficult to... ..make sense of it. surinder kaur had been in relatively good health before she died in hospital in london. but the impact of covid continues to disproportionately affect people from ethnic minorities in england. latest findings in a report by the government's race disparity unit show higher death rates among pakistani and bangladeshi communities between september and december last year, compared with other ethnic groups, while death rates fell in black communities over the same period, with a similar risk to those from white british backgrounds. but scientists say we must be cautious of this new data. it's too early to really make conclusions from the early second wave data.
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it only really includes deaths up until the end of december. unfortunately, we've had a lot more deaths injanuary and february. it's only when we include all of those deaths that we will know what the true picture is. the government says it is doing everything it can to protect the most vulnerable. but vaccine hesitancy among these groups continues to be one of the biggest challenges. adina campbell, bbc news. mps are to investigate the safety of so—called smart motorways which use the hard shoulder as an extra lane during busy periods. it comes after a coroner said the deaths of two men on a stretch of smart motorway near sheffield in 2019 could have been avoided. 0ur transport correspondent, caroline davies reports. jason mercer was driving to work injune 2019. he was on the m1 near sheffield, a smart motorway with no hard shoulder, when he had a minor collision with another driver. both pulled over, but the cameras didn't see them.
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the lane wasn't closed and both drivers were killed by a lorry. i should have been in the car that day, but i was ill. since her husband's death, claire mercer has been campaigning against smart motorways. you can be the best driver in the world and your tyre can burst, or someone can slam into you. and if there is not a hard shoulder, you are more at risk. smart motorways mean that the hard shoulder operates fully or partially as a live lane with traffic. today, the transport select committee has said it will launch an investigation into smart motorways. the technology is not in place that i was even promised. and, quite frankly, i think they need to be held to account. we need to investigate much more thoroughly whether smart motorways really are safe enough to continue. but claire is not convinced the investigation will go far enough. i'm just worried it is going to be yet another busy work. it doesn't achieve anything anything. it'lljust come back and say, oh, we just need a few more tweaks and a few more bits and pieces. we don't. we need the hard shoulder back. smart motorways were created to help ease congestion without building an extra lane of traffic.
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but given the way our lives have changed during the pandemic, some have questioned whether they are either needed. i think the major question remains — what will traffic be like after lockdown? smart motorways were introduced to alleviate congestion. but if use of motorways is reduced, you could then question do we really need smart motorways to increase capacity, if people are worried about them? the department for transport has said they welcomed the inquiry and that the transport secretary has expressed concerns over smart motorways and committed £500 million to safety improvements. but some still want smart motorways to be removed altogether. caroline davies, bbc news. lady gaga is offering a reward of half—a—million dollars — that's around £360,000 — for the safe return of her french bulldogs, koji and gustav, after they were stolen at gunpoint in hollywood. the singer's dog walker was shot during the incident.
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he's now recovering in hospital, as our north america correspondent david willis reports. this leafy hollywood street formed the backdrop to a crime so audacious that even the city's film—makers might deem it implausible. it was here, late on wednesday night, that a shot rang out. it was the screaming that alerted me. i heard screaming, like, a lot of it. i thought it sounded like a man in extreme distress. yeah. the man in question was lady gaga's dog walker. he'd been shot in the chest by two men, who pulled up in a car and made off with two of her french bulldogs. a rescue worker was pictured retrieving a third dog from the man's grasp as he lay bleeding on the pavement. police say he struggled with the suspects before being hit by a bullet from a semi—automatic handgun.
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the incident comesjust after a month after lady gaga won rave reviews for her performance at president biden�*s inauguration ceremony. she is yet to comment on the incident, but has offered a $500,000, no—questions—asked reward for the for the dogs' return. frequently spotted with her pets in tow, lady gaga is known to be passionate about them and highly protective. they proved the inspiration for her own pet product line. and miss asia, the one that evaded capture, even has her own instagram page, with more than 220,000 followers. french bulldogs are in high demand here, but they are notoriously difficult to breed. pedigree puppies can fetch as much as $10,000 apiece. the dog walker is said to be in a critical condition, but he is expected to survive. the question for detectives — was this a random attack, or was he targeted because of his celebrity client?
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david willis, bbc news, los angeles. what i think will resonate with people, anyone who is a dog owner or an animal lover, it is the heart wrenching thing when you lose one of your beloved pets. i was looking here in the uk, dog thefts here are up here in the uk, dog thefts here are up by here in the uk, dog thefts here are up by 170% since lockdown began. there is such high demand because people are in lockdown and one of these. also, certain breeds are attracting attention. lots of people will resonate with that story. shocking stuff. just after quarter past six. that weekend is nearly here. lots more walks, everybody. matt has the forecast. shall we go for a walk?! why not? i've got the weather for you as well. why not? i've got the weather for you as well-— you as well. let's have a change. start doing _ you as well. let's have a change. start doing the _ you as well. let's have a change. start doing the walk— you as well. let's have a change. start doing the walk in _ you as well. let's have a change. start doing the walk in reverse. l start doing the walk in reverse. there is the excitement of the
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weekend. . , ,., ., there is the excitement of the weekend. . , ., ., weekend. that is something i got to challen . e weekend. that is something i got to challenge the _ weekend. that is something i got to challenge the kids _ weekend. that is something i got to challenge the kids to _ weekend. that is something i got to challenge the kids to do _ weekend. that is something i got to challenge the kids to do this - challenge the kids to do this weekend. they will be doing under sunny skies though thankfully, for the vast majority of the time. some gorgeous sunsets from yesterday evening. more to come. the outlook this weekend and next week is for mostly dry conditions across the uk. there will be some sunshine. do be warned though if you are a key gardener, there will be some chilly nights and chilly mornings. 0ut there this morning we have temperatures as low as “i! in benson in 0xfordshire. things will warm up a little bit through the day. plenty of sunshine. should be a lovely sunrise. a few mist and fog patches across the west. more cloud to the north and west of scotland. outbreaks of rain in shetland. that will pass through. but for most of you it is going to be a blue sky day. even though temperatures not as high as the 18 degrees we saw the
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other day, three to 4 degrees above average, around ten to 13 degrees. we finished the day with another lovely sunset. some mist and fog patches tonight. more cloud putting into scotland and northern ireland, with rain for a time. elsewhere, across england and wales another cold night. frosting places. temperatures down to —3 and “i! eastern england. while there will be frosty mornings to come this weekend, a perfect weekend for a walk. 0h, walk. oh, good! walk. 0h, nood! , ., walk. 0h, nood! , . ., walk. 0h, nood! , ., ., ., oh, good! there is a novel idea. . thanks. oh, good! there is a novel idea. . thanks- when _ oh, good! there is a novel idea. . thanks. when you _ oh, good! there is a novel idea. . thanks. when you said _ oh, good! there is a novel idea. . thanks. when you said doing - oh, good! there is a novel idea. . thanks. when you said doing it i oh, good! there is a novel idea. . thanks. when you said doing it in | thanks. when you said doing it in reverse, thanks. when you said doing it in reverse. i — thanks. when you said doing it in reverse, i imagine _ thanks. when you said doing it in reverse, i imagine walking -- - thanks. when you said doing it in i reverse, i imagine walking -- would reverse, i imagine walking —— would walking backwards. i reverse, i imagine walking -- would walking backwards.— walking backwards. i now have an imaue of walking backwards. i now have an image of matt _ walking backwards. i now have an image of matt dragging _ walking backwards. i now have an image of matt dragging his - walking backwards. i now have an image of matt dragging his family backwards! he is so good. we image of matt dragging his family backwards! he is so good. we have to make a different _ backwards! he is so good. we have to make a different somehow. _ we are waiting for the budget. the chancellor is announcing it next
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week. that is what ben is looking at. it is one of those frustrating moments. it was almost like february 22. wait until february 22, then we will get the plans. now we are waiting for the budget. lots of pressure on taxes and future announcements how we are going to pay for all of this?— pay for all of this? yes, you are absolutely _ pay for all of this? yes, you are absolutely right. _ pay for all of this? yes, you are absolutely right. wait _ pay for all of this? yes, you are absolutely right. wait and - pay for all of this? yes, you are absolutely right. wait and see. | pay for all of this? yes, you are l absolutely right. wait and see. it will not stop people speculating about what they want to see in the budget on wednesday. that is when the chancellor will lay out his tax and spending plans for the year ahead. lots of it touted about what he might consider doing. remember, he might consider doing. remember, he has to try to balance the books a little bit to pay for the pandemic. we know already it has cost around £280 billion, this pandemic. things like lost taxes from business and from all of us., but also support schemes he has offered business to p"°p schemes he has offered business to prop the economy. what might he consider doing? what may be on his to—do list? furlough, one of the
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most important issues that has got many people through this crisis. there are currently 4.7 million people currently furloughed, having their income supported by the government. it depends what sector you are working in what impact it is having. things like construction and manufacturing have been able to get back to work pretty much as normal, within the limits. but there are well—publicised sectors, things like hospitality, travel and tourism, that have really struggled to get back to any sort of business as usual. it is those workers that may need more help from the furlough scheme well into the summer. we expect the chancellor will extend that as long as restrictions are in place until the economy can reopen. for those on low incomes as well, they got a bit of a boost during the pandemic, an extra £20 a week in universal credit. there is pressure on the chancellor to extend that even further, to make sure those on the lowest incomes have a bit of extra help. we might get details of that on wednesday. if you are a home
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buyer, in the housing market, that has been propped up of late by a stamp duty holiday. that means you have paid no stamp duty on properties up to £500,000. that has been a welcome boost. if that isn't extended beyond its current expiry date at the end of march, 300,000 property transactions could fall through because people are pinning their hopes on getting that extra bit of cash in their sale. there is speculation that might be extended until the summer as well. and then it comes, of course, to taxes. raising taxes to boost income, or cutting taxes to boost the economy. and one we think good be in line for a cut is beer duty. in the uk currently one of the most expensive in europe as far as alcohol duty is concerned, a cut in that would help the ailing hospitality industry and would be very welcome for them. and of course may be for all of us to go out and celebrate when all of this
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is over. it is a move that would be welcomed by the beer and pub association.— welcomed by the beer and pub association. , . , , association. the beer and the pub sector have _ association. the beer and the pub sector have been _ association. the beer and the pub sector have been devastated - sector have been devastated throughout this pandemic. our message — throughout this pandemic. our message to each answer is clear. we would _ message to each answer is clear. we would like _ message to each answer is clear. we would like to see a beer duty cut. we pay— would like to see a beer duty cut. we pay ii — would like to see a beer duty cut. we pay 11 times more beer duty than they do— we pay 11 times more beer duty than they do in— we pay 11 times more beer duty than they do in germany and in spain. we pay 54p _ they do in germany and in spain. we pay 54a as— they do in germany and in spain. we pay 54p as consumers in a pointed direct— pay 54p as consumers in a pointed direct to _ pay 54p as consumers in a pointed direct to the taxman. the reality is we want _ direct to the taxman. the reality is we want to— direct to the taxman. the reality is we want to be supporting our pubs and making sure they can recover, and making sure they can recover, and we _ and making sure they can recover, and we want — and making sure they can recover, and we want to support our great british... _ and we want to support our great british... it— and we want to support our great british... it would be nice to have a point _ british... it would be nice to have a point that— british... it would be nice to have a point that is slightly cheaper when — a point that is slightly cheaper when we — a point that is slightly cheaper when we get to the pub. ithink— when we get to the pub. i think we could all agree with that. it would be nice to get back in the pub again with a point with some friends. lots of speculation about what might happen on wednesday. the chancellor says he is committed to supporting business and the economy. we are not quite out of this yet as far as the economy is concerned. unemployment is still rising, there are still many sectors are struggling to open up. travel,
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tourism, retail, hospitality the worst affected. and a lot of people who have not qualified for any help at all, still in a precarious position. lots for the chance to die just on wednesday. we will get a few more details about what help may be extended into the summer. more details then. i'm off to get a cup of tea. see you after nine. of tea. see ou after nine. ., . oftea. see ou after nine. ., ., , oftea. see ou afternine. ., . , ., see you after nine. not a pint of beer? remember _ see you after nine. not a pint of beer? remember when - see you after nine. not a pint of beer? remember when we - see you after nine. not a pint ofj beer? remember when we used see you after nine. not a pint of i beer? remember when we used to see you after nine. not a pint of - beer? remember when we used to say, shau beer? remember when we used to say, shall be grab — beer? remember when we used to say, shall be grab a — beer? remember when we used to say, shall be grab a drink? _ beer? remember when we used to say, shall be grab a drink? those _ beer? remember when we used to say, shall be grab a drink? those were i shall be grab a drink? those were the da s. shall be grab a drink? those were the days- i _ shall be grab a drink? those were the days. i cannot _ shall be grab a drink? those were the days. i cannot wait _ shall be grab a drink? those were the days. i cannot wait until i shall be grab a drink? those were the days. i cannot wait until we i shall be grab a drink? those were l the days. i cannot wait until we can all go out as a team.— the days. i cannot wait until we can all go out as a team. meantime ben, if ou no all go out as a team. meantime ben, if you go for— all go out as a team. meantime ben, if you go for a _ all go out as a team. meantime ben, if you go for a walk... _ all go out as a team. meantime ben, if you go for a walk... 0h, _ all go out as a team. meantime ben, if you go for a walk... oh, yeah. i i if you go for a walk... oh, yeah. i will do that- _ if you go for a walk... oh, yeah. i will do that. don't _ if you go for a walk... oh, yeah. i will do that. don't go _ if you go for a walk... oh, yeah. i will do that. don't go too - if you go for a walk... oh, yeah. i will do that. don't go too far. i if you go for a walk... oh, yeah. i will do that. don't go too far. see ou will do that. don't go too far. see you later- — let's take a look at today's papers. the queen features on many of the front pages this morning, after that historic intervention urging people to get the coronavirus vaccine. "right as reign" is the headline in the sun. the daily telegraph focuses on her comments about people who refuse the vaccine, quoting her as saying they "ought
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to think about other people rather than themselves". next week's budget is the focus for the i, which reports there will be no pay rise for nhs staff in england. it says the chancellor rishi sunak will not make a decision on health worker salaries until may. you just heard ben talking about looking ahead to the budget. he would be doing that for us this morning. would be doing that for us this morninu. . ,. , would be doing that for us this morninu. . y., , , would be doing that for us this morninu. . , , , . morning. have you seen this piece in the sun? they _ morning. have you seen this piece in the sun? they have _ morning. have you seen this piece in the sun? they have got _ morning. have you seen this piece in the sun? they have got a _ morning. have you seen this piece in the sun? they have got a screen i morning. have you seen this piece in | the sun? they have got a screen grab from the queen's video call that we just saw. they are pointing out that the brooch she is wearing, that floral diamond brooch, is the one she wore for her engagement to prince philip seven decades ago. that is a sign she is thinking of him while he is in hospital. he is likely to remain there for a few more days, we are told. brute likely to remain there for a few more days, we are told. we also heard as well _ more days, we are told. we also heard as well he _ more days, we are told. we also heard as well he had _ more days, we are told. we also heard as well he had had - more days, we are told. we also heard as well he had had the i heard as well he had had the coronavirus vaccine as well. do you want a contrasting story?—
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coronavirus vaccine as well. do you want a contrasting story? yeah. two ro erties want a contrasting story? yeah. two properties for _ want a contrasting story? yeah. two properties for you- _ want a contrasting story? yeah. two properties for you. here _ want a contrasting story? yeah. two properties for you. here is _ want a contrasting story? yeah. two properties for you. here is a - want a contrasting story? jae—.i. two properties for you. here is a beach hut in dorset. it measures 16 by 10'. ok? and here is a house, a three—bedroom house in aberdare in south wales. which one is worth more? ., , , south wales. which one is worth | more?_ there south wales. which one is worth i more?_ there you more? the house, surely? there you to. i've more? the house, surely? there you go- i'vejust— more? the house, surely? there you go. i've just lifted _ more? the house, surely? there you go. i'vejust lifted up. _ more? the house, surely? there you go. i'vejust lifted up. that— more? the house, surely? there you go. i've just lifted up. that houses i go. i'vejust lifted up. that houses starting at £0. apparently it needs a bit of work. the auctioneers say the reason is it is the leasehold expires in 30 years. so they need to extend it all. but other houses in that area selling for £400,000. that is starting at £0. don't need to worry too much about stamp duty with that one. and the beach hut, which measures 16 by 10', faces away from the sea. the price is £325,000.
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what?! actually, i can believe that. property prices in devon... there has been a massive surge of people leaving the cities and going to the coast. i leaving the cities and going to the coast. ., ., . ., leaving the cities and going to the coast. ., ., .., ., ., , coast. i am often compared to many thins. coast. i am often compared to many things- potato _ coast. i am often compared to many things. potato head. _ coast. i am often compared to many things. potato head. you _ coast. i am often compared to many things. potato head. you loved i coast. i am often compared to many things. potato head. you loved that| things. potato head. you loved that story. i things. potato head. you loved that sto . ., things. potato head. you loved that sto. ., . things. potato head. you loved that sto. ., ~ ., ., story. i saw that story. mr potato head, as story. i saw that story. mr potato head. as we — story. i saw that story. mr potato head, as we have _ story. i saw that story. mr potato head, as we have always - story. i saw that story. mr potato head, as we have always called l head, as we have always called him, is being chopped, according to this piece in the mirror. he is becoming gender neutral. he willjust be called potato head from now on. gender neutral. there was a mrs potato head. gender neutral. there was a mrs potato head-— gender neutral. there was a mrs otato head. . , . , ., potato head. there was. we use to net one potato head. there was. we use to get one of— potato head. there was. we use to get one of each. _ potato head. there was. we use to get one of each. so _ potato head. there was. we use to get one of each. so you _ potato head. there was. we use to get one of each. so you will- potato head. there was. we use to get one of each. so you will get i potato head. there was. we use to | get one of each. so you will get one of both available, _ get one of each. so you will get one of both available, but _ get one of each. so you will get one of both available, but they - get one of each. so you will get one of both available, but they are i get one of each. so you will get one of both available, but they are just l of both available, but they are just called potato heads. i know how that feels. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc
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london, i'm tolu adeoye. grassroots projects tackling violence along a road branded the crime capital of croydon have been given a share of £6 million of funding from city hall. a new application process has encouraged local groups to join forces to pitch for cash, rather than going up against each other. eight areas have been awarded money from the my ends programme. we picked areas where there was high demonstratable need. those organisations that came forward were able to talk about some of the problems, some of the alienation they felt there was for some of the young people in the area, the poverty, some of the deprivation. but, also, and really critically, they talk with a huge amount of optimism and enthusiasm about working together, engaging residents, and coming up with solutions. free—to—use cash machines are vanishing at an alarming rate, according to the consumer rights group which. london has seen the greatest decline with more than a quarter disappearing from our high streets
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in the last two years. which says in deprived areas, where people are more likely to depend on cash, they could be forced to pay to withdraw their own money. a castle in south—east london could have to close less than a decade after it was restored and opened to the public. severndroog castle on shooters hill was built in 1784. the pandemic means it's been temporarily shut to vistors and there are growing concerns about it's longer term future. it's a precarious time for us. we don't get admissions, we don't get money from events, we don't get money from our weddings and our hires. so a lot of our income streams have disappeared. there is no other grant funding for the castle now, so it all depends on the support from the community. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning as you can see. 0n the trains — there's no great northern, thameslink or london north eastern service at st pancras today with engineering works over the weekend.
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in east finchley: the high road is closed between the library and east end road following an accident. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it is a cold start, especially compared to the last few nights. last night, temperatures dropped, in one or two spots, to just below zero. so a patchy ground frost for some first thing. one or two mist and fog patches potentially, but they should lift and we will see sunshine. blue sky today, perhaps broken cloud developing through the afternoon. but the wind is light and the temperature feeling mild. we are looking at a maximum of around 13 celsius. overnight tonight, it's a repeat performance. clear skies and the temperature dropping very close to zero, if not just below. we could see a mist orfog patch by dawn. the minimum down to around —2 away from central london. into the weekend, high pressure dominates our weather for the next few days, which means we will see plenty of fine, settled, dry weather. lots of sunshine around for saturday. perhaps a little bit more in the way
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of cloud for sunday, but the wind is light and daytime temperatures, again, feeling mild. night—time temperatures dropping close to zero. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london in half an hour. now though it's back tojon and naga. hello this is breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. coming up on breakfast this morning. we'll speak to the world champion rower who left rivals in her wake without getting her feet wet, or even leaving her own kitchen. the princess of power ballads, bonnie tyler, got stuck in portugal at the start of the pandemic and she's decided to stay put for now. we'll be holding out for a chat
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with bonnie at around 8:50. and i predict a riot of colour, as the kaiser chiefs frontman ricky wilson tells us about his new art show on cbbc. multitalented. we're going to tell you now about an amazing woman called linda udeagbala, who sadly died three weeks ago from coronavirus. she was just 60 years old. linda was a district nurse for nearly 20 years and she was clearly an inspiration, because four of her five children have followed in her footsteps. brea kfast�*s tim muffett went to meet them. she was everything to us. she was the embodiment of someone who was kind and caring and loving. that motherly love, she had that in abundance. i always look at my mum as a superhero.
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she was working, she was a mum, she'd cook. i'd never think covid could take her life. i almost thought she was invincible, yeah. # happy birthday happy birthday to you #. i linda udeagbala celebrated her 60th birthdayjust a few weeks ago. she was surrounded by the most important people in her life — her husband and five children. no matter what, she always tried to keep positive. she was very outgoing and joyful. she liked to be with friends and she liked a lot of company. she always liked to be around people. one thing you can never forget, really, it's the smile you can't forget. she was always positive, she was always caring, she was always loving, always forgiving. and selfless. you can see, she died doing what she loved to do, really, caring for people. linda was a district nurse in the nhs for more than 20 years.
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because she was diabetic, her employers told her she should work from the office, but linda was determined to keep seeing her patients. it's something she enjoyed doing. something that makes her happy. all of us, we tried to say to her you are at risk, but she was full of confidence. she believed in herfaith, she felt that nothing can happen to me. she chose. ultimately, the decision was hers. and i am a strong believer in taking responsibility for yourself. rather than relying on others. we all spoke to her. we all expressed concerns. "mum, you shouldn't be working," yeah. linda started to feel ill at the end ofjanuary and died in hospital just over a week later. she has left a remarkable legacy. four of her children have followed in her footsteps and become nhs nurses. we said, if mother is so happy doing
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this, and loving it, why not follow suit? maybe you will find happiness as well. so all followed in her footsteps, with her massive encouragement. and that made her extremely happy. i always remember looking on the nmc register and just seeing all of our names there. a wonderful feeling. wonderful. she was the type of mother. everyone would love to have. she did a great job with all of us. linda's death is a terrible reminder that this pandemic is still taking loved ones every day. that nurses have put their lives on the line to care for others. but black and minority ethnic staff have been some of the most at risk. she has given us so much hope and so many things that we will carry on in our own lives and, even though she might not be here physically, she is going to be here in spirit. i just can't wait to tell my
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children, tell all the other people that i get to meet later in life about how wonderful my mum was. thanks so much to the family for speaking there. an amazing family. and obviously a lovely lady. it shows how important the nhs is. when you have one family member, you appreciate and understand what it is about. and we can pick up this theme with the regular gp. let's see what dr mohit mandiratta thinks. you can see the inspiration to go into that profession and help. i into that profession and help. i echo what you have said. working in the nhs has been off pride for me and my parents and in the pandemic, with the love and respect shown
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across the country, and two people who have —— and to people who work in the nhs, in a&e, respiratory units, they are heroes. they have been on the front line in this battle and there have been so many tragic lives lost. it is a thing of pride. it does pass through families. you see someone working for the nhs and the incredible effort they put in. it is amazing. reau effort they put in. it is amazing. really good _ effort they put in. it is amazing. really good words, _ effort they put in. it is amazing. really good words, thank- effort they put in. it is amazing. really good words, thank you. | really good words, thank you. interesting, we saw the queen talking on a video call and talking about receiving the coronavirus vaccine. and being unusually candid, i think, just saying get it. that is reassuring, because you have been aware of certain groups being hesitant when it comes to vaccination.— hesitant when it comes to vaccination. . ., ., vaccination. yes. i would love everybody — vaccination. yes. i would love everybody who _ vaccination. yes. i would love everybody who is _ vaccination. yes. i would love everybody who is in _ vaccination. yes. i would love everybody who is in a -
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vaccination. yes. i would love| everybody who is in a position vaccination. yes. i would love i everybody who is in a position of influence to reflect the statement we are sharing as health care professionals. we want everybody to get the vaccine. there is hesitancy. there has been focus on the bame communities. we have mentioned health inequalities. and they exist in the nhs. we know our bame communities are more affected by the virus. i do not think there is one reason, it is getting to the personal, individual reasons why people are hesitant, but the message needs to be shed far and wide. i have had my vaccination and i am delighted to have had it. let’s have had my vaccination and i am delighted to have had it. let's talk about people _ delighted to have had it. let's talk about people who _ delighted to have had it. let's talk about people who have _ delighted to have had it. let's talk about people who have been i delighted to have had it. let's talk. about people who have been invited for the vaccine. the government was given a list by the body that
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determines which groups should be getting the vaccine, thejcvi. those who have been shielding are being asked to come, and that is a big step. are you seeing an influx of those people now? $5 step. are you seeing an influx of those people now?— step. are you seeing an influx of those people now? as we have been uuided b those people now? as we have been guided by the _ those people now? as we have been guided by the science, _ those people now? as we have been guided by the science, the _ those people now? as we have been guided by the science, the jcvi i those people now? as we have been guided by the science, the jcvi have | guided by the science, thejcvi have invited cohorts with age being the biggest risk factor, but we have gone through the initial shielding list when we did over 70s. alongside extremely vulnerable. that list has been expanded. that is a good thing. taking into account the new data we have had it takes into account peoples bmi, ethnicity, which is important and also deprivation, talking about health inequalities. we know our deprived communities suffer most with health generally in terms of health outcomes so
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encouraging them to get the vaccine early and protect them is important. we are being guided by the science and it is only a good thing that the more we find out about the virus and how it affects people, the more people we will protect.- people we will protect. talking about the science _ people we will protect. talking about the science and - people we will protect. talking about the science and where l people we will protect. talking | about the science and where we people we will protect. talking i about the science and where we are in terms of the pandemic and how it is hitting the uk. the coronavirus alert level has dropped from five down to four which does not necessarilyjust down to four which does not necessarily just reflect down to four which does not necessarilyjust reflect how many people are being infected. it takes into account _ people are being infected. it takes into account lots _ people are being infected. it takes into account lots of _ people are being infected. it takes into account lots of things. - people are being infected. it takes into account lots of things. it i people are being infected. it takes into account lots of things. it adds| into account lots of things. it adds to the hope we feel as you were talking earlier, we are waiting for during the 21st, but we know community cases are coming down and hospitalisations are coming down, reflecting the work going on in the vaccine programme with one third of adults in the uk now vaccinated. the vaccine does reduce transmission but i would urge caution, 10,000 cases a
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day is high. hospitals are under pressure and critical care departments in a lot of cases over. so follow the guidance. we are not out of the woods yet and it has to be a marathon rather than a sprint. what is the building behind you? it is the taj mahal. i thought - what is the building behind you? it is the taj mahal. i thought it i what is the building behind you? it is the taj mahal. i thought it was! l is the taj mahal. i thought it was! somethin: is the taj mahal. i thought it was! something to _ is the taj mahal. i thought it was! something to keep _ is the taj mahal. i thought it was! something to keep me _ is the taj mahal. i thought it was! something to keep me busy. i is the taj mahal. i thought it was! something to keep me busy. you| is the taj mahal. i thought it was! i something to keep me busy. you built it? yes, it is — something to keep me busy. you built it? yes, it is lego. _ something to keep me busy. you built it? yes, it is lego. i— something to keep me busy. you built it? yes, it is lego. i am _ it? yes, it is lego. i am fascinated. _ it? yes, it is lego. i am fascinated. how- it? yes, it is lego. i am fascinated. how long i it? yes, it is lego. i am| fascinated. how long did it? yes, it is lego. i am i fascinated. how long did it it? yes, it is lego. i am - fascinated. how long did it take it? yes, it is lego. i am _ fascinated. how long did it take to build? it fascinated. how long did it take to build? it was _ fascinated. how long did it take to build? it was when _ fascinated. how long did it take to build? it was when i _ fascinated. how long did it take to build? it was when i was - fascinated. how long did it take to build? it was when i was on i fascinated. how long did it take to build? it was when i was on leave | fascinated. how long did it take to i build? it was when i was on leave in the first lockdown so it took 5—6 days of focus work but it was sunny so i sat in the garden, topping up my tan, using protection, sitting in the sun. ., , .,, , .,
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the sun. you never stop being a doctor. the sun. you never stop being a doctor- a _ the sun. you never stop being a doctor- a bit — the sun. you never stop being a doctor. a bit of— the sun. you never stop being a doctor. a bit of suntan - the sun. you never stop being a doctor. a bit of suntan lotion. i | the sun. you never stop being a i doctor. a bit of suntan lotion. i am very impressed by everything you do and grateful, but that has topped the achievement so far for guess this morning. now your parents can be proud! now your parents can be proud! now they can be happy! i believe he's got some lego bricks in his hand right now. and you have a day off, so enjoy it. thank you. we know how he will be relaxing now. that is brilliant. interesting what you said about people being proud working for the nhs. emma said she is the fourth generation in her family working for the nhs. they are also proud of each other. good to know that your doctor is so good with their hands. that was brilliant. i thought it was something he bought.
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i am recovering from a ridiculous day of sport. first of all the cricket, all over before you could blink. and then the football. arsenal thought they were going out. arsenal thought they were going out. arsenal fans furious, arsenal thought they were going out. arsenalfans furious, thinking it was the end of their season. so then there were four british clubs left in the europa league and they will find out their next opponents this afternoon. for arsenal, it's their only chance to salvage something from a disappointing season. with the tie all square. they were playing their home leg against benfica in greece, they were heading out their season effectively over. until, with just three minutes left, pierre—emerick aubameyang headed the goal to take them through and lift the pressure on their manager mikel arteta. manchester united were as good as through before last night, having beaten real sociedad 4—0 in the first leg and their best chance came when alex tuanzebe looked to have scored his first goal for the club, only to see it ruled out by var, and victor lindelof given a yellow card for his early jump and foul.
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but leicester are out after they were beaten 2—0 at home by the czech side slavia prague, who called it a sporting miracle, while leicester boss brendan rogers said they can now turn their attentions elsewhere. we will go away and reflect. we have to push now in the final two competitions we are in. the europa league we wanted to do well in. but it was not to be. now we can go all the way in the league and fa cup. and after feeling the wrath of rangers manager steven gerrard for attending an illegal house party, nathan patterson made amends on the pitch against royal antwerp. the teenager scored just 16 seconds after coming on for the second half. they won 5—2. the 9—5 aggregate score was the competition's highest for 13 years. talking of records... cricket fans' can probably still feel their heads spinning, after the third test between england and india finished before
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the end of the second day — it was the shortest test match since 1935. the stats were staggering as england lost by ten wickets in ahmedabad. england captainjoe root, who's only a part time bowler, took five wickets for just eight runs, as india were bowled out for 145. but then england collapsed again to just 81 all out in reply. 17 wickets falling in two sessions. india then cruised to the 49 runs they needed for victory. we haven't become a bad team overnight. and we've got to be realistic about a number of different things. and if we are going to get better, then we got to understand there's going to be the odd bump in the road. we're not always going to be perfect. but it's how we respond, that's the important thing, is that we go into next week with a very good attitude and take the hurt from this and we apply it in that performance, and try to use this as motivation to come away from the series with something. in contrast, england's women have taken an unbeatable lead
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in the one—day series in new zealand, with victory in the second match in dunedin. nat sciver took three wickets to help bowl out the home side for 192 she then made 63, as england won, by seven wickets. the third final game is tomorrow. and the former england women's captain charlotte edwards will become the first female president of the professional cricketers' association. edwards led england to world cup victory in 2009, and replaces graham gooch. she says she's hugely honoured, to be given such a prestigious role. 17 former british gymnasts, including three olympians, have sent a legal letter to british gymnastics outlining allegations of physical and psychological abuse in the sport. the women say the abuse happened to children as young as six, and caused long—lasting damage. one of the claimants is nicole pavier. we've had time to kind of process things and realise, actually, what was wrong and speak to team—mates and go, actually, whilst we thought that was normal, we laughed it off, it was not ok
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and, actually, it has a really long—term impact. there's a lot of impacts it still has on your life, whether it's dealing with work, dealing with stress, dealing with ptsd, anxiety, they're all things that we're dealing with that actually we shouldn't have been dealing with at our age. meanwhile in usa, the former coach of the american women's gymnastics team — john geddert — has been found dead, just hours after being charged with multiple counts of sexual and physical assaults against young women and a girl. he'd previously worked closely with larry nassar — a team doctor who abused hundreds of athletes. his body was found after he failed to surrender himself at a sheriff's office. the world race series, for electric cars starts in new season tonight, live on the bbc.
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24 drivers will be competing for the formula e title over the coming year, and 7 of them are british, but unlike in f1 we are still waiting for first home grown world champion. first action starts in saudi arabia this aftermoon i have been in the car and if the light pops up you have to jump clear of the car so you don't get electrocuted. luckily, nothing went wrong. at what speed? if something goes wrong, you stop the car. not when it's moving! that's a different sport. 80 miles an hour! stop first. here's matt with a look at the weather. are you still chuckling at my stupid
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question? a lovely start already with a beautiful sunrise developing in kent. it is going to be like that across many parts at the moment but even though we have clear skies it is pretty cold. night—time frosts have returned. the coldest in 0xfordshire, benson. and you can see in wales down to —2. a frosty start but it will feel pleasant when the sun is up and on yourface once again. we have high pressure that means things are clearing. you can see the clear skies bringing the frost. some cloud here in the west of scotland. that will push your way through the morning. the odd spot of rain in the far north—west but most parts of the country dry today. any
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fog will clear. uninterrupted blue sky today. not as warm as it was early in the week but temperatures 3-4 early in the week but temperatures 3—4 above where we should be in late february. tonight it will turn cold quickly across england and wales. cloudy in parts of scotland and northern ireland. rain for a time. it keeps the temperature is up here. coldest in wales and england. temperatures could get down to —4 in eastern areas. feeling nicer by day but the mornings will be cold and at times frosty. 0n but the mornings will be cold and at times frosty. on saturday, we will see high pressure in charge. temperatures similar to today. cloudy on saturday. but high pressure remains on sunday. like saturday we could start with mist and fog but some good sunny spells
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developing for the majority. more of a breeze developing in the second half of the weekend across the south. feeling cooler around the english channel coast. lighter wind further north. cloud amount difficult to tell. but sunny spells for the majority. in temperatures above where we should be. high pressure holding on next week. isolated shower in the south—west. overall, compared to the wet weather so far this year, it is looking like an overall dry story. gorgeous pictures. it's friday, which means another week of home schooling is nearly over — and we know that many children are working on laptops and devices donated by generous breakfast viewers. you've been helping to bridge the so—called "digital divide" during the pandemic — but as schools start to fully reopen, they need to get that technology back into the classroom.
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fiona lamdin, has been finding out what impact that will have. 0ver over the past few months 86,000 devices have been donated thanks to the bbc�*s campaign. it is a life—saver. helping children learn at home. charities say the pandemic has shone a light on the students who do not have access to devices or data, which is why companies like jeff's are still donating as many laptops as they can. historically, we replace our computers on the 4—6 year cycle and they are handed in, we wipe them, throw them away. molar
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we wipe them, throw them away. now we wipe them, throw them away. now we are able to — we wipe them, throw them away. iirm-or we are able to give them to schools on a ten year replacement recycle for their kit and they can use those devices and access online learning. so it is a win—win situation. i do not know why we didn't think of it before. , ' �* . not know why we didn't think of it before. _ not know why we didn't think of it before. , , ., ., ., before. jeff's company is not alone. thousands of _ before. jeff's company is not alone. thousands of devices _ before. jeff's company is not alone. thousands of devices are _ before. jeff's company is not alone. thousands of devices are donated l before. jeff's company is not alone. | thousands of devices are donated by businesses. many end up in this warehouse and charities distribute them to schools and families who need them. i them to schools and families who need them-— them to schools and families who need them. . ., ., , .,, ., ,., need them. i have a laptop for you. families like _ need them. i have a laptop for you. families like irina's. _ need them. i have a laptop for you. families like irina's. now— need them. i have a laptop for you. families like irina's. now we i need them. i have a laptop for you. families like irina's. now we have l need them. i have a laptop for you. j families like irina's. now we have a la--to, it families like irina's. now we have a laptop. it will _ families like irina's. now we have a laptop. it will be — families like irina's. now we have a laptop, it will be better— families like irina's. now we have a laptop, it will be better to - families like irina's. now we have a laptop, it will be better to use i families like irina's. now we have a laptop, it will be better to use and. laptop, it will be better to use and bigger to read the words. thea;r laptop, it will be better to use and bigger to read the words. they are auoin back bigger to read the words. they are going back to _ bigger to read the words. they are going back to school— bigger to read the words. they are going back to school in _ bigger to read the words. they are going back to school in a _ bigger to read the words. they are going back to school in a couple i bigger to read the words. they are going back to school in a couple ofj going back to school in a couple of weeks, is it too late? it is going back to school in a couple of weeks, is it too late?— weeks, is it too late? it is never too late- — weeks, is it too late? it is never too late- we _ weeks, is it too late? it is never too late. we still _ weeks, is it too late? it is never too late. we still have _ weeks, is it too late? it is never too late. we still have a - weeks, is it too late? it is never too late. we still have a few i weeks, is it too late? it is neverl too late. we still have a few days left to _ too late. we still have a few days left to do — too late. we still have a few days left to do some work so it will be helpfut — left to do some work so it will be helful. . . . ., helpful. irina and her children have waited months _
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helpful. irina and her children have waited months for _ helpful. irina and her children have waited months for this _ helpful. irina and her children have waited months for this laptop i helpful. irina and her children have waited months for this laptop but l helpful. irina and her children have| waited months for this laptop but in a few weeks they may have to hand it back to the school who own it. it will be heartbreaking asking those children who have worked hard to give their devices back to us. but some of those devices are schools stock. we have very few devices at school. we need sets of 30 to go into classes. we need as many devices as possible whilst their learning. it would be fantastic if they could have a device each and take that home just like they take reading books home. filth. take that home just like they take reading books home.— take that home just like they take reading books home. oh, my goodness! we filmed with — reading books home. oh, my goodness! we filmed with edwina _ reading books home. oh, my goodness! we filmed with edwina last _ reading books home. oh, my goodness! we filmed with edwina last month. i we filmed with edwina last month. when she and her children received a laptop. giving it back will be hard. i don't want to sound selfish. even though i know it was lent to us by the school, handing it back is
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really going to affect my children negatively, because they are used to it now. but then we just have to hand it back. even though pupils will soon be back face—to—face, many more devices are still needed so students can learn at school and at home. fiona lamdin, bbc news. if you have a laptop or tablet that you want to donate then please go to bbc.co.uk slash "make a difference" — where you can find details of the charities which will get them to children who need them. we'll be talking to the racing driver billy monger after half—past eight. we wanted to give him a bit of a lie—in because, quite frankly, he deserves one. billy's spent the last few days getting battered by the elements while walking, kayaking and cycling 140 miles for comic relief and he's nearly finished. let's get an idea
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of his efforts so far. never done anything like this before. it's completely different to my background in racing. me and my trainer and he been flat out, cycling, kayaking. the cycling, i started on the turbo trainer and then booted it up so i was cycling outdoors. it then booted it up so i was cycling outdoors. . then booted it up so i was cycling outdoors. , ., , outdoors. it is never a case with bill , outdoors. it is never a case with billy. can _ outdoors. it is never a case with billy. can i _ outdoors. it is never a case with billy. can i do — outdoors. it is never a case with billy, can i do this? _ outdoors. it is never a case with billy, can i do this? it— outdoors. it is never a case with billy, can i do this? it is- outdoors. it is never a case with billy, can i do this? it is a i outdoors. it is never a case with billy, can i do this? it is a case. billy, can i do this? it is a case of how— billy, can i do this? it is a case of how well_ billy, can i do this? it is a case of how well can i do it? it billy, can i do this? it is a case of how well can i do it?- billy, can i do this? it is a case of how well can i do it? it is a big challenae of how well can i do it? it is a big challenge and — of how well can i do it? it is a big challenge and he _ of how well can i do it? it is a big challenge and he has _ of how well can i do it? it is a big challenge and he has already - challenge and he has already started _ challenge and he has already started it _ challenge and he has already started. it is _ challenge and he has already started. it is lovely— challenge and he has already started. it is lovely to - challenge and he has already started. it is lovely to see i challenge and he has already l started. it is lovely to see you. you _ started. it is lovely to see you. you have — started. it is lovely to see you. you have set _ started. it is lovely to see you. you have set off _ started. it is lovely to see you. you have set off this _ started. it is lovely to see you. you have set off this morning. | started. it is lovely to see you. - you have set off this morning. the rain has _ you have set off this morning. the rain has come _ you have set off this morning. the rain has come out, _ you have set off this morning. the rain has come out, how— you have set off this morning. the rain has come out, how lovely! - you have set off this morning. the. rain has come out, how lovely! how are ou rain has come out, how lovely! how are you doing? _ rain has come out, how lovely! how are you doing? it — rain has come out, how lovely! how are you doing? it is _ rain has come out, how lovely! are you doing? it is early doors, rain has come out, how lovely!- are you doing? it is early doors, an hour in, so a long way to go. you
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are an extraordinary _ hour in, so a long way to go. you are an extraordinary person. i am honoured — are an extraordinary person. i am honoured to — are an extraordinary person. i am honoured to call you a friend. it is u . honoured to call you a friend. it is u- to me honoured to call you a friend. it is up to me to _ honoured to call you a friend. it is up to me to get— honoured to call you a friend. it 3 up to me to get into the water. i am ready for it now. i am excited and refreshed. i know you will be the inspiration that you — i know you will be the inspiration that you were _ i know you will be the inspiration that you were born _ i know you will be the inspiration that you were born to _ i know you will be the inspiration that you were born to be. - i know you will be the inspiration that you were born to be. so - i know you will be the inspiration. that you were born to be. so good luck, _ that you were born to be. so good luck. bitty — that you were born to be. so good luck, bitty. he _ that you were born to be. so good luck. billy-— luck, billy. he is an amazing erson, luck, billy. he is an amazing person. strong _ luck, billy. he is an amazing person, strong character. i luck, billy. he is an amazing| person, strong character. he luck, billy. he is an amazing i person, strong character. he is funny. — person, strong character. he is funny, cheeky, adorable. this person, strong character. he is funny, cheeky, adorable. this is tim peake. funny, cheeky, adorable. this is tim peake- you — funny, cheeky, adorable. this is tim peake. you have _ funny, cheeky, adorable. this is tim peake. you have had _ funny, cheeky, adorable. this is tim peake. you have had rough - funny, cheeky, adorable. this is tim i peake. you have had rough conditions to deal with, but you are a huge inspiration to many and what you are doing is for such a good cause. mr; doing is for such a good cause. my ast doing is for such a good cause. my past experiences of being helped in my recovery by a lot of people and i would _ my recovery by a lot of people and i would not _ my recovery by a lot of people and i would not be where i am today without — would not be where i am today without them and hopefully i can
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.ive without them and hopefully i can give something back to people during this challenge. with the money we raise. _ this challenge. with the money we raise. it _ this challenge. with the money we raise, it will be a sensational and special— raise, it will be a sensational and special feeling. we'll be talking to billyjust after 8.30. we will pep him up. send your messages. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. grassroots projects tackling violence along a road branded "the crime capital of croydon", have been given a share of £6 million of funding from city hall. a new application process has encouraged local groups to join forces to pitch for cash, rather than going up against each other. eight areas have been awarded money from the my ends programme. free—to—use cash machines are "vanishing at an alarming rate", according to the consumer rights group which? london has seen the greatest decline with more than a quarter
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disappearing from our high streets in the last two years. which? says in deprived areas, where people are more likely to depend on cash, they could be forced to pay to withdraw their own money. a castle in south—east london could have to close, less than a decade after it was restored and opened to the public. severndroog castle on shooters hill was built in 178a. the pandemic means it's been temporarily shut to visitors, and there are growing concerns about it's longer term future. it's a precarious time for us. we don't get admissions, we don't get money from events, we don't get money from our weddings and our hires. so a lot of our income streams have disappeared. there is no other grant funding for the castle now, so it all depends on the support from the community. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there are minor delays on the circle, hammersmith and city and on tfl rail. on the trains, there's no great northern, thameslink or london north eastern service at kings cross today, with engineering works over the weekend.
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southern has disruption between london bridge and tulse hill because of a points failure. in east finchley: the high road is closed between the library and east end road following an accident. on finchley road there are lane closures at hendon way — because of a burst water main. on the a205, one lane is closed southbound between chiswick roundabout and kew bridge for gas repairs. now the weather with kate. good morning. it is a cold start, especially compared to the last few nights. last night, temperatures dropped, in one or two spots, to just below zero. so a patchy ground frost for some first thing. one or two mist and fog patches potentially, but they should lift and we will see plenty of sunshine. blue sky today, perhaps broken cloud developing through the afternoon. but the wind is light and the temperature feeling mild. we are looking at a maximum
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of around 13 celsius. overnight tonight, it's a repeat performance. clear skies and the temperature dropping very close to zero, if not just below. we could see a mist orfog patch by dawn. the minimum down to around —2 away from central london. into the weekend, high pressure dominates our weather for the next few days, which means we will see plenty of fine, settled, dry weather. lots of sunshine around for saturday. perhaps a little bit more in the way of cloud for sunday, but the wind is light and daytime temperatures, again, feeling mild. night—time temperatures dropping close to zero. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london in half an hour. now though it's back tojon and naga. bye— bye. good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. our headlines today: the coronavirus vaccine gets the royal seal of approval, as the queen encourages everyone
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to get the jab. it is obviously difficult for people if they— it is obviously difficult for people if they have never had a vaccine. they— if they have never had a vaccine. they ought — if they have never had a vaccine. they ought to think about other people — they ought to think about other people rather than themselves. in memory of martyn — a new law aimed at tightening security at events in the light of the manchester arena bombing moves a step closer. not so smart motorways. mps are to investigate the safety of the roads designed to keep traffic moving. good morning. huge relief for arsenal — a late goal, keeps alive, their only hope of a trophy this season, as they stay in the europa league. and we are into a spell of dry weather across the uk. at the knights will be chilly. we are not done with frosty days yet. full forecast here on breakfast. good morning. it's friday, the 26th of february. our top story. the queen has said people
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who are hesitant about getting a covid jab should think of others rather than themselves. in a rare display of personal opinion, she made the comments during a video call to health leaders in charge of the vaccine roll—out. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports. they both had their vaccinations last month, and though the duke is now in hospital being treated for a non—covid infection, the queen, unperturbed, it would seem, by her husband's absence, was earlier this week on a video conference with health officials from across the uk. the vaccination programme had stirred memories. well, having lived in the war, it's very much like that, you know, when everybody had the same idea. and i think this has rather sort of inspired that, hasn't it? it's a bit like a plague, isn't it? because it's not only here that we've got the virus, but it's everywhere. so, it's a strange battle that
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everybody�*s actually fighting. but how had the queen found her own vaccination? well, once you've had the vaccine, you have a feeling of, you know, you're protected, which is, i think, very important. as far as i can make out it was quite harmless. it was very quick. and i've had lots of letters from people who've been very surprised by how easy it was to get the vaccine. and the jab was very — it didn't hurt at all. there was understanding for people who are nervous of the vaccination, but a reminder that everyone has a responsibility to have it. it is obviously difficult for people if they've never had a vaccine. they ought to think about other people rather than themselves. and there was a message to the scientists who developed the vaccines, and all the staff who are administering them. it is remarkable how quickly the whole thing has has been done. so many people have had
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the vaccine already, so you have to keep up the good work. nicholas witchell, bbc news. the former first minister of scotland, alex salmond, will be questioned by members of the scottish parliament today, over his claims of a "malicious and concerted" conspiracy against him. it's part of an inquiry into the mishandling of sexual harassment complaints about him, which were later disproven in court. the current first minister nicola sturgeon, a former ally of alex salmond, has dismissed his claims. the supreme court will rule today on whether shamima begum, who left london as a teenager tojoin the so—called islamic state in syria, should be allowed back into the uk. she wants to appeal against the decision by the government to remove her british nationality. miss begum was 15 when she and two other schoolgirls from east london made the journey six years ago. she's currently in a refugee camp in northern syria.
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mps are to investigate the safety of so—called smart motorways, which use the hard shoulder as an extra lane during busy periods. it comes after a coroner said the deaths of two men on a stretch of smart motorway near sheffield in 2019 could have been avoided. our transport correspondent, caroline davies reports. jason mercer was driving to work in june 2018. he was on a smart motorway when he had a collision with another driver. both pulled over but the cameras didn't see them. the loan wasn't closed. both drivers were killed by a lorry. i drivers were killed by a lorry. i should have been in a car that day but i was ill. should have been in a car that day but i was ill-— but i was ill. claire messer has been campaigning _ but i was ill. claire messer has been campaigning against - but i was ill. claire messer has been campaigning against a i but i was ill. claire messer has - been campaigning against a smart motorway is a centre has been's death. ., .. motorway is a centre has been's death. ., , , , death. you can be the best driver in the world but _ death. you can be the best driver in the world but someone _ death. you can be the best driver in the world but someone can - death. you can be the best driver in i the world but someone can slamming to you. if there is not a hard shoulder you are more at risk. smart motorway is — shoulder you are more at risk. smart motorway is mainly _ shoulder you are more at risk. smart motorway is mainly hard _ shoulder you are more at risk. smart motorway is mainly hard shoulder. motorway is mainly hard shoulder operates fully or partially as a lifeline with traffic. today the
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transport select committee has said it will launch an investigation into smart motorways. the it will launch an investigation into smart motorways. the technology is not in place — smart motorways. the technology is not in place that _ smart motorways. the technology is not in place that highways _ smart motorways. the technology is not in place that highways england i not in place that highways england promised. they need to be held to account, _ promised. they need to be held to account, you need to investigate much _ account, you need to investigate much more _ account, you need to investigate much more thoroughly whether smart motorways— much more thoroughly whether smart motorways are safe enough to continue _ motorways are safe enough to continue. �* . , �* motorways are safe enough to continue. . ,�* . continue. but claire isn't convinced the investigation _ continue. but claire isn't convinced the investigation will _ continue. but claire isn't convinced the investigation will go _ continue. but claire isn't convinced the investigation will go far - the investigation will go far enough. the investigation will go far enou . h. �* ., , enough. i'm worried it will be another busy _ enough. i'm worried it will be another busy work. _ enough. i'm worried it will be another busy work. that - enough. i'm worried it will be another busy work. that it. enough. i'm worried it will be - another busy work. that it doesn't achieve anything. it willjust come back and say, we need a few more tweaks and bits and pieces. we don't. ~ ., , ., don't. we need the hard shoulder back. don't. we need the hard shoulder back- smart _ don't. we need the hard shoulder back. smart motorways _ don't. we need the hard shoulder back. smart motorways were - don't. we need the hard shoulder- back. smart motorways were created to help ease congestion without building an extra lane of traffic. but given how our lives have changed during the pandemic some have questioned if they are needed. the department for transport have welcomed the enquiry. the transport secretary has expressed concerns over smart motorways and committed £5 million to improvements. —— £500 million. but someone smart motorways removed altogether.
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lady gaga's dog walker has been shot in hollywood by an assailant who then stole two of the singer's french bulldogs. the man's recovering in hospital, but the dogs, koji and gustav, are still missing, and lady gaga has offered a reward of half a million dollars for their safe return. here's our north america correspondent david willis. this leafy hollywood street formed the backdrop to a crime so audacious that even the city's film—makers might deem it implausible. it was here, late on wednesday night, that a shot rang out. it was the screaming that alerted me. i heard screaming, like, a lot of it. i thought it sounded like a man in extreme distress. yeah. the man in question was lady gaga's dog walker. he'd been shot in the chest by two men, who pulled up in a car and made off with two of her french bulldogs. a rescue worker was pictured retrieving a third dog from the man's grasp as he lay bleeding on the pavement. police say he struggled
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with the suspects before being hit by a bullet from a semi—automatic handgun. the incident comesjust after a month after lady gaga won rave reviews for her performance at president biden's inauguration ceremony. she is yet to comment on the incident, but has offered a $500,000, no—questions—asked reward for the dogs' safe return. frequently spotted with her pets in tow, lady gaga is known to be passionate about them and highly protective. they proved the inspiration for her own pet product line. and miss asia, the one that evaded capture, even has her own instagram page, with more than 220,000 followers. french bulldogs are in high demand here, but they are notoriously difficult to breed. pedigree puppies can fetch as much as $10,000 apiece. the dog walker is said to be in a critical condition, but he is expected to survive.
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the question for detectives — was this a random attack, or was he targeted because of his celebrity client? david willis, bbc news, los angeles. and i think one of the reasons this will resonate with a lot of people here in the uk, pet owners will really feel for lady gaga and of course the dog walker, who is recovering in hospital, because dog thefts in the uk have risen by something like 170% during lockdown. because there is such a demand for poppies. because there is such a demand for .o . ies. ., . , because there is such a demand for .uoies. , because there is such a demand for ---oies. , ., , poppies. exactly. people have been caettin poppies. exactly. people have been getting dogs- _ poppies. exactly. people have been getting dogs. they have _ poppies. exactly. people have been getting dogs. they have been - getting dogs. they have been targeted as well. lots of people will understand. pets are part of your family. will understand. pets are part of your family-— will understand. pets are part of our famil . . , . ., your family. and the price of them, i cuess. your family. and the price of them, i guess- it — your family. and the price of them, i guess- it is _ your family. and the price of them, i guess. it is nine _ your family. and the price of them, i guess. it is nine minutes- your family. and the price of them, i guess. it is nine minutes past - i guess. it is nine minutes past seven. we are nearly at the weekend, everyone. matt has the weather for
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the next few days. good morning. the next few days. good morninu. ., good morning. good morning. good news for the — good morning. good morning. good news for the weekend _ good morning. good morning. good news for the weekend weather - good morning. good morning. good news for the weekend weather as i news for the weekend weather as well. lovely start to friday out there. blue skies. a beautiful sunrise. but you will notice on the ground just outside stockport, there is a frost. you will have to get used to that. some chilly nights on the way. but once we are in the daytime it is going to be mostly dry. there will be some sunshine. i did mention it is called. temperatures at —1i at the moment in benson in oxfordshire. a widespread frost across the country. not so much in the far north and west of scotland. a bit cloudier. rain at the moment across shetland. that will come and go. then it will depart. forall of will come and go. then it will depart. for all of you a dry afternoon. sunny spells for most. a bit more cloud in the north—west of scotland. even though we're seeing temperatures as high as they were during the week, ten to 30 degrees is still above where it should be at
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this stage of the year. as we go into this evening and overnight, more cloud in scotland and northern ireland. a bit of overnight rain for some. not for everyone. much of england and wales stays dry. patchy mist and fog. a bit of a frost. particularly for england and wales. -3 particularly for england and wales. —3 to particularly for england and wales. -3 to “4. particularly for england and wales. —3 to —1i. frosty mornings but for the most part it is dry with cloud and some sunshine. thank you. that is good news, thank you. lovely. thanks. 11 minutes past seven. it's nearly four years since 22 innocent people were murdered in the manchester arena bombing. now, plans for new counter—terrorism laws to improve security in public places, have taken a step forward. an 18—week consultation begins today, looking at what rules will be required, and which venues they'll apply to. it follows a campaign by figen murray, whose son martyn hett died in the attack. our north of england correspondent,
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judith moritz, reports. figen murray has made it her mission to improve security in the uk. she doesn't want any other parent to feel the pain like her, caused by the murder of her son martyn flett, one of 22 people killed in the bombing in manchester arena. if bombing in manchesterarena. if something happens, if we get an attack... . . , something happens, if we get an attack... ,, ., , ., something happens, if we get an attack... ,, ., attack... she has long campaigned for a law in — attack... she has long campaigned for a law in martin's _ attack... she has long campaigned for a law in martin's name - attack... she has long campaigned for a law in martin's name to - attack... she has long campaigned for a law in martin's name to force | for a law in martin's name to force public places to be prepared for terror attacks and improve protection. now the government is inviting owners and operators of venues to consult on legislation. this will mean a significant change, a significant change in terms of public protection, but also enhance public protection, but also enhance public safety measures. this is now about developing, through this consultation, legislation in the
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future, post—consultation, working with venues, but also working with the security, counterterror police as well, so we can strengthen any gaps we feel may be out there. venues large and small would all be bound by the law, though they wouldn't all be expected to introduce exactly the same measures. there's no one size fits all. and each venue and each space has the opportunity to make those assessments, and put in measures that are going to be proportionate. now, clearly, venues come in all sorts of different sizes. and, you know, i do have some sympathy for larger arena or stadia—based venues, where you're managing a number of in and out, if you like, doorways and openings and spaces. and i think that that could present some challenges. the consultation will last for 18 weeks, and will run alongside the manchester arena public inquiry, which will also make recommendations about counter—terrorism security.
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judith moritz, bbc news, manchester. let's speak to martyn's mum, figen murray, whojoins us let's speak to martyn's mum, figen murray, who joins us from stockport. good morning. thank you forjoining us. asjudith was saying there, four years after the bombing, two years after your campaign started, the beginning today of this consultation period. it is a big day for you? it is indeed, yes. i'm really, really grateful— is indeed, yes. i'm really, really grateful that this day has come. yeah, _ grateful that this day has come. yeah, very— grateful that this day has come. yeah, very delighted. it grateful that this day has come. yeah, very delighted.— yeah, very delighted. it has robabl yeah, very delighted. it has probably taken _ yeah, very delighted. it has probably taken longer - yeah, very delighted. it has probably taken longer to . yeah, very delighted. it has| probably taken longer to get yeah, very delighted. it has i probably taken longer to get to yeah, very delighted. it has - probably taken longer to get to this point then you would have hoped, partly because of covid and the delays, it must have been a frustrating time? to delays, it must have been a frustrating time?— delays, it must have been a frustrating time? delays, it must have been a frustratin: time? ., , ., , frustrating time? to be quite honest with ou, frustrating time? to be quite honest with you. from _ frustrating time? to be quite honest with you. from a _ frustrating time? to be quite honest with you, from a personal— with you, from a personal perspective, i am glad we are here. the delay— perspective, i am glad we are here. the delay obviously was caused
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mainty— the delay obviously was caused mainly through covid. i wouldn't want _ mainly through covid. i wouldn't want to— mainly through covid. i wouldn't want to he — mainly through covid. i wouldn't want to be any government at the nronrent — want to be any government at the moment. just grateful we are here now and _ moment. just grateful we are here now and that is all that matters. obviously — now and that is all that matters. obviously losing martyn was the main drive behind this for you. but i believe there was a moment when you went to the theatre a couple of years ago when the need for this change in the law became clear in your mind. just tell us what happened?— your mind. just tell us what ha ened? . ., , happened? yeah, welli naively assumed that _ happened? yeah, welli naively assumed that since _ happened? yeah, welli naively assumed that since the - happened? yeah, welli naively assumed that since the arena l happened? yeah, welli naively i assumed that since the arena attack public— assumed that since the arena attack public venues had really sharpened up public venues had really sharpened up their— public venues had really sharpened up their security. we went to a small— up their security. we went to a small venue to watch a singer. there appeared _ small venue to watch a singer. there appeared to — small venue to watch a singer. there appeared to be no security that i could _ appeared to be no security that i could see — appeared to be no security that i could see. it kind of deeply upset me. could see. it kind of deeply upset nre i_ could see. it kind of deeply upset me. i chewed over it for a couple of weeks _ me. i chewed over it for a couple of weeks and — me. i chewed over it for a couple of weeks and then decided to do something about it, hence the petition — something about it, hence the petition that we then started. this
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consultation _ petition that we then started. try 3 consultation period, what do you hope happens at the end of it? what would you like in practical terms this law change to mean? would you like in practicalterms this law change to mean?- would you like in practicalterms this law change to mean? well, the law change is _ this law change to mean? well, the law change is obviously _ this law change to mean? well, the law change is obviously that - this law change to mean? well, the law change is obviously that public| law change is obviously that public venues. _ law change is obviously that public venues, publicly assess —— accessible casings and operators of venues. _ accessible casings and operators of venues. are — accessible casings and operators of venues, are in need of taking responsibility for the safety of their— responsibility for the safety of their customers and people that visit their— their customers and people that visit their venue. the consultation really— visit their venue. the consultation really is _ visit their venue. the consultation really is about working with these places _ really is about working with these places to — really is about working with these places to find out the best way to implement the law. it's obviously a huge _ implement the law. it's obviously a huge document. it's engaging these places— huge document. it's engaging these places to _ huge document. it's engaging these places to ensure that actually it becomes— places to ensure that actually it becomes a collaborative process, because — becomes a collaborative process, because every venue is different. every— because every venue is different. every venue will have different requirements. it is not meant to be a punitive _ requirements. it is not meant to be a punitive process. it is meant to be collaborative. i itjust finds
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out who— be collaborative. i itjust finds out who it _ be collaborative. i itjust finds out who it applies to and what exactly — out who it applies to and what exactly people are required to do. and obviously there is loads of guidance — and obviously there is loads of guidance the government will give and support. venues won't be on their— and support. venues won't be on their own — and support. venues won't be on their own with this. there's lots of help and _ their own with this. there's lots of help and support. it is already in existence, — help and support. it is already in existence, actually. but they will further _ existence, actually. but they will further prepare as the consultation .oes further prepare as the consultation goes on _ further prepare as the consultation goes on it— further prepare as the consultation goes on. it is a very comprehensive document — goes on. it is a very comprehensive document. yeah, it is a good way to establish _ document. yeah, it is a good way to establish how then to move it forward — establish how then to move it forward to the next space. if in the future ou forward to the next space. if in the future you were _ forward to the next space. if in the future you were to _ forward to the next space. if in the future you were to go _ forward to the next space. if in the future you were to go to _ forward to the next space. if in the future you were to go to a - forward to the next space. if in the future you were to go to a theatre | future you were to go to a theatre like the one that he went to a couple of years ago, how would you like the experience to be different and feel safer in the future? what would you like to see at the theatre doors as part of the process? itrefoil.
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doors as part of the process? well, i'd like to see _ doors as part of the process? well, i'd like to see security _ doors as part of the process? well, i'd like to see security in _ doors as part of the process? well, i'd like to see security in action. i i'd like to see security in action. i'd like to see security in action. i hasten — i'd like to see security in action. i hasten to— i'd like to see security in action. i hasten to add security, in my view, — i hasten to add security, in my view, has _ i hasten to add security, in my view, has to be proportionate. it's not one _ view, has to be proportionate. it's not one size — view, has to be proportionate. it's not one size fits all like it was said _ not one size fits all like it was said in— not one size fits all like it was said in the _ not one size fits all like it was said in the report earlier. it is literativ— said in the report earlier. it is literally depending on the size of the venue. the bigger the venue, the more _ the venue. the bigger the venue, the more security and would like to see. but even _ more security and would like to see. but even in — more security and would like to see. but even in smaller places i would like to— but even in smaller places i would like to know and a sense that i am safer, _ like to know and a sense that i am safer, whether that is somebody standing — safer, whether that is somebody standing at the door or a metal detector? _ standing at the door or a metal detector? s to bigger venues. security— detector? s to bigger venues. security takes many formats really. nobody _ security takes many formats really. nobody is _ security takes many formats really. nobody is going to argue with the sentiment behind it. i suppose coming out of the pandemic when lots of venues have been shut and they have lost huge amounts of money, some owners are some promoters might be thinking, my goodness, this is another expense, potentially a huge expense, more your accuracy involved. what would you say to reassure them?—
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involved. what would you say to reassure them? ~ , ., ._ , reassure them? well, there is always resistance when _ reassure them? well, there is always resistance when new _ reassure them? well, there is always resistance when new things _ reassure them? well, there is always resistance when new things happen. l resistance when new things happen. but martyn's law is not costing a lot of— but martyn's law is not costing a lot of money. sometimes there is no cost involved. there are ways of recouping — cost involved. there are ways of recouping some of the money at bigger— recouping some of the money at bigger venues if there is extra security— bigger venues if there is extra security that needs to be installed or staff _ security that needs to be installed or staff needed to be hired. as a nrother— or staff needed to be hired. as a mother i— or staff needed to be hired. as a mother i depend maybe a couple of times— mother i depend maybe a couple of times more on a ticket price for a bil times more on a ticket price for a big show— times more on a ticket price for a big show as — times more on a ticket price for a big show as a security levy. for instance. — big show as a security levy. for instance, that is one way of a venue being _ instance, that is one way of a venue being able _ instance, that is one way of a venue being able to claw that money back a bit. being able to claw that money back a bit but— being able to claw that money back a bit. but these are expenses that actually— bit. but these are expenses that actually are important expenses and one-off— actually are important expenses and one—off expenses. but moving away from the _ one—off expenses. but moving away from the money side, a lot of venues don't _ from the money side, a lot of venues don't even _ from the money side, a lot of venues don't even have to spend money. it can be _ don't even have to spend money. it can be literallyjust doing risk assessment and training their staff. it can— assessment and training their staff. it can be _ assessment and training their staff. it can be as — assessment and training their staff. it can be as simple as that. and that— it can be as simple as that. and that training is freely available
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already— that training is freely available already for notjust that training is freely available already for not just venues but members _ already for not just venues but members of the public. so there is a lot of— members of the public. so there is a lot of support out there that cost absolutely nothing. you lot of support out there that cost absolutely nothing.— lot of support out there that cost absolutely nothing. you have told us before about — absolutely nothing. you have told us before about how— absolutely nothing. you have told us before about how much _ absolutely nothing. you have told us before about how much you - absolutely nothing. you have told us before about how much you miss i before about how much you miss martyn and how losing him has affected your family and his friends, and how loved he was. we see the pictures of you in the piece of you out talking to politicians, dressing big crowds, talking to the police and the industry. i mean, your life has changed immeasurably in so many ways. how are you doing right now? in so many ways. how are you doing riaht now? ., , . ., right now? here, it has changed completely- _ right now? here, it has changed completely. would _ right now? here, it has changed completely. would you - right now? here, it has changed completely. would you believe i right now? here, it has changed i completely. would you believe it, i used to— completely. would you believe it, i used to be — completely. would you believe it, i used to be an introvert, so talking to crowds— used to be an introvert, so talking to crowds would be something i would have laughed at and use told me that four years _ have laughed at and use told me that four years ago. but this law is important _ four years ago. but this law is important to me and martyn's death has somehow given me the courage and the impetus— has somehow given me the courage and the impetus to do something about
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it. the impetus to do something about it i'm _ the impetus to do something about it. i'm really busy. i'm attending the enquiry. and i am also in my last stage — the enquiry. and i am also in my last stage of my university course. i am _ last stage of my university course. i am doing — last stage of my university course. i am doing a — last stage of my university course. i am doing a masters in counterterrorism. that's a lot of academic— counterterrorism. that's a lot of academic work. i have to sink my teeth— academic work. i have to sink my teeth into — academic work. i have to sink my teeth into it _ academic work. i have to sink my teeth into it. there isn't that much time _ teeth into it. there isn't that much time to— teeth into it. there isn't that much time to think about anything else. thank— time to think about anything else. thank you — time to think about anything else. thank you for talking to us this morning. all the best wishes from all of us here. thank you.- all of us here. thank you. thank ou. interesting to not have to time to think about much as a most help. yes. 21 think about much as a most help. yes. ' , , , �* , yes. 21 minutes past seven. let's take ou yes. 21 minutes past seven. let's take you back— yes. 21 minutes past seven. let's take you back to _ yes. 21 minutes past seven. let's take you back to another - yes. 21 minutes past seven. let's take you back to another one i yes. 21 minutes past seven. let's take you back to another one of. yes. 21 minutes past seven. let's l take you back to another one of our main stories. the enquiry into so—called smart motorways begins today. so-called smart motorways begins toda . , . ., . ~ so-called smart motorways begins toda. , . . today. they have tackled traffic in en . land today. they have tackled traffic in england for _ today. they have tackled traffic in england for 20 — today. they have tackled traffic in england for 20 years _ today. they have tackled traffic in england for 20 years now. - today. they have tackled traffic in england for 20 years now. but i today. they have tackled traffic in i england for 20 years now. but there are concerns over how smart they actually are.
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let's get a view from the aa's edmund king, who joins us from st albans. thank you for your time. good morning. thank you for your time. good morninu. ,., ., thank you for your time. good morning-— thank you for your time. good j morning._ what thank you for your time. good i morning._ what is thank you for your time. good - morning._ what is your morning. good morning. what is your view of smart — morning. good morning. what is your view of smart motorways? _ morning. good morning. what is your view of smart motorways? we - morning. good morning. what is your view of smart motorways? we have i view of smart motorways? we have been raising — view of smart motorways? we have been raising concerns _ view of smart motorways? we have been raising concerns probably i view of smart motorways? we have been raising concerns probably for. been raising concerns probably for more _ been raising concerns probably for more than — been raising concerns probably for more than ten years. in fact, i think— more than ten years. in fact, i think i— more than ten years. in fact, i think i have _ more than ten years. in fact, i think i have already spoken to about three _ think i have already spoken to about three house of commons transport committee is on it and spoken to more _ committee is on it and spoken to more than — committee is on it and spoken to more than 12 ministers and secretaries of state. from the outset — secretaries of state. from the outset we _ secretaries of state. from the outset we said there was a pilot on the 42 _ outset we said there was a pilot on the 42 where you had emergency every 500 metres _ the 42 where you had emergency every 500 metres. that worked quite well. when _ 500 metres. that worked quite well. when they— 500 metres. that worked quite well. when they were rolled out to other motorways without any consultation, the spacing between refugees moved from 500 _ the spacing between refugees moved from 500 metres to 2500 metres, or a mile and _ from 500 metres to 2500 metres, or a mile and a — from 500 metres to 2500 metres, or a mile and a half. we said from the outset _ mile and a half. we said from the outset that— mile and a half. we said from the outset that is too dangerous. if you break _ outset that is too dangerous. if you break down — outset that is too dangerous. if you break down in a live lane then you are at— break down in a live lane then you are at risk — break down in a live lane then you
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are at risk if— break down in a live lane then you are at risk. if there are more emergency lay—by is, you've got more chance _ emergency lay—by is, you've got more chance of— emergency lay—by is, you've got more chance of pulling off the highway. we think— chance of pulling off the highway. we think banging on the doors of government, putting that message across— government, putting that message across for— government, putting that message across for ten years, and here we are ten— across for ten years, and here we are ten years later and yet another enquiry— are ten years later and yet another enquiry looking into this. so are ten years later and yet another enquiry looking into this.— enquiry looking into this. so there is no way the _ enquiry looking into this. so there is no way the extra _ enquiry looking into this. so there is no way the extra lane _ enquiry looking into this. so there is no way the extra lane can i enquiry looking into this. so there is no way the extra lane can be i is no way the extra lane can be combined with more refuges? well, there is, because _ combined with more refuges? well, there is, because the _ combined with more refuges? well, there is, because the m _ combined with more refuges? well, there is, because the m 42 - combined with more refuges? well, there is, because the m 42 pilot showed — there is, because the m 42 pilot showed quite clearly that you could have more — showed quite clearly that you could have more refuge areas. but a decision— have more refuge areas. but a decision was taken back then without consultation to actually expand the motorway — consultation to actually expand the motorway system on the cheap. there were reports— motorway system on the cheap. there were reports done at the time that showed _ were reports done at the time that showed the risk was three times higher— showed the risk was three times higher if— showed the risk was three times higher if you didn't have that number— higher if you didn't have that number of refuge areas. but that decision— number of refuge areas. but that decision was taken then.- number of refuge areas. but that decision was taken then. sorry, i'm 'ustt inc decision was taken then. sorry, i'm just trying to _ decision was taken then. sorry, i'm just trying to make _ decision was taken then. sorry, i'm just trying to make clear. _ decision was taken then. sorry, i'm just trying to make clear. so - decision was taken then. sorry, i'm| just trying to make clear. so decent is not an argument about no smart motorways, from your point of view. —— this isn't an argument. it is
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about deploying the extra lane because the idea is to reduce congestion. it would work if there were more refuges? it is more against the decision to diminish the number of those that is the problem? yeah, indeed. and it is not only the refuges _ yeah, indeed. and it is not only the refuges but— yeah, indeed. and it is not only the refuges. but also, there is a stopped _ refuges. but also, there is a stopped vehicle detection radar system — stopped vehicle detection radar system that has only been brought in and about— system that has only been brought in and about 25 miles of smart motorway. it is now being retrofitted. that is a little late. that _ retrofitted. that is a little late. that should have been put in at the beginning — that should have been put in at the beginning. there are a number of safety— beginning. there are a number of safety issues. what it comes down to is the _ safety issues. what it comes down to is the risk— safety issues. what it comes down to is the risk of— safety issues. what it comes down to is the risk of breaking down in a lifeline — is the risk of breaking down in a lifeline. currently, 38% of breakdowns on the smart motorways are in— breakdowns on the smart motorways are in a _ breakdowns on the smart motorways are in a live — breakdowns on the smart motorways are in a live lane. then you are at the mercy— are in a live lane. then you are at the mercy of— are in a live lane. then you are at the mercy of being spotted, at the mercy— the mercy of being spotted, at the mercy of— the mercy of being spotted, at the mercy of drivers abiding by the red x. mercy of drivers abiding by the red x many— mercy of drivers abiding by the red x many of— mercy of drivers abiding by the red x. many of the tragic deaths have occurred — x. many of the tragic deaths have occurred when other vehicles have
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ploughed — occurred when other vehicles have ploughed into the back of a stationary vehicle. so currently, we believe _ stationary vehicle. so currently, we believe more needs to be done. the roblem is believe more needs to be done. problem is at believe more needs to be done. the problem is at the moment, not so much at the moment because we are not done on traffic levels are supposed to be significantly reduced, once we get back to normal, whatever that may be, there is a congestion problem in this country, particularly amongst certain motorways, so there needs to be almost some breathing space or mechanism to allow congestion to ease? ~ ., ,., , ., ease? well, indeed. the reasons for smart motorways — ease? well, indeed. the reasons for smart motorways was _ ease? well, indeed. the reasons for smart motorways was down - ease? well, indeed. the reasons for smart motorways was down to i smart motorways was down to congestion. it was costing billions of pounds — congestion. it was costing billions of pounds. it was a cheaper, quicker way of— of pounds. it was a cheaper, quicker way of increasing capacity. so that was done — way of increasing capacity. so that was done. however, we are different situation _ was done. however, we are different situation it— was done. however, we are different situation. it would be interesting if the _ situation. it would be interesting if the select committee reviews what a traffic— if the select committee reviews what a traffic level is going to be like post— a traffic level is going to be like post lockdown. and in a way there is a bit of— post lockdown. and in a way there is a bit of an— post lockdown. and in a way there is a bit of an anomaly currently because _ a bit of an anomaly currently because more than one third of drivers— because more than one third of drivers on— because more than one third of
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drivers on smart motorways don't use the inside _ drivers on smart motorways don't use the inside lane because they are worried — the inside lane because they are worried about the stationary vehicle ahead _ worried about the stationary vehicle ahead so _ worried about the stationary vehicle ahead. so in a way they are treating it like _ ahead. so in a way they are treating it like a _ ahead. so in a way they are treating it like a hard— ahead. so in a way they are treating it like a hard shoulder. so you are not getting — it like a hard shoulder. so you are not getting the benefits. the other concern _ not getting the benefits. the other concern is, — not getting the benefits. the other concern is, if there is a major crash, — concern is, if there is a major crash, it— concern is, if there is a major crash, it takes longer for the emergency services to get to that incident _ emergency services to get to that incident because on a conventional motorway— incident because on a conventional motorway they can go down the hard shoulder— motorway they can go down the hard shoulder to— motorway they can go down the hard shoulder to get to that incident. and the — shoulder to get to that incident. and the first hour after a major collision — and the first hour after a major collision is _ and the first hour after a major collision is the golden hour. it is very— collision is the golden hour. it is very important to get people to hospital — very important to get people to hospital. it can be the difference between — hospital. it can be the difference between life and death. so there is still a _ between life and death. so there is still a number of issues. what evidence do _ still a number of issues. what evidence do you _ still a number of issues. what evidence do you have - still a number of issues. what evidence do you have in i still a number of issues. what| evidence do you have in terms still a number of issues. what i evidence do you have in terms of timings, in terms of the delay? the olice timings, in terms of the delay? the police have — timings, in terms of the delay? the police have given evidence at a select — police have given evidence at a select committee is about the time it takes _ select committee is about the time it takes. ~ . , it takes. what is the time difference? _ it takes. what is the time difference? sorry, - it takes. what is the time difference? sorry, time i it takes. what is the time j difference? sorry, time is it takes. what is the time i difference? sorry, time is tight, but i'd be interested to know what the time difference is because you brought that up? it the time difference is because you brought that up?— the time difference is because you brought that up? it depends on the
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incident. if you _ brought that up? it depends on the incident. if you have _ brought that up? it depends on the incident. if you have got _ brought that up? it depends on the incident. if you have got four - brought that up? it depends on the incident. if you have got four lanes| incident. if you have got four lanes of stopped — incident. if you have got four lanes of stopped traffic, the police have .ot of stopped traffic, the police have got to— of stopped traffic, the police have got to weave through cars, obviously it will_ got to weave through cars, obviously it will take _ got to weave through cars, obviously it will take more time. and a matter of minutes_ it will take more time. and a matter of minutes can be the difference between — of minutes can be the difference between life and death in that situation. . ~ between life and death in that situation. ., ~ , ., situation. edmund king, thank you ve much situation. edmund king, thank you very much for— situation. edmund king, thank you very much for your _ situation. edmund king, thank you very much for your time. _ situation. edmund king, thank you very much for your time. i - situation. edmund king, thank you very much for your time. i should l very much for your time. i should say a department for transport spokesperson said since taking office the current secretary of state has expressed his concerns over smart motorways and committed 500 minim safety improvements. we welcome this important enquiry from the transport committee and will provide written evidence to help in its work. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. it say good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. grassroots projects tackling violence along a road branded the crime capital of croydon have been given a share
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of £6 million of funding from city hall. a new application process has encouraged local groups to join forces to pitch for cash — rather than going up against each other. eight areas have been awarded money from the my ends programme. we picked areas where there was high demonstratable need. those organisations that came forward were able to talk about some of the problems, some of the alienation they felt there was for young people in the area, the poverty, some of the deprivation. but, also, and really critically, they talk with a huge amount of optimism and enthusiasm about working together, engaging residents, and coming up with solutions. free—to—use cash machines are vanishing at an alarming rate, according to the consumer rights group which. london has seen the greatest decline with more than a quarter cut in the last two years. which says in deprived areas, where people are more likely to depend on cash, they could be forced to pay to withdraw their own money. a castle in south—east london could have to close less than a decade after it was restored and opened to the public.
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severndroog castle on shooters hill was built in 178a. the pandemic means it's been temporaily shut to visitors and there are concerns about it's future. it's a precarious time for us. we don't get admissions, we don't get money from events, we don't get money from our weddings and our hires. so a lot of our income streams have disappeared. there is no other grant funding for the castle now, so it all depends on the support from the community. let's take a look at the travel situation now... there are minor delays on the circle line, hammersmith and city and on tfl rail. on the trains — there's no great northern, thameslink or london north eastern service at kings cross today with engineering works over the weekend. southern has disruption between london bridge and tulse hill because of a points failure. on the roads. the a404 is closed southbound between mao atjunction 4 and marlow after an accident. now the weather with kate. good morning. it is a cold start, especially
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compared to the last few nights. last night, temperatures dropped, in one or two spots, to just below zero. so a patchy ground frost for some first thing. one or two mist and fog patches potentially, but they should lift and we will see plenty of sunshine. blue sky today, perhaps broken cloud developing through the afternoon. but the wind is light and the temperature feeling mild. we are looking at a maximum of around 13 celsius. overnight tonight, it's a repeat performance. clear skies and the temperature dropping very close to zero, if not just below. we could see a mist orfog patch by dawn. the minimum down to around —2 away from central london. into the weekend, high pressure dominates our weather for the next few days, which means we will see plenty of fine, settled, dry weather. lots of sunshine around for saturday. perhaps a little bit more in the way of cloud for sunday, but the wind is light and daytime temperatures, again, feeling mild. night—time temperatures dropping close to zero. i'm back in an hour
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with the latest from bbc london. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. the queen has encouraged those who are hesitant about having the coronavirus vaccine to "think about other people rather than themselves". she was speaking for the first time about her experience of having the jab since being inoculated last month. during a video call with health leaders, the queen said she felt protected since having the vaccine. leaders, the queen said she felt it leaders, the queen said she felt was quite harmles quick. it was quite harmless. it was very auick. i it was quite harmless. it was very quick- i have _ it was quite harmless. it was very quick. i have had _ it was quite harmless. it was very quick. i have had lots— it was quite harmless. it was very quick. i have had lots of- it was quite harmless. it was very quick. i have had lots of letters . quick. i have had lots of letters from people who have been very surprised by how easy it was to get the vaccine. the jab did not hurt at
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all. it is obviously difficult for people, if they have never had a vaccine. they ought to think about other people rather than themselves. the former first minister of scotland — alex salmond — will be questioned by members of the scottish parliament today over his claims of a "malicious and concerted" conspiracy against him. it's part of an inquiry into the mishandling of sexual harassment complaints about him, which were later disproven in court. dismissed in court. the current first minister nicola sturgeon, a former ally of alex salmond, has dismissed his claims. the supreme court will rule today on whether shamima begum — who left london as a teenager tojoin the so—called islamic state in syria — should be allowed back into the uk. she wants to appeal against the decision by the government to remove her british nationality. miss begum was 15 when she and two other schoolgirls from east london made the journey six years ago. she's currently in a refugee camp in northern syria.
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in the past half hour, figen murray, whose son martyn hett was killed in the manchester arena bombing four years ago, has told breakfast she wants a change in the law to be his legacy. a consultation begins today into plans to make it a legal requirement for public places and venues to improve security. we can speak now to thejustice secretary robert buckland, who is in swindon. good morning. very moving hearing from the mother of martyn hett about the need for changes she sees it. it is almost four years since the manchester arena bombing. why has this taken long? i manchester arena bombing. why has this taken long?— this taken long? i want to pay a hue this taken long? i want to pay a huge tribute — this taken long? i want to pay a huge tribute to _ this taken long? i want to pay a huge tribute to what _ this taken long? i want to pay a huge tribute to what she - this taken long? i want to pay a huge tribute to what she and i this taken long? i want to pay a i huge tribute to what she and other campaigners have achieved. yes, it has taken a long time. we pledged this at the election. we wanted to
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get this right. colleagues at the home office have worked on the detail of what will be a consultation because there needs to be a balance struck between the obvious need, i think for venues and large venues that expect lots of people to come for music or other events to plan and think ahead with regard to what would be an exceptional and appalling events such as the one in manchester. it is important we work out who should be subject to the duty, the extent of it, and making sure we get the balance right between the need to protect people and also they need to make sure that it is proportionate, bearing in mind the fact there might bearing in mind the fact there might be venues it would not be appropriate for. people will have a chance to have their say. i am very much looking forward to the home secretary looking forward to
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bringing forward this statutory duty as soon as possible to fulfil the hopes and aims of the campaigners. we had people get in touch asking why it is it has taken her, as a grieving mother, to push this potential change in the law, and why politicians, who are paid to protectors, did not think of it and do something sooner. it is protectors, did not think of it and do something sooner. it is always a ro er do something sooner. it is always a preper question _ do something sooner. it is always a proper question to _ do something sooner. it is always a proper question to ask. _ do something sooner. it is always a proper question to ask. as - do something sooner. it is always a proper question to ask. as a - do something sooner. it is always a proper question to ask. as a senior| proper question to ask. as a senior minister with responsibility for aspects of public protection, i am always racking the mines to ask myself searching questions about what more can be done to maximise safety. in a democracy the role of campaigners is important. and frankly, they have a huge role to play to make sure politicians listen
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and take appropriate action. that is what we are doing now with this consultation and with our intention to bring forward that statutory duty that will i think improve the way in which venues will plan for and anticipate and deal with and minimise the risk of harm these terrible events, as we saw in 2017, can cause. terrible events, as we saw in 2017, can cause-— can cause. you talk about your resuonsibility _ can cause. you talk about your responsibility areas, _ can cause. you talk about your responsibility areas, you - can cause. you talk about your responsibility areas, you are l responsibility areas, you are justice secretary. the figures are stark on the number of cases pending in courts. 50,000 cases, a backlog in courts. 50,000 cases, a backlog in the courts. reports from lawyers and police say criminals are getting lesser sentences because they have to wait so long for cases to come. what are you doing to speed things up what are you doing to speed things up and cleared the backlog? i am investin: up and cleared the backlog? i—n investing unprecedented amounts of
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money into scaling up the capacity of our courts. with social distancing, a lot of work had to be done to make them safer so juries could carry on with their important work. that has been done. we have on the court a state over 250 courts that can hearjury trial safely. and also nightingale courts. we have 50 extra court rooms up and running on monday, 60 by the end of march, many of which will be doing criminal cases. it of which will be doing criminal cases. , ., .,, of which will be doing criminal cases. , ., ., of which will be doing criminal cases. , . . , . of which will be doing criminal cases. ., , . cases. it is almost a year since the andemic cases. it is almost a year since the pandemic started. _ cases. it is almost a year since the pandemic started. labour - cases. it is almost a year since the pandemic started. labour have - cases. it is almost a year since the i pandemic started. labour have called on you to do the nightingale courts and have more of the much sooner. you could maybe have done this more quickly? you could maybe have done this more cuickl ? ., . ., , quickly? no, i certainly was well ahead of the _ quickly? no, i certainly was well ahead of the labour _ quickly? no, i certainly was well ahead of the labour party. i i quickly? no, i certainly was well i ahead of the labour party. i started calling for and moving on nightingale courts in the summer and we have been rolling out that programme since then. i published
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plans for court expansion six months ago. i have been working with the treasury to get investment. we are dealing with small and administrative hearings and fitting in as many days as possible. judges are sitting in a very active way in order to get three cases. my plan is with the help of the judiciary to really sit as many days as possible in the year ahead to help deal with the caseload. it is normal to have a caseload of many thousands. the key is the time it takes. i am focused upon making sure we can reduce time scale so witnesses and victims can give their evidence and have the matter dealt with. fin give their evidence and have the matter dealt with.— matter dealt with. on covid vaccinations, _ matter dealt with. on covid vaccinations, we _ matter dealt with. on covid vaccinations, we are - matter dealt with. on covid| vaccinations, we are waiting matter dealt with. on covid i vaccinations, we are waiting for matter dealt with. on covid - vaccinations, we are waiting for the latest advice from experts on the
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bands and ages of who should come next. one suggestion has been vaccinating all prisoners within an institution, because that would keep notjust institution, because that would keep not just them safe institution, because that would keep notjust them safe but prison staff say. it has been an issue in the pandemic in prisons. if the scientists say vaccinate prisoners next, or very soon, with the government be prepared to do that and take the political hit? i government be prepared to do that and take the political hit?— and take the political hit? i think throughout _ and take the political hit? i think throughout this _ and take the political hit? i think throughout this crisis _ and take the political hit? i think throughout this crisis and - and take the political hit? i think| throughout this crisis and through the vaccination programme, jcvi's advice has been important, and the success we have had has been in no doubt in great part to the sensible advice they have given and we will await the next stage of advice. with regard to prisoners, it is right to say no prisoner would get priority ahead of the cohort in the community and therefore making sure there is that consistency is important and
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that consistency is important and that has been happening. i am keen to make sure dedicated prison staff get the vaccination. many of them are already because they are in the current categories, and i want to make sure that happens quickly. the thing for me is speed. if we have advice from jcvi that maximises speed of the roll—out of the vaccination programme, that will be for everybody, where ever they are. it would surely be quicker and more efficient for a team to go into a prison and do everybody in there, staff and prisoners at the same time, then going in one week to do over 70s, the next week over 60s. that would make efficiency sense. the question is whether you are prepared to do that, knowing the headlines it would create about prisoners coming before other key workers such as teachers. i prisoners coming before other key workers such as teachers.- prisoners coming before other key workers such as teachers. i think we need to see — workers such as teachers. i think we need to see the _ workers such as teachers. i think we need to see the advice _
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workers such as teachers. i think we need to see the advice from - workers such as teachers. i think we need to see the advice from jcvi i need to see the advice from jcvi with regard to closed environment such as prisons. the important point is we make sure there is a consistency and clarity and that need for speed. there are various ways it can be done. i do not think anybody is saying prisons have lagged behind. they have not gone in front of the community, but they have not lagged behind, and the huge work done over the past 12 months has saved many lives. whilst every life lost is a matter of regret and sadness, the fact is we have managed to minimise and contain outbreaks in prisons. today, about 30 prisons have outbreaks of more than ten cases out of 120 prisons in england and wales. that is because of the incredible work done by officers and staff and i want to pay tribute to them for everything they continue to do. ., them for everything they continue to do. . . , ~' them for everything they continue to
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do. . ., ., ., do. can i ask about the health secretary _ do. can i ask about the health secretary matt _ do. can i ask about the health secretary matt hancock, i do. can i ask about the health secretary matt hancock, a i do. can i ask about the health i secretary matt hancock, a court found he acted unlawfully in the way the health department delayed publishing details of ppe contracts. mr hancock said they were busy and dealing with the pandemic and had to do what they did and it was a few days late and so be it, almost. the fact is he acted unlawfully. you are the justice secretary. fact is he acted unlawfully. you are thejustice secretary. you cannot have been comfortable with the explanation of we were very busy? the courts, every month, are asked to make important decisions about lawfulness and otherwise of government actions and there will be times when government will be held to have acted lawfully and times when they have not have and this was one such occasion. i read the judgment carefully. the important point is the points are learned and aspects of behaviour are not repeated. i accept we were extremely
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and continue to be extremely busy, but the judge and continue to be extremely busy, but thejudge made and continue to be extremely busy, but the judge made the ruling and that will be respected. what but the judge made the ruling and that will be respected.— but the judge made the ruling and that will be respected. what sort of messa . e that will be respected. what sort of message does _ that will be respected. what sort of message does it _ that will be respected. what sort of message does it send _ that will be respected. what sort of message does it send to _ that will be respected. what sort of message does it send to the - that will be respected. what sort of message does it send to the rest i that will be respected. what sort of message does it send to the rest of us, the public, that the health secretary, in a position of authority, says we were very busy, we had to get this ppe? as a general message about legality and illegality, that is not great, is it? j illegality, that is not great, is it? “ illegality, that is not great, is it? 4' ,., ., illegality, that is not great, is it? 4' ., , it? i think the important point is once a court _ it? i think the important point is once a court has _ it? i think the important point is once a court has made - it? i think the important point is once a court has made a - it? i think the important point is i once a court has made a judgment, is it accepted and do consequences follow? at a respect for the rule of law and judiciary means that must be done and the lesson must be learnt and that has to apply and does apply every day right across government. i would strongly refute any suggestion there is somehow an attitude in government that would seek to disregard the important decisions
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and binding decisions ofjudges in our courts. that is certainly the case here. it would be the case no doubt in other examples before and since that particularjudgment. it since that particularjudgment. it almost sounds like you as a government are saying it's ok to break the law sometimes if we are in a hurry or cannot do it. surely the message should be we will always abide by the law because we set the example? i abide by the law because we set the examle? ., abide by the law because we set the examle? . , , ., example? i am sorry, there is no doubt about _ example? i am sorry, there is no doubt about this. _ example? i am sorry, there is no doubt about this. we _ example? i am sorry, there is no doubt about this. we will- example? i am sorry, there is no doubt about this. we will always | doubt about this. we will always abide by the law. but doubt about this. we will always abide by the law.— doubt about this. we will always abide by the law. doubt about this. we will always abideb the law. �* ~ ., abide by the law. but mr hancock has been unapologetic _ abide by the law. but mr hancock has been unapologetic about _ abide by the law. but mr hancock has been unapologetic about this. - abide by the law. but mr hancock has been unapologetic about this. he i abide by the law. but mr hancock has been unapologetic about this. he hasj been unapologetic about this. he has not said sorry, he has said this is why we did it. the not said sorry, he has said this is why we did it— not said sorry, he has said this is wh we did it. ., , , why we did it. the 'udgment has been made. it is why we did it. the judgment has been made. it is accepted. _ why we did it. the judgment has been made. it is accepted. the _ why we did it. the judgment has been made. it is accepted. the particular. made. it is accepted. the particular reasons advanced by the department meant... thejudge reasons advanced by the department meant... the judge took his view it was unlawful. you listen to the arguments, and he had criticisms to
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make on aspects of the application. i'm sorry, i am not talking about thejudge's decision but i'm sorry, i am not talking about the judge's decision but the government response to the decision. it is important. looking at the detail is everything and the judge made important observations about all aspects of the case. the key thing for government is will they abide by the ruling? of course they will. that is central to the rule of law and there are no ifs and buts about that. law and there are no ifs and buts about that-— let say hello to mike. so much going on yesterday. my head was spinning with the cricket. but not for long. the scores were lower than previous records. the way wickets just fell. 17 lower than previous records. the way wicketsjust fell. 17 in lower than previous records. the way wickets just fell. 17 in a lower than previous records. the way wicketsjust fell. 17 in a day, the second shortest test match ever.
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when you thought england could do no more. the pitch helped them. we will talk about that in a moment. in the evening, a dramatic night for arsenal. like a cup final with this season hinging on the last three minutes. a reminder of how football fortunes can change on a dramatic night for british clubs in europe. it was all square against benfica, being played in greece, because of coronavirus restrictions. arsenal were heading out on the away goals rule, until pierre—emerick aubameyang headed the goal to take them through and lift the pressure on their manager mikel arteta. manchester united already had a 4—0 lead over real sociedad going into the second leg. they thought they score through alex twanzebe butjust watch how high team—mate victor lindelof jumps here. it meant the goal was ruled
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out by var, and he was given a yellow card. but leicester are out after they were beaten 2—0 at home by the czech side slavia prague, who called it a sporting miracle. and after feeling the wrath of rangers manager steven gerrard for attending an illegal house party, teenager nathan patterson made amends on the pitch against royal antwerp. he scored just 16 seconds after coming on for the second half. they won 5—2. the aggregate score of 9—5 was the competition's highest, for 13 years. 17 former british gymnasts, including three olympians, have sent a legal letter to british gymnastics, outlining allegations of physical. outlining allegations of physical and psychological abuse in the sport. the women say the abuse happened, to children as young as six, and caused long—lasting damage. one of the claimants is nicole pavier. we've had time to kind of process things and realise, actually, what was wrong and speak to team—mates and go, actually, whilst we thought that was normal, we laughed it off, it was not ok and, actually, it has a really long—term impact. there's a lot of impacts it
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still has on your life, whether it's dealing with work, dealing with stress, dealing with ptsd, anxiety, they're all things that we're dealing with that actually we shouldn't have been dealing with at our age. meanwhile in the usa, the former coach of the american women's gymnastics team — john geddert — has been found dead, just hours after being charged with multiple counts of sexual and physical assaults against young women and a girl. he'd previously worked closely with larry nassar — a team doctor who's injail after abusing hundreds of athletes. geddert�*s body was found after he failed to surrender himself at a sheriff's office. o nto onto the cricket. as the dust settles on the crazy test match that finished inside two days yesterday, the pitch is under scrutiny again. england captainjoe root says the international cricket council should make its ownjudgment on the conditions in ahmedabad, after india beat england in the shortest test since 1935.
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root says it's not up to the players to decide if a surface is fit for purpose, and he called it "very difficult to play on". the stats were extraordinary — a total of 17 wickets fell in the day, as india won by ten wickets. root said he felt fans had been robbed. in contrast, england's women, have taken an unbeatable lead, in the one—day series in new zealand, with victory in the second match in dunedin. nat sciver took three wickets, to help bowl out the home side for 192. she then made 63, as england won, by seven wickets. the third and final game is tomorrow. what is impressive is they have not played for so long, a year. it is brilliant. the focus is on the shorter format with a hundred coming this summer. and starting with the women's game. you hear michael vaughan saying things like the test game is under threat. players putting their emphasis on the shorter format.
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where the money is, possibly. it appeals to people who do not have 3-4 it appeals to people who do not have 3—4 days to watch cricket. could not have been quicker or shorter than yesterday. by shorter than yesterday. by lunchtime. every time you tuned in, a wicket had gone. i was trying to sleep! a friend had taken the day off work to watch it. i tell you what you can do, go for walk. matt can tell you where to walk, backwards, forwards. lovely day if you are heading off for a walk and indeed this weekend. fog around at the moment as you can see here, but pretty cold after the milder conditions this week. temperatures low enough for frost just about anywhere. the coldest in
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benson at the moment in oxfordshire. we have clearer skies. cloud will produce rain over the coming hours in shetland before easing off. cloudy to the north and west of scotland. light winds elsewhere. fog clearing by mid morning where you have it, and then for many blue skies. temperatures down on what we saw the other day. this is still 3—4 above what we should be for the time of year. feeling lovely with strengthening sunshine. overnight, cloud and a bit of rain returning to scotland. it stops temperatures dropping away as much. clear skies in england and wales, a cold one. tomorrow morning and the next few mornings, there will be frost and fog around. england and wales,
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initially, on saturday. most of that will clear. more cloud than today. turning sunny in scotland and northern ireland. parts of england turning cloudy later with the odd spot of rain. most will be dry and another relatively mild day for this stage of the year. high pressure will stop the rain. cloud will be in amongst this on sunday. feeling cooler around the english channel with more of a breeze. cloud through central areas. there will be more cloudy moments compared to what we see today and lingering fog. turning cooler but high—pressure holding on into next week so it will stay very pleasant across many parts of the country. more cloud developing as we go through the week. temperatures above where we should be at this stage in the year but not as warm as
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it has been. the warmth continues at the moment across some parts of europe. sweden and in poland yesterday they broke national records for temperatures in february. astonishing for this stage in february to see 22 in poland. germany has had six days where someone has got above 20 degrees. it means snow and ice has melted and had an impact in denmark. this is from west denmark. the breeze pushing broken ice onto the shore which has mounted up to produce these spectacular scenes. i will have more later. that is beautiful. have you ever seen that in real life? i have not, and it sounds amazing, broken ice tinkling over each other. it will be amazing to see. have you been to the hottest place in poland? i in poland ? i have in poland? i have not. it is one for the bucket
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list. i saw your wind arrows. how choppy is the sea at the moment? not very choppy away from the north—west of scotland. it is pleasant out there, like a mill pond. you are an impressive man. obviously, you know everything, apart from that place in poland. which i will soon learn about. the reason i wanted the water, you will understand this... we are talking about rowing. we will be talking about rowing. we will be talking to billy monger at half past eight and he struggled on one of the legs of the kayaking walking and running because the wind was so high, the water was choppy, so he struggled in the open water. but some people who love rowing cannot get out. this morning we have a world beating rower stops she has not had to leave the kitchen to her title.
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imy bantick is the new under—23 world indoor rowing champion, having completed the 2km race in seven minutes and 22 seconds. shejoins us now from bath. good morning. good morning. seriously impressive times. i suppose indoor rowing comes into its own in a pandemic because you cannot get out on the water.— get out on the water. definitely, it is re get out on the water. definitely, it is pretty much _ get out on the water. definitely, it is pretty much the _ get out on the water. definitely, it is pretty much the only _ get out on the water. definitely, it is pretty much the only thing i get out on the water. definitely, it is pretty much the only thing we . get out on the water. definitely, it i is pretty much the only thing we can do at the moment. the is pretty much the only thing we can do at the moment.— do at the moment. the kitchen is our do at the moment. the kitchen is your chosen _ do at the moment. the kitchen is your chosen place _ do at the moment. the kitchen is your chosen place of _ do at the moment. the kitchen is your chosen place of work - do at the moment. the kitchen is your chosen place of work out? i do at the moment. the kitchen is i your chosen place of work out? well, i am not your chosen place of work out? well, i am rrot sure — your chosen place of work out? well, i am not sure chosen _ your chosen place of work out? well, i am not sure chosen is _ your chosen place of work out? well, i am not sure chosen is the _ your chosen place of work out? -i! i am not sure chosen is the right word. , . ., , ., ~ word. pretty much only option. when ou are word. pretty much only option. when you are rowing. _ word. pretty much only option. when you are rowing. in — word. pretty much only option. when you are rowing, in the _ word. pretty much only option. when you are rowing, in the days _ word. pretty much only option. when you are rowing, in the days when i you are rowing, in the days when gyms were open, when i was on the rowing machine i would have to have a focus, focusing on numbers or looking outside. when you are rowing in the kitchen, if i were you, i would be distracted by what i was
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going to eat next. what is your focus on when you are rowing in the kitchen? i! it focus on when you are rowing in the kitchen? , ., ., , focus on when you are rowing in the kitchen? , . ., , ., kitchen? if it is a really long session. _ kitchen? if it is a really long session. i — kitchen? if it is a really long session, i have _ kitchen? if it is a really long session, i have a _ kitchen? if it is a really long session, i have a stand i kitchen? if it is a really long session, i have a stand on l kitchen? if it is a really long l session, i have a stand on the machine where i can put my phone and watch a bit of tv while i am rowing. if not, music is really good. it if not, music is really good. it obviously works because you have been doing this from a young age, and you joined the university rowing team, but did you know you are a world—class indoor rower? i do team, but did you know you are a world-class indoor rower? i do not think i expected _ world-class indoor rower? i do not think i expected to _ world-class indoor rower? i do not think i expected to be _ world-class indoor rower? i do not think i expected to be at _ world-class indoor rower? i do not think i expected to be at the i world-class indoor rower? i do not think i expected to be at the world j think i expected to be at the world indoors. i wanted to enter the british to see how i was doing compared to everyone else and i have a race we could do this year. and it progressed really quickly. seriously imressive progressed really quickly. seriously impressive times. _ progressed really quickly. seriously impressive times. incredible. i progressed really quickly. seriously impressive times. incredible. howl impressive times. incredible. how does it work, the competition, in terms of you are in your kitchen and
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the other competitors are all over the other competitors are all over the world. can you see one another like a video conference? we the world. can you see one another like a video conference?— the world. can you see one another like a video conference? we have our rowin: like a video conference? we have our rowing machines _ like a video conference? we have our rowing machines connected - like a video conference? we have our rowing machines connected to - like a video conference? we have our rowing machines connected to our. rowing machines connected to our laptops. on the laptop you have a standing of where everyone is in the race. you also have to livestream to prove it is you on the machine. so they have set up an online meeting. we are watching you now. that is brilliant. have you ever hit that time before? no, actually. it was a new personal best. ~ ., ., i. no, actually. it was a new personal best. ~ ., ., ., | no, actually. it was a new personal best-_ i don't. best. what got you to it? i don't really know- _ best. what got you to it? i don't really know. i _ best. what got you to it? i don't really know. i think— best. what got you to it? i don't really know. i think i _ best. what got you to it? i don't really know. i think i had - best. what got you to it? i don't really know. i think i had my i really know. i think i had my housemates behind me cheering me and also trying to stay focused rather than have distractions of people around me. i than have distractions of people around me— than have distractions of people around me. . ., i. around me. i reckon one thing you have been —
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around me. i reckon one thing you have been worried _ around me. i reckon one thing you have been worried about, - around me. i reckon one thing you have been worried about, what i around me. i reckon one thing you have been worried about, what if. have been worried about, what if your wife i dropped out? if your wife i dropped out, what would have happened? ? if you're wifi dropped out, what would have happened? if out, what would have happened? if our machine cut out we could still have the video to prove we had done it and send in a picture. i think we had a safety net, but it was a stress, especially in a student house. ., ., , , ., house. you mention the support of student housemates, _ house. you mention the support of student housemates, what - house. you mention the support of student housemates, what do i house. you mention the support of student housemates, what do theyj student housemates, what do they make of not being able to come into the kitchen a lot of the time? thea;r the kitchen a lot of the time? they are mostly — the kitchen a lot of the time? they are mostly rowers, _ the kitchen a lot of the time? they are mostly rowers, as _ the kitchen a lot of the time? they are mostly rowers, as well, - the kitchen a lot of the time? tue: are mostly rowers, as well, so the kitchen a lot of the time? he are mostly rowers, as well, so we the kitchen a lot of the time? tt9:1 are mostly rowers, as well, so we do training together. pretty much on a cycle, the rowing machine, at the moment. nobody can get to the toaster behind you!— moment. nobody can get to the toaster behind you! definitely not. what is the _ toaster behind you! definitely not. what is the plan? _ toaster behind you! definitely not. what is the plan? you _ toaster behind you! definitely not. what is the plan? you have - what is the plan? you have potential. will you stick with it and perhaps turn professional, or
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remain as a hobby? shat and perhaps turn professional, or remain as a hobby?— and perhaps turn professional, or remain as a hobby? at the moment, it is 'ust a remain as a hobby? at the moment, it isiust a hobby. _ remain as a hobby? at the moment, it isjust a hobby, but _ remain as a hobby? at the moment, it isjust a hobby, but exciting _ remain as a hobby? at the moment, it isjust a hobby, but exciting to - remain as a hobby? at the moment, it isjust a hobby, but exciting to see i is just a hobby, but exciting to see where it could go. in a moment, excited to get back on the water, which we aim to do by april. the smile on your — which we aim to do by april. the smile on your face, just to get out again. it has been lovely to talk to you. thank you. good luck. indoor rowing, easierthan you. thank you. good luck. indoor rowing, easier than what billy monger is dealing with, but seven minutes 22, two kilometres. we will speak to billy about his 140 mile epic week. stay with us, headlines coming up.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. our headlines today: the coronavirus vaccine gets the royal seal of approval, as the queen encourages everyone to get the jab. it is obviously difficult for people if they have never had a vaccine. they ought to think about other people rather than themselves. from political allies to bitter enemies — alex salmond is set to give evidence accusing nicola sturgeon of misleading the scottish parliament. racing driver billy monger nears the end of his gruelling triple challenge for comic relief. we'lljoin him at brands hatch as he sets out on a marathon bike ride.
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the chancellor's big balancing act — as he prepares to lay out his tax and spending plans in the budget next week, can he make the numbers add up to pay for the pandemic? and join me for news of a lot of dry weather in the next few days. of the night will be chilly. good morning. it's friday, the 26th of february. our top story. the queen has spoken publicly for the first time about receiving her covid jab last month and said those who are hesitant about getting vaccinated should think of others rather than themselves. she gave the rare display of personal opinion during a video call to health leaders in charge of the vaccine rollout. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports. they both had their vaccinations last month, and though the duke is now in hospital being treated for a non—covid infection, the queen, unperturbed,
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it would seem, by her husband's absence, was earlier this week on a video conference with health officials from across the uk. the vaccination programme had stirred memories. well, having lived in the war, it's very much like that, you know, when everybody had the same idea. and i think this has rather sort of inspired that, hasn't it? it's a bit like a plague, isn't it? because it's not only here that we've got the virus, but it's everywhere. so, it's a strange battle that everybody�*s actually fighting. but how had the queen found her own vaccination? well, once you've had the vaccine, you have a feeling of, you know, you're protected, which is, i think, very important. as far as i can make out it was quite harmless. it was very quick. and i've had lots of letters
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from people who've been very surprised by how easy it was to get the vaccine. and the jab was very — it didn't hurt at all. there was understanding for people who are nervous of the vaccination, but a reminder that everyone has a responsibility to have it. it is obviously difficult for people if they've never had a vaccine. they ought to think about other people rather than themselves. and there was a message to the scientists who developed the vaccines, and all the staff who are administering them. it is remarkable how quickly the whole thing has has been done. so many people have had the vaccine already, so you have to keep up the good work. nicholas witchell, bbc news. lovely to see her majesty smiling. the duke of edinburgh in hospital at the moment. we have got an update that he has also received the jab.
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under the sun have spotted something rather lovely in that video call. there is the queen wearing the brooch spotted in the piece. they have noticed it is exactly the same brooch she was there 7a years ago on the day she became engaged to prince philip. it is a touching way of paying tribute to him and remembering him. t paying tribute to him and remembering him. i think it was their last wedding _ remembering him. i think it was their last wedding anniversary . remembering him. i think it was| their last wedding anniversary as well. that is their thing. very sweet. four minutes per stage. the former first minister of scotland, alex salmond, will be questioned by members of the scottish parliament today, over his claims of a "malicious and concerted" conspiracy against him. our political correspondent nick eardley is at holyrood for us. nick, should we expect a dramatic day? it is going to be a big deal today. morning —
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it is going to be a big deal today. morning. this row has been brewing for a couple — morning. this row has been brewing for a couple of years now. remember that alex _ for a couple of years now. remember that alex salmond and nicola sturgeon used to be not only really close _ sturgeon used to be not only really close political allies, but they were — close political allies, but they were best friends. that relationship is collapsed completely. mr salmond is collapsed completely. mr salmond is going _ is collapsed completely. mr salmond is going to _ is collapsed completely. mr salmond is going to make allegations today which _ is going to make allegations today which some believe could ultimately brin- which some believe could ultimately bring nicola sturgeon down. i will try to _ bring nicola sturgeon down. i will try to explain a bit more. for years, this was the closest relationship in scottish politics, alex salmond and his protege, nicola sturgeon. now, though, they're bitter enemies. he accuses her of failing to tell the truth. she says he is living in an alternative reality. this is mr salmond outside the high court in edinburgh last year. he had just been cleared of sexual assault. there is certain evidence that i would have liked to have seen led in this trial, but for a variety of reasons we were not able to do so. at some point, that information, that facts and that evidence, will see the light of day. now it's nicola sturgeon and her government that's under the spotlight.
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its investigation into mr salmond was found to be unlawful and tainted by apparent bias. mr salmond is coming here to the scottish parliament to make some extraordinary claims. mr salmond claims nicola sturgeon has misled the scottish parliament. that she's guilty of several breaches of the ministerial code. and that people around her, including her husband and her chief of staff, engaged in a malicious campaign to damage his reputation, even to the extent of having him imprisoned. it's a row which has caused an earthquake in scottish politics, with claims that holyrood is struggling to hold the government to account. parts of mr salmond's evidence have been taken down, after prosecutors said they could be in contempt of court and identify his accusers. opposition parties have suggested taking the evidence down is part of a cover—up.
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miss sturgeon has denied breaking the ministerial code, and says there's no evidence of a conspiracy. what is not legitimate is to pursue a conspiracy theory, a scorched earth policy, that threatens the reputation and the integrity of scotland's independentjustice institutions, just because you happen to dislike this government. and to sacrifice all of that, if i may say so. presiding officer, on the altar of the ego of one man. this explosive row is now reaching its climax. miss sturgeon will give evidence next week, as two first ministers, two colossal figures in scotland, make their case to parliament. nick eardley, bbc news, holyrood. so that is what is going on. it is complicated and it has been a huge developing story. but it is a big crisis _ developing story. but it is a big crisis here _ developing story. but it is a big crisis here. it is probably the biggest _ crisis here. it is probably the biggest crisis that scottish politics has faced since the
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scottish— politics has faced since the scottish parliament reopened in 1999. _ scottish parliament reopened in 1999. 22— scottish parliament reopened in 1999, 22 years ago. but ultimately it comes _ 1999, 22 years ago. but ultimately it comes down to this. alex salmond is saying _ it comes down to this. alex salmond is saying some pretty incredible things— is saying some pretty incredible things that hugely damage nicola sturgeon, if not cause her resignation. she says he is making it up. _ resignation. she says he is making it up. that — resignation. she says he is making it up, that this is a conspiracy without— it up, that this is a conspiracy without any evidence. they can't both _ without any evidence. they can't both be — without any evidence. they can't both be right. for years they agreed on everything but on this they are polar— on everything but on this they are polar opposites. in the next few days _ polar opposites. in the next few days they — polar opposites. in the next few days they will get the chance to persuade — days they will get the chance to persuade msps in there and all of us that they— persuade msps in there and all of us that they are telling the truth. as i say. _ that they are telling the truth. as i say. they— that they are telling the truth. as i say, they can't both be right. half— i say, they can't both be right. half past— i say, they can't both be right. half past 12, alex salmond will appear~ — half past 12, alex salmond will appear. we are expecting him to give evidence _ appear. we are expecting him to give evidence for— appear. we are expecting him to give evidence for four hours. a beautiful day in _ evidence for four hours. a beautiful day in edinburgh. but it is pretty chilly _ day in edinburgh. but it is pretty chilly it — day in edinburgh. but it is pretty chilly it is — day in edinburgh. but it is pretty chilly. it is going to be a long one — chilly. it is going to be a long one i— chilly. it is going to be a long one. ~' , chilly. it is going to be a long one. ~ , , one. i think it will be frosty indoors as _ one. i think it will be frosty indoors as well. _ one. i think it will be frosty indoors as well. that i one. i think it will be frosty indoors as well. that is i one. i think it will be frosty indoors as well. that is fairj one. i think it will be frosty i indoors as well. that is fair to predict. thank you so much. public venues could soon be legally required to improve security measures to protect against terror
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attacks. a consultation on the proposals begins today. it follows a campaign by figen murray, who son martyn hett was one of 22 people murdered in the manchester arena bombing. the consultation really is about working — the consultation really is about working with these places to find out the _ working with these places to find out the best way to implement the law. out the best way to implement the law it _ out the best way to implement the law it is _ out the best way to implement the law. it is obviously a huge document. it is a questionnaire. it is really— document. it is a questionnaire. it is really engaging these places to ensure _ is really engaging these places to ensure that actually it becomes a collaborative process, because every venue _ collaborative process, because every venue is— collaborative process, because every venue is different, every venue will have different requirements. it is not meant — have different requirements. it is not meant to be a punitive process, it is meant— not meant to be a punitive process, it is meant to be collaborative. the supreme court will rule today on whether shamima begum, who left london as a teenager tojoin the so—called islamic state in syria, should be allowed back into the uk. she wants to appeal against the decision by the government to remove her british nationality.
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miss begum was 15 when she and two other schoolgirls from east london made the journey six years ago. she's currently in a refugee camp in northern syria. we are all awaiting the big exclusive sit down with oprah winfrey in the next couple of weeks, harry and meghan talking. but prince harry and meghan talking. but prince harry has already been giving an insight into his home life during an appearance on us talk show. prince harry was filmed taking an open—topped bus tour of los angeles — complete with afternoon tea — for the late late show with james corden, on cbs. he spoke about his tv viewing habits, baby archie's first words — and even what the queen sent him for christmas. how are you finding fatherhood? my son is— how are you finding fatherhood? my son is now— how are you finding fatherhood? my son is nowjust over a year—and—a—half. he is hysterical. he has— year—and—a—half. he is hysterical. he has got— year—and—a—half. he is hysterical. he has got the most amazing personality. he is already putting three. _ personality. he is already putting three, four words together, singing
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songs _ three, four words together, singing sonts. ~ . three, four words together, singing sonis, . ., ., , three, four words together, singing sonisr ., , three, four words together, singing sonts. . , , three, four words together, singing sonis, . ., , , :, songs. what was his first word? crocodile- _ songs. what was his first word? crocodile. that _ songs. what was his first word? crocodile. that is _ songs. what was his first word? crocodile. that is a _ songs. what was his first word? crocodile. that is a big - songs. what was his first word? crocodile. that is a big word! i crocodile. that is a big word! interesting, my grandmother asked us what artie _ interesting, my grandmother asked us what artie wanted for christmas. and make _ what artie wanted for christmas. and make said _ what artie wanted for christmas. and make said a — what artie wanted for christmas. and make said a waffle maker. she sent us a waffle — make said a waffle maker. she sent us a waffle maker. so much to unpack there! i am going for crocodile. i bet he said crocodile. and then the waffle maker, how thoughtful. why not? always ask what people want. itttul’ith maker, how thoughtful. why not? always ask what people want. with a ro al crest always ask what people want. with a royal crest on — always ask what people want. with a royal crest on it. _ always ask what people want. with a royal crest on it. i _ always ask what people want. with a royal crest on it. i could _ always ask what people want. with a royal crest on it. i could do _ always ask what people want. with a royal crest on it. i could do with i always ask what people want. with a royal crest on it. i could do with a i royal crest on it. i could do with a waffle now. matt has got the weather. maybe try to find one. haste weather. maybe try to find one. have ou tot weather. maybe try to find one. have you got any — weather. maybe try to find one. have you got any waffle — weather. maybe try to find one. have you got any waffle is _ weather. maybe try to find one. have you got any waffle is coming your way? no. sadly. i have been missing you both _ no. sadly. i have been missing you both so _ no. sadly. i have been missing you both so i — no. sadly. i have been missing you both. so i thought i would take myself— both. so i thought i would take myself to— both. so i thought i would take myself to be with you in salford.
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lovely— myself to be with you in salford. lovely start out there at this morning _ lovely start out there at this morning. as it is across many parts of the _ morning. as it is across many parts of the country. good morning. hope you're _ of the country. good morning. hope you're enjoying disputable start to friday _ you're enjoying disputable start to friday. blue skies further south into hampshire. frost on the ground. get used _ into hampshire. frost on the ground. get used to— into hampshire. frost on the ground. get used to that. the nights are going _ get used to that. the nights are going to — get used to that. the nights are going to be chilly in the next few days _ going to be chilly in the next few days not — going to be chilly in the next few days. not as mild as it has been. most— days. not as mild as it has been. most of— days. not as mild as it has been. most of the — days. not as mild as it has been. most of the time it is said to be dry with— most of the time it is said to be dry with some sunshine. mine is parts _ dry with some sunshine. mine is parts of— dry with some sunshine. mine is parts of southern scotland, west wales _ parts of southern scotland, west wales and parts of 0xfordshire. that frost will _ wales and parts of 0xfordshire. that frost will be melting away fairly quickly — frost will be melting away fairly quickly. the sun gaining strength. a few mist— quickly. the sun gaining strength. a few mist and fog patches. they will be gone _ few mist and fog patches. they will be gone by— few mist and fog patches. they will be gone by mid—morning. cloud to the north— be gone by mid—morning. cloud to the north and _ be gone by mid—morning. cloud to the north and west of scotland. six shetland — north and west of scotland. six shetland has some rain in the next few hours— shetland has some rain in the next few hours before it departs. temperature is not as high as they were _ temperature is not as high as they were early— temperature is not as high as they were early in the week. you have still got _ were early in the week. you have still got the effect of that strengthening sun on your bike and temperatures are still about three to four— temperatures are still about three to four celsius above where they should _ to four celsius above where they should be — to four celsius above where they should be at this stage of the end of february. tonight, we will see cloud _ of february. tonight, we will see cloud arriving to parts of scotland and northern ireland. maybe some
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rain here _ and northern ireland. maybe some rain here or— and northern ireland. maybe some rain here orthere. and northern ireland. maybe some rain here or there. clear skies across— rain here or there. clear skies across england and wales. some mist and fog _ across england and wales. some mist and fog a— across england and wales. some mist and fog. a touch of frost into tomorrow _ and fog. a touch of frost into tomorrow morning. still some frost around _ tomorrow morning. still some frost around this— tomorrow morning. still some frost around this weekend. but it is looking — around this weekend. but it is looking dry and reasonably sunny for most _ you bring us a picture. we give you the real thing. this is really what it is like outside this morning in salford. t it is like outside this morning in salford. ~ , , . it is like outside this morning in salford. ~' , , . , it is like outside this morning in salford. ~' , , : , . salford. i think my picture is nice and clear- _ salford. i think my picture is nice and clear. well, _ salford. i think my picture is nice and clear. well, this _ salford. i think my picture is nice and clear. well, this is _ salford. i think my picture is nice and clear. well, this is real i salford. i think my picture is nice and clear. well, this is real life. | and clear. well, this is real life. life is rtot _ and clear. well, this is real life. life is not just _ and clear. well, this is real life. life is notjust pretty _ and clear. well, this is real life. life is notjust pretty pictures. | life is notjust pretty pictures. this is the real thing. see you later. take care.— as we've been hearing, the queen has spoken about her experience of getting the coronavirus vaccine, and has encouraged others to do the same. she was speaking to health leaders during a video call. more than 18 million people have now had the jab, and everyone in the top four priority groups has now been offered one.
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who next? now thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation must decide who should get the vaccine next. let's reflect on all of this with two of our regular breakfast guests — dr nighat arif, who's a gp, and the epidemiologist dr mike tildesley. good morning. doctor, what did you think when you saw the queen stepping out there and saying we should all have it? 1 stepping out there and saying we should all have it?— should all have it? i think it is really important _ should all have it? i think it is really important to _ should all have it? i think it is really important to have i should all have it? i think it is really important to have our l should all have it? i think it is i really important to have our leaders come _ really important to have our leaders come forward. who doesn't love the queen? _ come forward. who doesn't love the queen? having somebody of her status say, queen? having somebody of her status say. i— queen? having somebody of her status say i have _ queen? having somebody of her status say, i have had it, it was really quick. — say, i have had it, it was really quick. it — say, i have had it, it was really quick, it wasn't that painful at all, quick, it wasn't that painful at all. didn't— quick, it wasn't that painful at all, didn't cause me any harm, and to know— all, didn't cause me any harm, and to know that— all, didn't cause me any harm, and to know that a colleague of mine has given— to know that a colleague of mine has given it _ to know that a colleague of mine has given it underthe to know that a colleague of mine has given it under the queen is absolutely fine, it's a sweet spot for me _ absolutely fine, it's a sweet spot for me as — absolutely fine, it's a sweet spot for me as a — absolutely fine, it's a sweet spot for me as a doctor. and knowing that she is— for me as a doctor. and knowing that she is encouraging other people to take it _ she is encouraging other people to take it as— she is encouraging other people to take it as well. because we do look
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up take it as well. because we do look up to— take it as well. because we do look up to the _ take it as well. because we do look up to the queen, we do listen to the queen _ up to the queen, we do listen to the queen. there is always this misconception around people, the message — misconception around people, the message is going to be important? we do listen~ _ message is going to be important? we do listen. when prince william talks about _ do listen. when prince william talks about mental health and racism in football, _ about mental health and racism in football, we listen. this is one of our road — football, we listen. this is one of our road maps out of the pandemic. when _ our road maps out of the pandemic. when the _ our road maps out of the pandemic. when the queen speaks, we are going to listen _ when the queen speaks, we are going to listen. between 11 to 15% of the population are hesitant around the vaccine _ population are hesitant around the vaccine. that seems to be more skewed — vaccine. that seems to be more skewed towards the bame communities. myself, _ skewed towards the bame communities. myself, my— skewed towards the bame communities. myself, my colleagues, a lot of us are doing — myself, my colleagues, a lot of us are doing a — myself, my colleagues, a lot of us are doing a lot of groundwork in order— are doing a lot of groundwork in order to — are doing a lot of groundwork in order to build that confidence back. so to— order to build that confidence back. so to have — order to build that confidence back. so to have the queen say it is ok, it is all— so to have the queen say it is ok, it is all right, that is great. this hopefully— it is all right, that is great. this hopefully will encourage people who need the _ hopefully will encourage people who need the second vaccine as well. so we have _ need the second vaccine as well. so we have got— need the second vaccine as well. so we have got the older generation in their 70s— we have got the older generation in their 70s and 80s and 90s and above, who need _ their 70s and 80s and 90s and above, who need their second vaccine, which we are _ who need their second vaccine, which we are rolling out soon as well. this _ we are rolling out soon as well. this is— we are rolling out soon as well. this is all— we are rolling out soon as well. this is alljust part of us working together, — this is alljust part of us working together, which is fantastic. she went far, didn't _ together, which is fantastic. ’it9 went far, didn't she? together, which is fantastic. 5t9 went far, didn't she? she said people who are hesitant should think about others rather than thinking
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about others rather than thinking about themselves. it is almost like she is reading the government's official health guidance?- she is reading the government's official health guidance? which is exactly what _ official health guidance? which is exactly what we _ official health guidance? which is exactly what we need _ official health guidance? which is exactly what we need to - official health guidance? which is exactly what we need to do, i official health guidance? which is i exactly what we need to do, because that is— exactly what we need to do, because that is how— exactly what we need to do, because that is how vaccines work. she is saying _ that is how vaccines work. she is saying something that isn't inaccurate. if you get yourself vaccinated, it brings up your immunity. _ vaccinated, it brings up your immunity, so your complications, if you get— immunity, so your complications, if you get covid, york obligations will be less. _ you get covid, york obligations will be less, less need for hospitalisation. if we all do that, that means that we do think about others _ that means that we do think about others and — that means that we do think about others and we are putting less pressure — others and we are putting less pressure on the staff in the nhs, because — pressure on the staff in the nhs, because i— pressure on the staff in the nhs, because i can tell you the winter, this winter— because i can tell you the winter, this winter that we have been slammed. the death toll is got crushingly saddening. my colleagues in secondary care, we are feeling it at the _ in secondary care, we are feeling it at the minute. this is not sustainable. the vaccine is our one way _ sustainable. the vaccine is our one way if _ sustainable. the vaccine is our one way if you — sustainable. the vaccine is our one way. if you are offered it, please, please _ way. if you are offered it, please, please take — way. if you are offered it, please, please take it.— way. if you are offered it, please, please take it. let's pick up on the oint ou please take it. let's pick up on the point you make — please take it. let's pick up on the point you make there _ please take it. let's pick up on the point you make there about i please take it. let's pick up on the point you make there about your. point you make there about your colleagues been under immense
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pressure. mike, iwant colleagues been under immense pressure. mike, i want to bring in lowering the alert level. when you hear the coronavirus alert level has dropped from —— is dropped, you think perhaps fewer people are getting the infection, fewer people are succumbing to the illness, but it is notjust about are succumbing to the illness, but it is not just about that, are succumbing to the illness, but it is notjust about that, is it? well, no. we need to be careful with the alert— well, no. we need to be careful with the alert level. _ well, no. we need to be careful with the alert level. when _ well, no. we need to be careful with the alert level. when we _ well, no. we need to be careful with the alert level. when we are - well, no. we need to be careful with the alert level. when we are at - the alert level. when we are at alert— the alert level. when we are at alert level— the alert level. when we are at alert level five, _ the alert level. when we are at alert level five, we _ the alert level. when we are at alert level five, we are - the alert level. when we are at alert level five, we are in- the alert level. when we are at alert level five, we are in a i the alert level. when we are at l alert level five, we are in a really serious _ alert level five, we are in a really serious situation. _ alert level five, we are in a really serious situation. there - alert level five, we are in a really serious situation. there are i serious situation. there are concerns— serious situation. there are concerns that _ serious situation. there are concerns that the _ serious situation. there are concerns that the nhs i serious situation. there are concerns that the nhs is i serious situation. there arej concerns that the nhs is on serious situation. there are i concerns that the nhs is on the brink— concerns that the nhs is on the brink of— concerns that the nhs is on the brink of being _ concerns that the nhs is on the brink of being overwhelmed. i concerns that the nhs is on the . brink of being overwhelmed. that concerns that the nhs is on the - brink of being overwhelmed. that was raised _ brink of being overwhelmed. that was raised to— brink of being overwhelmed. that was raised to level — brink of being overwhelmed. that was raised to level five _ brink of being overwhelmed. that was raised to level five in _ brink of being overwhelmed. that was raised to level five in early _ raised to level five in early january _ raised to level five in early january when _ raised to level five in early january. when cases - raised to level five in early january. when cases were | raised to level five in early - january. when cases were really high, _ january. when cases were really high. hospital— january. when cases were really high, hospital occupancy- january. when cases were really high, hospital occupancy was i high, hospital occupancy was extremely— high, hospital occupancy was extremely high _ high, hospital occupancy was extremely high and - high, hospital occupancy was extremely high and in - high, hospital occupancy was| extremely high and in several regions — extremely high and in several regions hospitals _ extremely high and in several regions hospitals were - extremely high and in several regions hospitals were filling i extremely high and in several. regions hospitals were filling up. that was— regions hospitals were filling up. that was the _ regions hospitals were filling up. that was the real _ regions hospitals were filling up. that was the real concern. - regions hospitals were filling up. that was the real concern. this i that was the real concern. this reduction — that was the real concern. this reduction to _ that was the real concern. this reduction to level— that was the real concern. this reduction to level four, - that was the real concern. this reduction to level four, we i that was the real concern. this reduction to level four, we stillj reduction to level four, we still need _ reduction to level four, we still need to— reduction to level four, we still need to remember— reduction to level four, we still need to remember it _ reduction to level four, we still need to remember it is - reduction to level four, we still. need to remember it is extremely high _ need to remember it is extremely high there — need to remember it is extremely high there are _ need to remember it is extremely high. there are five _ need to remember it is extremely high. there are five levels - need to remember it is extremely high. there are five levels to i need to remember it is extremelyj high. there are five levels to this. level— high. there are five levels to this. level four— high. there are five levels to this. level four is — high. there are five levels to this. level four is on _ high. there are five levels to this. level four is on the _ high. there are five levels to this. level four is on the high _ high. there are five levels to this. level four is on the high end. i high. there are five levels to this. level four is on the high end. wel level four is on the high end. we still have — level four is on the high end. we still have high— level four is on the high end. we still have high hospital— level four is on the high end. wel still have high hospital occupancy. things— still have high hospital occupancy. things are — still have high hospital occupancy. things are moving _ still have high hospital occupancy. things are moving in— still have high hospital occupancy. things are moving in the - still have high hospital occupancy. things are moving in the right i things are moving in the right direction _ things are moving in the right direction. our— things are moving in the right direction. our cases _ things are moving in the right direction. our cases have i things are moving in the righti direction. our cases have been coming — direction. our cases have been coming down _ direction. our cases have been coming down. pressure - direction. our cases have been coming down. pressure is i direction. our cases have been. coming down. pressure is slowly coming — coming down. pressure is slowly coming off— coming down. pressure is slowly coming off the _ coming down. pressure is slowly coming off the hospitals - coming down. pressure is slowly coming off the hospitals and i
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coming down. pressure is slowly coming off the hospitals and the| coming off the hospitals and the number— coming off the hospitals and the number of— coming off the hospitals and the number of deaths _ coming off the hospitals and the number of deaths that _ coming off the hospitals and the number of deaths that were i coming off the hospitals and the . number of deaths that were terribly hi-h number of deaths that were terribly high through— number of deaths that were terribly high throuthanuary, _ number of deaths that were terribly high through january, are _ number of deaths that were terribly high throuthanuary, are now- high throuthanuary, are now starting — high throuthanuary, are now starting to— high throuthanuary, are now starting to come _ high throuthanuary, are now starting to come down. - high throuthanuary, are now starting to come down. but i high throuthanuary, are now. starting to come down. but they high throuthanuary, are now- starting to come down. but they are still starting to come down. but they are stilt high _ starting to come down. but they are still high this — starting to come down. but they are still high. this is — starting to come down. but they are still high. this is the _ starting to come down. but they are still high. this is the key— starting to come down. but they are still high. this is the key thing. - still high. this is the key thing. we need — still high. this is the key thing. we need to— still high. this is the key thing. we need to send _ still high. this is the key thing. we need to send the _ still high. this is the key thing. we need to send the message i still high. this is the key thing. - we need to send the message that there _ we need to send the message that there isn't— we need to send the message that there isn't an — we need to send the message that there isn't an immediate _ we need to send the message that there isn't an immediate threat- we need to send the message that there isn't an immediate threat ofl there isn't an immediate threat of there isn't an immediate threat of the nhs _ there isn't an immediate threat of the nhs being— there isn't an immediate threat of the nhs being overwhelmed - there isn't an immediate threat of the nhs being overwhelmed at. there isn't an immediate threat of. the nhs being overwhelmed at this moment— the nhs being overwhelmed at this moment irr— the nhs being overwhelmed at this moment in time _ the nhs being overwhelmed at this moment in time but _ the nhs being overwhelmed at this moment in time but we _ the nhs being overwhelmed at this moment in time but we are - the nhs being overwhelmed at this moment in time but we are still- the nhs being overwhelmed at this moment in time but we are still in| the nhs being overwhelmed at this| moment in time but we are still in a very serious — moment in time but we are still in a very serious situation. _ moment in time but we are still in a very serious situation. we _ moment in time but we are still in a very serious situation. we still- very serious situation. we still need _ very serious situation. we still need pe0pte _ very serious situation. we still need pe0pte to _ very serious situation. we still need people to adhere - very serious situation. we still need people to adhere to - very serious situation. we still need people to adhere to the. very serious situation. we still- need people to adhere to the rules and take _ need people to adhere to the rules and take up— need people to adhere to the rules and take up the— need people to adhere to the rules and take up the vaccine _ need people to adhere to the rules and take up the vaccine when- need people to adhere to the rules and take up the vaccine when it - need people to adhere to the rules and take up the vaccine when it isi and take up the vaccine when it is offered _ and take up the vaccine when it is offered in — and take up the vaccine when it is offered iha— and take up the vaccine when it is offered. in a few— and take up the vaccine when it is offered. in a few weeks _ and take up the vaccine when it is offered. in a few weeks we - and take up the vaccine when it is offered. in a few weeks we are i and take up the vaccine when it is i offered. in a few weeks we are going to start _ offered. in a few weeks we are going to start the _ offered. in a few weeks we are going to start the process _ offered. in a few weeks we are going to start the process of— offered. in a few weeks we are going to start the process of unlocking - to start the process of unlocking the country _ to start the process of unlocking the country. and _ to start the process of unlocking the country. and quite - to start the process of unlocking the country. and quite rightly, l to start the process of unlocking. the country. and quite rightly, this is being _ the country. and quite rightly, this is being done — the country. and quite rightly, this is being done irr— the country. and quite rightly, this is being done in a _ the country. and quite rightly, this is being done in a gradual- the country. and quite rightly, this is being done in a gradual way. - the country. and quite rightly, this is being done in a gradual way. we need _ is being done in a gradual way. we need to— is being done in a gradual way. we need to allow_ is being done in a gradual way. we need to allow the _ is being done in a gradual way. we need to allow the vaccination - is being done in a gradual way. we need to allow the vaccination to i need to allow the vaccination to help us— need to allow the vaccination to help us along, _ need to allow the vaccination to help us along, as— need to allow the vaccination to help us along, as we _ need to allow the vaccination to help us along, as we do - need to allow the vaccination to help us along, as we do this, i need to allow the vaccination to i help us along, as we do this, and need to allow the vaccination to - help us along, as we do this, and we still need _ help us along, as we do this, and we still need pe0pte _ help us along, as we do this, and we still need people to _ help us along, as we do this, and we still need people to adhere - help us along, as we do this, and we still need people to adhere to - help us along, as we do this, and we still need people to adhere to the . still need people to adhere to the rules— still need people to adhere to the rules that — still need people to adhere to the rules that are _ still need people to adhere to the rules that are in _ still need people to adhere to the rules that are in place _ still need people to adhere to the rules that are in place as - still need people to adhere to the rules that are in place as we - still need people to adhere to the rules that are in place as we starti rules that are in place as we start to unlock— rules that are in place as we start to unlock the _ rules that are in place as we start to unlock the country. _ rules that are in place as we start to unlock the country. interesting, ou said to unlock the country. interesting, you said that _ to unlock the country. interesting, you said that the _ to unlock the country. interesting, you said that the most _ to unlock the country. interesting, you said that the most vulnerable | you said that the most vulnerable have been offered the vaccine. the government has seen the plans for the next stage, they are announced on sunday, we are waiting for that to be announced as to who is next.
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what are your thoughts, my, on the progress of this? at the moment it has been in age groups, hasn't it? yes, i think quite rightly so at the moment — yes, i think quite rightly so at the moment we _ yes, i think quite rightly so at the moment. we need _ yes, i think quite rightly so at the moment. we need to— yes, i think quite rightly so at the moment. we need to remember. yes, i think quite rightly so at the . moment. we need to remember that yes, i think quite rightly so at the - moment. we need to remember that the reports _ moment. we need to remember that the reports about _ moment. we need to remember that the reports about vaccine _ moment. we need to remember that the reports about vaccine efficacy _ moment. we need to remember that the reports about vaccine efficacy in - reports about vaccine efficacy in the main — reports about vaccine efficacy in the main has— reports about vaccine efficacy in the main has been— reports about vaccine efficacy in the main has been about - reports about vaccine efficacy in - the main has been about prevention of severe _ the main has been about prevention of severe symptoms. _ the main has been about prevention of severe symptoms. early- the main has been about prevention of severe symptoms. early on - the main has been about prevention of severe symptoms. early on we i the main has been about prevention i of severe symptoms. early on we know this is— of severe symptoms. early on we know this is mainly— of severe symptoms. early on we know this is mainly a — of severe symptoms. early on we know this is mainly a virus _ of severe symptoms. early on we know this is mainly a virus that _ of severe symptoms. early on we know this is mainly a virus that affects - this is mainly a virus that affects the vulnerable, _ this is mainly a virus that affects the vulnerable, affects - this is mainly a virus that affects the vulnerable, affects older- the vulnerable, affects older people. _ the vulnerable, affects older people, people _ the vulnerable, affects older people, people with - the vulnerable, affects older. people, people with underlying health— people, people with underlying health conditions. _ people, people with underlying health conditions. they- people, people with underlying health conditions. they are - people, people with underlying l health conditions. they are more likely— health conditions. they are more likely to — health conditions. they are more likely to develop _ health conditions. they are more likely to develop severe - health conditions. they are more . likely to develop severe symptoms. that is _ likely to develop severe symptoms. that is why — likely to develop severe symptoms. that is why the _ likely to develop severe symptoms. that is why the vaccination - likely to develop severe symptoms. i that is why the vaccination campaign is very— that is why the vaccination campaign is very much— that is why the vaccination campaign is very much targeted _ that is why the vaccination campaign is very much targeted those - that is why the vaccination campaign is very much targeted those groups i is very much targeted those groups of individuals. _ is very much targeted those groups of individuals. a _ is very much targeted those groups of individuals. a soggy _ is very much targeted those groups of individuals. a soggy hope - is very much targeted those groups of individuals. a soggy hope is - is very much targeted those groups of individuals. a soggy hope is that| of individuals. a soggy hope is that if we _ of individuals. a soggy hope is that if we can— of individuals. a soggy hope is that if we can get— of individuals. a soggy hope is that if we can get out _ of individuals. a soggy hope is that if we can get out of— of individuals. a soggy hope is that if we can get out of very _ of individuals. a soggy hope is that if we can get out of very high - if we can get out of very high levels — if we can get out of very high levels across— if we can get out of very high levels across everybody- if we can get out of very high levels across everybody over| if we can get out of very high - levels across everybody over 50, we should _ levels across everybody over 50, we should he _ levels across everybody over 50, we should be significantly— levels across everybody over 50, we should be significantly reducing - levels across everybody over 50, we should be significantly reducing the i should be significantly reducing the pressure. _ should be significantly reducing the pressure. the — should be significantly reducing the pressure, the risk— should be significantly reducing the pressure, the risk of _ should be significantly reducing the pressure, the risk of people - pressure, the risk of people developing _ pressure, the risk of people developing symptoms, - pressure, the risk of people developing symptoms, thei pressure, the risk of people - developing symptoms, the pressure pressure, the risk of people _ developing symptoms, the pressure on the nhs, _ developing symptoms, the pressure on the nhs, i_ developing symptoms, the pressure on the nhs, iwas— developing symptoms, the pressure on the nhs, i was going _ developing symptoms, the pressure on the nhs, i was going to _ developing symptoms, the pressure on the nhs, i was going to say. _ developing symptoms, the pressure on the nhs, i was going to say. this - developing symptoms, the pressure on the nhs, i was going to say. this is - the nhs, i was going to say. this is very important _ the nhs, i was going to say. this is very important. as _ the nhs, i was going to say. this is very important. as we _ the nhs, i was going to say. this is very important. as we move - the nhs, i was going to say. this is very important. as we move to - the nhs, i was going to say. this is very important. as we move to the | very important. as we move to the next _ very important. as we move to the next phase — very important. as we move to the next phase there _ very important. as we move to the next phase there are _ very important. as we move to the next phase there are still- very important. as we move to the | next phase there are still obviously risks associated _ next phase there are still obviously risks associated with _ next phase there are still obviously risks associated with age, - next phase there are still obviously risks associated with age, but - next phase there are still obviously| risks associated with age, but there may he, _ risks associated with age, but there may be. possibly— risks associated with age, but there may be, possibly we _ risks associated with age, but there may be, possibly we may— risks associated with age, but there may be, possibly we may start - risks associated with age, but there may be, possibly we may start to l
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may be, possibly we may start to look may be, possibly we may start to took at _ may be, possibly we may start to took at the — may be, possibly we may start to look at the potential— may be, possibly we may start to look at the potential of— may be, possibly we may start to look at the potential of people i may be, possibly we may start to look at the potential of people in| look at the potential of people in society— look at the potential of people in society more _ look at the potential of people in society more liable _ look at the potential of people in society more liable to _ look at the potential of people in society more liable to transmit . look at the potential of people in i society more liable to transmit the virus. _ society more liable to transmit the virus. more — society more liable to transmit the virus, more likely— society more liable to transmit the virus, more likely to _ society more liable to transmit the virus, more likely to be _ society more liable to transmit the virus, more likely to be affected. i virus, more likely to be affected. certaih_ virus, more likely to be affected. certain key— virus, more likely to be affected. certain key workers _ virus, more likely to be affected. certain key workers will- virus, more likely to be affected. certain key workers will be - certain key workers will be prioritised~ _ certain key workers will be prioritised. i— certain key workers will be prioritised. i haven't - certain key workers will be prioritised. i haven't seeni certain key workers will be i prioritised. i haven't seen the plans — prioritised. i haven't seen the plans i— prioritised. i haven't seen the plans i am _ prioritised. i haven't seen the plans. iam irr— prioritised. i haven't seen the plans. i am in the _ prioritised. i haven't seen the plans. i am in the same - prioritised. i haven't seen the . plans. i am in the same position prioritised. i haven't seen the - plans. i am in the same position as you. _ plans. i am in the same position as you. so— plans. i am in the same position as you. so i_ plans. i am in the same position as you. so i dont— plans. i am in the same position as you, so i don't know— plans. i am in the same position as you, so i don't know what - plans. i am in the same position as you, so i don't know what the - you, so i don't know what the prioritisation— you, so i don't know what the prioritisation is— you, so i don't know what the prioritisation is going - you, so i don't know what the prioritisation is going to - you, so i don't know what the prioritisation is going to be. l you, so i don't know what the . prioritisation is going to be. but we are — prioritisation is going to be. but we are stilt— prioritisation is going to be. but we are still in— prioritisation is going to be. but we are still in a _ prioritisation is going to be. but we are still in a position - prioritisation is going to be. but we are still in a position that - prioritisation is going to be. but we are still in a position that we need _ we are still in a position that we need to— we are still in a position that we need to do— we are still in a position that we need to do what _ we are still in a position that we need to do what we _ we are still in a position that we need to do what we can - we are still in a position that we need to do what we can to - we are still in a position that we . need to do what we can to protect the most — need to do what we can to protect the most vulnerable _ need to do what we can to protect the most vulnerable people - need to do what we can to protect the most vulnerable people in- the most vulnerable people in society — the most vulnerable people in society that _ the most vulnerable people in society. that is— the most vulnerable people in society. that is why _ the most vulnerable people in society. that is why we - the most vulnerable people in society. that is why we need, | society. that is why we need, regardless _ society. that is why we need, regardless of _ society. that is why we need, regardless of the _ society. that is why we need, | regardless of the prioritisation society. that is why we need, . regardless of the prioritisation or order. _ regardless of the prioritisation or order. we — regardless of the prioritisation or order. we need _ regardless of the prioritisation or order, we need to _ regardless of the prioritisation or order, we need to get _ regardless of the prioritisation or order, we need to get the - regardless of the prioritisation or . order, we need to get the message out that— order, we need to get the message out that we — order, we need to get the message out that we need _ order, we need to get the message out that we need as _ order, we need to get the message out that we need as many - order, we need to get the message out that we need as many people . order, we need to get the messagei out that we need as many people as possible. _ out that we need as many people as possible, whether— out that we need as many people as possible, whether they— out that we need as many people as possible, whether they are - possible, whether they are vulnerable _ possible, whether they are vulnerable or— possible, whether they are vulnerable or not, - possible, whether they are vulnerable or not, to - possible, whether they are vulnerable or not, to takei possible, whether they are l vulnerable or not, to take up possible, whether they are - vulnerable or not, to take up the vaccine. — vulnerable or not, to take up the vaccine, because _ vulnerable or not, to take up the vaccine, because by— vulnerable or not, to take up the vaccine, because by taking - vulnerable or not, to take up the vaccine, because by taking it, i vulnerable or not, to take up the vaccine, because by taking it, asi vaccine, because by taking it, as the queen— vaccine, because by taking it, as the queen has— vaccine, because by taking it, as the queen has quite _ vaccine, because by taking it, as the queen has quite rightly- vaccine, because by taking it, as| the queen has quite rightly said, you don't— the queen has quite rightly said, you don't think— the queen has quite rightly said, you don't think about _ the queen has quite rightly said, you don't think about your - the queen has quite rightly said, you don't think about your own . the queen has quite rightly said, . you don't think about your own risk if you _ you don't think about your own risk if you are _ you don't think about your own risk if you are in — you don't think about your own risk if you are in the _ you don't think about your own risk if you are in the healthy _ if you are in the healthy population. _ if you are in the healthy population, you - if you are in the healthy population, you need i if you are in the healthyi population, you need to if you are in the healthy - population, you need to think if you are in the healthy _ population, you need to think about you are _ population, you need to think about you are taking — population, you need to think about you are taking the _ population, you need to think about you are taking the vaccine _ population, you need to think about you are taking the vaccine to - you are taking the vaccine to potentially _ you are taking the vaccine to potentially protect _ you are taking the vaccine to potentially protect your - you are taking the vaccine to| potentially protect your loved you are taking the vaccine to - potentially protect your loved ones who are _ potentially protect your loved ones who are more _ potentially protect your loved ones who are more vulnerable _ potentially protect your loved ones who are more vulnerable than - potentially protect your loved onesi who are more vulnerable than you. doctor. _ who are more vulnerable than you. doctor. where _ who are more vulnerable than you. doctor, where do— who are more vulnerable than you. doctor, where do you _ who are more vulnerable than you. doctor, where do you stand - who are more vulnerable than you. doctor, where do you stand on- who are more vulnerable than you. doctor, where do you stand on this possible changing of the priority list, that you maybe say that people who work in meat processing plants or bus drivers, teachers, even
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prisoners, take priority over others, notjust at prisoners, take priority over others, not just at their age? prisoners, take priority over others, notjust at their age? is that doable or is itjust asking for trouble and complication? i that doable or is itjust asking for trouble and complication?- that doable or is itjust asking for trouble and complication? i think it is doable and _ trouble and complication? i think it is doable and i _ trouble and complication? i think it is doable and i think— trouble and complication? i think it is doable and i think it _ trouble and complication? i think it is doable and i think it is _ is doable and i think it is necessary as well. they have been looking _ necessary as well. they have been looking at — necessary as well. they have been looking at more of a holistic approach _ looking at more of a holistic approach is to who should be getting the vaccine _ approach is to who should be getting the vaccine more quickly. so we are looking _ the vaccine more quickly. so we are looking at— the vaccine more quickly. so we are looking at areas of deprivation. we are looking — looking at areas of deprivation. we are looking at those who don't necessarily have a health risk but 'ust necessarily have a health risk but just ethnic— necessarily have a health risk but just ethnic minority communities. our teachers who are going to be in 0ur teachers who are going to be in touch— our teachers who are going to be in touch with — our teachers who are going to be in touch with lots of students when the school _ touch with lots of students when the school is _ touch with lots of students when the school is open. bus drivers. face—to—face roles are where people are at— face—to—face roles are where people are at risk— face—to—face roles are where people are at risk of— face—to—face roles are where people are at risk of getting more infection— are at risk of getting more infection with covid—19 and therefore complication. we need to be looking — therefore complication. we need to be looking at everybody in a holistic— be looking at everybody in a holistic manner, notjust be looking at everybody in a holistic manner, not just as we did before _ holistic manner, not just as we did before when we looked at the shielding group, whichjust looked at health— shielding group, whichjust looked at health needs. health isjust one part of— at health needs. health isjust one part of it — at health needs. health isjust one part of it. there are lots of other factors _ part of it. there are lots of other factors that _ part of it. there are lots of other factors that make us vulnerable to the condition.—
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factors that make us vulnerable to the condition. thank you both very much indeed- _ the condition. thank you both very much indeed. we _ the condition. thank you both very much indeed. we should - the condition. thank you both very much indeed. we should hear - the condition. thank you both very much indeed. we should hear in l the condition. thank you both very i much indeed. we should hear in the next couple of days about the next list of priorities. in the meantime, thank you. we're going to tell you now about an amazing woman called linda udeagbala, who sadly died three weeks ago from coronavirus. she was just 60 years old. linda was a district nurse for nearly 20 years, and she was clearly an inspiration because four of her five children have followed in her footsteps. breakfast�*s graham satchell went to meet them. she was everything to us. she was the embodiment of someone who was kind and caring and loving. that motherly love, she had that in abundance. i always look at my mum as a superhero. she was working, she was a mum, she'd cook. i'd never think covid could take her life. i almost thought she
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was invincible, yeah. # happy birthday happy birthday to you #. - linda udeagbala celebrated her 60th birthdayjust a few weeks ago. she was surrounded by the most important people in her life — her husband and five children. no matter what, she always tried to keep positive. she was very outgoing and joyful. she liked to be with friends and she liked a lot of company. she always liked to be around people. one thing you can never forget, really, it's the smile you can't forget. she was always positive, she was always caring, she was always loving, always forgiving. and selfless. you can see, she died doing what she loved to do, really, caring for people. linda was a district nurse in the nhs for more than 20 years. because she was diabetic, her employers told her she should work from the office, but linda was determined to keep seeing her patients.
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it's something she enjoyed doing. something that makes her happy. all of us, we tried to say to her you are at risk, but she was full of confidence. she believed in herfaith, she felt that nothing can happen to me. she chose. ultimately, the decision was hers. and i am a strong believer in taking responsibility for yourself. rather than relying on others. we all spoke to her. we all expressed concerns. "mum, you shouldn't be working," yeah. linda started to feel ill at the end ofjanuary and died in hospital just over a week later. she has left a remarkable legacy. four of her children have followed in her footsteps and become nhs nurses. we said, if mother is so happy doing this, and loving it, why not follow suit? maybe you will find happiness as well. so all followed in her footsteps, with her massive encouragement.
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and that made her extremely happy. i always remember looking on the nmc register and just seeing all of our names there. a wonderful feeling. wonderful. she was the type of mother everyone would love to have. she did a great job with all of us. linda's death is a terrible reminder that this pandemic is still taking loved ones every day. that nurses have put their lives on the line to care for others. but black and minority ethnic staff have been some of the most at risk. she has given us so much hope and so many things that we will carry on in our own lives and, even though she might not be here physically, she is going to be here in spirit. i just can't wait to tell my children, tell all the other people that i get to meet later in life about how wonderful my mum was.
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it's been really lovely getting e—mails and tweets from you about multi—generationalfamilies e—mails and tweets from you about multi—generational families who have worked, generations and families, i should say, who have worked in the nhs and just how it inspires them. we spoke to a doctor earlier who was saying that he was inspired by his parents as well. once you get in there and you know what you are doing and nobody you are giving back, it is a good thing. thank you so much as well to the family for talking to us and telling us your story. and memories of mum stop quite some legacy. and memories of mum stop quite some lea . . and memories of mum stop quite some leia _ ., ., and memories of mum stop quite some lea . . .. ., and memories of mum stop quite some lea . . ., ., , and memories of mum stop quite some lea . ., ., ., , ,, legacy. thanks for 'oining us. still to come. # i really need you tonight, forever is going to start tonight... that is what we all need. the princess of power ballads, bonnie tyler, willjoin us live. she has a new album.
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tyler, willjoin us live. she has a new album-— tyler, willjoin us live. she has a new album. ~ .. .. ., new album. whoever thought of the hrase new album. whoever thought of the phrase total — new album. whoever thought of the phrase total eclipse _ new album. whoever thought of the phrase total eclipse of _ new album. whoever thought of the phrase total eclipse of the - new album. whoever thought of the phrase total eclipse of the heart - phrase total eclipse of the heart would ever make sense? time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. grassroots projects tackling violence along a road branded the crime capital of croydon have been given a share of £6 million of funding from city hall. a new application process has encouraged local groups to join forces to pitch for cash, rather than going up against each other. eight areas have been awarded money from the my ends programme. we picked areas where there was high demonstratable need. those organisations that came forward were able to talk about some of the problems, some of the alienation they felt there was for some of the young people in the area, the poverty, some of the deprivation. we picked areas where there was high demonstratable need. those organisations that came forward were able to talk
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about some of the problems, some of the alienation they felt there was for some of the young people in the area, the poverty, some of the deprivation. but, also, and really critically, they talk with a huge amount of optimism and enthusiasm about working together, engaging residents, and coming up with solutions. free—to—use cash machines are 'vanishing at an alarming rate' according to the consumer rights group which. london has seen the greatest decline with more than a quarter cut in the last two years. which says in deprived areas, where people are more likely to depend on cash, they could be forced to pay to withdraw their own money. a castle in south—east london could have to close — less than a decade after it was restored and opened to the public. severndroog castle on shooters hill was built in 178a. the pandemic means it's been temporaily shut to visitors and there are concerns about future. it's a precarious time for us. we don't get admissions, we don't get money from events, we don't get money from our weddings and our hires. so a lot of our income streams have disappeared. there is no other grant funding for the castle now, so it all depends on the support from the community. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there are minor delays on the circle line, hammersmith and city and on tfl rail. on the trains — there's no
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great northern, thameslink or london north eastern service at kings cross today with engineering works over the weekend. southern has disruption between london bridge and tulse hill because of a points failure. the ali06 is slow eastbound from colney hatch interchange to clockhouse interchange due to an earlier broken down lorry now the weather with kate. good morning. it is a cold start, especially compared to the last few nights. last night, temperatures dropped, in one or two spots, to just below zero. so a patchy ground frost for some first thing. one or two mist and fog patches potentially, but they should lift and we will see plenty of sunshine. blue sky today, perhaps broken cloud developing through the afternoon. but the wind is light and the temperature feeling mild. we are looking at a maximum of around 13 celsius. overnight tonight, it's a repeat performance. clear skies and the temperature dropping very close to zero, if not just below. we could see a mist orfog patch by dawn. the minimum down to around —2 away from central london. into the weekend, high pressure dominates our weather
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for the next few days, which means we will see plenty of fine, settled, dry weather. lots of sunshine around for saturday. perhaps a little bit more in the way of cloud for sunday, but the wind is light and daytime temperatures, again, feeling mild. night—time temperatures dropping close to zero. i'm back with the latest from bbc london in half an hour. now though it's back tojon and naga. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. morning live follows us on bbc one later. let's find out what's in store with kym and gethin. how are you? thank you. as we have been hearing on breakfast, the queen is feeling positive about the vaccine and encouraging people to
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think of others, but is it time to rethink other preventable illnesses following the news that not one single case of flu has been detected this year. today we ask if you are happy for masks to stay after the pandemic. happy for masks to stay after the andemic. �* ., .. , ..y .., .. pandemic. and demand for staycation hohda pandemic. and demand for staycation holiday homes — pandemic. and demand for staycation holiday homes has _ pandemic. and demand for staycation holiday homes has increased - pandemic. and demand for staycation holiday homes has increased this - holiday homes has increased this week— holiday homes has increased this week so— holiday homes has increased this week so we are meeting simon parfitt who has— week so we are meeting simon parfitt who has advice to help you cash in on the _ who has advice to help you cash in on the craze — who has advice to help you cash in on the craze by creating your own unique _ on the craze by creating your own unique b&b. on the craze by creating your own unique 5&5.— unique 8&3. talking of master craftsmen. _ unique 8&3. talking of master craftsmen, will _ unique 8&3. talking of master craftsmen, will is _ unique 8&3. talking of master craftsmen, will is here - unique 8&3. talking of master craftsmen, will is here to - unique 8&3. talking of master craftsmen, will is here to telll unique 8&3. talking of master. craftsmen, will is here to tell us craftsmen, willis here to tell us why he's swapped tools for trainers after discovering a fitness app that has more than a million people moving. nice leggings! it has more than a million people moving. nice leggings!- has more than a million people moving. nice leggings! it was cold, was it? freezing. _ moving. nice leggings! it was cold, was it? freezing. you _ moving. nice leggings! it was cold, was it? freezing. you will- moving. nice leggings! it was cold, was it? freezing. you will also - moving. nice leggings! it was cold, l was it? freezing. you will also show us an ancient _ was it? freezing. you will also show us an ancient craft _ was it? freezing. you will also show us an ancient craft making _ was it? freezing. you will also show us an ancient craft making a - us an ancient craft making a comeback. | us an ancient craft making a comeback-— us an ancient craft making a comeback. , .. , .. ., us an ancient craft making a comeback. , .. , .. .. ., us an ancient craft making a comeback. , .. , .. .. .. ., comeback. i will show you how to add a ersonal comeback. i will show you how to add a personal touch _ comeback. i will show you how to add a personal touch to _ comeback. i will show you how to add a personal touch to your _ comeback. i will show you how to add a personal touch to your kitchen - a personal touch to your kitchen with an — a personal touch to your kitchen with an ancient _ a personal touch to your kitchen with an ancient technique - a personal touch to your kitchen
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with an ancient technique that l a personal touch to your kitchen l with an ancient technique that can be good _ with an ancient technique that can be good for— with an ancient technique that can be good for anxiety. _ with an ancient technique that can be good for anxiety. [— with an ancient technique that can be good for anxiety. i bet- with an ancient technique that can be good for anxiety.— be good for anxiety. i bet ruby wishes she _ be good for anxiety. i bet ruby wishes she could _ be good for anxiety. i bet ruby wishes she could escape - be good for anxiety. i bet ruby wishes she could escape the i be good for anxiety. i bet ruby - wishes she could escape the drama in albert square. eastenders star louisa lytton reveals the latest twist in her gripping storyline. and twist in her gripping storyline. and no escaping _ twist in her gripping storyline. and no escaping her twists! katya jones has a _ no escaping her twists! katya jones has a fun— no escaping her twists! katya jones has a fun filled work to give you that friday feeling. find has a fun filled work to give you that friday feeling.— has a fun filled work to give you that friday feeling. and will will be takin: that friday feeling. and will will be taking part- _ that friday feeling. and will will be taking part. would _ that friday feeling. and will will be taking part. would you - that friday feeling. and will will be taking part. would you like l that friday feeling. and will will i be taking part. would you like him to wear his leggings?— be taking part. would you like him to wear his leggings? leggings are nood, buti to wear his leggings? leggings are good, but i think— to wear his leggings? leggings are good, but i think he _ to wear his leggings? leggings are good, but i think he is _ to wear his leggings? leggings are good, but i think he is missing - to wear his leggings? leggings are good, but i think he is missing a i good, but i think he is missing a paso— good, but i think he is missing a paso dohte — good, but i think he is missing a paso dohte a _ good, but i think he is missing a paso doble a cape _ good, but i think he is missing a paso doble a cape or— good, but i think he is missing a| paso doble a cape or something. good, but i think he is missing a - paso doble a cape or something. we will paso doble a cape or something. c will see paso doble a cape or something. will see you at 9:15am. paso doble a cape or something. we will see you at 9:15am. why - paso doble a cape or something. we will see you at 9:15am. why are - will see you at 9:15am. why are takin: will see you at 9:15am. why are taking part? — will see you at 9:15am. why are taking part? your— will see you at 9:15am. why are taking part? your shoulders, i will see you at 9:15am. why are | taking part? your shoulders, are they hurting after yesterday? i am they hurting after yesterday? i am takin: art they hurting after yesterday? i am taking part today. _ they hurting after yesterday? i am taking part today. i _ they hurting after yesterday? i an taking part today. i may regret the light blue shirt because i think it will get quite sweaty.— light blue shirt because i think it will get quite sweaty. kym, oversee it. iwill, i will get quite sweaty. kym, oversee it. i will, i will— will get quite sweaty. kym, oversee it. iwill, iwill pick— will get quite sweaty. kym, oversee it. i will, i will pick him _ will get quite sweaty. kym, oversee it. i will, i will pick him up - will get quite sweaty. kym, oversee it. i will, i will pick him up on - it. i will, i will pick him up on his mistakes.—
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it. i will, i will pick him up on his mistakes. prince harry has insisted he "never walked away" from the royal family, and that he did "what any husband or father would do". the duke of sussex spoke about his move to los angeles during an appearance on the late late show with james corden, on the us network cbs. to have walked away from the royal family, why did you feel that was necessary and the right thing to do for you and yourfamily? it necessary and the right thing to do for you and your family?— for you and your family? it was never walking _ for you and your family? it was never walking away, _ for you and your family? it was never walking away, it - for you and your family? it was never walking away, it was - for you and your family? it was - never walking away, it was stepping back rather— never walking away, it was stepping back rather than stepping down. it was a _ back rather than stepping down. it was a difficult environment, as i think— was a difficult environment, as i think a — was a difficult environment, as i think a lot — was a difficult environment, as i think a lot of people saw. we know what _ think a lot of people saw. we know what the _ think a lot of people saw. we know what the british press can be like. it what the british press can be like. it was _ what the british press can be like. it was destroying my mental health. this is— it was destroying my mental health. this is toxic! i did what any husband _ this is toxic! i did what any husband and father would do. i am going _ husband and father would do. i am going to _ husband and father would do. i am going to get my family out of here. we never— going to get my family out of here. we never walked away. as far as i am concerned. _ we never walked away. as far as i am concerned, whatever decisions are made _
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concerned, whatever decisions are made on _ concerned, whatever decisions are made on that side, i will never walk away _ made on that side, i will never walk away i_ made on that side, i will never walk away iwitt— made on that side, i will never walk away. i will always be contributing. my life _ away. i will always be contributing. my life is _ away. i will always be contributing. my life is public service. that made it clear. there has been so much debate about the idea. walking away from the royal family or walking away to protect your family. let's speak to our royal correspondent sarah campbell. this is candid and ahead of the oprah winfrey interview. you wait all ear oprah winfrey interview. you wait all year for _ oprah winfrey interview. you wait all year for a _ oprah winfrey interview. you wait all year for a proper _ oprah winfrey interview. you wait all year for a proper chat - oprah winfrey interview. you wait all year for a proper chat with - all year for a proper chat with harry and meghan and two come along at once. we knew this interview had taken place because there were pictures taken while he was on the top of the bus. it was the beginning of february. before the statements released by harry and meghan last week, and the queen, talking about the fact they are now not working royals and will not be coming back and do the half in, half out of the royalfamily, but it
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and do the half in, half out of the royal family, but it is an interesting interview carried out with james corden, who was at their wedding. it is very much an informal chat on the top of the bus. the first insight, really, we have had since last year into the mental health and mindset of harry. it is interesting from that perspective. you heard him in the clip talking about the press being toxic and that was the reason they felt they had to get away from the situation they were in. that was the serious side but there was plenty of light material. it is about 16 minutes. they take him on an assault course with james corden, also we get an insight into life with harry and meghan and baby archie in their california mansion. we hear that baby archie is active, runs around, and we heard about the present he received from his great—grandmother.
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how are you finding fatherhood? mr; how are you finding fatherhood? �*f�*ii'; son is how are you finding fatherhood? son isjust over a year and a half. he is— son isjust over a year and a half. he is hysterical. he has an amazing personality — he is hysterical. he has an amazing personality. he already puts three, four words — personality. he already puts three, four words together. what personality. he already puts three, four words together.— four words together. what was his first word? — four words together. what was his first word? crocodile. _ four words together. what was his first word? crocodile. three - first word? crocodile. three syllables- — first word? crocodile. three syllables. and _ first word? crocodile. three syllables. and my _ first word? crocodile. three - syllables. and my grandmother asked us what _ syllables. and my grandmother asked us what archie wanted for christmas. meqhan— us what archie wanted for christmas. meghan said a waffle maker. she sent us waffle _ meghan said a waffle maker. she sent us waffle maker.— us waffle maker. there you got, a waffle maker— us waffle maker. there you got, a waffle maker from _ us waffle maker. there you got, a waffle maker from the _ us waffle maker. there you got, a waffle maker from the queen. - us waffle maker. there you got, a | waffle maker from the queen. one waffle makerfrom the queen. one wonders what revelations there will be in the oprah winfrey interview. we have a few days to wait. thank ou. it is we have a few days to wait. thank you. it is interesting _ we have a few days to wait. thank you. it is interesting whether- we have a few days to wait. thank you. it is interesting whether the i you. it is interesting whether the potential stink of the oprah winfrey interview is reduced by the fact he has done this interview now and said may be things that would come out then. although this was done in february
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before the announcement about the royal patronage and their duties. it's friday, which means another week of home schooling is nearly over, and we know that many children are working on laptops and devices donated by generous breakfast viewers. you've been helping to bridge the so—called "digital divide" during the pandemic — but as schools start to fully reopen, they need to get that technology back into the classroom. fiona lamdin, has been finding out what impact that will have. over the past few months, 86,000 devices have been donated following the bbc�*s campaign. it's a life—changer. and it's also a life—saver. helping children learn at home.
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charities say the pandemic have shone a light on the 1.7 million students who don't have access to devices or data. and that's why companies likejeff�*s... he is a nice 15 inch laptop with charger. ..are still donating as many laptops as they can. historically, we replace our computers on a 4—6 year cycle. they are handed in, wipe them, throw them away. now, we are able to give them to schools who are on a ten year replacement cycle for their kit, and they are able to reuse their devices and access online learning. so it has been a win—win situation everyone. i don't know why we didn't think of it before. and jeff's company isn't alone. 60,000 devices are being donated by businesses. many of them end up here in this warehouse. charities then distribute them to schools and families who need them.
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i have a laptop for you. families like irena's. we had to use a phone, but now we have a laptop, it will be much better to use. it will be bigger to read the words. you've got the laptop now, but you're going back to school in a couple of weeks. is it too late? never is it too late, to be honest. we still have a few days left to do some work, for which it will be extremely helpful. irena and her children have waited months for this laptop. but, in a few weeks, they may have to hand it back to the school who own it. it is going to be heartbreaking bringing them back in and asking those children who have worked so hard over this period to give their devices back to us. but some of those devices are school stock. we have very few devices at school and we need sets of 30 to go into classes to make sure all the children here
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can get as much access to devices as possible, whilst they are learning. it would be absolutely fantastic if the children could have a device each and take that home, just like they take reading books home. oh, my goodness! we filmed with edwina last month. thank you very much. when she and her children received a laptop. giving it back will be hard. i don't want to sound selfish. even though i know it was lent to us by the school, _ handing it back is really. going to affect my children negatively, because they are kind of use to it now. - kind of used to it now. but then we just have to hand it back. - even though pupils will soon be back face—to—face, many more devices are still needed so students can learn at school and at home. fiona lamdin, bbc news. you can feel how much those devices
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mean to those families. we'rejoined now by tom campbell, chief education officer at greenwood academies trust, which has 36 schools across the east of england. how much difference have these devices made? the how much difference have these devices made?— how much difference have these devices made? the devices have transformed _ devices made? the devices have transformed remote _ devices made? the devices have transformed remote learning - devices made? the devices have transformed remote learning fori devices made? the devices have - transformed remote learning for many families. across our trust of over 18,000 pupils, two thirds would be recognised as disadvantaged and that meant the deprivation impacted on their access to learning at home. we work really hard in schools to make sure there is equality in terms of devices provided in classrooms, but when it comes to remote learning at home, we really did see the impact of deprivation, with children either having no device or sharing a device with three or four siblings, which prove difficult when all children were trying to learn at the same
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time. it has been transformational. we have been fortunate as a trust. we have been fortunate as a trust. we managed to draw down over 3000 devices from the government scheme. we had donations from family members and local community. we also had large donations from corporate partners and we had one example when deloitte purchased a laptop for every single child in a peterborough special school. all of this support has been transformational for many of those families. taste has been transformational for many of those families.— has been transformational for many of those families. we heard some of the parents — of those families. we heard some of the parents in _ of those families. we heard some of the parents in the _ of those families. we heard some of the parents in the piece _ of those families. we heard some of the parents in the piece by - of those families. we heard some of the parents in the piece by fiona - the parents in the piece by fiona saying now the schools are going back full time from the 8th of march, they will have to hand the laptops back. and that might have an impact on home learning, or if there is another lockdown. what can be done to try to ease that transition? it is a complex question because,
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for example, you do not solve hunger by providing people with an oven. whilst there has been a clamour to provide all children with a device, i think it underestimates the complexity of learning and, hopefully, at school, what we can do is bring what we have learnt around remote learning, and i am sure teachers will bring to the classroom new skills they have learnt, whether that be on google classrooms, microsoft teams, and i am sure that will enhance the classroom experience but this is complex. there are emotional aspects of learning which i think parents appreciate, having seen children struggle on occasion at home. whilst the technology is welcome, we very much promote a blended approach, which will continue using technology where appropriate, but will also try to restore the social aspect of
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education and learning. it is a complex issue we are understanding more about everyday. tam complex issue we are understanding more about everyday. tom campbell, thanks. more about everyday. tom campbell, thanks- they — more about everyday. tom campbell, thanks- they are _ more about everyday. tom campbell, thanks. they are still _ more about everyday. tom campbell, thanks. they are still asking - more about everyday. tom campbell, thanks. they are still asking for - thanks. they are still asking for laptops and tablets. please go to... we'll be talking to the racing driver billy monger in a couple of minutes. he's at brands hatch, where he'll be finishing a gruelling comic relief challenge today. what have you done this week? enough, but not as much as billy. he's been walking, kayaking and cycling 140 miles with very little co—operation from our great british weather.
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remember that billy lost both legs in a crash four years ago. let's take a look at his journey so far. i've never done anything like this before. it's completely different to my background in racing. me and my trainer andy have been flat out, cycling, kayaking. the cycling, i started on the turbo trainer and then booted it up so i was cycling outdoors. it is never a case with billy, can i do this? it is a case of how well can i do it? it is a big challenge - and he has already started. it is lovely to see you. you have set off this morning. the rain has come out, how lovely! how are you doing? it is early doors, an hour in, so a long way to go. you are an extraordinary person. i am honoured to call you a friend. it is up to me to get
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into the water. i am ready for it now. i am excited and refreshed. i know you will be the inspiration that you were born to be. - so good luck, billy. he is an amazing person, strong character. he is funny, cheeky, adorable. this is tim peake. you have had rough conditions to deal with, but you are a huge inspiration to many, and what you are doing is for such a good cause. my past experiences of being helped in my recovery by a lot of people, and i would not be where i am today without them, and hopefully i can give something back to people
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during this challenge. with the money we raise, it will be a sensational and special feeling. billy mongerjoins us now from brands hatch. good morning, how are you feeling? i am absolutely exhausted. but you are smiling and the sun is out. that's better than what you have been going through lately. taste better than what you have been going through lately-— through lately. we are back down south at my _ through lately. we are back down south at my local _ through lately. we are back down south at my local track _ through lately. we are back down south at my local track and - through lately. we are back down south at my local track and the i south at my local track and the weather has been kind so far. today looks like it — weather has been kind so far. today looks like it could _ weather has been kind so far. today looks like it could be _ weather has been kind so far. today looks like it could be a _ weather has been kind so far. today looks like it could be a good - weather has been kind so far. today looks like it could be a good day. what is the plan? what is the timetable today?— what is the plan? what is the timetable today? today we will be doinu timetable today? today we will be doing lapse _ timetable today? today we will be doing lapse of _ timetable today? today we will be doing lapse of the _ timetable today? today we will be doing lapse of the circuit, - timetable today? today we will be doing lapse of the circuit, it - timetable today? today we will be doing lapse of the circuit, it is - timetable today? today we will be doing lapse of the circuit, it is a i doing lapse of the circuit, it is a two and a half mile track and we have 20 want to do, 18 on the bike and three by walking. so laps to cover. ., ., ., , , ~ ,
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cover. how tough has this week been? i don't cover. how tough has this week been? i don't think— cover. how tough has this week been? i don't think i — cover. how tough has this week been? i don't think i can _ cover. how tough has this week been? i don't think i can quite _ cover. how tough has this week been? i don't think i can quite describe - i don't think i can quite describe it. everyday there has been miles that have felt ok and miles that have like i could go through the whole duration of the challenge to get through. physically and mentally it has been challenging. i am really running on reserves. i woke up this morning and felt like i needed a week of sleep.— week of sleep. think of the lion with ou week of sleep. think of the lion with you will — week of sleep. think of the lion with you will have _ week of sleep. think of the lion with you will have tomorrow. i week of sleep. think of the lion - with you will have tomorrow. please tell me you do not have to get up early to get up early tomorrow —— ly in the. i early to get up early tomorrow -- ly in the. , ., �* early to get up early tomorrow -- ly in the. , .. �* ., .. in the. i definitely don't have to net u- in the. i definitely don't have to get up tomorrow. _ in the. i definitely don't have to get up tomorrow. we _ in the. i definitely don't have to get up tomorrow. we wanted i in the. i definitely don't have to| get up tomorrow. we wanted to in the. i definitely don't have to i get up tomorrow. we wanted to do in the. i definitely don't have to - get up tomorrow. we wanted to do an interview at — get up tomorrow. we wanted to do an interview at 6:10am _ get up tomorrow. we wanted to do an interview at 6:10am tomorrow, - get up tomorrow. we wanted to do an interview at 6:10am tomorrow, is - interview at 6:10am tomorrow, is that all right? ten interview at 6:10am tomorrow, is that all right?— that all right? ten past six in the evenin: , that all right? ten past six in the evening. may — that all right? ten past six in the evening, may be. _ that all right? ten past six in the evening, may be. you _ that all right? ten past six in the evening, may be. you have - that all right? ten past six in the evening, may be. you have had. evening, may be. you have had setbacks- _ evening, may be. you have had setbacks. 3ecause _ evening, may be. you have had setbacks. because of _ evening, may be. you have had setbacks. because of the - evening, may be. you have had i setbacks. because of the weather. tell us where that has left you today because you have quite a few laps to get in. today because you have quite a few laps to get im—
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laps to get in. yes, basically, des two, the laps to get in. yes, basically, des two. the kayak — laps to get in. yes, basically, des two, the kayak day, _ laps to get in. yes, basically, des two, the kayak day, we _ laps to get in. yes, basically, des two, the kayak day, we could - laps to get in. yes, basically, des two, the kayak day, we could not| laps to get in. yes, basically, des - two, the kayak day, we could not get out because of the conditions. it was 60 mph winds. there was no chance of staying in the kayak, never mind going anywhere in it. we had to postpone des two, come back the next day, and because of sorting out safety boats and the conditions were not great, we only managed a few hours in the water. the mileage we hope to cover in the kayak we did not manage to do so we have added those miles to the bike which means today gets longer. those miles to the bike which means today gets longer-— today gets longer. getting on the bike has been _ today gets longer. getting on the bike has been challenging. - today gets longer. getting on the bike has been challenging. you i today gets longer. getting on the i bike has been challenging. you were working out how to ride a bike, because i do not think you had done much cycling since your accident. is that the bit you are confident about? i that the bit you are confident about? .. that the bit you are confident about? . . , . that the bit you are confident about? . .y. , . that the bit you are confident about? . , . , about? i have never cycled since my accident before _ about? i have never cycled since my accident before since _ about? i have never cycled since my accident before since i _ about? i have never cycled since my accident before since i started i accident before since i started training for this. the first i got out on the road with my trainer to
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cycle was middle of january. so maybe three weeks ago was the first actual trip out onto the roads. it is a whole new experience. yesterday on the bike went well. we covered a lot of miles. i was exhausted by the end of it. i do not know how today is going to feel. i know every inch of this place so i know how far i will have to go every single lap. i know the racing line, so maybe that will help me out. {lit know the racing line, so maybe that will help me out.— will help me out. cut a few corners! it has will help me out. cut a few corners! it has been — will help me out. cut a few corners! it has been an _ will help me out. cut a few corners! it has been an exhausting, - will help me out. cut a few corners! it has been an exhausting, painful. it has been an exhausting, painful week. during the toughest moments, what has kept you going? what have you been thinking about? i what has kept you going? what have you been thinking about?— you been thinking about? i think esterda you been thinking about? i think yesterday the — you been thinking about? i think yesterday the steepest - you been thinking about? i think yesterday the steepest hills i i you been thinking about? i think. yesterday the steepest hills i have seen and i ended up trying to go up them. there were points when i did not think i would make it up the hills. at those times i had to dig
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the deepest i have had to to get up and get through it. it was thinking about the charities i have been involved with and seeing where the money comic relief raises will go. the people, it was all about the people. the people i had met through this process and who it will affect. that is what this is all about at the end of the day. i had to draw on that yesterday. taste]!!! the end of the day. i had to draw on that yesterday-— that yesterday. well said. have a aood da that yesterday. well said. have a good day today- _ that yesterday. well said. have a good day today. it _ that yesterday. well said. have a good day today. it will _ that yesterday. well said. have a good day today. it will all - that yesterday. well said. have a good day today. it will all be i that yesterday. well said. have a j good day today. it will all be over soon. you should be massively proud of yourself. i think everybody watching is hugely impressed. thanks for sharing it. you have the right mindset. rememberwhat for sharing it. you have the right mindset. remember what you are doing it for. good luck. the sun will shine on you today. here's how you can support billy...
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like dame shirley bassey and sir tom jones, bonnie tyler has one of those voices that could only come from wales. there is a trend there. she has not beenin there is a trend there. she has not been in wales this year. she got stuck in portugal and has been there
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ever since. # i need a hero. # i'm holding out for a hero till the end of the night. # he's got to be strong and he's got to be fast and he's got to be fresh from the fight. # i need a hero. # i'm holding on for a hero till the morning light. # he's got to be sure and he's got to be seen and he's got to be larger than life. # he's got to be sure and he's got to be soon and he's got to be larger than life. # i don't know what i do and i'm always in the dark. # we're living in a powderkeg and giving off sparks. # i really need it tonight. # for ever�*s going to start tonight. bonnie tylerjoins us now from faro in portugal. hello. good morning. we are playing the stuff from _ hello. good morning. we are playing the stuff from years _ hello. good morning. we are playing the stuff from years gone _ hello. good morning. we are playing the stuff from years gone by. - hello. good morning. we are playing the stuff from years gone by. you i the stuff from years gone by. you have had an album in the works that has been hanging there over
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lockdown. it has been hanging there over lockdown-— has been hanging there over lockdown. .. has been hanging there over lockdown. . , .. ... ., lockdown. it was due to come out last a - ril lockdown. it was due to come out last april but _ lockdown. it was due to come out last april but because _ lockdown. it was due to come out last april but because 79 - lockdown. it was due to come out last april but because 79 of i lockdown. it was due to come out last april but because 79 of my i last april but because 79 of my shows were postponed into this year and 2022, now is the best time for it to come out. i was only meant to come to portugalfor a it to come out. i was only meant to come to portugal for a week plus matt holliday, after the last show i did. the boys flew into heathrow and i flew here, did. the boys flew into heathrow and iflew here, and i have been here ever since. you could not be in a better place. but the sun is not shining like it is for you at home today. 0h, shining like it is for you at home today. oh, thank you, darling. i5 today. oh, thank you, darling. is that a cup of tea or a cup of coffee? ,,._ ., that a cup of tea or a cup of coffee? ,_ ., ., , that a cup of tea or a cup of coffee? , ., ., , hello. coffee? say hello, robert. hello. good morning. — coffee? say hello, robert. hello. good morning, robert. _ coffee? say hello, robert. hello. good morning, robert. is- coffee? say hello, robert. hello. good morning, robert. is that i coffee? say hello, robert. hello. good morning, robert. is that a l coffee? say hello, robert. hello. i good morning, robert. is that a cup of tea or coffee? fix, good morning, robert. is that a cup of tea or coffee?— of tea or coffee? a cup of tea, darlin: , of tea or coffee? a cup of tea, darling. with _ of tea or coffee? a cup of tea, darling, with a _ of tea or coffee? a cup of tea, darling, with a straw- of tea or coffee? a cup of tea, darling, with a straw to i of tea or coffee? a cup of tea, darling, with a straw to keep l of tea or coffee? a cup of tea, i darling, with a straw to keep the lipstick on. he darling, with a straw to keep the lipstick om—
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darling, with a straw to keep the listick on. ~ ., , i. lipstick on. he knows you well. it is not sangria. _ lipstick on. he knows you well. it is not sangria. not _ lipstick on. he knows you well. it is not sangria. not yet. _ lipstick on. he knows you well. it is not sangria. not yet. anyway, | lipstick on. he knows you well. it| is not sangria. not yet. anyway, i have a new _ is not sangria. not yet. anyway, i have a new album _ is not sangria. not yet. anyway, i have a new album out. _ is not sangria. not yet. anyway, i have a new album out. explain i is not sangria. not yet. anyway, i i have a new album out. explain why ou are in have a new album out. explain why you are in portugal. _ have a new album out. explain why you are in portugal. i _ have a new album out. explain why you are in portugal. i am _ have a new album out. explain why you are in portugal. i am hoping i have a new album out. explain why| you are in portugal. i am hoping you are not in a hotel. {lit you are in portugal. i am hoping you are not in a hotel.— are not in a hotel. of course, i am at my -- — are not in a hotel. of course, i am at my -- of— are not in a hotel. of course, i am at my -- of course _ are not in a hotel. of course, i am at my -- of course i _ are not in a hotel. of course, i am at my -- of course i am _ are not in a hotel. of course, i am at my -- of course i am not. i i are not in a hotel. of course, i am at my -- of course i am not. i am| are not in a hotel. of course, i am l at my -- of course i am not. i am at at my —— of course i am not. i am at my lovely house in the algarve. i am lucky to be here. it was a fluke. i came here for a week's holiday and i have been here since. i have missed my family. if you are watching, i love you all. and my friends. we are all in the same boat. i would not be able to see them if i was home anyway. able to see them if i was home an a . �* ., able to see them if i was home an a . ~ ., ., ., , anyway. and i have learnt to swim. we soke anyway. and i have learnt to swim. we spoke about — anyway. and i have learnt to swim. we spoke about this. _ anyway. and i have learnt to swim. we spoke about this. you - anyway. and i have learnt to swim. we spoke about this. you have i anyway. and i have learnt to swim. we spoke about this. you have the | we spoke about this. you have the album, waiting for that to come out, and you learn to swim. you have the
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swimming pool and it was about time. it took me long enough. i am 69. my mother tried her best to get me to have lessons to swim when i was small. but i had so many traumatic things happen to me in the water. but my new album is called the best is yet to come. and the next and i is "we have the bad days on the run". and thank god, for scientists, we have. i have not had the vaccine yet. i had a letter in wales to say i could have it but i am not in wales! and then i am on the road. i cannot wait to be on the stage. you could have — cannot wait to be on the stage. you could have not _ cannot wait to be on the stage. you could have not have introduced it better. # i can see a red light burning.
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bonnie tyler on the road. how much are you looking forward to touring and live audiences again? figs are you looking forward to touring and live audiences again? as soon as we can aet and live audiences again? as soon as we can get out _ and live audiences again? as soon as we can get out there, _ and live audiences again? as soon as we can get out there, we _ and live audiences again? as soon as we can get out there, we will - and live audiences again? as soon as we can get out there, we will be i we can get out there, we will be there. the next thing is to get together with my wonderful band. there. the next thing is to get together with my wonderful hand. if you are listening, darling is, i cannot wait to see you. and the crew. we will have many rehearsals. it has been a long time. and then we will be out. we are supposed to be out in june. will be out. we are supposed to be out injune. but i do not know. i half expect a phone call about that festival. it might not happen. who knows? i might have the vaccination ljy knows? i might have the vaccination by them. it is wonderful how everybody is having it in the uk. it is very slow here in portugal. when are you coming back? when i can fly
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next. i am are you coming back? when i can fly next. iam not are you coming back? when i can fly next. i am not flying home to stay in a hotel for ten days. it is crazy. i will come back probably afterjune, i imagine. i crazy. i will come back probably afterjune, i imagine.— crazy. i will come back probably afterjune, i imagine. i always like to learn something _ afterjune, i imagine. i always like to learn something that _ afterjune, i imagine. i always like to learn something that perhaps i afterjune, i imagine. i always like| to learn something that perhaps no one else will know when we interview someone. how does bonnie tyler take her tea? someone. how does bonnie tyler take hertea? how someone. how does bonnie tyler take her tea? how do i what? how do you take your tea, very important. iiliul’ith take your tea, very important. with milk. and take your tea, very important. with milk- and it — take your tea, very important. with milk. and it has _ take your tea, very important. with milk. and it has to _ take your tea, very important. with milk. and it has to be _ take your tea, very important. ti milk. and it has to be builder's tea. ., ., ., , ., , , tea. not l grade. that is absolutely it. your tea. not l grade. that is absolutely it- your energy _ tea. not l grade. that is absolutely it. your energy is _ tea. not l grade. that is absolutely it. your energy is infectious. i tea. not l grade. that is absolutely it. your energy is infectious. you i it. your energy is infectious. you look great, you look like you are in good spirits. soon you will be back on tour. ., ., ~' good spirits. soon you will be back on tour. ., i. , ., on tour. look after yourself. i am t in: on tour. look after yourself. i am trying my — on tour. look after yourself. i am trying my best- — on tour. look after yourself. i am trying my best- i— on tour. look after yourself. i am trying my best. i have _ on tour. look after yourself. i am trying my best. i have not - on tour. look after yourself. i am trying my best. i have not been l on tour. look after yourself. i am l trying my best. i have not been out at least three weeks. i go to the supermarket every three weeks or something. supermarket every three weeks or somethina. ., ~ supermarket every three weeks or something-— supermarket every three weeks or something._ bonnie, i supermarket every three weeks or i something._ bonnie, take something. take care. bonnie, take care.
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something. take care. bonnie, take care- thank — something. take care. bonnie, take care. thank you. _ something. take care. bonnie, take care. thank you. and _ something. take care. bonnie, take care. thank you. and the _ something. take care. bonnie, take care. thank you. and the best i something. take care. bonnie, take care. thank you. and the best is i something. take care. bonnie, take! care. thank you. and the best is yet to come is — care. thank you. and the best is yet to come is a — care. thank you. and the best is yet to come is a good _ care. thank you. and the best is yet to come is a good message. - care. thank you. and the best is yet to come is a good message. her i care. thank you. and the best is yet | to come is a good message. her new album the best is yet to come is released today.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. health leaders have welcomed the queen's comments about her vaccine experience, describing them as an "incredibly important vote of confidence in the programme". it is obviously difficult for people if they have never had a vaccine. they ought to think about other people rather than themselves. as ever, we'd like to hearfrom you. if you've had your vaccine, how was your experience? or are you still hesitant about getting a jab? what do you need to hear to feel safe about getting a vaccination? i'm on twitter @annita—mcveigh. the former first minister of scotland alex salmond will be questioned by members of the scottish parliament today over his claims of a conspiracy against him over sexual harassment claims.
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the supreme court will today rule on whether runaway schoolgirl

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