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tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 26, 2021 9:00am-10:01am GMT

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. health leaders have welcomed the queen's comments about her vaccine experience, describing them as an "incredibly important vote of confidence in the programme". it is obviously difficult for people if they have never had a vaccine. they ought to think about other people rather than themselves. as ever, we'd like to hearfrom you. if you've had your vaccine, how was your experience? or are you still hesitant about getting a jab? what do you need to hear to feel safe about getting a vaccination? i'm on twitter @annita—mcveigh. the former first minister of scotland alex salmond will be questioned by members of the scottish parliament today over his claims of a conspiracy against him over sexual harassment claims.
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the supreme court will today rule on whether runaway schoolgirl shamima begum can return to the uk to appeal against the removal of her british citizenship. mps are to investigate the safety of so—called smart motorways, which use the hard shoulder as an extra lane during busy periods. 17 former british gymnasts, including three olympians, have sent a legal letter to the gymnastics governing body outlining allegations of physical and psychological abuse in the sport. and prince harry has spoken about his mental health, and once again blamed the british press for his move to the us. it was destroying my mental health. really? i was like, this is toxic. yeah. so i did what any husband and father would do. i was like, i need to get my family out of here.
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good morning. health leaders have welcomed the queen's comments about her vaccine experience, describing them as an "incredibly important vote of confidence in the programme". the monarch has urged those hesitant about the vaccine to take up the offer, urging them to "think of others", as the government prepares to publish details on the next phase of the roll—out. thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation is understood to have recommended that prioritisation should continue down the age ranges, with people in their 40s next to be invited for a jab. the move could come as a blow to those who have been campaigning for teachers, police officers and other front line key workers to be next on the list. meanwhile, a government study has revealed that people from pakistani and bangladeshi backgrounds in england had a higher risk
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of dying with covid—19 during the second wave of the pandemic compared with other ethnic groups. ministers have suggested up to 15% of people remain "vaccine—hesitant", with confidence in the jab lower among black and asian communities. the queen, who was inoculated injanuary, said she understood that people who have never had a vaccine would find it "difficult" but encouraged them to "think about other people rather than themselves". our royal correspondent nick witchell reports. they both had their vaccinations last month, and though the duke is now in hospital being treated for a non—covid infection, the queen, unperturbed, it would seem, by her husband's absence, was earlier this week on a video conference with health officials from across the uk. the vaccination programme had stirred memories. well, having lived in the war, it's very much like that, you know, when everybody had the same idea.
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and i think this has rather sort of inspired that, hasn't it? it's a bit like a plague, isn't it? because it's not only here that we've got the virus, but it's everywhere. so, it's a strange battle that everybody�*s actually fighting. but how had the queen found her own vaccination? well, once you've had the vaccine, you have a feeling of, you know, you're protected, which is, i think, very important. as far as i can make out, it was quite harmless. it was very quick. and i've had lots of letters from people who've been very surprised by how easy it was to get the vaccine. and the jab was very — it didn't hurt at all. there was understanding for people who are nervous of the vaccination, but a reminder that everyone has a responsibility to have it. it is obviously difficult for people if they've never had a vaccine. they ought to think about other
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people rather than themselves. and there was a message to the scientists who developed the vaccines, and all the staff who are administering them. it is remarkable how quickly the whole thing has has been done. so many people have had the vaccine already, so you have to keep up the good work. nicholas witchell, bbc news. on bbc breakfast, justice secretary robert buckland refused to rule out the prospect of prison inmates and staff being vaccinated en masse in the next phase of the vaccine roll—out. with regard to prisons, i think it is right to say that no prisoner would get priority ahead of the cohort in the community, and therefore, making sure that there is that consistency is very important and that has been happening thus far. i am particularly keen to make sure that our dedicated prison staff get that vaccination.
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many of them are of course already because they are in the current categories and i want to make sure that happens as quickly as possible. the thing for me is speed. if we have advice from the jcvi that maximises speed of the roll—out of the vaccination programme, that is going to be good for everybody, wherever they are. danny altmann is the professor of immunology at imperial college, london. hejoins me now. good morning. we are expecting in the next few days said the need to hear from the joint committee on vaccination and immunisation about the next phase of the roll—out of covid vaccines. would you be surprised if we get anything other than a continued progression down through the age groups, apart from those people most vulnerable who have already been identified? i think that is what we do expect because, you know, if it ain't broke, don't fix it, and it's gone exceptionally well, it really has.
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and the vaccines are performing very well, as we have seen in the data. recap for us where you would where we are in terms of the progression through the groups. 50. we are in terms of the progression through the groups.— we are in terms of the progression through the groups. so, i think the ch through the groups. so, i think the jcvi have through the groups. so, i think the jcvi have done _ through the groups. so, i think the jcvi have done a _ through the groups. so, i think the jcvi have done a very _ through the groups. so, i think the jcvi have done a very solid - through the groups. so, i think the jcvi have done a very solid job - through the groups. so, i think the jcvi have done a very solid job at l jcvi have done a very solid job at working out the groups and we are now heading, aren't we, from the 60s and over through to the 50s and over and over through to the 50s and over and all the data we have seen in the uk, and the scottish data from this week and around the world, like from israel, says the vaccines in real life are, if anything, even more effective than we dared to dream of in the trials. effective than we dared to dream of in the trials-— in the trials. how important do you think what the — in the trials. how important do you think what the queen _ in the trials. how important do you think what the queen has - in the trials. how important do you think what the queen has said, - in the trials. how important do you | think what the queen has said, and we have already run a report on that this morning, what the queen has said about her vaccine experience, encouraging people to take the jab if they are feeling at all hesitant about that?— about that? well, you know, all immunologists _ about that? well, you know, all immunologists and _ about that? well, you know, all. immunologists and vaccinologists really welcome the queen's endorsement and every word she said
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was correct and i liked her residence with wartime spirit because the vaccine is our battle in this war. —— her resonance with wartime spirit. i speak to health care worker groups a lot, including bame health care workers, and there is some sensitivity and hesitancy out there, you know, sometimes for kind of, you know, heartfelt reasons. wejust kind of, you know, heartfelt reasons. we just need to have those discussions. i think the better the news gets, the more it is a virtuous cycle where people think they are safe and they are working and so i want that. white matter in terms of making a breakthrough to the hesitant, what more needs to be done? ~ , . ~ hesitant, what more needs to be done? ~ , ., ~ ., hesitant, what more needs to be done? . , ., ~' ., , done? we will be talking about this a bit later in _ done? we will be talking about this a bit later in the _ done? we will be talking about this a bit later in the programme - done? we will be talking about this a bit later in the programme but. a bit later in the programme but clearly there's a lot of outreach going on with different community newspapers, radio stations, in multiple languages, to try to reach people who, for whatever reason, have not yet come forward. i think we need to — have not yet come forward. i think we need to be _ have not yet come forward. i think we need to be sensitive _ have not yet come forward. i think
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we need to be sensitive and - have not yet come forward. i think we need to be sensitive and listen| we need to be sensitive and listen and keep talking. these are not people who are stupid. they have concerns and we need to kind of keep talking and tried to allay their fears. as i say, the more good news we have about how well the vaccines are working, the easier the discussion becomes. we are working, the easier the discussion becomes. ~ ., ., discussion becomes. we are hearing about johnson _ discussion becomes. we are hearing about johnson & _ discussion becomes. we are hearing about johnson & johnson _ discussion becomes. we are hearing about johnson &johnson and - discussion becomes. we are hearing about johnson & johnson and their l aboutjohnson &johnson and their vaccine now, which looks set to gain approval in the us. what do you know about that particular jab? approval in the us. what do you know about that particularjab? the uk has ordered 30 million doses and i think the eu 200 million, and the covax programme has 500 million doses on order. how does it compare to the ones we know most about so far, pfizerand to the ones we know most about so far, pfizer and astrazeneca? to the ones we know most about so far, pfizerand astrazeneca? in far, pfizerand astrazeneca? i�*t approach, it is a near far, pfizerand astrazeneca? i�*i approach, it is a near neighbour of the astrazeneca approach or indeed the astrazeneca approach or indeed the sputnik approach, so it isn't adenovirus, a common cold virus that has been modified. they set out their stall to be a vaccine that
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could be delivered with one dose, one or two doses, and all we can say is that the data again looks really good. it isjust is that the data again looks really good. it is just a really good addition to the armoury, another good one. addition to the armoury, another tood one. . ~' ,, addition to the armoury, another tood one. ., ~ i. ., ., , the former first minister of scotland alex salmond will be questioned by members of the scottish parliament today over his claims of a "malicious and concerted" conspiracy against him. it's part of an inquiry into the mishandling of sexual harassment complaints about him, which were later disproven in court. the current first minister nicola sturgeon, a former ally of alex salmond, has dismissed his claims. our political correspondent nick eardley reports. for years, this was the closest relationship in scottish politics, alex salmond and his protegee, nicola sturgeon. now, though, they're bitter enemies. he accuses her of failing to tell the truth. she says he is living in an alternative reality.
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this is mr salmond outside the high court in edinburgh last year. he had just been cleared of sexual assault. there is certain evidence that i would have liked to have seen led in this trial, but for a variety of reasons we were not able to do so. at some point, that information, that facts and that evidence, will see the light of day. now it's nicola sturgeon and her government that's under the spotlight. its investigation into mr salmond was found to be unlawful and tainted by apparent bias. mr salmond is coming here to the scottish parliament to make some extraordinary claims. mr salmond claims nicola sturgeon has misled the scottish parliament. that she's guilty of several breaches of the ministerial code. and that people around her, including her husband and her chief of staff, engaged in a malicious campaign to damage his reputation, even to the extent of having him imprisoned. it's a row which has caused
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an earthquake in scottish politics, with claims that holyrood is struggling to hold the government to account. parts of mr salmond's evidence have been taken down, after prosecutors said they could be in contempt of court and identify his accusers. opposition parties have suggested taking the evidence down is part of a cover—up. miss sturgeon has denied breaking the ministerial code, and says there's no evidence of a conspiracy. what is not legitimate is to pursue a conspiracy theory, a scorched earth policy, that threatens the reputation and the integrity of scotland's independentjustice institutions, just because you happen to dislike this government. and to sacrifice all of that, if i may say so. presiding officer, on the altar of the ego of one man. this explosive row is now reaching its climax. miss sturgeon will give evidence next week, as two first ministers, two colossal figures in scotland,
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make their case to parliament. nick eardley, bbc news, holyrood. and we can speak to nick eardley now, at holyrood. good morning. we are going to see and hear more in public today about the breakdown between the relationship of the former first minister, alex salmond, and his protege, the current first minister, nicola sturgeon? it is protege, the current first minister, nicola sturgeon?— nicola sturgeon? it is hard to exaggerate — nicola sturgeon? it is hard to exaggerate how _ nicola sturgeon? it is hard to exaggerate how significant i nicola sturgeon? it is hard to i exaggerate how significant that breakdown has been. remember, back in 2014, when scotland held its independence referendum, nicola sturgeon and alex salmond were the dream team of nationalist politics in scotland. now, they really are bitter enemies and we are going to see that playing out in the most extraordinary fashion this afternoon. we expect mr salmond to start giving evidence in parliament at around 12:30pm. the session could
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be as long as four hours, such is the depth of the evidence that he wants to get over. and they claims really are incredible. yes, he thinks that nicola sturgeon has misled parliament and that is something her opponents say she would have to resign over if it was proved to be correct. but perhaps even more significantly than that, mr salmond believes that there was a plot to remove him from public life and potentially even send him to jail. he will be asked this afternoon if there is evidence of that. what makes him think that? how did he reach that conclusion? it is going to be an incredible moment in scottish politics. when we see the man who led this parliament for several years, who is scotland's longest serving first minister, led the scottish government and the snp, saying the same snp and the next scottish government conspired to try to send him to prison. ok. scottish government conspired to try to send him to prison.—
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to send him to prison. 0k, nick, thank you _ to send him to prison. 0k, nick, thank you for— to send him to prison. 0k, nick, thank you for that. _ to send him to prison. 0k, nick, thank you for that. nick - to send him to prison. 0k, nick, thank you for that. nick eardleyl to send him to prison. 0k, nick, i thank you for that. nick eardley at holyrood. and you can watch the whole of alex salmond's evidence to the holyrood inquiry. that's here on the bbc news channel. it's expected to start after about 12:30 this lunchtime. the headlines on bbc news. health leaders have welcomed the queen's comments urging the public to "think about other people" and get a covid jab when they are offered one. alex salmond will be questioned by members of the scottish parliament today. the former scottish first minister claims there was a conspiracy against him over sexual harassment claims. and the supreme court will today rule on whether runaway schoolgirl shamima begum can return to the uk to appeal against the removal of her british citizenship. prince harry has said the british press was "destroying" his mental health, in an interview with the late late show host james corden. he said the pressure he was under meant he had
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to move his family away. the interview was recorded earlier this month — before he and his wife meghan lost their royal patronages. our royal correspondent sarah campbelljoins me now. good morning. harry has never shied away from discussing his mental health. tells more about this interview. health. tells more about this interview— health. tells more about this interview. ., ., , interview. no, you're right. heads totether interview. no, you're right. heads togetherwas— interview. no, you're right. heads together was a — interview. no, you're right. heads together was a huge _ interview. no, you're right. heads together was a huge project - interview. no, you're right. heads together was a huge project he i interview. no, you're right. heads. together was a huge project he was involved in at the time with his brother and sister—in—law when he was part of the royal family as a working member, ishould was part of the royal family as a working member, i should say, was part of the royal family as a working member, ishould say, of was part of the royal family as a working member, i should say, of the royal family. working member, i should say, of the royalfamily. this interview with james gordon, who you are a member is a friend of harry and meghan, he was at their wedding and is a very big name over in the united states, hosts one of the really popular late—night tv shows and this was a very light—hearted, or segment which was recorded —— informal segment which was recorded on the 5th of february, as you say, before the statement about the royal patriot is being removed. isay
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statement about the royal patriot is being removed. i say it was light—hearted, there were light—hearted, there were light—hearted moments but there were also some serious questions and some insights into why harry and meghan the uk. what is life like, _ or what are you excited for it to be, out of lockdown? i've no idea. like, a slightly different version but a continuation of what we were doing back in the uk anyway, right? it's going to be... that's what our life, my life is always going to be about public service and meghan has signed up to that and the two of us enjoy doing that. trying to bring some compassion and, you know, trying to make people happy and try and change the world in any small way that we can. it's such a monumental- decision to have walked away from the royal family. why did you feel that _ that was necessary and the right thing to do for you and your family? it was never walking away. it was stepping back rather than stepping down. right. it was a really difficult environment, as i think a lot of people saw. we all know what the british press
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can be like and it was destroying my mental health. really? i was like, this is toxic. yeah. so i did what any husband and what any father would do is i needed to get my family out of here but we never walked away. and as far as i'm concerned, whatever decisions are made on that side, i will never walk away. i will always be contributing, but my life is public service, so wherever i am in the world it's going to be the same thing. a really interesting insight into how's— a really interesting insight into how's mental health, the way they were thinking, calling the press toxic_ were thinking, calling the press toxic and — were thinking, calling the press toxic and saying they had to get away~ _ toxic and saying they had to get away. that is the serious stuff, there _ away. that is the serious stuff, there are — away. that is the serious stuff, there are some also really interesting glimpses into the lives that harry and meghan rallied in california, so they talk about archie. — california, so they talk about archie, who will be two later this year— archie, who will be two later this year and — archie, who will be two later this year and they say his first word was crocodile _ year and they say his first word was crocodile. his great grandmother the queen— crocodile. his great grandmother the queen apparently gave him a waffle maker— queen apparently gave him a waffle maker for— queen apparently gave him a waffle maker for christmas, queen apparently gave him a waffle makerfor christmas, so queen apparently gave him a waffle maker for christmas, so they all sit
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around _ maker for christmas, so they all sit around and — maker for christmas, so they all sit around and have waffle's every morning — around and have waffle's every morning. and meghan made an appearance on face time. i said it was quite — appearance on face time. i said it was quite a — appearance on face time. i said it was quite a light—hearted interview, they stopped by one of the houses in bet-air, _ they stopped by one of the houses in bet-air, and — they stopped by one of the houses in bel—air, and james gordon suggested that prince _ bel—air, and james gordon suggested that prince harry might like to live there. _ that prince harry might like to live there. like — that prince harry might like to live there, like the fresh prince. and they— there, like the fresh prince. and they found — there, like the fresh prince. and they found meghan, and she said they had had _ they found meghan, and she said they had had enough of moving. interesting, all of harry and meghan's fans, of which there are many, _ meghan's fans, of which there are many, will— meghan's fans, of which there are many, will be fascinated by this interview. — many, will be fascinated by this interview, and even if you are not a fan, interview, and even if you are not a fan. i_ interview, and even if you are not a fan. ithink— interview, and even if you are not a fan, i think it's still interesting, bearing — fan, i think it's still interesting, bearing in— fan, i think it's still interesting, bearing in mind how high on the news agenda _ bearing in mind how high on the news agenda they have been in the last 12 n1onthe— agenda they have been in the last 12 months. , , ., , months. definitely a very interesting _ months. definitely a very interesting insight. - months. definitely a very interesting insight. sarah months. definitely a very _ interesting insight. sarah campbell, thank you. the supreme court will today rule on whether shamima begum — who went to join the so—called islamic state group in syria six years ago when she was 15, can return to the uk to appeal against the removal of her british citizenship. ms begum is currently in a refugee camp in northern syria. dominic casciani reports. this is the story of how a 15—year—old girl ran away
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from home, became an international terrorist, and how herfight to return raises a fundamental question aboutjustice. on a cold february morning in 2015, shamima begum left her home here in bethnal green in london for the final time. she secretly flew to turkey with two friends and within days, they had been smuggled into syria. they had fallen for the propaganda of the self—styled islamic state group. the militants told a well—crafted lie. be part of our utopia, they said. until you are shot or decapitated for disagreeing. and every brit who joined them encouraged others to follow. two weeks ago... leave your decadent western lifestyle behind, they said, marry a foreign fighter, have babies. and within a few weeks, shamima begum went from gcses tojihadi bride. this dutch fighter, seven years
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older, took her as his own. it was not going to be a happy ever after. the regime began to collapse as an international coalition bombed it to bits. both shamima's friends are now believed to be dead. her own babies, a boy and a girl, died within weeks of each other. and as 2018 ended, her thoughts finally turned to home, and the country that she had rejected. i just want forgiveness, really, from the uk. like, everything i've been through, i did not expect i would go through that and, you know, losing my children the way i lost them. shamima begum survived the fall of the self—styled islamic state. her third baby, born in the squalid camp that was now her home, didn't. and back here at parliament, her interviews caused uproar. they hate our country and the values that we stand for. shamima said she wanted to come back
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home but ministers said she was still a threat, and so they used an exceptional power to deprive her of her british citizenship. and that meant she could never get back in. that has been used more than 150 times against other terrorism suspects, men like these. i was definitely an enemy of britain. what did you do in is? a question i would prefer to decline to answer at this present stage. but this is where it gets legally complicated. the government took away shamima's british citizenship because of her heritage. they said she could ask bangladesh for a passport, but bangladesh doesn't want her. she could even be hanged if she turned up. it was all going to end up in the courts. shamima begum is fighting to remain british. her lawyers say she is prepared to face justice but she can't defend herself from a dangerous refugee camp in northern syria. the court of appeal ruled
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that the only way in which she can have a fair and effective appeal is to be permitted to come into the uk. in short, fairness and justice must outweigh national security concerns. and that is why the case is now here at the supreme court. under the law, we are all entitled to a fair hearing before a judge, whether we are good or bad. but does that mean that the government should help shamima begum leave her camp to take part in this legal battle in london? only the supreme court can now decide that and its answer to that fundamental question of law is far bigger than the fate of shamima begum alone. let's speak to christopher cole, from the law society's immigration committee. good morning. thank you forjoining
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us. just to recap, what we are looking at today when we eventually hear the supreme court decision is not whether shamima begum has won the right to have her british citizenship back but whether she will be allowed leave to come back to the uk to basically fight that appeal? to the uk to basically fight that a i teal? ., . , , to the uk to basically fight that a-teal? , , , , ., appeal? exactly. this is 'ust a proceduratfi appeal? exactly. this is 'ust a procedural step t appeal? exactly. this is 'ust a procedural step within h appeal? exactly. this isjust a procedural step within her - procedural step within her substantive appeal. it is just deciding whether she can have a fair and effective hearing of the decision to take away her citizenship while she is in syria, or whether she needs to be in the uk to be able to have a fair and effective hearing.— to be able to have a fair and effective hearing. and of course, sor to effective hearing. and of course, sorry to interrupt _ effective hearing. and of course, sorry to interrupt but _ effective hearing. and of course, sorry to interrupt but the - effective hearing. and of course, sorry to interrupt but the home i sorry to interrupt but the home office, i was about to say, earlier in this process, said that she is now... her lawyers have launched an appeal to allow her to come back but the government argues she has created these impediments herself by
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going to syria in the first instance.— going to syria in the first instance. , , ., , . instance. exactly, it is a difficult balancin: instance. exactly, it is a difficult balancing act — instance. exactly, it is a difficult balancing act between _ instance. exactly, it is a difficult balancing act between the - balancing act between the government, who want to argue that they are protecting the public by keeping out somebody who they believe to be a terrorist and a threat to the country, and the fundamental right of somebody to have a fair hearing on such a key issue, which is taking away someone's british nationality, which is a major issue. it is a difficult balancing exercise, looking at the particular facts of this particular case. i5 particular facts of this particular case. , . , particular facts of this particular case. , ., , , , case. is there any president, thou:h, case. is there any president, though, where _ case. is there any president, though, where the _ case. is there any president, though, where the court - case. is there any president, though, where the court has| case. is there any president, - though, where the court has been asked to balance up safety here in the uk against someone's call for a fair and effective trial? this the uk against someone's call for a fair and effective trial?— fair and effective trial? this is robabl fair and effective trial? this is probably the _ fair and effective trial? this is probably the most _ fair and effective trial? this is| probably the most high-profile fair and effective trial? this is - probably the most high-profile and probably the most high—profile and certainly the first case that has got to the supreme court but there are other cases where you know, terrorists or alleged terrorists have had their citizenship taken away and they have not been allowed
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to return to the uk to fight their appeal. it has been decided that it is fair and effective for them to be able to appeal and participate from abroad. i think it has got to be remembered that this is about the particular facts of this particular case that the supreme court and the justices will be weighing up, looking at both sides of the argument to try to make that very difficult decision, balancing those two really important issues. 50 if two really important issues. so if shamima begum, _ two really important issues. so if shamima begum, if— two really important issues. so if shamima begum, if she - two really important issues. so if shamima begum, if she was refused leave to enter the uk, what would then happen to the appeal against her citizenship being revoked? it is a difficult her citizenship being revoked? it 3 a difficult question to answer, lawyers say the appeal should be allowed anyway the argument has been rejected in the lower tribunal is and in the court of appeal. the supreme court will be deciding on that but it seems unlikely that they will agree that the appeal should just be allowed out right. she is not allowed into the uk —— if she is
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not allowed into the uk —— if she is not allowed into uk she will somehow have to pursue the appeal from abroad even though it accepted by the court that it would not be a fair and effective appeal. it is a difficult decision for the justices to consider. difficult decision for the 'ustices to consider.�* difficult decision for the 'ustices to conidr— to consider. and the flip side of the question. — to consider. and the flip side of the question, then, _ to consider. and the flip side of the question, then, finally, - to consider. and the flip side of the question, then, finally, if . to consider. and the flip side of i the question, then, finally, if she is actually allowed leave to enter the uk again, does the government have any option but to allow her to enter the uk? have any option but to allow her to enterthe uk?— enter the uk? realistically, no, this is the _ enter the uk? realistically, no, this is the supreme _ enter the uk? realistically, no, this is the supreme court - enter the uk? realistically, no, this is the supreme court and i enter the uk? realistically, no, this is the supreme court and itj enter the uk? realistically, no, i this is the supreme court and it is the highest court in the land. one would like to think that the government would respect the rule of law. if she is allowed back into the uk, it is very unlikely that she would just be allowed free reign to come back. there are lots of specific measures that could be taken to negate or limit any risk to the public. there are certainly lots of issues and measures that can be taken which the court of appeal took into account when they allowed her case. it will be interesting to see what the supreme court say about it.
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ok, christopher, thank you very much for your thoughts. christopher cole from the law society's immigration committee. and we are expecting to hear that judgment before 10am and we will bring that to you here on the news channel. mps are to investigate the safety of so—called smart motorways — which use the hard shoulder as an extra lane during busy periods. it comes after a coroner said the deaths of two men on a stretch of smart motorway near sheffield in 2019 could have been avoided. our transport correspondent caroline davies reports. jason mercer was driving to work injune 2019. he was on the m1 near sheffield, a smart motorway with no hard shoulder, when he had a minor collision with another driver. both pulled over, but the cameras didn't see them. the lane wasn't closed and both drivers were killed by a lorry. i should have been in the car that day, but i was ill. since her husband's death, claire mercer has been campaigning against smart motorways. you can be the best driver in the world and your tyre can burst, or someone can slam into you.
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and if there is not a hard shoulder, you are more at risk. smart motorways mean that the hard shoulder operates fully or partially as a live lane with traffic. today, the transport select committee has said it will launch an investigation into smart motorways. the technology is not in place that i was even promised. highways england promised. and, quite frankly, i think they need to be held to account. we need to investigate much more thoroughly whether smart motorways really are safe enough to continue. but claire is not convinced the investigation will go far enough. i'm just worried it is going to be yet another busy work. it doesn't achieve anything. it'lljust come back and say, oh, we just need a few more tweaks and a few more bits and pieces. we don't. we need the hard shoulder back. smart motorways were created to help ease congestion without building an extra lane of traffic. but given the way our lives have changed during the pandemic, some have questioned whether they are even needed. i think the major question remains — what will traffic be like after lockdown? smart motorways were introduced
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to alleviate congestion. but if use of motorways is reduced, you could then question, do we really need smart motorways to increase capacity, if people are worried about them? the department for transport has said they welcome the inquiry and that the transport secretary has expressed concerns over smart motorways and committed £500 million to safety improvements. but some still want smart motorways to be removed altogether. caroline davies, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt. at long last we have got dry weather dominating. lovely star in melton mowbray a short while ago but we will have some chilly nights evenif even if it is quite chilly by day. for most of us today it will be mist and fog, it will clear by
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mid—morning. a little bit more cloud to the north—west but for most it is a dry and sunny friday and temperature is not as high as they were during the week. still three or 4 degrees higher than they should be for the stage in february. overnight, a bit of a change for scotland and northern ireland, more outbreaks of rain. most same drive. england and wales a dry night and another frost england and wales a dry night and anotherfrost tonight england and wales a dry night and another frost tonight could get temperatures down to —3 or —4. we will see the full moon tonight as we go through tonight and into tomorrow. tomorrow, a bit more cloud into the northern areas. a fine day for much of the country though and temperatures again above where they should be at the time of year. see you in half an hour.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... health leaders have welcomed the queen's comments about her vaccine experience, describing them as an "incredibly important vote of confidence in the programme". the former first minister of scotland, alex salmond, will be questioned by members of the scottish parliament today over his claims of a conspiracy against him over sexual harassment claims. the supreme court will today rule on whether runaway schoolgirl shamima begum can return to the uk to appeal against the removal of her british citizenship. mps are to investigate the safety of so—called smart motorways, which use the hard shoulder as an extra lane during busy periods. seventeen former british gymnasts, including three olympians, have sent a legal letter, to the gymnastics governing body, outlining allegations of physical. and psychological
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abuse in the sport. and prince harry has spoken about his mental health, and once again blamed the british press for his move to the us. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's mike. good morning. there will be four british clubs in the draw for the next round of the europa league, that will be made this lunchtime. arsenal are still involved after a late goal saved them. with the tie all square, they were playing their home leg against benfica in greece, because of coronavirus restrictions. they were heading out, their season effectively over, until, with just three minutes left, pierre—emerick aubameyang headed the goal to take them through and lift the pressure on their manager mikel arteta. manchester united already had a 4—0 lead over real sociedad
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going into the second leg. and their best chance came when axel tuanzebe looked to have scored, butjust watch how high team—mate victor lindelof jumps here. it meant the goal was ruled out by var and he was given a yellow card. but leicester are out after they were beaten 2—0 at home by the czech side slavia prague, who called it a sporting miracle, while leicester boss brendan rogers said they can now turn their attentions elsewhere. we will go away and reflect. we have to push now in the final two competitions we are in. the europa league we wanted to do well in. but it was not to be. now we can go all the way in the league and fa cup. and after feeling the wrath of rangers manager steven gerrard for attending an illegal house party, teenager nathan patterson made amends on the pitch against royal antwerp. he scored just 16 seconds after coming off the bench. they won 5—2 and the aggregate score of 9—5 was the competition's
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highest for 13 years. wrexham's new owners, ryan reynolds and rob mcelhenney, have offered players a bonus of £250,000, if they win promotion, from the national league this season. the actors have already made, a £2 million investment, since completing their takeover this month. they said they wanted to recognised the side's confidence that they could return to the football league. wrexham are seventh in the table, in the final play—off spot. england's women have taken an unbeatable lead in the one—day series in new zealand, with victory in the second match in dunedin. nat sivver took three wickets, to help bowl out the home side for 192. she then made 63, as england won by seven wickets. the third and final game is tomorrow. we are we a re really we are really happy with where we are at the minute and i guess the things that we needed to work on from the warm up game, a bit more
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consistency with the ball and putting in the right area more often but also batting partnerships and making sure that we extend those and keep doing the good things for longer. so i think we are in a really good place at the minute and hopefully we can wrap up the odi part of the tour in two days�*s time. seventeen former british gymnasts, including three olympians, have sent a legal letter, to british gymnastics, outlining allegations of physical and psychological abuse in the sport. the women say the abuse happened, to children as young as six, and caused long—lasting damage. one of the claimants is nicole pavier. we've had time to kind of process things and realise, actually, what was wrong and speak to team—mates and go, actually, whilst we thought that was normal, we laughed it off, it was not ok and, actually, it has a really long—term impact. there's a lot of impacts it still has on your life, whether it's dealing with work, dealing with stress, dealing with ptsd, anxiety, they're all things that we're
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dealing with that actually we shouldn't have been dealing with at our age. jamie murray has organised another battle of the brits team tennis tournament. scotland will take on england in a two—day event in aberdeen, just before christmas. andy murray and british number one, dan evans, have both signed up to play. the world race series, for electric cars, starts its new season today — and it's live on the bbc. 24 drivers will be competing for the formula e title over the coming year and seven of them are british. but unlike in f1, we are still waiting for first home—grown world champion. the action begins in saudi arabia at 1245 on the red button, iplayer and the bbc sport. that's all the sport for now. thank you, mike. we are going to be
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talking about covid disparities between communities but first of all we would like to hear from you today. if you have already had your vaccine today, tell us about that. if you're still hesitant about taking the vaccine why is that and what would it take to give you confidence in having the jab. people from pakistani and bangladeshi backgrounds were more likely to die from coronavirus — compared with other ethnic groups — during the second wave of the pandemic, according to a new government report. the risk was reduced for black communities, which saw high death rates in the early stages of the outbreak last year. our community affairs correspondent adina campbell reports. we would have a cup of tea and we'd just sit together and, you know, talk for a few minutes every morning. i miss that. remembering her mum three weeks on since she died from coronavirus. it felt cruel, you know.
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she suddenly deteriorated. and from that point to the following morning... ..and, eh, yeah, it'sjust been difficult to... ..make sense of it. surinder kaur had been in relatively good health before she died in hospital in london. but the impact of covid continues to disproportionately affect people from ethnic minorities in england. latest findings in a report by the government's race disparity unit show higher death rates among pakistani and bangladeshi communities between september and december last year, compared with other ethnic groups, while death rates fell in black communities over the same period, with a similar risk to those from white british backgrounds. but scientists say we must be cautious of this new data.
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it's too early to really make conclusions from the early second wave data. it only really includes deaths up until the end of december. unfortunately, we've had a lot more deaths injanuary and february. it's only when we include all of those deaths that we will know what the true picture is. the government says it is doing everything it can to protect the most vulnerable. but vaccine hesitancy among these groups continues to be one of the biggest challenges. adina campbell, bbc news. well, to talk us through the report we can speak now to dr raghib ali, government advisor on covid—19 and ethnicity, and an honorary consultant physician in acute medicine at the oxford university hospitals nhs trust. very good to have you with us this morning. just to be clear about the time period we are talking here, this is essential pre—the vaccination programme, isn't it? really looking at the second wave and comparing it to the very beginning of the pandemic. good
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mornint. beginning of the pandemic. good morning- yes. — beginning of the pandemic. good morning. yes, that's _ beginning of the pandemic. good morning. yes, that's correct. - beginning of the pandemic. (limb. morning. yes, that's correct. most of the data we looked at in this report was from the period september to december which was the early part of the second way. we found that compared to data from the first way. communities from the pakistani community and others are at increased risk.— community and others are at increased risk. why did it reduce for some ethnic _ increased risk. why did it reduce for some ethnic minority - increased risk. why did it reduce for some ethnic minority groups| increased risk. why did it reduce - for some ethnic minority groups and worsen for others? you have already mentioned from a pakistani and bangladeshi background. mini; mentioned from a pakistani and bangladeshi background. why was that? we don't — bangladeshi background. why was that? we don't know _ bangladeshi background. why was that? we don't know for _ bangladeshi background. why was that? we don't know for certain i bangladeshi background. why was. that? we don't know for certain and as i said in the report and this is early data, once we include, sadly we have thousands more deaths in january and february, once we include those the data may change. but the key factors we have found is that those groups that are at increased risk have an increased risk... increased risk of infection.
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you're more likely to pick up the infection on transport and more likely to live with parents and grandparents and combined with going back to households with elderly relatives. ., .., back to households with elderly relatives. ., , ., relatives. you can see a vicious cle relatives. you can see a vicious cycle forming — relatives. you can see a vicious cycle forming here _ relatives. you can see a vicious cycle forming here can't - relatives. you can see a vicious cycle forming here can't you i relatives. you can see a vicious i cycle forming here can't you because a lower uptake of the vaccine and i know you haven't looked at this phase yet which we are seeing in these groups could lead to further health and economic inequalities. it's possible. actually, the good news is that vaccine uptake has been improving banks most south asian and black communities of the last few weeks and i think we can be reassured now that millions of people in the uk and all over the world have had these vaccines that they are safe and effective. i've not had the vaccine myself, i have had —— i have had the vaccine myself a couple months ago as a front line
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worker. the vaccine does protect you from death and i would encourage people from all backgrounds to take the vaccine once they are offered it. i the vaccine once they are offered it. ~' the vaccine once they are offered it. ~ ., , ., , it. i think it was quite a big outreach — it. i think it was quite a big outreach programme i it. i think it was quite a big outreach programme isn'tl it. i think it was quite a big i outreach programme isn't there across different communities of different ethnic backgrounds across different ethnic backgrounds across different languages to try to engage with people who are affected by this disparity, this covid disparity, isn't there?— disparity, this covid disparity, isn't there? there is. and it is beginning _ isn't there? there is. and it is beginning to _ isn't there? there is. and it is beginning to show _ isn't there? there is. and it is beginning to show good i isn't there? there is. and it is. beginning to show good results although we have a long way to go, the government working with the nhs and working with doctors on the ground and other health care professionals as well as mosques and temples and churches, it is making a difference and i'm confident as we go forward and people see just how safe the vaccine is and that it is having an impact on reducing the hospital admissions and deaths that that impact will —— that uptake will improve further. bud that impact will -- that uptake will improve further.—
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that impact will -- that uptake will improve further. and if there is one thin that improve further. and if there is one thing that would _ improve further. and if there is one thing that would further— improve further. and if there is one thing that would further help i improve further. and if there is one thing that would further help to i thing that would further help to reduce the disparity between those groups, those ethnic backgrounds that we have talked about and other communities, notably white people, what would that one thing be? the keatint what would that one thing be? iie: keating really is to what would that one thing be? "iie: keating really is to take what would that one thing be? iie: keating really is to take the vaccine, that is the best way of reducing your risk of infection. you can protect yourself, yourfamily and other relatives and the whole society. we are very lucky in this country we have access to vaccines, so as soon as you get the invitation please take it. and i would say this to young people as well, i have seen people in their 20s, 30s, 40s in their hospital —— back in hospital with covid and even in intensive care, so you can protect yourself and also your parents and grandparents if you take the vaccine. a british man has been sentenced to two weeks in prison and fined just over £540 for breaking quarantine rules
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in singapore. nigel skea who's 52, was told to isolate in a hotel after flying from london. but he walked up an emergency staircase to spend the night with his fiancee. she was sentenced to one week in prison for abetting the crime. south korea has begun its vaccination programme against coronavirus. more than 5,000 health care workers and patients at long—term care facilities are the first to begin receiving doses of locally produced astrazeneca vaccine, in the first stage of the nationwide rollout. recipients will all be under sixty five years of age following a decision to await further data on astrazeneca's suitability for older people. we are going to go straight to the supreme court now for the ruling on shamima begum, who seeking leave to enter the uk. to shamima begum, who seeking leave to enterthe uk-— enter the uk. to mike too was at that time and _ enter the uk. to mike too was at that time and still— enter the uk. to mike too was at that time and still is _ enter the uk. to mike too was at that time and still is held - enter the uk. to mike too was at that time and still is held at i enter the uk. to mike too was at that time and still is held at a i that time and still is held at a camp in syria by the syrian democratic forces. two to appeal against the decision to the special immigration appeals commission. she
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also applied for leave to enter the uk in order to pursue her appeal and to avoid the risk of mistreatment. the home secretary refuse the application and she appealed against that decision as well. appeals have now reached the supreme court in... the first two held that the home secretary did not depart from his human rights policy when he made the deprivation decision. and that although ms begum could not have an effective appeal against that decision in her current circumstances, that did not mean that her appeal must succeed. ms begum challenged those decisions by
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an application forjudicial review. on that application, the judges of the court of appeal sitting as a divisional court, found in tap—in to's favour on the policy issue. —— found in ms begum's favour. instead of applying the policies themselves. the secretary of state appeals to the supreme court against that decision. the divisional court found against ms begum on the question whether her inability to pursue an effective appeal while in the camp meant that her appeal should automatically be allowed. two to cross appeals on the issue. —— ms begum cross appeals on the issue. second decision refusing her leave to enter the uk. 21 had a statutory right of appeal against that
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decision, only in far as she put some firms of the human rights act. the appeal was refused but that decision was overturned by the court of appeal. it held that leave to enter the uk must be granted to ms begum because she could not otherwise have a fair and effective hearing of her appeal against the deprivation decision. the home secretary appeals to the supreme court against that decision. the third proceedings also concern leave enter decision. as well as appealing against it, ms begum also challenged it by an application forjudicial review. herapplication it by an application forjudicial review. her application was dismissed by the administrative court but granted by the court of appeal on the basis that leave to enter the uk must be granted to turn
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one because she could not otherwise have a fair and effective hearing of her appeal against the deprivation decision. —— ms begum. the secretary of state appeals to the supreme court against that decision. the supreme court unanimously allows all of the home secretary's appeals and dismisses ms begum's cross—appeal. a court has identified four areas in thejudgment of the court has identified four areas in the judgment of the court of appeal. first, it misunderstood the scope of an appeal against the home secretary's appeal to refuse leave to a person to enter the uk. such an appeal can only be brought on the ground that the decision was unlawful under the human rights act. as ms begum did not advance the argument before the court of appeal, her appeal should have been
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dismissed. secondly, the court of appeal heard in its approach to 21's... refusal of leave to enter the uk. it made its own assessment of the requirements of national security and preferred it to that of the home secretary, despite the absence of any relevant evidence for it or any relevant findings of fact by the court below. it did not give the home secretary's assessment the respect which it should have received, given that it is the home secretary who has been charged by parliament with responsibility for making such assessments and was democratically accountable to parliament for the discharge of that responsibility. thirdly, the court
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of appeal mistakenly believed that when an individual�*s right to have a fair hearing of an appeal came into conflict with the requirements of national security, the right to a fair hearing must prevail. but the right to a fair hearing does not trump all other considerations, such as the safety of the public. if a vital public interest makes it impossible for a case to be fairly heard, then the courts cannot ordinarily hear it. the appropriate response to the problem in the present case is for the deprivation appeal to be stayed or postponed until ms begum is in a position to play an effective part in it without public safety being compromised. that is not a perfect solution, as it is not known how long it maybe before that is possible. but there is no perfect solution to the
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dilemma of the present kind. fourthly, the court of appeal mistakenly treated the home secretary's human rights policy as if it was a rule of law, rather than something intended to guide the exercise of his discretion. in this case, having considered detailed assessments by his officials and by the security service, the home secretary was not satisfied that depriving turn one of british citizenship would expose her to a real risk of mistreatment. —— ms begum. there was no defect in the reasoning in that regard. the result of the supreme court's unanimous decision is that ms begum's appeal against a leave to enter decision is
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dismissed, her application against a leave to enter decision is dismissed, herapplication for dismissed, her application for judicial dismissed, herapplication for judicial review of the leave to enter decision is dismissed and her application forjudicial review of the decision in her appeal against deprivation decision is also dismissed. you heard it very clearly there from lord reid at the supreme court, the supreme court unanimously dismissing all the appeals that 23 was making, her legal team on her behalf. —— shamima begum. in order to appeal against the uk government's decision to remove her british citizenship. watching that with me is oui’ our home affairs correspondent. research conference a victory for
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the british government. not only has 22 lost all her appeals but the governors won all its. had to allow two to back into the country to appeal against the loss of her citizenship. the supreme court justices have said that's not right. they have said that essentially the duty of the home secretary to protect the public does actually trump shamima begum's right to have a fair hearing against a loss of citizenship. a fair hearing against a loss of citizenship-— a fair hearing against a loss of citizenshin. ., , , ., , , ., a fair hearing against a loss of citizenshin. ., , , ., ,, ., ., citizenship. that is perhaps one of the most significant _ citizenship. that is perhaps one of the most significant moments i citizenship. that is perhaps one of i the most significant moments wasn't it when lord reid said that. what it when lord reid said that. what the have it when lord reid said that. what they have opted _ it when lord reid said that. what they have opted for _ it when lord reid said that. what they have opted for is _ it when lord reid said that. what they have opted for is an - it when lord reid said that. “ii“isgt they have opted for is an option which lawyers for the home secretary had proposed to them which is saying that the correct procedures is essentially stay the procedure, in other words put them on hold. 21 is currently in a camp in northern syria controlled by the kurdish
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fighting group. what they are saying that once shamima begum is in a better position to instruct a lawyer and fight this case, that is the time at which it should be heard. but the idea that she should be brought back in order to have this hearing heard is not the correct approach. and also they have dismissed the idea that because she can't have a fair hearing she should automatically have a british citizenship restored. so essentially she has now lost her british citizenship. that will remain the case and she won't be brought back to the uk to fight that. if at some point in the future she can get herself to a better place where she can better instruct her lawyers or perhaps give evidence by video link then at that point the case may resume again. so then at that point the case may resume again.— then at that point the case may resume aain. , ,, resume again. so the process could be rear repeated _ resume again. so the process could be rear repeated essentially? i resume again. so the process could be rear repeated essentially? she i be rear repeated essentially? she still has a be rear repeated essentially? “the: still has a right be rear repeated essentially? 5“i2 still has a right to challenge this decision to remove her british citizenship and that can be done at some point in the future when she is better able to instruct lawyers. but at this point there is no prospect
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of her being able to properly instruct a and to give evidence herself as to why she is not a threat to international security. so in the meantime the situation is staid, due to legal term, basically put on hold and she remains where she is. it will be very, very, very disappointing for her and for her family and for those that said that as a 15—year—old she was groomed and persuaded to travel halfway across the world to join islamic state, to marry a foreign fighter, when she wasjust15, in no fit marry a foreign fighter, when she was just 15, in no fit state to make a decision. such consequential decisions about her life and that she should have been given some latitude. and that she isn't a threat to national security, that has always been the argument of her supporters. but in the end, the supreme courtjustice said that's up to the home secretary to decide and his decision, now her decision has to be stayed for now.— to be stayed for now. daniel sanford. _ to be stayed for now. daniel sanford, our— to be stayed for now. daniel sanford, our home - to be stayed for now. daniel sanford, our home affairs i sanford, our home affairs correspondent. the time is 9:56am. let“s correspondent. the time is 9:56am. let's have a look at the weather.
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hello, it has been a beautiful late winter's day across the uk and more of that to come across the days ahead. high pressure is in charge meaning most places will stay dry. cloud developing but still some sunny spells. like this morning it will be chilly at times. with high pressure in charge, the rain bearing cloud has been pushing to the north, it has been producing rain across shetland. that clear this afternoon for brighter weather. for the vast majority, blue skies all the way this afternoon and although we don't see highs of 18 degrees which is pretty unusual this week temperatures are still about three or 4 degrees above average for the time of year in most parts. late afternoon, early evening sunshine, lovely sunset. clouding over tonight across scotland and northern ireland at times to produce a few spots of rain here. not much though. a good view of the full moon but another cold night for england and wales and here we could see temperatures drop
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as much as —3 in one or two rural spots. there will be some fog patches becoming a bit more abundant under high pressure. fog patches across england and wales to start with, the most of that will clear. a few spots of light rain and drizzle as we will see in the isle of man. scotland and northern ireland after cloudy start things will brighten up with sunny spells here through the afternoon and temperatures still above where they should be for this time in the year. 13 or 14 degrees. they go, confirmation... weather front tangled in amongst it so there will be cloud around into sunday across the central areas. mist and fog lingering in the first part of the morning. more breeze across southern counties on sunday, that will make it feel cooler. by and large to be more cloud around. it will drop relative to today and tomorrow but still above where we should be. high pressure with us all
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the way through next week, a few rain showers to the south—west but most will stay dry. the heat continues across parts of central and eastern europe and yesterday sweden and poland saw record—breaking debris temperatures, germany also saw their sixth consecutive day above 20 degrees. but even here things will cool down in the days ahead.
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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. health leaders have welcomed the queen's comments about her vaccine experience, describing them as an “'incredibly important vote of confidence in the programme". it is obviously difficult for people if they've never had a vaccine. they ought to think about other people rather than themselves. the supreme court has unanimously dismissed claims from the runaway schoolgirl shamima begum that she should be able to return to the uk to challenge her loss of citizenship. the result of the supreme court's unanimous decision is that shamima begum“s leave to enter the uk to appeal against the decision is
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dismissed.

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