Skip to main content
Internet Archive's 25th Anniversary Logo

tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 26, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm GMT

10:00 am
this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. health leaders have welcomed the queen's comments about her vaccine experience, describing them as an "incredibly important vote of confidence in the programme". it is obviously difficult for people if they've never had a vaccine. they ought to think about other people rather than themselves. the supreme court has unanimously dismissed claims from the runaway schoolgirl shamima begum that she should be able to return to the uk to challenge her loss of citizenship. the result of the supreme court's unanimous decision is that shamima begum's leave to enter the uk to appeal against the decision is
10:01 am
dismissed. the former first minister of scotland — alex salmond — will be questioned by members of the scottish parliament today over his claims of a conspiracy against him over sexual harassment claims. the us responds to this attack in iraq by launching its own air strikes in eastern syria. at least 17 members of an iranian—backed militia are dead. and prince harry has spoken about his mental health, and has blamed the british press for his move to the us. it was destroying my mental health. really? i was like, this is toxic. yeah. so, i did what any husband and what any father would do. i was like, i need to get my family out of here. hello and welcome
10:02 am
if you're watching in the uk or around the world. health leaders have welcomed the queen's comments about her vaccine experience, describing them as an "incredibly important vote of confidence in the programme". the monarch has urged those hesitant about the vaccine to take up the offer, urging them to "think of others" as the government prepares to publish details on the next phase of the rollout. thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation, who we'll hear from live at 11 o'clock this morning, is understood to have recommended that prioritisation should continue down the age ranges, with people in their 40s next to be invited for a jab. the move could come as a blow to those who have been campaigning for teachers, police officers and other front line key workers to be next on the list. meanwhile, a government study has revealed that people from pakistani and bangladeshi backgrounds in england had a higher risk of dying with covid—19 during the second wave of the pandemic
10:03 am
compared with other ethnic groups. ministers have suggested up to 15% of people remain "vaccine—hesitant", with confidence in the jab lower among black and asian communities. the queen, who was inoculated in january, said she understood that people who have never had a vaccine would find it "difficult", but encouraged them to "think about other people rather than themselves". our royal correspondent nick witchell reports. they both had their vaccinations last month, and though the duke is now in hospital being treated for a non—covid infection, the queen, unperturbed, it would seem, by her husband's absence, was earlier this week on a video conference with health officials from across the uk. the vaccination programme had stirred memories. well, having lived in the war, it's very much like that, you know, when everybody had the same idea. and i think this has rather sort of inspired that, hasn't it? it's a bit like a plague, isn't it?
10:04 am
because it's not only here that we've got the virus, but it's everywhere. so, it's a strange battle that everybody�*s actually fighting. but how had the queen found her own vaccination? well, once you've had the vaccine, you have a feeling of, you know, you're protected, which is, i think, very important. as far as i can make out, it was quite harmless. it was very quick. and i've had lots of letters from people who've been very surprised by how easy it was to get the vaccine. and the jab was very — it didn't hurt at all. there was understanding for people who are nervous of the vaccination, but a reminder that everyone has a responsibility to have it. it is obviously difficult for people if they've never had a vaccine. they ought to think about other people rather than themselves. and there was a message to the scientists who developed the vaccines, and all the staff
10:05 am
who are administering them. it is remarkable how quickly the whole thing has has been done. so many people have had the vaccine already, so you have to keep up the good work. nicholas witchell, bbc news. earlier, i spoke to danny altmann, professor of immunology at imperial college london. he said he expected that the joint committee on vaccination and immunisation would recommend that prioritisation for the vaccine should continue down the age groups. you know, if it ain't broke, don't fix it, and it's gone exceptionally well, it really has. and the vaccines are performing very well, as we have seen in the data. recap for us if you would where we are in terms of the progression through the groups. so, i think thejcvi have done a very solid job at working out the groups and we are now heading,
10:06 am
aren't we, from the 60s and over through to the 50s and over and all the data we have seen in the uk, the scottish data from this week and around the world, like from israel, says the vaccines in real life are, if anything, even more effective than we dared to dream of in the trials. how important do you think what the queen has said, and we have already run a report on that this morning, what the queen has said about her vaccine experience, encouraging people to take the jab if they are feeling at all hesitant about that? well, you know, all immunologists and vaccinologists really welcome the queen's endorsement and every word she said was correct and i liked her resonance with wartime spirit because the vaccine is our battle in this war. but i also accept... i speak to health care worker groups a lot,
10:07 am
including bame health care workers, and there is some sensitivity and hesitancy out there, you know, sometimes for kind of, you know, heartfelt reasons. we just need to have those discussions. i think the better the news gets, the more it is a virtuous cycle where people think they are safe and they are working and so i want that. have been davey says he has not taken a vaccine since childhood, has not taken the flu vaccine and does not taken the flu vaccine and does not taken the flu vaccine and does not take antibiotics, tries not to take things in his body and if it was just about take things in his body and if it wasjust about him, take things in his body and if it was just about him, he would not have a covert matt prodger but it is not so he is having it. another says they have had theirjab but others have refused that they are fit and healthy and age 30. this one says it is a postcode lottery but they are doing what they need to and accept the jab is part of a national effort and when you get the option, take it. nick says he had his on wednesday and feels fantastic with no side effects. it gives the reassurance that i am part of the
10:08 am
nearly 20 million that have had it and we are on the road to getting back to almost normality this year. this one says they had their vaccine yesterday, and it was super quick and the people were brilliant and the whole experience took less than 30 minutes, no problems today apart from a sore arm so happy that they got it. let me know your thoughts on the vaccine or if you are vaccine hesitant and you need some more information to feel confident, let us know as well. and any of the other stories we are today as well, get in on twitter. use the bbc your questions hashtag. the uk's supreme court has rejected a legal attempt by shamima begum to return to the country to challenge the government's decision to strip her of her citizenship. she was 15 years old when she travelled to syria to join the so—called islamic state group. her british citizenship was revoked on national security grounds shortly after she was found in a syrian refugee camp in february 2019. the decision was read out by the president of the supreme court lord reed.
10:09 am
the result of the supreme court's unanimous decision is that shamima begum's appeal against the leave to enter decision is dismissed. her application forjudicial review of the leave to enter this mission —— enter decision is dismissed and her application forjudicial review of the siacs decision against the appeal of deprivation this mission is dismissed. let's talk to our home affairs correspondent, daniel sandford. so all of the appeal is that shamima begum's legal team are making on her behalf were dismissed as we heard from lord reed at the supreme court. talk to us about the significance of this ruling. talk to us about the significance of this rulina. , ., ., , ., this ruling. first of all, it is of hue this ruling. first of all, it is of huge significance _ this ruling. first of all, it is of huge significance for- this ruling. first of all, it is of huge significance for a - this ruling. first of all, it is of huge significance for a young | this ruling. first of all, it is of- huge significance for a young woman who is currently in a camp in northern syria away from her family and away from the country where she was born and grew up. she will have
10:10 am
to stay there. it has a broader significance as well because essentially, the supreme court is re—establishing the right of the home secretary, the duty of the home secretary, to make their own decisions about what is in the interests of national security, and saying essentially that will trump the right of somebody like schama beckham, for example, in their judgment, the supreme courtjustices said the appeal court had wrongly made its own assessment of the requirements of national security and preferring it to that of the home secretary. its approach did not give the home secretary's assessment the respect it deserved, given it is the respect it deserved, given it is the home secretary who has been charged by parliament with the responsibility for making such assessments. insofaras responsibility for making such assessments. insofar as schama beckham, it is almost impossible for her to challenge this decision, she can hardly talk to her lawyers, she is sitting on a camp halfway around the world, what they have said is that the appropriate thing is for
10:11 am
the proceedings, over whether or not she should keep their british citizenship, they should be put on hold and stayed. they say this is not a perfect solution as it is not known how long it may be before it is possible for her to challenge the decision but the supreme court justices say there is no perfect solution to a dilemma of the present kind and unfortunately for her, this is going to be where she stays for now. of course, many people have no sympathy for her. she had made her decision at aged 15 to go and join islamic state at a time when everybody knew what islamic state was all about, beheading videos and so on had already started coming out. but there are many people who still say she was so young when she made the decision that surely she should be given some leeway. but fundamentally, the supreme court have said at this point and in these circumstances, the right to a fair hearing, which was what her lawyers were arguing, that she could not have a fairand were arguing, that she could not have a fair and effective process if she was not brought back to the uk, the right to a fair hearing, the supreme court says, does not trump other considerations, including national security considerations so
10:12 am
thatis national security considerations so that is a key point in the judgment, isn't it? that is a key point in the “udgment, isn't it? ., . , ., isn't it? correct, they are saying, the home — isn't it? correct, they are saying, the home secretary _ isn't it? correct, they are saying, the home secretary has - isn't it? correct, they are saying, the home secretary has been - isn't it? correct, they are saying, l the home secretary has been given the home secretary has been given the very owner is job of considering national security in these very difficult cases —— owner isjob. the home secretary's decision has to be respected, although of course it could be challenged if it was blatantly wrong but they are saying in this case, you have to go with what the home secretary said. the point the supreme courtjustices are making, whether or not people consider that is fair, the point they are making is that she can challenge the decision but she can't do it now. she may at some point be able to do that but for now, things should be left as they are because the home secretary has decided she is a risk to national security because of the level of indoctrination that may have taken place while she was with islamic state for a very significant number of years and at a very significant moment in her life.— of years and at a very significant moment in her life. daniel, thank ou for moment in her life. daniel, thank you for that _ moment in her life. daniel, thank you for that. daniel— moment in her life. daniel, thank you for that. daniel sandford, - you for that. daniel sandford, there. reports from nigeria say a large number of schoolgirls have been abducted after gunmen stormed a government school and kidnapped
10:13 am
them from their dormitories. the abduction took place in the northwestern zamfara state, according to a spokesman for the state governor. a teacher at the school has told that bbc that more than 300 students have been kidnapped. 0ur correspondent in lagos, mayenijones, told us school kidnappings are becoming more and more common in nigeria. many of your viewers of course will remember the kidnapping of the chibok girls from april 2014 that was covered in media all over the world. since then, there have been several other high—profile kidnappings, some of them with equally humongous numbers. in 2018, 100 girls were taken from a town in the north—east. in december, just a couple of months ago, we had about 300 schoolboys taken from a school in the home state of the president, so this kidnapping, mass kidnapping of children appears to be becoming increasingly frequent, which is very worrying for parents trying to send their kids to school
10:14 am
in northern nigeria. the former first minister of scotland alex salmond will be questioned by members of the scottish parliament today over his claims of a "malicious and concerted" conspiracy against him. it's part of an inquiry into the mishandling of sexual harassment complaints about him, which were later disproven in court. the current first minister nicola sturgeon, a former ally of alex salmond, has dismissed his claims. 0ur political correspondent nick eardley reports. for years, this was the closest relationship in scottish politics, alex salmond and his protege, nicola sturgeon. now, though, they're bitter enemies. he accuses her of failing to tell the truth. she says he is living in an alternative reality. this is mr salmond outside the high court in edinburgh last year. he had just been cleared of sexual assault. there is certain evidence that i would have liked to have seen led in this trial, but for a variety of reasons
10:15 am
we were not able to do so. at some point, that information, that facts and that evidence, will see the light of day. now it's nicola sturgeon and her government that's under the spotlight. its investigation into mr salmond was found to be unlawful and tainted by apparent bias. mr salmond is coming here to the scottish parliament to make some extraordinary claims. mr salmond claims nicola sturgeon has misled the scottish parliament. that she's guilty of several breaches of the ministerial code. and that people around her, including her husband and her chief of staff, engaged in a malicious campaign to damage his reputation, even to the extent of having him imprisoned. it's a row which has caused an earthquake in scottish politics, with claims that holyrood is struggling to hold the government to account. parts of mr salmond's evidence have been taken down, after prosecutors said they could be in contempt of court and identify his accusers.
10:16 am
0pposition parties have suggested taking the evidence down is part of a cover—up. miss sturgeon has denied breaking the ministerial code, and says there's no evidence of a conspiracy. what is not legitimate is to pursue a conspiracy theory, a scorched earth policy, that threatens the reputation and the integrity of scotland's independentjustice institutions, just because you happen to dislike this government. and to sacrifice all of that, if i may say so. presiding officer, on the altar of the ego of one man. this explosive row is now reaching its climax. miss sturgeon will give evidence next week, as two first ministers, two colossal figures in scotland, make their case to parliament. nick eardley, bbc news, holyrood. and if you're in the uk, you can watch the whole of alex salmond's evidence to the holyrood inquiry here on bbc news at about 12:30 gmt.
10:17 am
the headlines on bbc news. health leaders have welcomed the queen's comments urging the public to "think about other people" and get a covid jab when they are offered one. the supreme court has unanimously dismissed claims from the runaway schoolgirl shamima begum that she should be able to return to the uk to challenge her loss of citizenship. alex salmond will be questioned by members of the scottish parliament today. the former scottish first minister claims there was a conspiracy against him over sexual harassment claims. prince harry has made an appearance onjames corden�*s the late late show in the us, where he revealed that archie's first word was "crocodile", and the queen bought her great—grandson a waffle maker for christmas. during the interview, where the pair explored la together, corden facetimed the duchess of sussex, to see if she wanted
10:18 am
to buy a house in bel—air. meghan! hi! now, listen, i've got to talk to you about i something quite serious, 0k? tell me. i'm here with the big man. i do you recognise this house? no, should i? that is the house from - the fresh prince of bel—air. and i think this is- where you should live. i don't think there's anything cooler. - you would be the fresh princess of bel—air. - what is he saying? well, of course, he's dragged his heels. . he's already used the bathroom. that is how at home he feels. that's wonderful. i think we've done enough moving! here is what i'll do, i'll put i you in touch with the owners, you guys can thrash it out. there is no doubt in my mind that |this is where you should be, 0k?| 0k. haz, how's your tour of la going? haz? i didn't know who we were calling you haz now. - no, well, you're not my wife, so... laughter. he is the worst tour guide in la i've ever had, put it that way. well, i am the only tour guide you have ever had so i am -
10:19 am
the best and the worst. he is having a great time, all right? - we'll do it again with someone different. see you soon. all our love. l bye. i'll put you in touch - with the owner, we will get the details, we'll lock it down. all our love! from me and haz, see you, bye. bye. i think that's a lock. but there was a serious side to the interview too — which was recorded earlier this month, before the duke lost his royal patronages — as harry said the british press had been "destroying" his mental health. 0ur royal correspondent sarah campbelljoins me now to talk more about those comments. gosh, light and shade, comedy and fun and then as we said, the serious discussion about prince harry's mental health. it is something he has talked about very openly before but he has been through a pretty turbulent time of late. yes. but he has been through a pretty turbulent time of late.— turbulent time of late. yes, it is funn , turbulent time of late. yes, it is funny. you _ turbulent time of late. yes, it is funny, you think— turbulent time of late. yes, it is funny, you think because - turbulent time of late. yes, it is funny, you think because we - turbulent time of late. yes, it is i funny, you think because we have heard and read so much that has been spoken and written about harry and meghan over the last year, it feels like they must have given interviews but the significance of this is that this is for the first time since
10:20 am
they left for california, this is prince harry talking about the situation in his own words. as you heard from the clip, there is plenty for harry and meghan fans to get their teeth into in terms of insights into their personal lives, baby archie, talking about his first word being crocodile. but as you say, there are also some more serious questions. the interviewer, james corden, is a friend of theirs. he went to their wedding. and although this was billed as a chat between mates on the top of a bus going around la, they did touch on some subjects and as you say, particularly the issue of why they left and we heard very clearly, prince harry's views on the press and the reasons behind it. let's take a listen. what is life like, or what are you excited for it to be out of lockdown? i've no idea. a slightly different version but a continuation of what we were doing back in the uk anyway. right? it's going to be...
10:21 am
that's what our life, my life is always going to be about public service, and meghan signed up to that, and the two of us enjoy doing that, trying to bring some compassion and, you know, trying to make people happy and trying to change the world in any small way that we can. it's such a monumental decision to have walked away from the royal family. why did you feel that that was necessary and the right thing to do for you and your family? it was never, it was never walking away. it was, it was stepping back rather than stepping down. right. it was a really difficult environment, as i think a lot of people saw. we all know what the british press can be like, and it was destroying my mental health. i was like, this is toxic. right. so i did what any husband and what any father would do. i was like, i need to get my family out of here. but we never walked away. and as far as i'm concerned, whatever decisions are made on that side, i will never walk away. i will always be contributing, but my life is public service,
10:22 am
so wherever i am in the world, it's going to be the same thing. so although that interview was recorded — so although that interview was recorded on the 5th of february, so before _ recorded on the 5th of february, so before the — recorded on the 5th of february, so before the statements were released last week _ before the statements were released last week confirming prince harry and meghan would never be returning to royal— and meghan would never be returning to royal life, a sentiment that they gave, _ to royal life, a sentiment that they gave, and — to royal life, a sentiment that they gave, and that famous line "service is universal", — gave, and that famous line "service is universal", talking about wanting to continue — is universal", talking about wanting to continue public service, that was very clear— to continue public service, that was very clear in — to continue public service, that was very clear in the statements that prince _ very clear in the statements that prince harry was making at the beginning of debris. 0ther prince harry was making at the beginning of debris. other things to take from _ beginning of debris. other things to take from it, looking through social media _ take from it, looking through social media at— take from it, looking through social media at the moment, you will see it is already— media at the moment, you will see it is already polarising opinion, as harry— is already polarising opinion, as harry and — is already polarising opinion, as harry and meghan stories generally do. there's talk of the fact that harry— do. there's talk of the fact that harry mentions the fact they stay in the evening and might watch something on netflix, people reflecting that they have signed a multi—million dollar deal with neifiix — multi—million dollar deal with netflix so is he plugging his would—be employers? there are other comments _ would—be employers? there are other comments about the crownth, james
10:23 am
corden _ comments about the crownth, james corden asked what he felt about it and harry— corden asked what he felt about it and harry said it is not strict the accurate — and harry said it is not strict the accurate but it gives you a rough idea accurate but it gives you a rough idea of _ accurate but it gives you a rough idea of the lifestyle. it is 16 idea of the lifestyle. it is 16 nrinutes— idea of the lifestyle. it is 16 minutes of very interesting insight into the _ minutes of very interesting insight into the lives of two people who have _ into the lives of two people who have been —— become global ceiehrity~ _ have been -- become global celebrity-— have been -- become global celebri . ., ., , , ., celebrity. sarah campbell, royal correspondent, _ celebrity. sarah campbell, royal correspondent, thank _ celebrity. sarah campbell, royal correspondent, thank you. - the pentagon says the us military has carried out an air strike on borderfacilities in eastern syria used by iran—backed militias, in retaliation for recent rocket attacks by pro—iranian groups on us troop locations in iraq. reports say at least 17 militia members are thought to have been killed in the strike. a spokesperson said president biden had chosen the most limited of possible response options. the defence secretary lloyd austin spoke to reporters in the last few hours. we are confident in the target we went after. we know what we did. and we are confident that that target was being used by the same shia
10:24 am
militia that conducted the strikes. the us is poised to approve a $1.9 trillion plan that presidentjoe biden has championed as a way to help struggling americans. leaders of his democratic party, which has a slim majority in congress, are planning to pass the so—called american rescue plan by the end of the month, but republicans say the plan is unnecessarily large and stuffed with democratic priorities unrelated to the pandemic. let's get more on this and speak to dr leslie vinjamuri, director of the us programme at chatham house. good morning. what is your analysis of the plan and what do you make of republican criticisms of it? it is republican criticisms of it? it is cominu republican criticisms of it? it is coming down — republican criticisms of it? it is coming down to _ republican criticisms of it? it is coming down to be _ republican criticisms of it? it 3 coming down to be a very partisan vote as we have seen and as you just mentioned, it is likely to go through under a procedure called budget reconciliation, which means it will only need a simple majority. i think it is not whatjoe biden
10:25 am
wanted, he has wanted to really be able to build a bipartisanship which is important notjust in the short term but also for the legislative packages coming up, where he takes on some tough things like infrastructure and immigration. having said that, it is very important right now to get the stimulus plan passed. we are about 10 millionjobs down stimulus plan passed. we are about 10 million jobs down from the pre—pandemic rate and that does not account for about another 4 million people that have dropped out of the job market altogether, just because they are faced with very tough personal constraints, caring for children etc. so i think the need for the recovery is very clear. nonetheless, it is very divided along partisan lines with republicans saying the package is simply too big. hour republicans saying the package is simply too big-— simply too big. how popular is it with the public, _ simply too big. how popular is it with the public, though? - simply too big. how popular is it with the public, though? i - simply too big. how popular is it with the public, though? i think| simply too big. how popular is it. with the public, though? i think the ublic is with the public, though? i think the public is also _ with the public, though? i think the public is also polarised _ with the public, though? i think the public is also polarised on - with the public, though? i think the public is also polarised on this - with the public, though? i think the public is also polarised on this but i public is also polarised on this but in the context of many people, about
10:26 am
11 million people that we'll lose their unemployment benefits in a matter of weeks if this is not past, a lot of americans, if it is, will not only receive those benefits but a much larger number of americans will receive stimulus checks of around $1400 extra per month, that is incredibly important to a lot of people so of course there is a lot in there which is important and popular and has popular appeal, investment in the airline industry and education, of course, in health. so i think overall, the stimulus, and remember that under president trump, there was about $4 trillion of stimulus passed, so the recovery is not complete. americans desperately need it. so even despite that very significant polarisation in the us, i think we will see quite a lot of support. there are certain measures that will always be seen through the lens of a divided
10:27 am
america, things like a minimum wage, which is proposed, $15 per hour, thatis which is proposed, $15 per hour, that is likely not to be put forward. it is divisive but again in the context of an economy that hasn't recovered, where jobs are not coming back at the rate they need to come back, i think it is widely supported. come back, i think it is widely supported-— come back, i think it is widely su orted. �* ., , supported. and how contingent is the success or otherwise _ supported. and how contingent is the success or otherwise of _ supported. and how contingent is the success or otherwise of this - supported. and how contingent is the success or otherwise of this rescue i success or otherwise of this rescue plan on the continued and successful roll—out of the vaccination programme in the us? anthony fauci has spoken recently about vaccine hesitancy, for example, being one of the key challenges to overcome if the key challenges to overcome if the pandemic is to be defeated. absolutely, and this package will help with that. there's a lot of money that will go into public health. but the recovery, you know, this has been the number—one lesson from start, you can't really see a full economic recovery until you
10:28 am
have an effective response to the pandemic and that means getting the vaccine doses into people's arms. president biden has now purchased enough vaccines, by the end ofjuly, there will be enough vaccine to vaccinate all 255 million americans, but there is a problem, that some people are not accepting the vaccine. i mentioned last week that about a third of the us military are not accepting the vaccine and there are pockets of people that are fearful of the side—effects. so that information continues to be incredibly important. but these two things will have to come in lockstep and that is why the economic recovery plan is still the —— is so important because we are still very months of —— many months away from having an effective vaccination policy implemented and we are looking at the late summer and into septemberfor looking at the late summer and into september for that. looking at the late summer and into septemberfor that. more looking at the late summer and into september for that.— september for that. more broadly, around a month _ september for that. more broadly, around a month into _ september for that. more broadly, around a month into the _ september for that. more broadly, i around a month into the presidency, how isjoe biden doing? what are his approval ratings like? and how visceral, i suppose is the word, is
10:29 am
donald trump's influence in washington still?— donald trump's influence in washington still? you ask really ureat washington still? you ask really great questions. _ washington still? you ask really great questions. we _ washington still? you ask really great questions. we have - washington still? you ask really great questions. we have seen l washington still? you ask really| great questions. we have seen a president who has moved forward incredibly quickly on the international front and the domestic front, he has taken america right backin front, he has taken america right back in to the big multilaterals, reaffirmed the importance of the transatlantic partnership. he is doing well at home in the context of a very polarised country, in which there is a pandemic and a very significant economic crisis. but you know, the tough calls come in the weeks and months ahead. the easy course, getting back into paris and the world health organization, committing $4 billion to helping with the global vaccine effort through covax, all of those things i think have been very well received. now we are looking at the big questions around the iran deal, we saw the use of violence, the response to attacks in iraq and the use of violence and the use of force
10:30 am
for the first time by the american president yesterday in syria, responding to that. at the same time, he is trying to move forward with negotiations with iran to take the us and europe fully back into the us and europe fully back into the iran deal so really tough policy is now coming forward but so far, this is a president who has moved very fast and remember, he has lifted the muslim ban which was one of the most controversial things in the trump presidency. but he rightly signalled on sunday, president trump is back on the state and he makes his first speech in florida so the dynamic might change quite quickly. thank you forjoining us. the headlines on bbc news... health leaders have welcomed the queen's comments about her vaccine experience, describing them as an incredibly important vote of confidence in the programme. the supreme court has unanimously dismissed claims from the runaway schoolgirl shamima begum that she should be able to return to the uk to challenge her loss of citizenship. reports from nigeria say
10:31 am
there's been another mass kidnapping of school girls, this time in the north western state of za mfara. the former first minister of scotland, alex salmond, will be questioned by members of the scottish parliament today over his claims of a conspiracy against him over sexual harassment claims. the us responds to this attack in iraq, by launching its own airstrikes in eastern syria. at least 17 members of an iranian—backed militia are dead. and prince harry has spoken about his mental health, and once again blamed the british press for his move to the us. in the uk, mps are to investigate the safety of so—called smart motorways — which use the hard shoulder as an extra lane during busy periods. it comes after a coroner said the deaths of two men on a stretch of smart motorway near sheffield in 2019 could have been avoided. 0ur transport correspondent, caroline davies reports.
10:32 am
jason mercer was driving to work injune 2019. he was on the m1 near sheffield, a smart motorway with no hard shoulder, when he had a minor collision with another driver. both pulled over, but the cameras didn't see them. the lane wasn't closed and both drivers were killed by a lorry. i should have been in the car that day, but i was ill. since her husband's death, claire mercer has been campaigning against smart motorways. you can be the best driver in the world and your tyre can burst, or someone can slam into you. and if there is not a hard shoulder, you are more at risk. smart motorways mean that the hard shoulder operates fully or partially as a live lane with traffic. today, the transport select committee has said it will launch an investigation into smart motorways. the technology is not in place that highways england promised. and, quite frankly, i think they need to be held to account. we need to investigate much more thoroughly whether smart motorways really are safe enough to continue. but claire is not convinced the investigation will go far enough.
10:33 am
i'm just worried it is going to be yet another busy work. it doesn't achieve anything. it'lljust come back and say, oh, we just need a few more tweaks and a few more bits and pieces. we don't. we need the hard shoulder back. smart motorways were created to help ease congestion without building an extra lane of traffic. but given the way our lives have changed during the pandemic, some have questioned whether they are even needed. i think the major question remains — what will traffic be like after lockdown? smart motorways were introduced to alleviate congestion. but if use of motorways is reduced, you could then question, do we really need smart motorways to increase capacity, if people are worried about them? the department for transport has said they welcome the inquiry and that the transport secretary has expressed concerns over smart motorways and committed £500 million to safety improvements. but some still want smart motorways to be removed altogether. caroline davies, bbc news.
10:34 am
the risk was reduced for black communities which saw high death rates. our community affairs correspondent has this report. we would have a cup of tea and we'd just sit together and, you know, talk for a few minutes every morning. i miss that. remembering her mum three weeks on since she died from coronavirus. it felt cruel, you know. she suddenly deteriorated. and from that point to the following morning... ..and, eh, yeah, it'sjust been difficult to... ..make sense of it. surinder kaur had been in relatively good health before she died in hospital in london.
10:35 am
but the impact of covid continues to disproportionately affect people from ethnic minorities in england. latest findings in a report by the government's race disparity unit show higher death rates among pakistani and bangladeshi communities between september and december last year, compared with other ethnic groups, while death rates fell in black communities over the same period, with a similar risk to those from white british backgrounds. but scientists say we must be cautious of this new data. it's too early to really make conclusions from the early second wave data. it only really includes deaths up until the end of december. unfortunately, we've had a lot more deaths injanuary and february. it's only when we include all of those deaths that we will know what the true picture is. the government says it is doing everything it can to protect the most vulnerable. but vaccine hesitancy among these groups continues to be one of the biggest challenges. adina campbell, bbc news.
10:36 am
let's talk to kamlesh khunti, a professor of diabetes and vascular medicine at leicester university who did research into covid—19 inequalities — he's a member of both the government's official sage scientific advisory group and the separate independent sage. very good to have you with us as ever, professor. iwonderwhen very good to have you with us as ever, professor. i wonder when we look back at last year in the beginning of the pandemic and then the second wave of this latest wave is about, why we saw those covid in disparity is reducing for some people, a variety of ethnic grounds from indian, chinese, black, and yet for people with the bangladeshi and pakistani background, those disparities worsen.—
10:37 am
pakistani background, those disparities worsen. yeah, really aood disparities worsen. yeah, really good question. _ disparities worsen. yeah, really good question. that _ disparities worsen. yeah, really good question. that data - disparities worsen. yeah, really good question. that data you i disparities worsen. yeah, really i good question. that data you just presented is our data as well and what we saw was great reductions in minority ethnic groups but the disparities were worse in bangladeshi and pakistani but also a little bit worse for indians. the reason ethnic minorities have been affected is very, very complex. 0ne affected is very, very complex. one of the areas we are looking at further is the possibility that maybe because of key workers being from these backgrounds but a key of the reason is that these populations live in multi—generational housing and also small houses with a high number of people, a high density of housing. and obviously if you have got a person who works as a key worker or comes into a multi—generational household either symptomatic or asymptomatic and passes it on to the elder people living in that multi—generational household, it is the perfect storm. they may not get the disease but elderly people, we know all people
10:38 am
are affected more and they maybe affected and have consequences of covid. ., ., , ., covid. how important is it then that eo - le covid. how important is it then that people who — covid. how important is it then that people who are _ covid. how important is it then that people who are disproportionately i people who are disproportionately affected because of that access the vaccine? 0f affected because of that access the vaccine? of course the data we are looking at was pre—the vaccine being rolled out. looking at was pre-the vaccine being rolled out. ., ., ., rolled out. yeah. so what we have seen recently _ rolled out. yeah. so what we have seen recently is _ rolled out. yeah. so what we have seen recently is that _ rolled out. yeah. so what we have seen recently is that the _ seen recently is that the vaccination programme has been a tremendous success. 19 million people vaccinated, which is better than any other country, much, much better than europe. so that is the good news. the bad news is that the disparities in terms of where vaccinations occurring still seem to stand. so there is less vaccinations in deprived populations and minority ethnic populations, these data are coming out on a weekly basis. so the disari coming out on a weekly basis. so the disparity and — coming out on a weekly basis. so the disparity and inequality, _ coming out on a weekly basis. so the disparity and inequality, it _ coming out on a weekly basis. so the disparity and inequality, it is - coming out on a weekly basis. so the disparity and inequality, it is a - disparity and inequality, it is a vicious cycle. it can grow further? that's what i mean. we are already
10:39 am
saying, newspaper headlines saying is this going to be the disease of the poor and the disease of ethnic minorities? unless we do something to increase the uptake in these populations, we will have a widening of disparities, definitely. what of disparities, definitely. what more can be — of disparities, definitely. what more can be done? _ of disparities, definitely. what more can be done? obviously there is a lot of outreach going on through local papers, local radio stations across many, many different languages. what more can be done to reach out to people who are hesitant about coming forward for a vaccine, in order to address these disparities and inequalities? first of all, we need _ disparities and inequalities? first of all, we need to _ disparities and inequalities? f “st of all, we need to find out what are the reasons for these vaccine tendencies and again these are multiple. if we look at them they're quite complex and they vary by age, they vary by different ethnic groups as well. so there are issues such as lower perception of risk in some communities, a huge amount of
10:40 am
misinformation, young females especially will that fertility maybe affected. some issues about religious beliefs that there maybe ingredients that may not be acceptable to their religious belief. there is also obviously a lack of trust. there has been a lack of trust in the health care system. people feel that these vaccines may not have been tested in minority ethnic populations. we have already seen the large disparities in worse outcomes for ethnic minority groups. so all of these are things that need addressing. in the way to address theseis addressing. in the way to address these is really having the correct message, having the right messenger, have an engagement and endorsement. the bigger structural issues here are not so easily sorted out though, are not so easily sorted out though, are they? because it's wonderful if people are living together in multi—generational households, that is a lovely thing when families are close and live together and want to have that generational conversation going on 20 47 in their homes. or if
10:41 am
people are employed in a particular area of work to makes them more susceptible, how do you address is greater structural issues to ensure that people are not disadvantaged because of that? first that people are not disadvantaged because of that?— because of that? first of all, we need to ensure _ because of that? first of all, we need to ensure that _ because of that? first of all, we need to ensure that people - because of that? first of all, we | need to ensure that people living because of that? first of all, we . need to ensure that people living in multi—generational housing and who are in the groups that are offered the vaccine, that's the first, we must get those vaccinated as quickly as possible. and the vaccination programme is going on seven days a week, we know that. so there is access to the vaccine. that is the best thing we can do straightaway. in terms of the people who are working in those environments, the key worker roles, i think there are still misconceptions there. we need to ensure that the information is going out there in the right format, in the right way. and if people don't like there is the issue of vulnerability, if they're positive they're not coming forward for the
10:42 am
test, trace an isolation programme. i think we need to fix that. they need to be supported in terms of both financially and in the isolation programmes as well. i}!(. isolation programmes as well. 0k, rofessor, isolation programmes as well. 0k, professor. good — isolation programmes as well. ok, professor, good to hear your thoughts on that. it has done research into covid inequalities. oxford university has said that one of its laboratories researching covid— nineteen has been hacked. the breach happened at the division of structural biology — and a private security researcher said he found screen shots online from inside the labs network. he said the hackers were portuguese— speakers operating out of south america, and were financially motivated. an oxford university spokesman said no personal data was compromised and that gchq was investigating. the pfizer covid—19 vaccine can be stored in a normal medicalfreezer for up to two weeks according to the us food and drugs administration. previously the vaccine had to be
10:43 am
kept at ultra—low temperatures between minus eighty and minus sixty degrees celsius. the vaccine developers say the change will ease the burden of transport and storage for vaccination centres. a british man has been sentenced to two weeks in prison and fined just over £540 for breaking quarantine rules in singapore. nigel skea, who's 52, was told to isolate in a hotel after flying from london. but he walked up an emergency staircase to spend the night with his fiancee. she was sentenced to one week in prison for abetting the crime. south korea has begun its vaccination programme against coronavirus. more than 5,000 health care workers and patients at long—term care facilities are the first to begin receiving doses of locally produced astrazeneca vaccine, in the first stage of the nationwide rollout. recipients will all be under 65 years of age following a decision to await further data on astrazeneca's suitability for older people. hong kong has begun
10:44 am
its first coronavirus vaccinations for the public. people were seen queueing outside vaccine centres in the causeway bay shopping district, as the financial hub kicked off the inoculation drive. the first shipment of one million chinese—made sinovacjabs arrived from the mainland last week. saudi arabia has long been a vital us ally in the middle east. but since he took office injanuary, president biden has vowed to �*reset�* relations with the gulf nation. in his first conversation with king salman yesterday, he stressed the importance the us placed on human rights. this, after he read a much—anticipated us intelligence report about the murder ofjournalist jamal khashoggi inside the saudi consulate in istanbul in 2018. the report is expected to say the murder was "likely to have been ordered" by the saudi crown prince himself, mohammed bin salman. our security correspondent frank gardner said the relationship would be very different from that under the trump administration.
10:45 am
this can't have been an easy conversation are several reasons. it is five weeks since president biden took office and he is left until now took office and he is left until now to speak to america's most important ally in the middle east. he also made it clear that he wanted to speak direct to the king, not his controversial son who is 35 and who manages most of the day—to—day running of the country. most importantly, as you mention there, the us administration ofjoe biden is now very much putting human rights front and centre of its relationship with saudi arabia. they are not abandoning the saudis but they are saying you have got to take that into account. that is a complete departure from president trump, who paid almost no attention to human rights in saudi whatsoever. the headlines on bbc news... health leaders have welcomed the queen's comments urging the public to "think about other people" and get a covid jab when they are offered one.
10:46 am
the supreme court has unanimously dismissed claims from the runaway schoolgirl shamima begum that she should be able to return to the uk to challenge her loss of citizenship. alex salmond will be questioned by members of the scottish parliament today. the former scottish first minister claims there was a conspiracy against him over sexual harassment claims. 17 current and former british gymnasts have sent a legal letter to the sport's governing body to complain about the alleged conduct of coaches and people employed by clubs across the uk. they claim that athletes have been subjected to inappropriate coaching techniques and bullying. in the us, a former olympics gymnastics coach has been found dead, hours after he was charged with multiple counts of sexual and physical abuse against young women and a girl. john geddert, who was 63, had worked closely with larry nassar, a team doctor who abused hundreds of athletes. our north america correspondent
10:47 am
lebo diseko reports. john geddert was entrusted with coaching some of america's top gymnasts. he led the us women's team to olympic glory in 2012, where they won a gold medal. but he is accused of breaking that trust. yesterday, he was charged with 24 felonies relating to the abuse of young women and children. these allegations focus around multiple acts of verbal, physical and sexual abuse, perpetrated by the defendant against multiple victims. the victims suffer from disordered eating — including bulimia and anorexia — suicide attempts and self—harm, excessive physical conditioning, repeatedly being forced to perform even when injured, extreme emotional abuse and physical abuse, including sexual assaults. just hours later, mr geddert
10:48 am
was found dead at this motorway rest stop. authorities say he took his own life. the charges against him originated from an investigation following the conviction of disgraced sports doctor larry nassar. he is currently in prison, having been sentenced to more than 350 years for the serial sexual abuse of gymnasts. some of that abuse is said to have taken place at a gym owned by geddert. and one of the charges against the former coach related to allegations he lied to law enforcement about his knowledge of nassar�*s crimes. one of nassar�*s earliest known victims, sarah klein, had said the two men enabled each other�*s abuse. on hearing of geddert�*s suicide, she called it: ms klein told espn that: his death, said michigan's attorney general, was a tragic end to a tragic story for everyone involved.
10:49 am
lebo diseko, bbc news, washington. the uk's supreme court has rejected a legal attempt by shamima begum to return to the country to challenge the government's decision to strip her of her citizenship. her british citizenship was revoked on national security grounds shortly after she was found in a syrian refugee camp in february 2019. sajid javid, who took that decision as home secretary, welcomed the ruling. but the human rights group liberty, said the supreme court's ruling sets "an extremely dangerous precedent". the decision was read out by the president of the supreme court lord reed. the result of the supreme court's unanimous decision is that ms begum's appeal against the leave to enter decision is dismissed. her application forjudicial review of the leave to enter decision is dismissed. and her application forjudicial
10:50 am
review of siac�*s decision in her appeal against the deprivation decision is also dismissed. let's talk to maya foa, director of reprieve a legal charity that works against human rights abuses. thank you forjoining us today. so the supreme court said it had identified a number of errors in a previous hearing by the court of appeal and it said that the court of appeal and it said that the court of appeal mistakenly believed that the right to a fair trial trumps all other considerations, including national security. what's your response to that specific point? thank you. yes, i think what the supreme court has said is that they are deferring to the government on this one. so our position really here is that nothing very much has changed for the small number of families of british nationals who are currently held in these detention camps in north—eastern syria. what we know is that the
10:51 am
current british policy is unsustainable. and what we believe and what national security experts have said, including former m15 director, including the current director of public prosecutions, including our allies in the biden administration is that the safest and best option here is to repatriate the families detained in north—east syria. repatriate the families detained in north-east syria.— north-east syria. explain why, in our north-east syria. explain why, in your view. _ north-east syria. explain why, in your view. it _ north-east syria. explain why, in your view, it is _ north-east syria. explain why, in your view, it is the _ north-east syria. explain why, in your view, it is the safest - north-east syria. explain why, in| your view, it is the safest option. because people will say, some people believe it is safer to keep someone like shamima begum where she is in syria rather than bring her back, citing for example that she may have been indoctrinated and would want to spread that ideology. 50 an been indoctrinated and would want to spread that ideology.— spread that ideology. so on that i think it is really _ spread that ideology. so on that i think it is really relevant - spread that ideology. so on that i think it is really relevant for - spread that ideology. so on that i think it is really relevant for us i think it is really relevant for us to look at what for example the us administration has done. they have repatriated all of the americans who went to north—east syria. so have other european allies including the germans, the finns, the irish, the italians. and i think the reason for
10:52 am
thatis italians. and i think the reason for that is what i've mentioned, that security experts know it is not safe to leave these camps, which are bursting at the seams, where people may escape, the camps may collapse. it is a very volatile situation. it is not safe from a national security perspective to leave people in that situation for a range of reasons. and what we also know is that these families can be prosecuted effectively in the uk or indeed as has happened in the us in finland, in germany, in other countries... but the court is saying that this process could begin again when shamima begum is in a better place, in other words not in a refugee camp where it is very difficult for her to communicate with her lawyers. does it need to be back in the uk for her to have a fair and effective hearing? for her to have a fair and effective hearin: ? ~ . for her to have a fair and effective hearin- ? . ., ., for her to have a fair and effective hearin: ? ~ ., ., , ., ., for her to have a fair and effective hearin. ? . ., ., , ., ., ., hearing? what other situation... you absently right. _ hearing? what other situation... you absently right, that _ hearing? what other situation... you absently right, that is _ hearing? what other situation... you absently right, that is what _ hearing? what other situation... you absently right, that is what they - absently right, that is what they said. i think taking aside where the
10:53 am
hearing takes place the only other option is for the british government to bring the small handful of families and people detained in north—eastern syria, the majority are children, let's remember that. the best option is to bring the 15 or 20 british family units back and prosecute the adults where there are charges to answer. that is the safest, most secure and in the interests of justice that safest, most secure and in the interests ofjustice that is the option we need to go for. fun interests ofjustice that is the option we need to go for. i'm sorry to interrupt — option we need to go for. i'm sorry to interrupt you — option we need to go for. i'm sorry to interrupt you but _ option we need to go for. i'm sorry to interrupt you but we _ option we need to go for. i'm sorry to interrupt you but we are - option we need to go for. i'm sorry to interrupt you but we are out - option we need to go for. i'm sorry to interrupt you but we are out of i to interrupt you but we are out of time today. thank you very much for sharing your thoughts on that. thank ou. k—pop superstars blackpink have emerged as the latest force in the global fight against climate change. the all—female group, whose stars have billions of fans around the world, have decided to speak outjust months before a major conference on climate change will be held in the uk. they spoke to our correspondent laura bicker in seoul. hi, this is blackpink. # hit you with that do—do—do—do—do #. they are one of the biggest
10:54 am
pop acts in the world. their videos are seen by billions and break youtube viewing records. this is a global challenge. each and every one of us can make a difference and we need to act now. so when they do a call to action like this, it can have a real impact. i think we all probably saw it, but definitely the documentary that david attenborough presented, a life on our planet, has helped us a lot, and various other platforms have helped us to actually learn more about what we can actually do to sustain our beautiful planet. basically, the documentary showed us how precious our planet is, and how vulnerable it is right now, so we are losing more of the natural world everyday and time is running out, it feels like.
10:55 am
so we just really felt like we need to say something. yeah, i think we have all still got so much more to learn but it feels good that we are able to participate in such an important cause. six years ago, a un conference on climate change in paris was seen as a pivotal moment. countries signed up to limit global warming to no more than two celsius. these countries will get together again in glasgow in november. it could be a make or break moment for change, and that is why blackpink say they have decided to speak out now. she speaks korean. the first step is to know what is happening with climate change, because it affects all of us, and we want to learn more and we hope ourfans do, too.
10:56 am
# hit you with that do—do—do—do—do #. you're watching bbc news. that's it from me for now. have a lovely weekend. it is time now for a look at the weather with matt taylor. hello, it has been a beautiful late winter's day across the uk and more of that to come over the days ahead. high pressure is in charge, it means most places will stay dry. a little bit more cloud developing but still some good sunny spells. the nights however, like this morning, will be a little bit chilly at times. but with high pressure in charge, you'll notice the main rain—bearing cloud has been pushing away to the north of us, it is producing a little bit of rain across shetland. that clears through — this afternoon looking drier and brighter. and a bit more cloud to the north and west of scotland. but for the vast majority, blue skies all the way through this afternoon and even though we are not seeing the highs of 18 degrees,
10:57 am
which was pretty unusual earlier this week, temperatures are still about three, 4 degrees above average for the time of year in most parts. so some late afternoon, early evening sunshine, a lovely sunset. but clouding over tonight across scotland, northern ireland at times, to produce a few spots of rain here and there not much though. clearer skies elsewhere, a good view of the full moon but another cold night for england and wales and it is here we could see temperatures drop as low as —3 in one or two rural spots. and that frost will still be a risk as we go through the next few days, if you are a keen gardener. and there will be some fog patches becoming a bit more abundant under an area of high pressure. fog patches mainly across parts of england and wales to begin with, most of that will lift and clear. sunny spells. more cloud though developing to northern england and north wales later, a few spots of light rain and drizzle as we will see in the isle of man. scotland, northern ireland though, after a bit of a cloudy start things will brighten up with some sunny spells here through the afternoon and temperatures still above where we should be at this stage in the year. around 13 or 14 degrees.
10:58 am
and they go, confirmation that area of high pressure is centred right over us as we go through saturday night into sunday. there is an old weather front tangled in amongst it, so that means there will be a bit more cloud around into sunday across central areas. mist and fog lingering through the first part of the morning. a bit more breeze across some southern counties on sunday. that will make it feel a little bit cooler. temperatures by and large with a little bit more cloud around will drop relative to today and tomorrow but still above where we should be. and they will stay just a notch above where we should be over the coming days. high pressure with us all the way through next week in fact, a few rain showers maybe into the south—west but most will stay dry. the heat though continues across parts of central and eastern europe and yesterday sweden and poland saw record—breaking february temperatures. germany also saw their sixth consecutive day above 20 degrees. but even here things will cool down in the days ahead.
10:59 am
11:00 am
this is bbc news, the headlines at 11... in the next few minutes, we're expecting to hear more detail about the next phases of the uk's vaccine roll—out. we'll go to that live when it begins. also, health leaders have welcomed the queen's comments about her vaccine experience, describing them as an "incredibly important vote of confidence in the programme". it is obviously difficult for people if they have never had a vaccine. they ought to think about other people rather than themselves. the supreme court has unanimously dismissed claims from the runaway schoolgirl shamima begum that she should be able to return to the uk to challenge her loss of citizenship. the result of the supreme court's unanimous decision is that
11:01 am
ms begum's leave to enter the uk to appeal against the decision is dismissed. the former first minister of scotland — alex salmond — will be questioned by members of the scottish parliament today over his claims of a conspiracy against him over sexual harassment claims. and prince harry has spoken about his mental health, and has blamed the british press for his move to the us. it was destroying my mental health. really? i was like, this is toxic. yeah. so i did what any husband and father would do. i was like, i need to get my family out of here. health leaders have welcomed the queen's comments about her vaccine experience, describing them as an "incredibly
11:02 am
important vote of confidence in the programme". the monarch has urged those hesitant about the vaccine to take up the offer, urging them to "think of others", as the government prepares to publish details on the next phase of the roll—out. thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation is due to give an update shortly — in which it's thought they'll recommend that the roll—out should continue down the age ranges, with people in their 40s next to be invited for a jab. the move could come as a blow to those who have been campaigning for teachers, police officers and other front line key workers to be next on the list. meanwhile, a government study has revealed that people from pakistani and bangladeshi backgrounds in england had a higher risk of dying with covid—19 during the second wave of the pandemic compared with other ethnic groups. ministers have suggested up to 15% of people remain "vaccine—hesitant", with confidence in the jab lower among black and asian communities. and the queen, who was inoculated injanuary, said she understood that
11:03 am
people who have never had a vaccine would find it "difficult" but encouraged them to "think about other people rather than themselves". our royal correspondent, nick witchell reports. they both had their vaccinations last month, and though the duke is now in hospital being treated for a non—covid infection, the queen, unperturbed, it would seem, by her husband's absence, was earlier this week on a video conference with health officials from across the uk. we are going to leave that report and head straight to the joint committee on vaccination and immunisation in downing street. brute immunisation in downing street. we are immunisation in downing street. - are going to start by looking at the phase one of the programme and how well the vaccine has been doing. soil pass over to marry to begin with. 50 soil pass over to marry to begin with. soil pass over to marry to begin with, , ., , soil pass over to marry to begin with, , .,, ., soil pass over to marry to begin with. , .,, ., ., with. so the phase one of the programme _ with. so the phase one of the programme was, _ with. so the phase one of the programme was, as - with. so the phase one of the programme was, as you - with. so the phase one of the programme was, as you will. with. so the phase one of the i programme was, as you will be with. so the phase one of the - programme was, as you will be aware, aimed _ programme was, as you will be aware, aimed at— programme was, as you will be aware, aimed at preventing severe morbidity and mortality from the programme. ——
11:04 am
from the _ and mortality from the programme. —— from the covid infection. and so we prioritised — from the covid infection. and so we prioritised the older age groups and people _ prioritised the older age groups and people who had underlying health conditions, and the programme has been _ conditions, and the programme has been really— conditions, and the programme has been really successful with the nhs delivering vaccines outpace. and we now have _ delivering vaccines outpace. and we now have evidence that the —— vaccines — now have evidence that the —— vaccines at _ now have evidence that the —— vaccines at pace, and the vaccine has had — vaccines at pace, and the vaccine has had a — vaccines at pace, and the vaccine has had a difference on the outcomes. one dose of the pfizer biontech — outcomes. one dose of the pfizer biontech vaccine reduces the risk of symptomatic cases in older people, that affect — symptomatic cases in older people, that affect starts about three weeks after they _ that affect starts about three weeks after they have the vaccine. and there _ after they have the vaccine. and there is— after they have the vaccine. and there is an — after they have the vaccine. and there is an even higher level of protection _ there is an even higher level of protection against a more severe forms— protection against a more severe forms of— protection against a more severe forms of disease, against hospitalisations and deaths. so that is really— hospitalisations and deaths. so that is really encouraging and very much reinforcing — is really encouraging and very much reinforcing the rationale of the programme as being correct, that we targeted _ programme as being correct, that we targeted the right people and we were aiming to have an impact on those— were aiming to have an impact on those outcomes. we have barely early
11:05 am
si-ns those outcomes. we have barely early signs that _ those outcomes. we have barely early signs that the astrazeneca vaccine -- very— signs that the astrazeneca vaccine —— very early signs, that vaccine is performing — —— very early signs, that vaccine is performing very well and that is excellent — performing very well and that is excellent news, preventing severe disease, _ excellent news, preventing severe disease, hospitalisations, some data came— disease, hospitalisations, some data came from _ disease, hospitalisations, some data came from scotland earlier this week — came from scotland earlier this week on — came from scotland earlier this week. on the basis of this, we are now beginning to see signs that the rate of— now beginning to see signs that the rate of deaths and the rate of hospitalisations in those vaccinated a-e hospitalisations in those vaccinated age groups are declining at a faster rate than— age groups are declining at a faster rate than in— age groups are declining at a faster rate than in the younger population. so again. _ rate than in the younger population. so again, really showing that the phase _ so again, really showing that the phase one — so again, really showing that the phase one approach with giving vaccine — phase one approach with giving vaccine to— phase one approach with giving vaccine to as many people in those older— vaccine to as many people in those older age _ vaccine to as many people in those older age groups as possible, as quickly— older age groups as possible, as quickly as— older age groups as possible, as quickly as possible, has really had an impact — quickly as possible, has really had an impact. and so now, we are ready to think— an impact. and so now, we are ready to think about— an impact. and so now, we are ready to think about what we are going to do in _ to think about what we are going to do in the _ to think about what we are going to do in the phase two of this programme. do in the phase two of this programme-— do in the phase two of this rouramme. ., ~ i. , , programme. thank you, mary. i 'ust want to remind fl programme. thank you, mary. i 'ust want to remind everyone i programme. thank you, mary. i 'ust want to remind everyone that h programme. thank you, mary. ijust want to remind everyone that phase| want to remind everyone that phase one of the programme involved all adults aged 50 years and above, as well as adults aged 16 years and
11:06 am
above with underlying health conditions that put them at risk of covid—19. all those people will be offered a vaccine within phase one offered a vaccine within phase one of the programme. what we are discussing here today is phase two of the programme, which really refers to people who are aged 50 years and below and fewer adults. —— and our adults. years and below and fewer adults. —— and ouradults. for years and below and fewer adults. —— and our adults. for phase two, if i could have the next slide, thejcvi has been asked by the department of health and social care to formulate advice on the optimal strategy to further reduce hospitalisations and deaths and severe illness. in other words, to reduce the severe clinical consequences from covid—19. next slide please. in order to formulate that advice, we considered various vaccination strategies. three
11:07 am
particular approaches i want to go through. the first is to offer vaccination in a way to protect individuals who are themselves at risk of serious disease. the second approach is to try and stop or reduce transmission of covid—19 within the population, and the third approach would be to structure a programme according to occupational risk or occupational groups. these three approaches are not mutually exclusive. we've also considered some other factors when deciding on our advice. some other factors when deciding on ouradvice. one some other factors when deciding on our advice. one is to look at the lessons learned, and we are still learning, from the current vaccine deployment programme, which is going so well. the second is to look at mathematical models of vaccination, and the third is to look at the situation of covid—19 within the uk at the moment. next slide, please. when we look at data from the second
11:08 am
wave of the pandemic, and in particular, looking at curious being hospitalised with severe disease in the uk, it is clear that age remains a dominant factor. it is still one of the most important causes for severe disease, even in those aged 50 years and below. this slide shows the age gradient in those who are admitted to intensive care units, at least in the second wave of the pandemic. operationally, we also know that age is a very easy and simple way to structure a vaccine programme. when we consider occupational groups, there are occupations where the risk of exposure to the virus might be higher. if we look at who is at risk of severe disease, being hospitalised or sadly dying from covid—19, then even within
11:09 am
occupational groups, it is those people who are older who are more at risk compared to younger individuals. and in the instance of phase two, it is a people who are aged 40—49 who are at higher risk compared to younger people. next slide, please. the other thing we know operationally is that speed is important. of all the different approaches to vaccination, getting vaccines into arms as quickly as possible is the fastest way and the best way to maximise benefit to the population. taking all of these factors into account, we advise that we offer a vaccination in phase two should still be age bass, starting at the oldest and preceding in the following order. those age 40—49, followed by those age 30—39, and
11:10 am
lastly those aged 18—29. following an age —based programme will be simple, and simplicity has been one of the cornerstones of the current programme in terms of speed and success. just a point about vaccination programmes according to occupations. an occupation —based vaccine programme has never been tested before on a large scale in the uk, it is in that sense untested and untried, so trying to switch from an age —based programme to an occupation —based programme will be more complex, and potentially introduce more delays to the programme. as i said before, speed is the criticalfactor programme. as i said before, speed is the critical factor here. next slide, please. there are some other groups in whom the risk of severe
11:11 am
disease is higher, and we want to advise that a deployment team to ensure access for an engagement with these groups of people, they include men, those from black, asian and other minority ethnic communities, those from the —— with a bmi of 30 or more and those living in deprived neighbourhoods. we want to stress that deployment activity should be structured in a way to promote vaccine uptake and to reduce health inequalities. next slide, please. lastly, ijust want inequalities. next slide, please. lastly, i just want to come inequalities. next slide, please. lastly, ijust want to come back inequalities. next slide, please. lastly, i just want to come back to remind ourselves of the vaccine deployment rate. at the start of this vaccination programme, most of us will remember that vaccine supply was very constrained. at that time there was a lot of tension on who would be at the front of the queue. currently, the vaccine programme is moving very quickly, such that
11:12 am
almost 3 million people are getting almost 3 million people are getting a first dose within each week. that means that the queue is moving very swiftly. what we want to concentrate on is getting people tojoin swiftly. what we want to concentrate on is getting people to join accu, we want as many people as possible to benefit from the protection that is offered from the covid—19 vaccines. the vaccines that we have approved and are using in the uk are safe and they work very well. they protect people from severe disease, for being hospitalised from covid and from dying from covid. that is important and we want everybody to benefit from this. so, we as a committee advise that everyone is ready to join the queue, to have their vaccines as soon as they are offered it. then queue. —— thank you. we will take some questions
11:13 am
now, from the bbc to start with. thank you very much. given that the vaccination _ thank you very much. given that the vaccination programme is progressing very smoothly, why do you think it will be _ very smoothly, why do you think it will be complex and slow things down 'ust will be complex and slow things down just to _ will be complex and slow things down just to prioritise some key worker groups— just to prioritise some key worker groups like — just to prioritise some key worker groups like teachers and the police? so we _ groups like teachers and the police? so we consider this very carefully, and one of the difficulties with occupational status is that it is not very well recorded or not completely recorded in primary care records. trying to work out the association between occupational risk and exposure and severe disease has been difficult enough, and i think structuring our entire mass vaccination programme around occupation would be even more difficult. we know that age —based programme is simple and works very well, and therefore it seems sensible to continue with that, keeping and i am speed. because
11:14 am
speed of deployment is the important factor. . �* speed of deployment is the important factor. ., �* ., speed of deployment is the important factor. ., ., factor. can't you do both with age and some key _ factor. can't you do both with age and some key worker _ factor. can't you do both with age and some key worker groups - factor. can't you do both with age i and some key worker groups easily identified _ and some key worker groups easily identified from public sectors? because — identified from public sectors? because a deployment is so quick, actually subdividing priorities within any age span may only gain one week as an advantage, if you will, in terms of the queue. and the effort to try and do that may actually slow down the overall programme. so, the benefit may not actually worth the effort and may actually worth the effort and may actually deter the entire programme as well. so we thought it was simpler to keep everything as straightforward as possible. thank you. i straightforward as possible. thank ou. ~' , straightforward as possible. thank ou. ~ , ., ., straightforward as possible. thank ou. ~ ., you. i think it is also worth saying that even within _ you. i think it is also worth saying that even within those _ you. i think it is also worth saying that even within those groups, i you. i think it is also worth saying | that even within those groups, the occupational— that even within those groups, the occupational groups, _ that even within those groups, the occupational groups, ages - that even within those groups, the occupational groups, ages still - that even within those groups, the occupational groups, ages still the predominant— occupational groups, ages still the predominant factor— occupational groups, ages still the predominant factor associated - occupational groups, ages still the | predominant factor associated with severe _ predominant factor associated with severe complications _ predominant factor associated with severe complications of _ predominant factor associated with
11:15 am
severe complications of disease. i predominant factor associated with | severe complications of disease. so we would _ severe complications of disease. so we would want _ severe complications of disease. so we would want 40—year—old - severe complications of disease. so we would want 40—year—old or- severe complications of disease. so we would want 40—year—old or 50 l we would want 40—year—old or 50 euros _ we would want 40—year—old or 50 euros placement _ we would want 40—year—old or 50 euros placement become - we would want 40—year—old or 50 euros placement become poor- we would want 40—year—old or 50 - euros placement become poor budget for a 20 _ euros placement become poor budget for a 20 euros — euros placement become poor budget for a 20 euros police _ euros placement become poor budget for a 20 euros police man, _ euros placement become poor budget for a 20 euros police man, so- euros placement become poor budget for a 20 euros police man, so in- for a 20 euros police man, so in that— for a 20 euros police man, so in that way— for a 20 euros police man, so in that way makes _ for a 20 euros police man, so in that way makes a _ for a 20 euros police man, so in that way makes a prioritisationl for a 20 euros police man, so in- that way makes a prioritisation much more _ that way makes a prioritisation much more simple — that way makes a prioritisation much more simple well. _ that way makes a prioritisation much more simple well. —— _ that way makes a prioritisation much more simple well. —— we _ that way makes a prioritisation much more simple well. —— we would - that way makes a prioritisation much more simple well. —— we would wantj more simple well. —— we would want 50-year-olds — more simple well. —— we would want 50-year-olds to _ more simple well. —— we would want 50—year—olds to come _ more simple well. —— we would want 50—year—olds to come forward - more simple well. —— we would wanti 50—year—olds to come forward before 820 police _ 50—year—olds to come forward before 820 police man~ _ 50-year-olds to come forward before 820 police man-— 820 police man. thank you for doing this. 820 police man. thank you for doing this- moving — 820 police man. thank you for doing this. moving onto _ 820 police man. thank you for doing this. moving onto the _ 820 police man. thank you for doing this. moving onto the things - 820 police man. thank you for doing this. moving onto the things that - 820 police man. thank you for doing this. moving onto the things that we | this. moving onto the things that we have learned from phase one, and mentioned — have learned from phase one, and mentioned that people from areas where _ mentioned that people from areas where there is high health inequalities, poverty, high prevalence of bame backgrounds, we have the _ prevalence of bame backgrounds, we have the lowest vaccine uptake and delivery _ have the lowest vaccine uptake and delivery. how serious a problem is this going — delivery. how serious a problem is this going to be as we move from phase _ this going to be as we move from phase one — this going to be as we move from phase one into phase two and what specific— phase one into phase two and what specific recommendations do you have for the _ specific recommendations do you have for the government of the health service _ for the government of the health service to — for the government of the health service to try and get around it? we are service to try and get around it? are certainly service to try and get around it? - are certainly concerned about any groups of people who are not taking up groups of people who are not taking up the offer of vaccination because
11:16 am
vaccination is the way to be protected against severe covid. so jcvi has looked at the information on vaccine uptake and coverage and we are in regular contact with the department of health as well as nhs england to ask them to keep a close attention to these groups and do everything possible to increase uptake. and i wonder if mary wants to add to that.— to add to that. yes, i think our local nhs _ to add to that. yes, i think our local nhs teams _ to add to that. yes, i think our local nhs teams and _ to add to that. yes, i think our local nhs teams and local - to add to that. yes, i think our. local nhs teams and local public health— local nhs teams and local public health teams, _ local nhs teams and local public health teams, director— local nhs teams and local public health teams, director of- local nhs teams and local public health teams, director of publicl health teams, director of public health. — health teams, director of public health. will— health teams, director of public health, will know _ health teams, director of public health, will know the _ health teams, director of public. health, will know the communities that they— health, will know the communities that they had _ health, will know the communities that they had difficulty— health, will know the communities that they had difficulty accessing. i that they had difficulty accessing. notjust_ that they had difficulty accessing. notjust for— that they had difficulty accessing. not just for vaccination, - that they had difficulty accessing. not just for vaccination, but - that they had difficulty accessing. not just for vaccination, but for. not just for vaccination, but for other— not just for vaccination, but for other services, _ not just for vaccination, but for other services, testing - not just for vaccination, but for other services, testing for - not just for vaccination, but for| other services, testing for covid not just for vaccination, but for. other services, testing for covid as well _ other services, testing for covid as well so. _ other services, testing for covid as well so. i— other services, testing for covid as well. so, ithink— other services, testing for covid as well. so, i think what _ other services, testing for covid as well. so, i think what we - other services, testing for covid as well. so, i think what we are - other services, testing for covid asj well. so, i think what we are really encouraging — well. so, i think what we are really encouraging is _ well. so, i think what we are really encouraging is more _ well. so, i think what we are really encouraging is more work- well. so, i think what we are really encouraging is more work with - well. so, i think what we are really encouraging is more work with the| encouraging is more work with the same _ encouraging is more work with the same sort — encouraging is more work with the same sort of— encouraging is more work with the same sort of communities, - encouraging is more work with the . same sort of communities, engaging, making _ same sort of communities, engaging, making sure _ same sort of communities, engaging, making sure the — same sort of communities, engaging, making sure the services _ same sort of communities, engaging, making sure the services are - making sure the services are accessible _ making sure the services are accessible it— making sure the services are accessible. it may— making sure the services are accessible. it may be - making sure the services are accessible. it may be that i making sure the services are i accessible. it may be that those communities— accessible. it may be that those communities are _ accessible. it may be that those communities are less _ accessible. it may be that those communities are less able - accessible. it may be that those communities are less able to i accessible. it may be that thosel communities are less able to get accessible. it may be that those i communities are less able to get a
11:17 am
car to— communities are less able to get a car to get— communities are less able to get a car to get her— communities are less able to get a car to get her vaccination - communities are less able to get a car to get her vaccination centre, i car to get her vaccination centre, for example _ car to get her vaccination centre, for example. and _ car to get her vaccination centre, for example. and i— car to get her vaccination centre, for example. and i think- car to get her vaccination centre, for example. and i think a - car to get her vaccination centre, for example. and i think a lot- car to get her vaccination centre, for example. and i think a lot ofl for example. and i think a lot of that works — for example. and i think a lot of that works already— for example. and i think a lot of that works already happening i for example. and i think a lot of. that works already happening with really _ that works already happening with really close — that works already happening with really close working _ that works already happening with really close working between - that works already happening with really close working between the i really close working between the public _ really close working between the public health _ really close working between the public health directors _ really close working between the public health directors and - really close working between the public health directors and the i really close working between the i public health directors and the nhs at a local— public health directors and the nhs at a local level. _ public health directors and the nhs at a local level. and _ public health directors and the nhs at a local level. and i— public health directors and the nhs at a local level. and i think- public health directors and the nhs at a local level. and i think that - at a local level. and i think that is the _ at a local level. and i think that is the best— at a local level. and i think that is the best way— at a local level. and i think that is the best way to _ at a local level. and i think that is the best way to get _ at a local level. and i think that is the best way to get this - is the best way to get this programme _ is the best way to get this programme rolled - is the best way to get this programme rolled out- is the best way to get this programme rolled out asl is the best way to get this - programme rolled out as equitably is the best way to get this _ programme rolled out as equitably as possible _ programme rolled out as equitably as possible one— programme rolled out as equitably as ossible. ., ., , ._ ., , possible. one follow-up ifi may, as ou to possible. one follow-up ifi may, as you go down — possible. one follow-up ifi may, as you go down the _ possible. one follow-up ifi may, as you go down the age _ possible. one follow-up ifi may, as you go down the age spectrum - possible. one follow-up ifi may, as you go down the age spectrum in i possible. one follow-up if i may, as| you go down the age spectrum in the phase _ you go down the age spectrum in the phase two _ you go down the age spectrum in the phase two programme, we will get to a point _ phase two programme, we will get to a point where the overall risk of covid _ a point where the overall risk of covid is — a point where the overall risk of covid is very low, down to people who are _ covid is very low, down to people who are in — covid is very low, down to people who are in their 205 and below, should — who are in their 205 and below, should be — who are in their 205 and below, should be thinking about reviewing the priorities again as we get further— the priorities again as we get further down that list? we are absolutely _ further down that list? we are absolutely going _ further down that list? we are absolutely going to _ further down that list? we are absolutely going to do - further down that list? we are absolutely going to do that. i further down that list? we are i absolutely going to do that. we further down that list? we are - absolutely going to do that. we will be reviewing the priorities all the way down, even as we are doing so now. so you are absolutely right. as we go down the age groups, the risk of severe disease will be lower and lower. and so we will be checking to make sure that it is all the right thing to do to offer all of these people vaccine. i thing to do to offer all of these
11:18 am
people vaccine.— thing to do to offer all of these people vaccine. i think we also are beauinnin people vaccine. i think we also are beginning to _ people vaccine. i think we also are beginning to suspect _ people vaccine. i think we also are beginning to suspect that - people vaccine. i think we also are beginning to suspect that the - beginning to suspect that the vaccine — beginning to suspect that the vaccine may— beginning to suspect that the vaccine may actually- beginning to suspect that the vaccine may actually help - beginning to suspect that the vaccine may actually help to. beginning to suspect that the - vaccine may actually help to reduce infection— vaccine may actually help to reduce infection rates _ vaccine may actually help to reduce infection rates as _ vaccine may actually help to reduce infection rates as well, _ vaccine may actually help to reduce infection rates as well, so - vaccine may actually help to reduce infection rates as well, so i - vaccine may actually help to reduce infection rates as well, so i think. infection rates as well, so i think it is important— infection rates as well, so i think it is important for— infection rates as well, so i think it is important for those - it is important for those individuals— it is important for those individuals to _ it is important for those individuals to be - it is important for those individuals to be 5aying| it is important for those - individuals to be saying this not 'u5t individuals to be saying this not just as — individuals to be saying this not just as something _ individuals to be saying this not just as something to _ individuals to be saying this not just as something to protect - just as something to protect themselves, _ just as something to protect themselves, but— just as something to protect themselves, but potentially| themselves, but potentially something _ themselves, but potentially something that _ them5elve5, but potentially something that might- themselves, but potentially something that might helpl themselves, but potentially- 5omething that might help protect something that might help protect our communities, _ something that might help protect our communities, their— something that might help protect our communities, their families. something that might help protect. our communities, their families and friends _ our communities, their families and friends and — our communities, their families and friends and their— our communities, their families and friends and their vulnerable - our communities, their families and friends and their vulnerable elderlyl friends and their vulnerable elderly relatives _ friends and their vulnerable elderly relatives so — friends and their vulnerable elderly relative5. so that _ friends and their vulnerable elderly relative5. so that is _ friends and their vulnerable elderly relative5. so that is an _ friends and their vulnerable elderly relative5. so that is an important l relative5. so that is an important message — relative5. so that is an important message to — relative5. so that is an important message to keep— relative5. so that is an important message to keep going - relative5. so that is an important message to keep going as- relative5. so that is an important message to keep going as we - relative5. so that is an important| message to keep going as we get relative5. so that is an important - message to keep going as we get into the me55age to keep going as we get into the younger— message to keep going as we get into the younger age — message to keep going as we get into the younger age ranges. _ message to keep going as we get into the younger age ranges. can - message to keep going as we get into the younger age ranges. (an i - message to keep going as we get into the younger age ranges.— the younger age ranges. can i move on to sky news. — the younger age ranges. can i move on to sky news, please? _ the younger age ranges. can i move on to sky news, please? i - the younger age ranges. can i move on to sky news, please? ijust - on to sky news, please? i 'ust wanted to fl on to sky news, please? i 'ust wanted to pick i on to sky news, please? i 'ust wanted to pick up i on to sky news, please? i 'ust wanted to pick up on i on to sky news, please? i 'ust wanted to pick up on what i on to sky news, please? ijust| wanted to pick up on what tom on to sky news, please? iju5t wanted to pick up on what tom was talking _ wanted to pick up on what tom was talking about. mary, it your intelligence from your local communities, the workers on the ground, — communities, the workers on the ground, had they identify why there's— ground, had they identify why there's so much vaccine hesitancy amongst — there's so much vaccine hesitancy among5t the5e there's so much vaccine hesitancy among5t these groups? what is going on? where _ among5t these groups? what is going on? where they not taking the vaccines? _ on? where they not taking the vaccines? —— why are they not? i vaccines? —— why are they not? think they're vaccines? —— why are they not? i think they're different communities with different _ think they're different communities with different concerns _ think they're different communities with different concerns in _ think they're different communities with different concerns in each - with different concerns in each local— with different concerns in each local area _ with different concerns in each local area will _ with different concerns in each local area will have _ with different concerns in each local area will have different i local area will have different profiles _ local area will have different profiles in _ local area will have different profiles in terms _
11:19 am
local area will have different profiles in terms of - local area will have different profiles in terms of the - local area will have different - profiles in terms of the communities that they— profiles in terms of the communities that they are — profiles in terms of the communities that they are finding _ profiles in terms of the communities that they are finding the _ profiles in terms of the communities that they are finding the most - that they are finding the most difficult — that they are finding the most difficult to _ that they are finding the most difficult to access. _ that they are finding the most difficult to access. there's - that they are finding the most i difficult to access. there's some communities— difficult to access. there's some communities where _ difficult to access. there's some communities where we - difficult to access. there's some communities where we have - difficult to access. there's some| communities where we have had historical— communities where we have had hi5torical i55ue5_ communities where we have had hi5torical issues with _ communities where we have had hi5torical issues with getting - hi5torical issues with getting access— hi5torical issues with getting access to _ hi5torical issues with getting access to vaccination, - hi5torical issues with getting i access to vaccination, traveller communities. _ access to vaccination, traveller communities, for— access to vaccination, traveller communities, for example, . access to vaccination, travellerl communities, for example, and access to vaccination, traveller. communities, for example, and a access to vaccination, traveller- communities, for example, and a lot of our— communities, for example, and a lot of our teams — communities, for example, and a lot of ourteams are— communities, for example, and a lot of our teams are working _ communities, for example, and a lot of our teams are working very- of our teams are working very closely — of our teams are working very closely to _ of our teams are working very closely to try _ of our teams are working very closely to try and _ of our teams are working very closely to try and get - of our teams are working very closely to try and get those i of our teams are working very- closely to try and get those people aboard _ closely to try and get those people aboard there _ closely to try and get those people aboard. there will— closely to try and get those people aboard. there will be _ closely to try and get those people aboard. there will be area5 - closely to try and get those people aboard. there will be area5 wherel aboard. there will be areas where they have — aboard. there will be areas where they have been. _ aboard. there will be areas where they have been, they— aboard. there will be areas where they have been, they have - aboard. there will be areas where they have been, they have heardl they have been, they have heard misinformation— they have been, they have heard misinformation about _ they have been, they have heard misinformation about what - they have been, they have heard misinformation about what is - they have been, they have heard misinformation about what is in| they have been, they have heard i misinformation about what is in the vaccine _ mi5information about what is in the vaccine for— misinformation about what is in the vaccine, for example, _ mi5information about what is in the vaccine, for example, whether- misinformation about what is in the vaccine, for example, whether that| vaccine, for example, whether that is acceptable — vaccine, for example, whether that is acceptable for— vaccine, for example, whether that is acceptable for someone - vaccine, for example, whether that is acceptable for someone from - vaccine, for example, whether that is acceptable for someone from a l is acceptable for someone from a muslim _ is acceptable for someone from a muslim background, _ is acceptable for someone from a muslim background, for- is acceptable for someone from a | muslim background, for example, is acceptable for someone from a - mu5lim background, for example, and we really— mu5lim background, for example, and we really need — mu5lim background, for example, and we really need to _ mu5lim background, for example, and we really need to correct _ mu5lim background, for example, and we really need to correct those - mu5lim background, for example, and we really need to correct those kind i we really need to correct those kind of things _ we really need to correct those kind of things and — we really need to correct those kind of things. and there's _ we really need to correct those kind of things. and there's some - of things. and there's some communities, _ of things. and there's some communities, for— of things. and there's some communities, for example, | of things. and there's some - communities, for example, ea5tern communities, for example, eastern european _ communities, for example, eastern european communities, _ communities, for example, eastern european communities, who - communities, for example, eastern european communities, who we - communities, for example, eastern. european communities, who we know communities, for example, eastern- european communities, who we know or 'u5t european communities, who we know or just perhaps _ european communities, who we know or just perhaps have — european communities, who we know or just perhaps have never— european communities, who we know or just perhaps have never had _ european communities, who we know or just perhaps have never had a _ ju5t perhaps have never had a vaccine — ju5t perhaps have never had a vaccine in _ ju5t perhaps have never had a vaccine in the _ ju5t perhaps have never had a vaccine in the uk. _ ju5t perhaps have never had a vaccine in the uk. they- ju5t perhaps have never had a vaccine in the uk. they are i ju5t perhaps have never had a - vaccine in the uk. they are adults and their— vaccine in the uk. they are adults and their children— vaccine in the uk. they are adults and their children may— vaccine in the uk. they are adults and their children may have - vaccine in the uk. they are adults and their children may have beenl and their children may have been vaccinated. — and their children may have been vaccinated, or— and their children may have been vaccinated, or if _ and their children may have been vaccinated, or if they— and their children may have been vaccinated, or if they have - and their children may have been vaccinated, or if they have come i and their children may have been l vaccinated, or if they have come as lon- vaccinated, or if they have come as long workers. — vaccinated, or if they have come as long workers, they _ vaccinated, or if they have come as long workers, they may— vaccinated, or if they have come as long workers, they may not - vaccinated, or if they have come as long workers, they may not have i vaccinated, or if they have come as i long workers, they may not have ever used a _ long workers, they may not have ever used a health— long workers, they may not have ever used a health service _ long workers, they may not have ever used a health service before. - long workers, they may not have ever used a health service before. and - used a health service before. and some _ u5ed a health service before. and some of— u5ed a health service before. and some of their— used a health service before. and some of their concerns _ used a health service before. and some of their concerns are - used a health service before. and some of their concerns are about| used a health service before. and - some of their concerns are about who is giving _ some of their concerns are about who is giving him — some of their concerns are about who is giving him the _ some of their concerns are about who is giving him the vaccine, _ some of their concerns are about who is giving him the vaccine, how- some of their concerns are about who is giving him the vaccine, how did - is giving him the vaccine, how did they get— is giving him the vaccine, how did they get it. — is giving him the vaccine, how did they get it. how— is giving him the vaccine, how did they get it, how did _ is giving him the vaccine, how did they get it, how did they- is giving him the vaccine, how did they get it, how did they regi5ter| they get it, how did they register with their— they get it, how did they register with their gp~ _ they get it, how did they register with their gp. so _ they get it, how did they register with their gp. so there _ they get it, how did they register with their gp. so there is - they get it, how did they register with their gp. so there is a - they get it, how did they regi5terj with their gp. so there is a range of different — with their gp. so there is a range of different doctor5, _ with their gp. so there is a range of different doctors, and - with their gp. so there is a range of different doctors, and i- with their gp. so there is a range of different doctors, and i think. of different doctors, and i think that is— of different doctors, and i think that is where _ of different doctors, and i think that is where the _ of different doctors, and i think that is where the local- of different doctors, and i think. that is where the local intelligence is really— that is where the local intelligence is really important _ that is where the local intelligence is really important in _ that is where the local intelligence is really important in trying - that is where the local intelligence is really important in trying to - is really important in trying to engage — is really important in trying to engage people _ is really important in trying to engage people with _ is really important in trying to engage people with the - is really important in trying to engage people with the rightl is really important in trying to -
11:20 am
engage people with the right message for the _ engage people with the right message for the right— engage people with the right message for the right group _ engage people with the right message for the right group. thank— engage people with the right message for the right group.— for the right group. thank you. chris smith _ for the right group. thank you. chris smith from _ for the right group. thank you. chris smith from the _ for the right group. thank you. chris smith from the times. i for the right group. thank you. i chris smith from the times. just for the right group. thank you. - chris smith from the times. just on transmission. _ chris smith from the times. just on transmission, there _ chris smith from the times. just on transmission, there needs - chris smith from the times. just on transmission, there needs to - chris smith from the times. just on transmission, there needs to be - tran5mi55ion, there needs to be evidence — tran5mi55ion, there needs to be evidence that this may be using tran5mi55ion, are you saying you're not convinced by that, or is not prioritising _ not convinced by that, or is not prioriti5ing people injob5ju5t purely— prioriti5ing people injob5ju5t purely a — prioriti5ing people injob5ju5t purely a matter of speed? so prioritising people injob5ju5t purely a matter of speed? so telling teachers. _ purely a matter of speed? so telling teachers, police officers now in their— teachers, police officers now in their 40s. _ teachers, police officers now in their405, 305, even 205, they might actually— their405, 305, even 205, they might actually be _ their405, 305, even 205, they might actually be vaccinated more quickly in the _ actually be vaccinated more quickly in the way— actually be vaccinated more quickly in the way that you're recommending? and if— in the way that you're recommending? and if i_ in the way that you're recommending? and if i can, _ in the way that you're recommending? and if i can, can i clarify the question— and if i can, can i clarify the question on local operational, we've heard _ question on local operational, we've heard of— question on local operational, we've heard of local teams going to prisons — heard of local teams going to prisons and hospitals and having to waste _ prisons and hospitals and having to waste times and sometimes even doses by returning _ waste times and sometimes even doses by returning several times to do different— by returning several times to do different age groups. and i think someone — different age groups. and i think someone on the committee would be free to _ someone on the committee would be free to treat those molecular homes and do _ free to treat those molecular homes and do everyone at once. so given the need _ and do everyone at once. so given the need for— and do everyone at once. so given the need for speed, what would you say for— the need for speed, what would you say for places that want to depart from _ say for places that want to depart from the —
11:21 am
say for places that want to depart from the strict priority order in that— from the strict priority order in that way? _ from the strict priority order in thatwa ? , from the strict priority order in that way?— from the strict priority order in that way? from the strict priority order in thatwa? that way? maybe i will start by your auestion that way? maybe i will start by your question on — that way? maybe i will start by your question on transmission. - that way? maybe i will start by your question on transmission. we - that way? maybe i will start by your question on transmission. we are i question on transmission. we are increasingly seeing evidence to suggest that the vaccines block infection, a symptomatically infection, a symptomatically infection, and my imprints possibly starting to block transmission —— mike inference. if you want to use transmission blocking is a mass vaccination means to reduce a rare disease, we would need to vaccinate a very large number of people —— to reduce severe disease, and would be need to do that to block transmission and they secondary impact of benefit in terms of stopping severe disease. it is more direct to go to the people who are most at risk, and we know that that works very quickly because we can deploy very quickly to those people also at risk. so overall, it is a balance of both speed and actually the best way to protect his people at risk is to directly protect them
11:22 am
rather than protect the people who are transmitting the disease. in terms of local taxability, —— local flexibility, we want to see it and nhs england have told us that having local flexibility is helpful in the way they deploy, both for efficiency and to avoid vaccine wastage. i can't tell you what happens at particular local levels, but as a general principle, that is something that we support. mary, do you want to add anything about local flexibility?— to add anything about local flexibili 7�* ., , ., flexibility? again, it comes back to the issue of— flexibility? again, it comes back to the issue of speed, _ flexibility? again, it comes back to the issue of speed, and _ flexibility? again, it comes back to the issue of speed, and we - flexibility? again, it comes back to i the issue of speed, and we encourage the issue of speed, and we encourage the nhs _ the issue of speed, and we encourage the nhs to— the issue of speed, and we encourage the nhs to work— the issue of speed, and we encourage the nhs to work with _ the issue of speed, and we encourage the nhs to work with their— the issue of speed, and we encourage the nhs to work with their local - the nhs to work with their local directors— the nhs to work with their local directors of— the nhs to work with their local directors of public— the nhs to work with their local directors of public health. - the nhs to work with their local directors of public health. it i the nhs to work with their local directors of public health. it is i directors of public health. it is very— directors of public health. it is very important _ directors of public health. it is very important that _ directors of public health. it is very important that if - directors of public health. it is very important that if they. directors of public health. it is very important that if they are doing — very important that if they are doing the _ very important that if they are doing the operational- very important that if they are i doing the operational flexibility, it seemed — doing the operational flexibility, it seemed to _ doing the operational flexibility, it seemed to be _ doing the operational flexibility, it seemed to be fair— doing the operational flexibility, it seemed to be fair and - doing the operational flexibility, it seemed to be fair and not- doing the operational flexibility, it seemed to be fair and not to i doing the operational flexibility, i it seemed to be fair and not to be disadvantaging _ it seemed to be fair and not to be disadvantaging another _ it seemed to be fair and not to be disadvantaging another group i it seemed to be fair and not to be| disadvantaging another group who might— disadvantaging another group who might be — disadvantaging another group who might be at — disadvantaging another group who might be at high— disadvantaging another group who might be at high risk. _ disadvantaging another group who might be at high risk. so - disadvantaging another group who might be at high risk. so things. disadvantaging another group whol might be at high risk. so things are going _ might be at high risk. so things are going really— might be at high risk. so things are going really well— might be at high risk. so things are going really well in _ might be at high risk. so things are going really well in an _ might be at high risk. so things are going really well in an area, - might be at high risk. so things are going really well in an area, that i going really well in an area, that it is reasonable _ going really well in an area, that it is reasonable for— going really well in an area, that it is reasonable for them - going really well in an area, that it is reasonable for them to i it is reasonable for them to accelerate _ it is reasonable for them to accelerate without - it is reasonable for them to accelerate without local- it is reasonable for them to i accelerate without local settings because — accelerate without local settings because that _ accelerate without local settings because that is _ accelerate without local settings because that is the _ accelerate without local settings because that is the easiest - accelerate without local settings because that is the easiest wayl accelerate without local settings i because that is the easiest way to do it _ because that is the easiest way to do it and — because that is the easiest way to do it. and absolutely, _ because that is the easiest way to do it. and absolutely, we - because that is the easiest way to do it. and absolutely, we don't. because that is the easiest way to i do it. and absolutely, we don't want vaccine _ do it. and absolutely, we don't want
11:23 am
vaccine wastage _ do it. and absolutely, we don't want vaccine wastage. but _ do it. and absolutely, we don't want vaccine wastage. but we _ do it. and absolutely, we don't want vaccine wastage. but we are - do it. and absolutely, we don't want vaccine wastage. but we are very. vaccine wastage. but we are very keen— vaccine wastage. but we are very keen that _ vaccine wastage. but we are very keen that people _ vaccine wastage. but we are very keen that people see _ vaccine wastage. but we are very keen that people see that - vaccine wastage. but we are very keen that people see that this i keen that people see that this programme _ keen that people see that this programme is _ keen that people see that this programme is targeting - keen that people see that this programme is targeting those| keen that people see that this . programme is targeting those at highest — programme is targeting those at highest risk— programme is targeting those at highest risk and _ programme is targeting those at highest risk and is _ programme is targeting those at highest risk and is about - programme is targeting those at highest risk and is about getting i highest risk and is about getting the balance _ highest risk and is about getting the balance right _ highest risk and is about getting the balance right and _ highest risk and is about getting the balance right and we - highest risk and is about getting the balance right and we have i highest risk and is about getting i the balance right and we have our tocat— the balance right and we have our local delivery _ the balance right and we have our local delivery teams— the balance right and we have our local delivery teams who - the balance right and we have our local delivery teams who will - the balance right and we have our| local delivery teams who will work with local — local delivery teams who will work with local public _ local delivery teams who will work with local public health _ local delivery teams who will work with local public health teams - local delivery teams who will work with local public health teams to i with local public health teams to make _ with local public health teams to make sure — with local public health teams to make sure that _ with local public health teams to make sure that that _ with local public health teams to make sure that that is _ make sure that that is understandable, - make sure that that is understandable, at. make sure that that is . understandable, at least, make sure that that is - understandable, at least, and make sure that that is _ understandable, at least, and seem to be _ understandable, at least, and seem to be as _ understandable, at least, and seem to be as fair— understandable, at least, and seem to be as fairas— understandable, at least, and seem to be as fair as possible _ understandable, at least, and seem to be as fair as possible to- understandable, at least, and seem to be as fair as possible to the - to be as fair as possible to the tocat— to be as fair as possible to the local population. _ to be as fair as possible to the local population.— to be as fair as possible to the local population. thank you, can i move on to _ local population. thank you, can i move on to martin _ local population. thank you, can i move on to martin from _ local population. thank you, can i move on to martin from the - local population. thank you, can i. move on to martin from the mirror? some of the first nhs data on transmission has been released today from cambridge suggesting the dramatic impact of the vaccine, the refusal— dramatic impact of the vaccine, the refusal to— dramatic impact of the vaccine, the refusal to prioritise key workers could _ refusal to prioritise key workers could be — refusal to prioritise key workers could be seen as regulators ignoring the risk— could be seen as regulators ignoring the risk of— could be seen as regulators ignoring the risk of transmission and focusing _ the risk of transmission and focusing on the risk of an individual dying. logistics aside, do you _ individual dying. logistics aside, do you consider the risk of teachers tiring _ do you consider the risk of teachers tiring the _ do you consider the risk of teachers bring the virus onto families, for example. — bring the virus onto families, for example. is— bring the virus onto families, for example, is properly weighted in this guidance?— this guidance? thank you, the cuestion this guidance? thank you, the question you _ this guidance? thank you, the question you raise _ this guidance? thank you, the question you raise comes - this guidance? thank you, the i question you raise comes back this guidance? thank you, the i question you raise comes back to this guidance? thank you, the - question you raise comes back to the risk of getting covid, which is getting the infection, and the risk
11:24 am
of exposure to infection. we have been asked specifically to look at how we can reduce the risk of severe disease, which is hospitalisation and further people dying from covid—i9. that means a combination of both exposure to the virus and personal vulnerability to severe disease. when you take both of those together, and the people most at risk remain those who are older compared to those who are younger, and the same is true in occupational groups, the occupations that have a higher risk of exposure to the virus are those who work in environments where there is close proximity to many people. possibly in places that are less well ventilated. that is exposure to the virus, but also there is then the personal risk of severe disease, which needs to be added to that. and so it is again, the older people at most at risk,
11:25 am
evenin the older people at most at risk, even in the at risk occupations. 50 by targeting the older people first and the fastest way possible, we will protect the most number of people in the shortest time. i will protect the most number of people in the shortest time. i think auoin back people in the shortest time. i think going back to _ people in the shortest time. i think going back to what _ people in the shortest time. i think going back to what was _ people in the shortest time. i think going back to what was said - people in the shortest time. i think going back to what was said to - people in the shortest time. i think going back to what was said to the | going back to what was said to the last question — going back to what was said to the last question as _ going back to what was said to the last question as well, _ going back to what was said to the last question as well, in _ going back to what was said to the last question as well, in order - going back to what was said to the last question as well, in order to l last question as well, in order to protect— last question as well, in order to protect more _ last question as well, in order to protect more vulnerable - last question as well, in order to protect more vulnerable people i last question as well, in order to l protect more vulnerable people by reducing _ protect more vulnerable people by reducing transmission, _ protect more vulnerable people by reducing transmission, we - protect more vulnerable people by reducing transmission, we need i protect more vulnerable people by reducing transmission, we need to vaccinate — reducing transmission, we need to vaccinate more _ reducing transmission, we need to vaccinate more of— reducing transmission, we need to vaccinate more of the _ reducing transmission, we need to vaccinate more of the population. i vaccinate more of the population. and so— vaccinate more of the population. and so it — vaccinate more of the population. and so it is — vaccinate more of the population. and so it is going _ vaccinate more of the population. and so it is going to _ vaccinate more of the population. and so it is going to take - vaccinate more of the population. and so it is going to take longer. i and so it is going to take longer. and so it is going to take longer. and so— and so it is going to take longer. and so i— and so it is going to take longer. and so i think— and so it is going to take longer. and so i think as— and so it is going to take longer. and so i think as he _ and so it is going to take longer. and so i think as he said, - and so it is going to take longer. and so i think as he said, the - and so i think as he said, the direct— and so i think as he said, the direct protection— and so i think as he said, the direct protection of— and so i think as he said, the direct protection of the - and so i think as he said, the| direct protection of the people and so i think as he said, the - direct protection of the people who are most— direct protection of the people who are most vulnerable _ direct protection of the people who are most vulnerable first _ direct protection of the people who are most vulnerable first is - direct protection of the people who are most vulnerable first is the - are most vulnerable first is the quickest— are most vulnerable first is the quickest way— are most vulnerable first is the quickest way to _ are most vulnerable first is the quickest way to have _ are most vulnerable first is the quickest way to have an - are most vulnerable first is the i quickest way to have an impact are most vulnerable first is the i quickest way to have an impact on deaths _ quickest way to have an impact on deaths and — quickest way to have an impact on deaths and hospitalisations, - quickest way to have an impact oni deaths and hospitalisations, which is stilt— deaths and hospitalisations, which is still the — deaths and hospitalisations, which is still the two _ deaths and hospitalisations, which is still the two main _ deaths and hospitalisations, which is still the two main drivers- deaths and hospitalisations, which is still the two main drivers of- is still the two main drivers of this programme. _ is still the two main drivers of this programme.— is still the two main drivers of this programme. thank you. can i move on to _ this programme. thank you. can i move on to pa — this programme. thank you. can i move on to pa media? _ this programme. thank you. can i move on to pa media? you - this programme. thank you. can i move on to pa media? you have. this programme. thank you. can i i move on to pa media? you have set this programme. thank you. can i - move on to pa media? you have set up the complexity — move on to pa media? you have set up the complexity of _ move on to pa media? you have set up the complexity of an _ move on to pa media? you have set up the complexity of an occupation - the complexity of an occupation -based — the complexity of an occupation —based approach, but can you please mention— —based approach, but can you please mention some of the risks to the current— mention some of the risks to the current programme of taking that approach — current programme of taking that approach rather than taking an age
11:26 am
phase _ approach rather than taking an age phase one? and will you be publishing more around your decisions? i publishing more around your decisions?— publishing more around your decisions? �* . . decisions? i didn't quite understand that. we decisions? i didn't quite understand that- we are — decisions? i didn't quite understand that. we are advising _ decisions? i didn't quite understand that. we are advising an _ decisions? i didn't quite understand that. we are advising an age - decisions? i didn't quite understand| that. we are advising an age -based that. we are advising an age —based programme. that. we are advising an age -based programme-— that. we are advising an age -based programme. yes, and you set up the complexities — programme. yes, and you set up the complexities for _ programme. yes, and you set up the complexities for that, _ programme. yes, and you set up the complexities for that, but _ programme. yes, and you set up the complexities for that, but would - programme. yes, and you set up the complexities for that, but would you | complexities for that, but would you please _ complexities for that, but would you please explain the risks that you see to _ please explain the risks that you see to the — please explain the risks that you see to the current programme as a result— see to the current programme as a result of— see to the current programme as a result of that approach? if see to the current programme as a result of that approach?— see to the current programme as a result of that approach? if you were to do occupation... _ result of that approach? if you were to do occupation... if— result of that approach? if you were to do occupation... if we _ result of that approach? if you were to do occupation... if we were - result of that approach? if you were to do occupation... if we were to i result of that approach? if you were to do occupation... if we were to do occupation. — to do occupation. .. if we were to do occupation. i— to do occupation. .. if we were to do occupation, i think— to do occupation. .. if we were to do occupation, i think if— to do occupation... if we were to do occupation, i think if we _ to do occupation... if we were to do occupation, i think if we went - to do occupation... if we were to do occupation, i think if we went down | occupation, i think if we went down the route of restructuring the programme by occupation, we would run the risk of missing some people because not all occupations are well documented. and we don't really know all of the occupations that are at risk. 50 we might be able to identify some occupations that are at higher risk, but there will be other people in other occupations where we may miss them. whereas if we go down and aged —based programme, it is simpler and we are
11:27 am
less likely to miss people who are at risk themselves. as i said before, there are difficulties with the data infrastructure to work in occupation —based programme, and i think that overall will end up being more complex and will slow the programme down. did you want to add anything else? no, ithink programme down. did you want to add anything else? no, i think you covered everything. can we move on to the guardian? hi. covered everything. can we move on to the guardian?— covered everything. can we move on to the guardian? hi, wendy or expect -hase to the guardian? hi, wendy or expect hase two to the guardian? hi, wendy or expect phase two of — to the guardian? hi, wendy or expect phase two of the _ to the guardian? hi, wendy or expect phase two of the vaccine _ to the guardian? hi, wendy or expect phase two of the vaccine roll-outs - phase two of the vaccine roll—outs to start _ phase two of the vaccine roll—outs to start -- — phase two of the vaccine roll—outs to start —— when do you expect, and can you _ to start —— when do you expect, and can you explain why a number of young _ can you explain why a number of young and— can you explain why a number of young and healthy people have been invited _ young and healthy people have been invited for— young and healthy people have been invited for vaccination during the current— invited for vaccination during the current phase of the vaccination programme?— current phase of the vaccination rouramme? . ~ �* programme? thank you, i can't give ou an programme? thank you, i can't give you an exact — programme? thank you, i can't give you an exact date _ programme? thank you, i can't give you an exact date of— programme? thank you, i can't give you an exact date of when _ programme? thank you, i can't give you an exact date of when phase - programme? thank you, i can't give| you an exact date of when phase two will start. it will start as soon phase one ends. 50 will start. it will start as soon phase one ends. so hopefully because we are still staying with an age
11:28 am
—based programme, the programme will be able to flow one into the other as quickly and as seamlessly as possible. your second question about why some people are being invited for a vaccination when they don't apparently have any underlying health condition is not one that i can necessarily answer because that is not the advice that comes from jcvi. i is not the advice that comes from jcvi. ~ is not the advice that comes from jcvi. 4' ., is not the advice that comes from jcvi. ~ ., , _, jcvi. i think there have been some stories of this _ jcvi. i think there have been some stories of this happening, - stories of this happening, netiquette has really been some of those _ netiquette has really been some of those areas where they have been going _ those areas where they have been going so— those areas where they have been going so well on the programme that they have _ going so well on the programme that they have been — going so well on the programme that they have been and _ going so well on the programme that they have been and they— going so well on the programme that they have been and they don't - going so well on the programme that they have been and they don't want i they have been and they don't want to waste _ they have been and they don't want to waste a — they have been and they don't want to waste a vaccine. _ they have been and they don't want to waste a vaccine. it _ they have been and they don't want to waste a vaccine. it goes - they have been and they don't want to waste a vaccine. it goes back - they have been and they don't want to waste a vaccine. it goes back toi to waste a vaccine. it goes back to the issue — to waste a vaccine. it goes back to the issue of— to waste a vaccine. it goes back to the issue of not— to waste a vaccine. it goes back to the issue of not wasting _ to waste a vaccine. it goes back to the issue of not wasting vaccine, i the issue of not wasting vaccine, they— the issue of not wasting vaccine, they have — the issue of not wasting vaccine, they have been _ the issue of not wasting vaccine, they have been calling _ the issue of not wasting vaccine, they have been calling people i the issue of not wasting vaccine, | they have been calling people in. the issue of not wasting vaccine, i they have been calling people in. in they have been calling people in. in the advice _ they have been calling people in. in the advice is — they have been calling people in. in the advice is very— they have been calling people in. in the advice is very clear _ they have been calling people in. in the advice is very clear that - they have been calling people in. in the advice is very clear that they i the advice is very clear that they should _ the advice is very clear that they should catt— the advice is very clear that they should call people _ the advice is very clear that they should call people and _ the advice is very clear that they should call people and priority. should call people and priority groups— should call people and priority groups and. _ should call people and priority groupsand, but— should call people and priority groups and, but it _ should call people and priority groups and, but it may- should call people and priority groups and, but it may be i should call people and priority groups and, but it may be in. should call people and priority- groups and, but it may be in some areas _ groups and, but it may be in some areas that— groups and, but it may be in some areas that it — groups and, but it may be in some areas that it has _ groups and, but it may be in some areas that it has been _ groups and, but it may be in somei areas that it has been opportunistic in terms _ areas that it has been opportunistic in terms of— areas that it has been opportunistic in terms of being _ areas that it has been opportunistic in terms of being able _ areas that it has been opportunistic in terms of being able to _ areas that it has been opportunistic in terms of being able to operate . areas that it has been opportunistic| in terms of being able to operate to a smatter— in terms of being able to operate to a smaller number— in terms of being able to operate to a smaller number of— in terms of being able to operate to a smaller number of people. - in terms of being able to operate to a smaller number of people. i- in terms of being able to operate to a smaller number of people. i hopei a smaller number of people. i hope that is— a smaller number of people. i hope that is very— a smaller number of people. i hope that is very unusual, _ a smaller number of people. i hope that is very unusual, i— a smaller number of people. i hope that is very unusual, i think - a smaller number of people. i hope that is very unusual, i think it - a smaller number of people. i hope that is very unusual, i think it is, i that is very unusual, i think it is, and i_ that is very unusual, i think it is,
11:29 am
and i think— that is very unusual, i think it is, and i think the _ that is very unusual, i think it is, and i think the main— that is very unusual, i think it is, and i think the main bulk- that is very unusual, i think it is, and i think the main bulk of- that is very unusual, i think it is, and i think the main bulk of the. and i think the main bulk of the programme _ and i think the main bulk of the programme has _ and i think the main bulk of the programme has been _ and i think the main bulk of the programme has been given- and i think the main bulk of the| programme has been given very and i think the main bulk of the - programme has been given very much in tine _ programme has been given very much in tine with _ programme has been given very much in line with what _ programme has been given very much in line with what the _ programme has been given very much in line with what the jcvi _ programme has been given very much in line with what the jcvi have - in line with what the jcvi have recommended. _ in line with what the jcvi have recommended.— in line with what the jcvi have recommended. ., , . ,, , ., , recommended. lovely, thank you very much. well. — recommended. lovely, thank you very much. well, that _ recommended. lovely, thank you very much. well, that brings _ recommended. lovely, thank you very much. well, that brings to _ recommended. lovely, thank you very much. well, that brings to an - recommended. lovely, thank you very much. well, that brings to an abrupt l much. well, that brings to an abrupt end that briefing _ much. well, that brings to an abrupt end that briefing by _ much. well, that brings to an abrupt end that briefing by the _ much. well, that brings to an abrupt end that briefing by the joint - end that briefing by the joint committee on vaccination and immunisation. our main headline there as you will of heard is as expected, phase two of the vaccination programme is going to go by age. 50 once phase one ends, phase one has been all adults over the age of 50 and also people over the age of 50 and also people over the age of 16 with underlying health conditions. once phase one ends, it will be phase two starting with people in this age group 40—49, then 30-39, 18-29. they people in this age group 40—49, then 30—39, 18—29. they were unclear as to exactly when that would start, but i think essentially the message was that as soon as it does in the
11:30 am
priority groups in days to have all been vaccinated, then phase two will start. time now to take a look at the weekend weather. here's matt taylor. temperatures may not be quite as high as recent days, but you will still feel the sun in your back almost uk—wide. blue skies for many, bit more cloud to the north and west of scotland, but the rain we've had recently across shetland will gradually clear group and most of the afternoon will be dry with temperatures about three or 4 degrees above where they should be a most parts of the uk. so still reasonably warm for the stage in february. tonight is chilly, another cold one to come across tonight, was a mist and fog. not quite as cold for scotland and northern ireland with cloud and a bit of rain spreading its way in. that rain not amounting to do much, but its opposite temperatures from dropping, to about —3 in some rural parts of england and wales for tomorrow. so as we go into saturday, it will be another dry day for many, some early
11:31 am
rain in southern scotland, maybe northern ireland and if it patchy rain through their northern england, but for the mass majority dry, and temperatures again about levels they should be for the of year. you soon. hello. this is bbc news. the headlines... the next phase of the uk's vaccine rollout has been announced. vaccines will be offered starting with those aged 40—49, then 30—39, finishing with those ages 18—29. it will not focus on certain at—risk groups or occupations. structuring an entire mass vaccination programme around occupation will be too difficult. we know _ occupation will be too difficult. we know that — occupation will be too difficult. we know that the age —based programme is simple _ know that the age —based programme is simple and works well and therefore it still seems sensible to continue _ therefore it still seems sensible to continue with that. the supreme court has unanimously dismissed claims from the runaway schoolgirl shamima begum that she should be able to return to the uk to challenge her loss of citizenship.
11:32 am
the former first minister of scotland — alex salmond — will be questioned by members of the scottish parliament today over his claims of a conspiracy against him over sexual harassment claims. mps are to investigate the safety of so—called smart motorways — which use the hard shoulder as an extra lane during busy periods. and prince harry has spoken about his mental health, and has blamed the british press for his move to the us. let's get more on today's developments in the vaccine rollout. on the vaccine rollout. we can speak now to professor adam finn, who is professor of paediatrics at the university of bristol and a member of thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation. good morning to you. so, this will not come as a surprise to you, i assume, that the committee has decided to go don the age —based... to maintain that route of going down
11:33 am
the ages. is that the right decision, in your opinion? yes. absolutely. _ decision, in your opinion? yes. absolutely. i— decision, in your opinion? yes. absolutely, i think _ decision, in your opinion? yes. absolutely, i think we - decision, in your opinion? yes. absolutely, i think we were i decision, in your opinion? yes. absolutely, i think we were all| decision, in youropinion? .ezs absolutely, i think we were all very clear. we discussed this over the last week and reached a very unanimous conclusion that this is the best way forward, in terms of continuing the success of the programme so far and maximising its impact as soon as possible. 50. impact as soon as possible. so, there were _ impact as soon as possible. so, there were questions about people who work in very public— basing occupations, teachers, police officers and a case has been made that they should be moved up the priority list now, we heard from the joint committee that the feeling was that that would actually slow the vaccination programme down. flan that that would actually slow the vaccination programme down. can you elaborate on — vaccination programme down. can you elaborate on that? _ vaccination programme down. can you elaborate on that? yes, _ vaccination programme down. can you elaborate on that? yes, it _ vaccination programme down. can you elaborate on that? yes, it could - elaborate on that? yes, it could potentially into ways, slow down the actual logistics of the delivery of the programme. what we have found so
11:34 am
far is that it's obviously easy to identify people buzz age. it's clearly recorded in all their medical records and it will help getting them immunise quickly and it's an efficient way of doing that. secondly, in terms of the impact of the programme, by identifying people in the highest age group, we can actually impact on the disease more quickly than if we go for occupational groups which will, of course, include a wider range of people, some who are at lower risk but who are at the higher end of the age range who are more at risk. we want to get shots in arms but also target the vaccinevaccines for the people who are most at risk. using ages clearly the best way of doing that. . . ., , ages clearly the best way of doing that. , . ., , . ages clearly the best way of doing that. , . . , . . that. this clearly evidence that someone on — that. this clearly evidence that someone on the _ that. this clearly evidence that someone on the panel- that. this clearly evidence that someone on the panel were i that. this clearly evidence that i someone on the panel were saying that vaccination also reduces the
11:35 am
rate of transmission. in that case, has a case been made to protect individuals from the risk of severe illness? has that been decided that thatis illness? has that been decided that that is more important than reducing rates of transmission? trio. that is more important than reducing rates of transmission?— rates of transmission? no, not reall . i rates of transmission? no, not really. i think _ rates of transmission? no, not really. i think both _ rates of transmission? no, not really. i think both of- rates of transmission? no, not really. i think both of these i rates of transmission? no, not i really. i think both of these things are going to turn out to be important but the evidence we have about these vaccines on preventing severe disease are more definite than the data we have yet on its impact on transmission. those being immunised, if this works then there will be transmitting less so ultimately, we could increase the impact on the disease faster by targeting younger people than by continuing to do what we are doing at the moment. so, i think is the evidence grows on transmission, we will be able to get a clearer handle
11:36 am
on hammy people need to be immunised in order to bring that into effect and bring it through. so far, there's quite a lot of uncertainty about that aspect. d0 there's quite a lot of uncertainty about that aspect.— there's quite a lot of uncertainty about that aspect. do you think it's ossible about that aspect. do you think it's possible that _ about that aspect. do you think it's possible that this _ about that aspect. do you think it's possible that this policy _ about that aspect. do you think it's possible that this policy might i about that aspect. do you think it's possible that this policy might be l possible that this policy might be reviewed? the possible that this policy might be reviewed? ,., . , ., reviewed? the policy on delivering the vaccines _ reviewed? the policy on delivering the vaccines is _ reviewed? the policy on delivering the vaccines is under— reviewed? the policy on delivering the vaccines is under constant i the vaccines is under constant review. we have just the vaccines is under constant review. we havejust been the vaccines is under constant review. we have just been told that rather than having one meeting a week for three hours, we are going to have two for five hours, so the review process is absolutely ongoing. as new evidence coming, people should be expecting things to change because as we get new evidence, we clearly change what we advise. so, yes, things may change but at the moment, this looks to be the most efficient way forward. professor lin was asked about the time phrase for phase two and he laughed and said when phase one is over but do you have some idea of when phase two might start? we know
11:37 am
that the government wants to have given everyone over the age of 18 the first dose byjuly, so what timeframe are we talking about? things have gone faster continually than our most optimistic efforts, so i think the reason he's been cautious is because things can go even faster than predicted. but you need three things, vaccine supply, the machinery to deliver and people to come forward to be immunised, all three of those. all of them have gone far so —— well so far but we need to then after that start maximising people with a second doses so that a whole other part of work to be done as well as these first doses going forward. so we are hoping that the phase one, phase two interface will be in april, it could be sooner but it could be later. thank you for talking to us, adam.
11:38 am
the supreme court has rejected a legal attempt by shamima begum to return to the country to challenge the government's decision to strip her of her citizenship. her british citizenship was revoked on national security grounds shortly after she was found in a syrian refugee camp in february 2019. sajid javid, who took that decision as home secretary, welcomed the ruling. but the human rights group liberty, said the decision sets "an extremely dangerous precedent". the ruling was read out by the president of the supreme court, lord reed. the result of the supreme court's unanimous decision is that ms begum's appeal against the leave to enter decision is dismissed. her application forjudicial review of the leave to enter decision is dismissed. and her application forjudicial review of siac�*s decision in her appeal against the deprivation
11:39 am
decision is also dismissed. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford explained the significance of this ruling. essentially the supreme court is re—establishing the right of the home — re—establishing the right of the home secretary, the duty of the home secretary— home secretary, the duty of the home secretary to _ home secretary, the duty of the home secretary to make their own decisions _ secretary to make their own decisions about what is in the interest— decisions about what is in the interest of national security which will essentially trump the right of somebody like this individual in their— somebody like this individual in theirjudgment. the supreme court justice _ theirjudgment. the supreme court justice said that the appeal court had wrongly made its own assessment of the _ had wrongly made its own assessment of the requirements of national security— of the requirements of national security and referring to that of the home — security and referring to that of the home secretary. the approach did not give _ the home secretary. the approach did not give the _ the home secretary. the approach did not give the home secretary's respect — not give the home secretary's respect it— not give the home secretary's respect it desert —— statement the respect _ respect it desert —— statement the respect it— respect it desert —— statement the respect it deserved. and so far as the fact— respect it deserved. and so far as the fact that... it's almost impossible for her to challenge this decision. _ impossible for her to challenge this decision. she can hardly talk to her lawyers _ decision. she can hardly talk to her lawyers and — decision. she can hardly talk to her lawyers and are sitting in a camp
11:40 am
halfway— lawyers and are sitting in a camp halfway round the world. the proceedings of whether or not she can appeal— proceedings of whether or not she can appeal the decision about her citizenship, should be delayed. it may not— citizenship, should be delayed. it may not be known how long it would take that _ may not be known how long it would take that challenge this decision but the — take that challenge this decision but the justice of the supreme court says there _ but the justice of the supreme court says there is no perfect decision. for her. — says there is no perfect decision. for her. this _ says there is no perfect decision. for her, this is going to be where she stays — for her, this is going to be where she stays for now. of course, many people _ she stays for now. of course, many people have — she stays for now. of course, many people have no simply for her. she made _ people have no simply for her. she made her— people have no simply for her. she made her decision aged 15 to go and 'oin made her decision aged 15 to go and join islamic— made her decision aged 15 to go and join islamic state when everybody knew _ join islamic state when everybody knew what it was all about, the heading — knew what it was all about, the heading videos and so forth had been coming _ heading videos and so forth had been coming out _ heading videos and so forth had been coming out but others say she was so young _ coming out but others say she was so young when _ coming out but others say she was so young when she made that decision that she _ young when she made that decision that she should surely be given some leeway~ _ that she should surely be given some leewa . ., ., . that she should surely be given some leewa . . . , ., within the past few minutes, the home secretary has given her reaction to the judgment. priti patel said" the supreme court has unanimously found in favour of the government's position, and reaffirmed the home secretary's
11:41 am
authority to make vital national security decisions. the government will always take the strongest possible action to protect our national security and our priority remains maintaining the safety and security of our citizens." the former first minister of scotland — alex salmond — will be questioned by members of the scottish parliament today over his claims of a "malicious and concerted" conspiracy against him. it's part of an inquiry into the mishandling of sexual harassment complaints about him, which were later disproven in court. the current first minister nicola sturgeon, a former ally of alex salmond, has dismissed his claims. our political correspondent nick eardley reports. for years, this was the closest relationship in scottish politics, alex salmond and his protege, nicola sturgeon. now, though, they're bitter enemies. he accuses her of failing to tell the truth. she says he is living in an alternative reality. this is mr salmond outside the high court in edinburgh last year. he had just been cleared of sexual assault. there is certain evidence that
11:42 am
i would have liked to have seen led in this trial, but for a variety of reasons we were not able to do so. at some point, that information, that facts and that evidence, will see the light of day. now it's nicola sturgeon and her government that's under the spotlight. its investigation into mr salmond was found to be unlawful and tainted by apparent bias. mr salmond is coming here to the scottish parliament to make some extraordinary claims. mr salmond claims nicola sturgeon has misled the scottish parliament. that she's guilty of several breaches of the ministerial code. and that people around her, including her husband and her chief of staff, engaged in a malicious campaign to damage his reputation, even to the extent of having him imprisoned. it's a row which has caused an earthquake in scottish politics, with claims that holyrood is struggling to hold the government to account.
11:43 am
parts of mr salmond's evidence have been taken down, after prosecutors said they could be in contempt of court and identify his accusers. opposition parties have suggested taking the evidence down is part of a cover—up. miss sturgeon has denied breaking the ministerial code, and says there's no evidence of a conspiracy. what is not legitimate is to pursue a conspiracy theory, a scorched earth policy, that threatens the reputation and the integrity of scotland's independentjustice institutions, just because you happen to dislike this government. and to sacrifice all of that, if i may say so. of that, if i may say so, presiding officer, on the altar of the ego of one man. cheering this explosive row is now reaching its climax. miss sturgeon will give evidence
11:44 am
next week, as two first ministers, two colossal figures in scotland, make their case to parliament. nick eardley, bbc news, holyrood. and you can watch the whole of alex salmond's evidence to the holyrood inquiry here on bbc news at about 12:30pm. prince harry has made an appearance onjame corden's the late late show in the us, where he revealed that archie's first word was crocodile, and the queen bought her great grandson a waffle maker for christmas. during the interview, where the pair explored la together, corden facetimed the duchess of sussex, to see if she wanted to buy a house in bel—air. hey, meghan! now, listen, i've got to talk to you about i something quite serious, ok? tell me. i'm here with the big man. do you recognise this house? no, should i? that is the house from i the fresh prince of bel—air. and i think this is- where you should live. i don't think there's anything cooler. i you would be the fresh princess of bel—air. i what is he saying? well, of course, he's dragged his heels. i he's already use the bathroom. that is how at home he feels.
11:45 am
that's wonderful. i think we've done enough moving! here is what i'll do, i'll put i you in touch with the owners, you guys can thrash it out. there is no doubt in my mind that |this is where you should be, ok? | 0k. haz, how's your tour of la going? haz? i didn't know who we were calling you haz now. i no, well, you're not my wife, so... laughter. he is the worst tour guide in la i've ever had, put it that way. well, i am the only tour guide you have ever had so i am i the best and the worst. he is having a great time, all right? i we'll do it again with someone different. see you soon. all our love. bye. i'll put you in touch - with the owner, we will get the details, we'll lock it down. all our love! from me and haz, see you, bye. bye. i think that's a lock. he also had a longer conversation
11:46 am
about his mental health. what he also had a longer conversation about his mental health. what are ou about his mental health. what are you excited _ about his mental health. what are you excited about _ about his mental health. what are you excited about out _ about his mental health. what are you excited about out of _ about his mental health. what are. you excited about out of lockdown? i've no idea. a slightly different version — i've no idea. a slightly different version of— i've no idea. a slightly different version of what we were doing back in the _ version of what we were doing back in the uk. — version of what we were doing back in the uk. what our life is like, we always— in the uk. what our life is like, we always wanted to devote allied to public _ always wanted to devote allied to public service, bring some compassion make people happy and try to change _ compassion make people happy and try to change the world in any small way that we _ to change the world in any small way that we can — to change the world in any small way that we can. it�*s to change the world in any small way that we can-— that we can. it's such a monumental decision to — that we can. it's such a monumental decision to have _ that we can. it's such a monumental decision to have walked _ that we can. it's such a monumental decision to have walked away - that we can. it's such a monumental decision to have walked away from | decision to have walked away from the royal family. decision to have walked away from the royalfamily. why did decision to have walked away from the royal family. why did you feel that that was necessary and the right thing to do for you and your family? it right thing to do for you and your famil ? ., . right thing to do for you and your famil ? . , ., ~ right thing to do for you and your famil ? . , . ,, . ._ family? it was never walking away. it was family? it was never walking away. it was stepping _ family? it was never walking away. it was stepping back _ family? it was never walking away. it was stepping back rather - family? it was never walking away. it was stepping back rather than i it was stepping back rather than stepping — it was stepping back rather than stepping down. it was a really difficult — stepping down. it was a really difficult environment as i thought people _ difficult environment as i thought people saw. we all know what the british _ people saw. we all know what the british press alike and it was destroying my mental health. i thought— destroying my mental health. i thought this is toxic! i did what
11:47 am
any husband and father would do. i thought. _ any husband and father would do. i thought, i'm going to get my family out of— thought, i'm going to get my family out of here. — thought, i'm going to get my family out of here, but we never walked away. _ out of here, but we never walked away. as — out of here, but we never walked away. as far _ out of here, but we never walked away. as far as i'm concerned, whatever— away. as far as i'm concerned, whatever decisions were made on that side, whatever decisions were made on that side. i_ whatever decisions were made on that side. iwill— whatever decisions were made on that side, i will never walk away. i will always— side, i will never walk away. i will always be — side, i will never walk away. i will always be contributing. wherever i am in _ always be contributing. wherever i am in the — always be contributing. wherever i am in the well, it's going to be the same _ am in the well, it's going to be the same thing. — am in the well, it's going to be the same thing-— same thing. prince harry there talkin: the headlines on bbc news... to james cordoned. to james corden. the next phase of the uk's vaccine roll—out has been announced... priority will now be given to those aged 40—49, then 30—39, finishing with those aged 18—29 — it won't focus on occupations. the supreme court has unanimously dismissed claims from the runaway schoolgirl shamima begum that she should be able to return to the uk to challenge her loss of citizenship... alex salmond will be questioned by members of the scottish parliament today. the former scottish first minister claims there was a conspiracy against him over sexual harassment claims.
11:48 am
following borisjohnson's announcement on the country's route out of lockdown, we're speaking to key figures from across society to get their thoughts on the past year and what their hopes are for the future. today, we're hearing from someone who has become one of the most famous faces in the world of local government, jackie weaver, the star of a virtual parish council meeting that went viral. please, let the chairman speak. you have no authority here, jackie weaver. no authority at all. she's kicked him out. i take charge! read the standing orders! read them and understand them! i'm pleased to say jackiejoins me now. good morning to you. could you ever had imagined you would have achieved such fame in these last months? absolutely not. as i've said before, if i had any inkling of it, i'd have made sure i'd done my hair that
11:49 am
night! made sure i'd done my hair that niuht! �* . . . made sure i'd done my hair that niht! �*,, ., ., ~' made sure i'd done my hair that niht! �*, , ., ., ~' ., made sure i'd done my hair that "pm! a, . . ~ night! it's strange talking to you down the line _ night! it's strange talking to you down the line like _ night! it's strange talking to you down the line like this _ night! it's strange talking to you down the line like this because i night! it's strange talking to you i down the line like this because this is the image we have a view, looking composed and in charge in front of your screen. composed and in charge in front of your screen-— your screen. eventually, iwill eventually — your screen. eventually, iwill eventually have _ your screen. eventually, iwill eventually have to _ your screen. eventually, iwill eventually have to show i your screen. eventually, iwill eventually have to show you | your screen. eventually, iwill. eventually have to show you that your screen. eventually, iwill- eventually have to show you that i do have legs. tell eventually have to show you that i do have legs-— eventually have to show you that i do have legs. tell me what life has been like since _ do have legs. tell me what life has been like since that _ do have legs. tell me what life has been like since that clip, _ do have legs. tell me what life has been like since that clip, since i been like since that clip, since that meeting went viral? well, it's almost had — that meeting went viral? well, it's almost had to _ that meeting went viral? well, it's almost had to tracks. _ that meeting went viral? well, it's almost had to tracks. one - that meeting went viral? well, it's almost had to tracks. one of i that meeting went viral? well, it's| almost had to tracks. one of them, absolutely surreal where i've had the pleasure, and it has been a pleasure, i'm mindful of what prince harryjust said a minute ago. mine has been very different, positive, my experience with the press has been quite different and i've met lots of lovely supportive and caring people on the way and been able to do fantastic things like, for me,
11:50 am
personally, cross a crowded street. but being able to promote something i've been passionate about for a long, long time which is local democracy and it's good to see young people taking a step towards us and saying, ok, tell us a little bit more. saying, ok, tell us a little bit more, ,., saying, ok, tell us a little bit more, y., ., saying, ok, tell us a little bit more. . . . , saying, ok, tell us a little bit more. ., . ., , saying, ok, tell us a little bit more. . . . , . more. so, you are clearly hoping and usina the more. so, you are clearly hoping and using the platform, _ more. so, you are clearly hoping and using the platform, the _ more. so, you are clearly hoping and using the platform, the publicity i using the platform, the publicity that you now have two push the cause of democracy local government? absolutely. but i have some fun along the way! i’m absolutely. but i have some fun along the way!— absolutely. but i have some fun along the way! i'm sure you have! i was auoin along the way! i'm sure you have! i was going to _ along the way! i'm sure you have! i was going to go — along the way! i'm sure you have! i was going to go on _ along the way! i'm sure you have! i was going to go on to _ along the way! i'm sure you have! i was going to go on to the - along the way! i'm sure you have! i was going to go on to the fun i along the way! i'm sure you have! i was going to go on to the fun nowl was going to go on to the fun now because we've got young people dressing up as you! i don't know if we've got any images to show. we've got you in kate for and you've alluded to the negative side. ——
11:51 am
cake form. you've also had horrible abuse. ., . i. cake form. you've also had horrible abuse. ., . . abuse. how have you coped with that? on balance. — abuse. how have you coped with that? on balance. if— abuse. how have you coped with that? on balance. if it _ abuse. how have you coped with that? on balance, if it had _ abuse. how have you coped with that? on balance, if it had been _ abuse. how have you coped with that? on balance, if it had been half- abuse. how have you coped with that? on balance, if it had been half and i on balance, if it had been half and half, ithinkl on balance, if it had been half and half, i think i probably would have gone away somewhere but the fact that so many people have been so positive and there's only a small handful of extremely negative kind of gives me the confidence to say, i must be reaching someone somewhere positively and it makes me want to continue doing it. you positively and it makes me want to continue doing it.— continue doing it. you sound resiuned continue doing it. you sound resigned and _ continue doing it. you sound resigned and philosophical i continue doing it. you sound i resigned and philosophical about continue doing it. you sound - resigned and philosophical about it. do you think it goes with the territory of being a woman in the public eye? i territory of being a woman in the public eye?— territory of being a woman in the ublice e? .,�* ,, ., . , public eye? i don't know, actually, one of the — public eye? i don't know, actually, one of the scariest _ public eye? i don't know, actually, one of the scariest things - public eye? i don't know, actually, one of the scariest things was i public eye? i don't know, actually, one of the scariest things was no l one of the scariest things was no very unpleasant e—mail sent to me by a man but what really hurt, i guess, is that some of them were from women. that i found, i know perhaps
11:52 am
it's a bit of a double standard but i somehow felt that was worse. you look completely bewildered. yes. hagar look completely bewildered. yes. how is this ear look completely bewildered. yes. how is this year been for you, quite apart from being in the public eye? you, like everybody in this you, like everybody else in this country, have endured a year of stop start lockdown is. what's it been like? i start lockdown is. what's it been like? ., ., ~ start lockdown is. what's it been like? ., .,~ . like? i do work full-time and rovide like? i do work full-time and provide support _ like? i do work full-time and provide support to _ like? i do work full-time and provide support to parish i like? i do work full-time and provide support to parish in l provide support to parish in cheshire. they've had to come to terms with the coronavirus regulations in terms of how they operate. that kept us as an organisation extremely busy, supporting and reacting to the things that come forward from them, because, back to my soapbox, if you think about 12 months ago, parish
11:53 am
councils have never had the power to undertake virtual meetings so we are all trying to get to grips with the new medium which we alljust take the granted. it’s new medium which we all 'ust take the granted.— new medium which we all 'ust take the grantee.— the granted. it's brought you this extraordinary _ the granted. it's brought you this extraordinary time. _ the granted. it's brought you this extraordinary time. what - the granted. it's brought you this extraordinary time. what would l the granted. it's brought you this i extraordinary time. what would you like coming out of lockdown? i think, like everybody else, i'm looking forward to being among people. that's part of the whole ethos of being in a parish council because you want to engage with your community. now, community means different things. we've got a virtual community we don't want to lose but it would be nice to get back to face—to—face, as well. we back to face-to-face, as well. we are all with _ back to face—to—face, as well. we are all with you on that front. such are all with you on that front. such a pleasure to talk to you. goodbye. people aged 40—49 will be prioritised next for a covid—19 vaccine, with scientific advisers saying the move will "provide the greatest benefit in the shortest time".
11:54 am
thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation considered whether groups such as teachers and police officers should be vaccinated next, but decided to carry on prioritising people by age. ken marsh is the chair of the metropolitan police federation. hejoins us now. what is he joins us now. what is your reaction to this decision, ken marsh. �* ., , , reaction to this decision, ken marsh.�* i, . marsh. i'm absolutely shocked. we have been told _ marsh. i'm absolutely shocked. we have been told over _ marsh. i'm absolutely shocked. we have been told over and _ marsh. i'm absolutely shocked. we have been told over and over- marsh. i'm absolutely shocked. we have been told over and over again i have been told over and over again there is much being held in top colourfor my brave, there is much being held in top colour for my brave, brave colleagues. we've lost many and this is not about us being pitted against others. this is a clear understanding that we do a job that no one else does in this country. we can't afford a two metre parameter from people. we have to be in people's faces at times and run around at times and my colleagues are genuinely scared about not
11:55 am
getting the vaccination. and, on top of that, this government are creating a super scenario. it's absurd for the buy cannot understand what is going on. i absurd for the buy cannot understand what is going om— absurd for the buy cannot understand what is going on— what is going on. i don't know how much of our _ what is going on. i don't know how much of our briefing _ what is going on. i don't know how much of our briefing you _ what is going on. i don't know how much of our briefing you manage l what is going on. i don't know how| much of our briefing you manage to hear but the point was made that if they attempted to roll out vaccinations according to occupation, it could slow the whole programme down. you occupation, it could slow the whole programme down.— occupation, it could slow the whole programme down. you don't accept that? now- — programme down. you don't accept that? now- i— programme down. you don't accept that? now. idon't— programme down. you don't accept that? now. i don't accept _ programme down. you don't accept that? now. i don't accept that - programme down. you don't accept that? now. i don't accept that at i that? now. i don't accept that at all. it's absolute nonsense. you look at the number of vaccinations we are talking about, it's a minuscule amount. on a daily basis, 10-15% of minuscule amount. on a daily basis, 10—15% of people do not turn up on their vaccinations of what has been laid out for that day. it should be done with absolute ease, so quickly that you wouldn't know it had happened. it's yet again rhetoric that's not there to my colleagues. again, it was pointed out that older officers will be prioritised. if you
11:56 am
go down... there is a system of priority even within the occupational age groups. older officers at risk will be getting a vaccine before younger officers. but we are vaccine before younger officers. emit we are talking about people who will die. what about the thousands, thousands of my colleagues who have been offered coronavirus, with long coronavirus, any of our iio—i20,000 colleagues could die. it's nonsense because of the job we do. tell colleagues could die. it's nonsense because of the job we do.— because of the 'ob we do. tell us about the because of the job we do. tell us about the figures. _ because of the job we do. tell us about the figures. you _ because of the job we do. tell us about the figures. you say - about the figures. you say thousands, how many have contracted coronavirus. i thousands, how many have contracted coronavirus. .., thousands, how many have contracted coronavirus-— coronavirus. i can only talk to the net but our _ coronavirus. i can only talk to the net but our highest _ coronavirus. i can only talk to the net but our highest peak - coronavirus. i can only talk to the net but our highest peak nearly i coronavirus. i can only talk to the l net but our highest peak nearly had 4000 officers off, either isolating or sick with coronavirus. we still
11:57 am
have just over 1000 not at work and thatis have just over 1000 not at work and that is not even taking into consideration long coronavirus and everything that comes with that. simple vaccination will stop this happening. and that's out of the force of 20—25,000? happening. and that's out of the force of 20-25,000? 32,000. happening. and that's out of the force of 20—25,000? 32,000. ken, were going to have to leave it there for reasons of time. thank you very much for your time. ten marsh from the police federation for the met police. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. hello, temperatures may not be quite as high as it were over recent days, but you will still feel the warmth of the sun on your back this afternoon, almost uk—wide. blue skies for many. there is still a bit more cloud to the north and west of scotland,
11:58 am
but the rain we've had recently across shetland will gradually clear through and most of this afternoon will be dried with temperatures about three — 4 degrees above where they should be as we go away on saturday, is expecting to be another dry day. a bit of patchy rain through the isle of man and northern england. sunshine top and tail of the country and temperatures above what they should be for the time of year. see you soon.
11:59 am
12:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines... in the next few minutes, the scottish parliament will begin questioning the former first minister of scotland — alex salmond — over his claims of a conspiracy against him over sexual harassment claims. mr salmond hasjust mr salmond has just arrived at the scottish parliament and the claims he is making will rock scottish politics. the next phase of the uk's vaccine roll—out has been announced. vaccines will be offered starting with those aged 40—49, then 30—39, finishing with those ages 18—29. it will not focus on certain at—risk groups or occupations. structuring an entire mass vaccination programme around occupation will be
12:01 pm
even more difficult. we know that the age—based programme is simple and works well and therefore it still seems sensible to continue with that. the supreme court has unanimously dismissed claims from the runaway schoolgirl shamima begum that she should be able to return to the uk to challenge her loss of citizenship. the result of the supreme court's unanimous decision is that ms begum's appeal to enter the uk to appeal against the decision is dismissed. and prince harry has spoken about his mental health, and has blamed the british press for his move to the us. it was destroying my mental health. really? i was like, this is toxic. yeah. so i did what any husband and father would do. i was like, i need to get my family out of here.
12:02 pm
the former first minister of scotland — alex salmond — will be questioned by members of the scottish parliament today over his claims of a "malicious and concerted" conspiracy against him. it's part of an inquiry into the mishandling of sexual harassment complaints about him, which were later disproven in court. the current first minister nicola sturgeon, a former ally of alex salmond, has dismissed his claims. our political correspondent nick eardley reports. for years, this was the closest relationship in scottish politics, alex salmond and his protege, nicola sturgeon. now, though, they're bitter enemies. he accuses her of failing to tell the truth. she says he is living in an alternative reality. this is mr salmond outside the high court in edinburgh last year. he had just been cleared of sexual assault. there is certain evidence that i would have liked to have seen led in this trial, but for a variety of reasons
12:03 pm
we were not able to do so. at some point, that information, that facts and that evidence, will see the light of day. now it's nicola sturgeon and her government that's under the spotlight. its investigation into mr salmond was found to be unlawful and tainted by apparent bias. mr salmond is coming here to the scottish parliament to make some extraordinary claims. mr salmond claims nicola sturgeon has misled the scottish parliament. that she's guilty of several breaches of the ministerial code. and that people around her, including her husband and her chief of staff, engaged in a malicious campaign to damage his reputation, even to the extent of having him imprisoned. it's a row which has caused an earthquake in scottish politics, with claims that holyrood is struggling to hold the government to account. parts of mr salmond's evidence have been taken down, after prosecutors said they could be in contempt of court and identify his accusers.
12:04 pm
opposition parties have suggested taking the evidence down is part of a cover—up. miss sturgeon has denied breaking the ministerial code, and says there's no evidence of a conspiracy. what is not legitimate is to pursue a conspiracy theory, a scorched earth policy, that threatens the reputation and the integrity of scotland's independentjustice institutions, just because you happen to dislike this government. and to sacrifice all of that, if i may say so, presiding officer, on the altar of the ego of one man. this explosive row is now reaching its climax. miss sturgeon will give evidence next week, as two first ministers, two colossal figures in scotland, make their case to parliament. nick eardley, bbc news, holyrood. and we can speak to nick eardley now — he's at holyrood. we are going to hearfrom
12:05 pm
we are going to hear from the we are going to hearfrom the man himself in about half an hour, but a couple of questions before that. just to be clear, this isn't about the harassment claims against him, it is about the government's handling of those claims. that is riuht. handling of those claims. that is right- when _ handling of those claims. that is right. when those _ handling of those claims. that is right. when those harassment . right. when those harassment allegations were made, alex salmond was the subject of an investigation which was found to be unlawful. he took the scottish government to court and he won. msps are now looking into how the scottish government mishandled those allegations and what has happened since. but the remit is fairly broad, so they are looking at everything from how that policy was drawn up, how it was used, to whether ministers have acted properly, knows allegations —— and thatis properly, knows allegations —— and that is where the allegations that alex salmond has made that nicola sturgeon broke the ministerial code, to the picture. i suppose that the big question over the next few hours, we have a rough idea of what alex salmond is going to say, what
12:06 pm
he is going to allege, the package there. his challenge now is to try and convince people, because there are many people arguing in the parliament behind me and a broader scottish politics, that although alex salmond has made explosive allegations of a conspiracy against him, there isn't much evidence. i suspect wanted big questions he is going to be asked by msps is whether there is evidence. but more broadly than not, it isjust going to be an extraordinary moment in scottish politics. it feels to me like one of the biggest crisis that scottish politics has faced since devolution set up in 22 years ago. with one first minister accusing another of lying to parliament, the other saying that the other is living in a parallel universe. it saying that the other is living in a parallel universe.— parallel universe. it has become extremely _ parallel universe. it has become extremely personal. _ parallel universe. it has become extremely personal. just - parallel universe. it has become extremely personal. just to - parallel universe. it has become j extremely personal. just to help guide us through this evidence that we are going to see in the session, is alex salmond effectively saying that he is being gagged because some
12:07 pm
of his evidence, a lot of his evidence, has been redacted, it has been blacked out?— been blacked out? yes, that is riuht. so been blacked out? yes, that is right- so he — been blacked out? yes, that is right. so he has _ been blacked out? yes, that is right. so he has said _ been blacked out? yes, that is| right. so he has said numerous pieces of evidence into this committee —— he has sent, there was one piece of evidence in particular, the one which he accuses nicola sturgeon of breaking the rules that ministers have to follow, part of that was published by the scottish parliament, but in taken down because it was a challenge from the crown office, which is scotland's prosecution service who were concerned that it might be in contempt of court and lead to some people managing to figure out who some of his accusers were. now, mr salmond says that is not the case and he think this evidence should have been kept up in full and there have been kept up in full and there have been kept up in full and there have been concerns raised by some in the scottish parliament that this is a cover—up because some of the passages that were removed preferred specifically to mrjen breaking the
12:08 pm
ministerial code. so that is his written evidence —— mrs nicola sturgeon, so the next is what he cannot can't say. i would be amazed if some of the allegations against nicola sturgeon are not discussed in detail, but particular elements of it, there might not feature in the oral evidences afternoon, but i would be hugely surprised we don't get into the details of those meetings. and not to go to deep into the weeds, but basically the accusation that mr salmond is making is that nicola sturgeon has not told the truth when she found out about the truth when she found out about the allegations against him. and that matters, because he said she found out before, she had a private meeting with him in her house back in 2018. this isn'tjust a question of whether she has made a mistake of a few days, it is what that meeting in her house was all about. because her opponents say that if you knew what the allegations were, you would not have met mr salmond privately, you would've it known was a government issue, not casey would've
12:09 pm
had recorded, tell your secretary and have minutes of that meeting taken. none of that happened, and she later claimed that she thought it was a party matter which wouldn't have to have civil servants or anything like the attic. it is a hugely controversial, hugely complicated row. but over the next few hours i'll examine's evidences a positive four hours, could be longer than that, so get the coffee zen. at this is going to be a remarkable moment in scottish politics. we will aet moment in scottish politics. we will net the moment in scottish politics. we will get the copies _ moment in scottish politics. we will get the copies in. — moment in scottish politics. we will get the copies in, you _ moment in scottish politics. we will get the copies in, you will _ moment in scottish politics. we will get the copies in, you will be - moment in scottish politics. we will get the copies in, you will be there l get the copies in, you will be there to guide us through. that is nick there guiding us through it from holyrood. and as he mentioned, you can watch the whole of the evidence to the inquiry here on bbc news and thatis to the inquiry here on bbc news and that is expected to start in about 20 minutes' time. the group of scientists advising the government have said vaccinating people in order of age is the fastest way to cut covid—19 deaths in the next phase of the roll—out. it means that the
12:10 pm
recommendation being put to number 10 will be that the people in their 40s will be the next in mind for the jab. teachers and police officers had campaigned to be prioritised in the next phase — but they will now be vaccinated in line with their age group. the scientists said priority based onjobs would be "more complex" and could "slow the programme down." all four nations of the uk will follow this approach with a target of vaccinating all adults by end ofjuly. more than 18 million people in the uk have received a first dose so far. professor wei shen lim said thejcvi had decided against prioritising particular occupations for the next phase of the vaccine roll—out. an occupation—based vaccine programme has never been tested before on a large scale in the uk. it is, in that sense, untested and untried, so trying to switch from an age—based programme to an occupation—based programme would be more complex and potentially introduce more delays to the programme. as i said before, speed
12:11 pm
is the critical factor here. the percentage of people testing positive for coronavirus is continuing to fall across every nation of the uk, that is according to figures from the office of national statistics in their latest infection survey. but they warned that the rates are still high and on par with the numbers seen in mid—october. to get reaction to all of those figures let's speak to dr deepti gurdasani, senior lecturer in clincical epidemiology at queen mary, university of london. good afternoon to you. so, good news, good continuing news about the downward trend of the r number. but knowing you, having spoken to you in the past, i am sure you would still urge caution. the past, i am sure you would still urge caution-— the past, i am sure you would still urge caution. yes, absolutely. it is really good — urge caution. yes, absolutely. it is really good news _ urge caution. yes, absolutely. it is really good news and _ urge caution. yes, absolutely. it is really good news and i _ urge caution. yes, absolutely. it is really good news and i think- urge caution. yes, absolutely. it is really good news and i think it - urge caution. yes, absolutely. it is really good news and i think it is l really good news and i think it is in the right direction, and it's all a result of the restrictions that are now in place. but we have to remember here we have been here two
12:12 pm
times before with things in the right direction, and once we started opening up we lost those gains, leading to another surgeon cases. so we have to be very mindful that given the opening up plan that is happening on the 8th of march, with all schools opening up together without a lot of medications in place, we have to be ready that we are going to start seeing an increase or a plateauing of the decline. and perhaps an increase in the r is well, which are quite likely. so it is very important that we are cautious at this point in time because all the things are going in the relatively right direction in terms of seeing a daily number of about 10,000 cases a day that are confirmed, in terms of hospitalisations, we are now below the peak, but not a lot below it. so there is still the potential for things to get worse once we start opening up. things to get worse once we start opening up-_ things to get worse once we start o-eninu u. ., ':: i: i: i: , , opening up. you say 10,000 cases still at the moment. _ opening up. you say 10,000 cases still at the moment. do _ opening up. you say 10,000 cases still at the moment. do you - opening up. you say 10,000 cases still at the moment. do you have l opening up. you say 10,000 cases| still at the moment. do you have in your head a figure, an idealfigure
12:13 pm
where you would feel, yes, ok, now we can really start to think of a more normal life? i we can really start to think of a more normal life?— we can really start to think of a more normal life? i think for me that figure _ more normal life? i think for me that figure needs _ more normal life? i think for me that figure needs to _ more normal life? i think for me that figure needs to be - more normal life? i think for me that figure needs to be in - more normal life? i think for me that figure needs to be in line i more normal life? i think for me l that figure needs to be in line with what a lot of other countries are following in terms of illumination strategies, so i would very much like that figure to be below 1000 cases or even 500 cases a day across the uk. so i think once it is below that number we can then sort of start thinking about opening up, but with the test, trace and isolate system, we have a reform that, to identify and control the outbreaks before they spread into the community and lead to a surgeon cases like we have seen before. and cases like we have seen before. and presumably — cases like we have seen before. and presumably you would be able to track how long it would take to get to get to 5000 cases a day, apart from the fact that we are going to be starting opening up from march the 8th. ., , i. , the 8th. that is your point. yes, but the current _ the 8th. that is your point. yes, but the current r, _ the 8th. that is your point. yes, but the current r, it _ the 8th. that is your point. yes, but the current r, it is _ the 8th. that is your point. yes, | but the current r, it is something that it could be achieved within two months, but if the r increases then thatis months, but if the r increases then that is not achievable initial
12:14 pm
repair of time. and it makes that period longer, and if the r rises above one, the research see those surges in cases again, which is exactly what a lot of the models commissioned by government has said will happen when schools open. that will happen when schools open. at the same time, the vaccination roll—out is progressing, it is progressing well, and there is evidence that vaccination helps reduce transmission rates. see you have got to factor that in as well, presumably. have got to factor that in as well, presumably-— have got to factor that in as well, presumably. yes, absolutely, buti think the issue _ presumably. yes, absolutely, buti think the issue with _ presumably. yes, absolutely, buti think the issue with that _ presumably. yes, absolutely, buti think the issue with that is - presumably. yes, absolutely, buti think the issue with that is that - think the issue with that is that only about 25% of the population has been vaccinated so far. so in terms of reducing transmission, that doesn't make a huge difference. and if we allow transmission to continue at high levels alongside vaccination, there is a real danger also notjust increase of our hospitalisations and deaths, but also adaptation of the virus, particularly viruses that escape vaccines, emerging and increasing in frequency across the uk. it important alongside vaccination also
12:15 pm
suppress transmission to also is possible to protect the vaccines. very good to speak to you as always. from queen mary university of london, thank you for your time. the supreme court has ruled that shemima begum, who left london and travelled to syria when she was 15 to join the islamic state group, should not be allowed to return to uk to challenge the removal of her british citizenship. her citizenship was revoked on national security grounds shortly after she was found in a syrian refugee camp in february 2019. the home secretary priti patel said the government would always take the strongest possible action to protect national security. the ruling was read out by the president of the supreme court lord reed. the result of the supreme court's unanimous decision is that ms begum's appeal against the leave to enter decision is dismissed. her application forjudicial review of the leave to enter decision is dismissed.
12:16 pm
and her application forjudicial review of siac�*s decision in her appeal against the deprivation decision is also dismissed. the scottish government is about to give its latest update on covid—19. it's being taken by the cabinet secretary for health, jeane freeman, and national clinical director jason leitch. 161 of those new cases were in greater glasgow, 105 in wooten and 97 in lanarkshire. the remaining cases were spread across eight other health board areas. 924 people are currently in hospital, that is 43 last thing yesterday, and 80 people are in intensive care, which is a reduction of nine from yesterday. but i regret to report that 27 additional deaths have been registered in the last 24 hours of
12:17 pm
the patients who first tested positive over the previous 28 days. that takes the total number of deaths registered under that definition to 7111. once again, i want to send my condolences to all of those who have lost a loved one. i am joined today by our national clinical director, professorjason leach, who will be helping me to answer the journalist's questions. before that, their two main issues i want to update you on. the first is about our vaccination programme. i can confirm that as of 830 this morning, 1,542,929 people in scotland have received their first dose of the vaccine. that is an increase of 26,949 since yesterday.
12:18 pm
in addition, 8679 people have received their second dose. and that brings the total number of people who have had their second dose to 65,340. as you know, the scottish government provides a daily breakdown of the numbers of people who have had theirfirst breakdown of the numbers of people who have had their first dose, breakdown of the numbers of people who have had theirfirst dose, that includes figures in each of the different age groups that we have started vaccinating. from today, public health scotland will begin to publish first dose statistics for all age groups. in addition, they have also defined some of the ways in which we will record the age of people being vaccinated, and that should make ourfigures more accurate. for example, previously where someone was over 69 and a half, they would've been included in the figures for the 70—74 —year—old cohort. underthe the figures for the 70—74 —year—old cohort. under the revised system, reporting will be based on the
12:19 pm
person's age as it would be on the 3ist person's age as it would be on the 31st of march. that brings us into line with the approach taken in england and wales. and as a consequence, it also means that the percentage figures are reporting today are calculated on a slightly different basis than the ones previously reported. so using public health scotland's revise figures, i can confirm that 94% of 65—69 —year—olds have now received a first dose of the vaccine. that is a significant increase on the percentage of 85% that we reported yesterday, and some of that increase will be yesterday, and some of that increase will he do to those reporting changes. but the figure shows very clearly that we are on track to offer a first dose to everyone age between 65 and 69 by early march. we now expect to be able to a first dose to everyone over 50 and to all
12:20 pm
adults with an underlying health condition by the 15th of april. although, as always, that is of course subject to supply. at that point, we move into the second phase of the vaccination programme, and this will involve vaccinating the rest of the adult population, which again, supplies permitting, we hope to do by the end ofjuly. this morning, thejoint to do by the end ofjuly. this morning, the joint committee on vaccination and immunisation publish advice on how to approach the next phase. they advise that we should prioritise vaccinations for the rest of the adult population on the basis of the adult population on the basis of age, with 40— 49 euros vaccinated first, followed by 30—39 —year—olds, and then 18—29 —year—olds. jcvi looked at a range of risk factors, occupation, gender, ethnicity and deprivation, but they conclude that even among groups with a heightened exposure or vulnerability to the
12:21 pm
virus, age is still the most significant factor. on that basis, the jcvi believe significant factor. on that basis, thejcvi believe that significant factor. on that basis, the jcvi believe that an significant factor. on that basis, thejcvi believe that an age —based approach to vaccination is the quickest and most effective way of protecting the most vulnerable. they also advised that in logistical terms it is a most efficient way of rolling out the vaccine to the remaining adult population. and i can confirm that together with the other governments in the uk, the scottish government has accepted the jcvi advice. the second issue i want to highlight relates to support from the health and social care workforce. the scottish government is determined to support our helping care workforce in whatever way we can, and that includes providing help for the mental health and well—being. last year we established a national well—being hub, and a national well—being helpline, to help health care workers need additional support. the well—being hub has been visited by nearly
12:22 pm
80,000 occasions. today we are formally launching a new service called the work for specialist service. it will supplement local staff support arrangements that are already in place. the service will therefore be able to the provide confidential and expert care for professionals who are suffering from a range of issues, including stress, anxiety, depression or addiction. details of how to use the workforce specialist service are available to her national well—being hub, which can be accessed at www.promis.scot. web your regular health and social service worker and feel that you would benefit from mental health treatment and care, please do find out more. working in the caring professions is stressful at any time, and i know it has been
12:23 pm
especially difficult over the last year. we know that we need to support staff and help them to recover. that is above all a part of our duty of care to our workforce, but it is also essential for health and social services in the months ahead. we need a strong and resilient workforce with time to recover in order to start to resume services that were paused during the pandemic. the new service is an important addition way in which we are trying to help support health care workers and attended to doing so much to help and support all of us. those were the two main issues i wanted to cover today. to close, i wanted to cover today. to close, i want to remind everyone once again have the current rules and guidelines. the most important rule for now remains the same, please stay at home. in any level for area, which is of course all main scotland
12:24 pm
—— mainland scotland, you only leave the house for essential purposes, you cannot meet with other households indoors, if you meet someone outdoors, you can only meet with one other person from one of their household. you must work from home if you possibly can, and employers have a legal duty to support people to work from home. and we have to leave the house, please continue to remember facts. where face coverings when you are likely to come in close contact with other people, avoid anywhere busy, clean hands and services, use two metre distancing if you are talking to someone from another household and self—isolate and book a test if you have symptoms. above all else, please stay at home as much as possible. i know how difficult it is and i really do appreciate your patience and the sacrifices i know you are making. but we need to keep going, this is a promising time, but
12:25 pm
we are not there yet. the past couple of months have seen good progress, but we really don't have any room for error right now. so it is vital that all of us continue to stick with the rules and the guidelines. that is how we make it safe to ease the restrictions more quickly. it is how we continue to protect each other, while vaccination programmes continue. and it is how we continue to protect our nhs and save lives. so thank you once again to all of you who are doing just that. now, once again to all of you who are doingjust that. now, let's once again to all of you who are doing just that. now, let's turn to our journalist who doing just that. now, let's turn to ourjournalist who have to own desk this morning, and the first of those is ross from scottish television. afternoon, you mentioned that the latest _ afternoon, you mentioned that the latestjcvl — afternoon, you mentioned that the latestjcvi recommendation on afternoon, you mentioned that the latest jcvi recommendation on the vaccination programme by age —
12:26 pm
police _ vaccination programme by age — police and — vaccination programme by age — police and teaching unions have been critical, _ police and teaching unions have been critical, asking why they are not front_ critical, asking why they are not front line — critical, asking why they are not front line staff —— asking why front line staff _ front line staff —— asking why front line staff are not being prioritise. and awarding from the bme this morning — and awarding from the bme this morning that the nhs won't recover from the _ morning that the nhs won't recover from the pandemic if senior staff such— from the pandemic if senior staff such as — from the pandemic if senior staff such as consultants cannot be retained~ _ such as consultants cannot be retained. it is enough being done to support— retained. it is enough being done to support staff and protect them from possible _ support staff and protect them from possible burn—out? support staff and protect them from possible burn-out?— possible burn-out? thank you very much, to important _ possible burn-out? thank you very much, to important questions. - possible burn-out? thank you very much, to important questions. i i possible burn-out? thank you very. much, to important questions. i will say a little bit aboutjcvi, but i will askjason to say more on why some of our professions and our sectoral groups may be disappointed at noswaith dda's advice. they are crystal clear about where the greatest risk factors i —— might be disappointed jcvi's advice. it is not rely on where you work, but how old he worked, as well as if you have underlying health condition or
12:27 pm
are clinically extremely vulnerable. we are working through those groups. it is the right thing for this government, and indeed the other governments of the uk, to follow that clinical advice. that wealth —— well thought through advice, it makes sense logistically and it makes sense logistically and it makes sense. it is straightforward for us to identify people on the basis of their age through our nhs scotland highly secure and protected records. much more difficult to go through those records and pull out who is a teacher, who works for the police force, who does something else. that takes longer, and of course, you will remember that what jcvi have also said from the very start is go as quickly as you can, as quickly as supplies allow, to maximise the vaccination of the largest number of the adult
12:28 pm
population as fast as you can. so if you take those two together, it makes real sense for the protection of all of us that we followjcvi advice. on your second point about what the bme have said, i completely appreciate the bma's point, i regularly discussed with them here in scotland they are part of the mobilisation recovery group that i chair, at that has been going for some time, as well as talking to our colleges about their particular concerns. and all of that has been about how do we retain expertise and experience at every level of the health and social care workforce. so there is a great deal of work under way, but as i indicated in my opening statement, i am very conscious that a large group of our
12:29 pm
health and social care workforce have been working under significant pressure for 12 months now. and we need to be able, as we plan the recovery of the nhs, for non—c—mac health care, we need to be able to get them time —— non—c—mac, so that is what all the planning is in hand, work is under way that will be at the end of this month, that mobilisation recovery group, the bma is important member of, they will look at these matters in early march and we will be setting out our plans as a government about how i hope, because of all the work everyone is doing, we are able to turn down the dial of it and how the nhs has to deal with covid related health care and turn up the dial. but not at an
12:30 pm
equal level on how we slowly begin to bring back her health service for all non—covid health care, making sure we have a resilient work first. so the jcvi sure we have a resilient work first. so thejcvi press conference, i so the jcvi press conference, i don't _ so the jcvi press conference, i don't know if you watched it, was very clear. — don't know if you watched it, was very clear, and they have taken weeks — very clear, and they have taken weeks to— very clear, and they have taken weeks to make this decision and that is because _ weeks to make this decision and that is because they've examined all the evidence _ is because they've examined all the evidence available. occupation, sex, a-e, evidence available. occupation, sex, age. all— evidence available. occupation, sex, age, all other variables that they could _ age, all other variables that they could possibly think of to give us a better— could possibly think of to give us a better bicycle. they've done that for 30 _ better bicycle. they've done that for 30 years, we have never departed from their— for 30 years, we have never departed from their advice and 30 years. they have said _ from their advice and 30 years. they have said today that those at highest — have said today that those at highest risk of hospitalisation outside — highest risk of hospitalisation outside of cohorts one are those aged _ outside of cohorts one are those aged 40- — outside of cohorts one are those aged 40— and vaccinated individuals at an— aged 40— and vaccinated individuals at an increased risk because of their— at an increased risk because of their occupation or sex or background are likely to be
12:31 pm
vaccinated most rapidly by a simple vaccine _ vaccinated most rapidly by a simple vaccine strategy. the question is do you do— vaccine strategy. the question is do you do prioritise a 49—year—old in order— you do prioritise a 49—year—old in order to _ you do prioritise a 49—year—old in order to vaccinate a 20—year—old who happens _ order to vaccinate a 20—year—old who happens to _ order to vaccinate a 20—year—old who happens to be in a profession? the w happens to be in a profession? the jcvi say— happens to be in a profession? the jcvi say they have looked at all of the evidence and they have decided the evidence and they have decided the safest _ the evidence and they have decided the safest risk—based, quickest way to do— the safest risk—based, quickest way to do this _ the safest risk—based, quickest way to do this is — the safest risk—based, quickest way to do this is by age on the way down — to do this is by age on the way down and _ to do this is by age on the way down. and that will be disappointing in some _ down. and that will be disappointing in some professions. remember, my final point— in some professions. remember, my final point is— in some professions. remember, my final point is that health and social— final point is that health and social care workers have an occupational exemption, not because of who— occupational exemption, not because of who they _ occupational exemption, not because of who they are, but because of who they look _ of who they are, but because of who they look after. so if you are a 26—year—old nurse in an intensive care _ 26—year—old nurse in an intensive care unit, — 26—year—old nurse in an intensive care unit, you would've been vaccinated because of the 85—year—olds in intensive care, not because _ 85—year—olds in intensive care, not because of— 85—year—olds in intensive care, not because of your risk. it is about the risk— because of your risk. it is about the risk of— because of your risk. it is about the risk of those you are looking after. _ the risk of those you are looking after, multiple elderly and high—risk individuals in the health and social— high—risk individuals in the health and social care system. so the joint committee — and social care system. so the joint committee has been crystal clear this morning and have decided and we
12:32 pm
have decided to accept it. thank ou, have decided to accept it. thank you. david _ have decided to accept it. thank you, david henderson _ have decided to accept it. thank you, david henderson from - have decided to accept it. thank| you, david henderson from bbc. have decided to accept it. thank - you, david henderson from bbc. you aren't obliged to take that advice, of course — aren't obliged to take that advice, of course. there are teachers, shop workers _ of course. there are teachers, shop workers and — of course. there are teachers, shop workers and police officers who are clearly _ workers and police officers who are clearly at _ workers and police officers who are clearly at higher risk than the rest of the _ clearly at higher risk than the rest of the population and they are easy to identify— of the population and they are easy to identify so they are wondering why they— to identify so they are wondering why they can't be prioritised? is it really— why they can't be prioritised? is it really beyond the powers of the nhs to find _ really beyond the powers of the nhs to find these people in schools, police _ to find these people in schools, police stations and get into the front _ police stations and get into the front of— police stations and get into the front of the queue? so, police stations and get into the front of the queue?— police stations and get into the front of the queue? so, thanks very much, front of the queue? so, thanks very much. david. _ front of the queue? so, thanks very much, david, i'm— front of the queue? so, thanks very much, david, i'm going _ front of the queue? so, thanks very much, david, i'm going to - front of the queue? so, thanks very much, david, i'm going to return i front of the queue? so, thanks very much, david, i'm going to return to| much, david, i'm going to return to jason on this but let me say a few things about it. in 30 years, no government in scotland has gone against the advice of the jcb government in scotland has gone against the advice of thejcb i and there is a really good reason to that. this is clinical expert advice who trawl through the data with
12:33 pm
people who had dedicated their lives to understand how vaccines and vaccination programmes work. i do not think it would be justifiable, proportionate or wise for this government to go against and cast aside the advice from that group of people. secondly, it isn't the case as the jcb i people. secondly, it isn't the case as thejcb i has said that anyone is at higher risk of theirjob, they are at higher risk above all because of their age and it's not beyond the wit of nhs scotland. we have one of the best, safe and secure records and systems, it's not beyond our wit to trawl through that but if you stop and think about this, it is easy to ask the system to pull out for me everyone with an nhs scotland
12:34 pm
record between ages 40—49 and the system can pull that out. then you can say would you like to see in that record anything that tells you whether they are a police officer, teacher or a worker in the power industry. think about what that then requires the system to do. the system could probably do it but by the time it's done that, we would have vaccine 80 days 40—49 —year—olds. .. have vaccine 80 days 40-49 -year-olds. . .— have vaccine 80 days 40-49 - ear-olds... ~ ., ., , ., -year-olds. .. we now going straight over to holyrood _ -year-olds. .. we now going straight over to holyrood where _ -year-olds. .. we now going straight over to holyrood where alex - -year-olds. .. we now going straight over to holyrood where alex alex i over to holyrood where alex alex salmond is talking to mps.... you salmond is talking to mps. . .. you are under— salmond is talking to mps.... gm. are under examination. my interest
12:35 pm
in assisting this enquiry is out of respect for our parliament. i have made no personal public comment on these matters of any kind for 11 months, not one single television interview, or press statement. i have turned down hundreds of such offers which the committee members know has not been hitherto my policy. i've been silent while this committee has been systematically deprived of the evidence it has sought. in fact, deprived of the evidence it has sought. infact, i'm i'm your only witness trying to present evidence instead of withholding it. we saw this week, it was published and then published by intervention of a crown office he should not be questioning the will of parliament. i watched in astonishment on wednesday when the first minister of scotland, the first minister of scotland, the first minister of scotland, the first minister of scotland, used a
12:36 pm
coronavirus press conference to effectively question the result of the jury. effectively question the result of thejury. still, isaid nothing. well, today, that changes. i have no incentive or advantage in revisiting the hurt and shock of the last three years from a personal perspective or from the perspective of two complainants failed by the government and enforced against the express wishes into women or process. this now admitted action neither serves the complaints nor serves justice. neither serves the complaints nor servesjustice. the neither serves the complaints nor serves justice. the two years and six months this has been a nightmare. in fact, six months this has been a nightmare. infact, i've six months this has been a nightmare. in fact, i've every desire to move on, to turn the page, to risk talking about yet again these events that are winding, some of the most any person can face. but we cannot turn that page, nor move on until this system undermining the
12:37 pm
government is addressed. the civil service matters, the independence of the crown office matters in the public interest. acting in accordance with legal advice matters. concealing evidence from the courts matters. the duty of candour of public authorities matter. democratic accountability through parliament matters. suppressing evidence from parliamentary committees matters and, yes, ministers are telling the truth to parliament matters. the day these do not matter would be a dark day for scotland. these events shine a light on a government whose actions are no longer a true to accountability, transparency which are the core principles on which the scottish parliament was founded. i
12:38 pm
remember. i was there. failures of leadership on many an obvious and yet, convenor, not one single person has taken responsibility, not one single resignation or sacking, not even admission. instead, we've had promotions, extensions of contract and self—serving defences. the government acted illegally but somehow, nobody is to blame. they delayed instruction of making evidence available. witness after witness later adjusting evidence delivered under oath. were it not for the independence of the judiciary, the robust scrutiny of the court of session and the common—sense of thejury the court of session and the common—sense of the jury made up of members of the public, the matters of this committee would never have come to light. the scottish courts
12:39 pm
emerge from these events with a reputation enhanced. can those leading the government and crown office say the same? some people say that the failures of these institutions, the blurring of the boundaries between party, government and prosecution service means that scotland is in danger of becoming a failed state. i disagree. the scottish civil service has not failed. its leadership has failed. the crown office has not failed. it leadership has failed. scotland has not failed. it leadership has failed. so the importance of this enquiries to put this right. my final point is simply this, i'm a private citizen. unlike, everyone represented in this enquiry, i've had to pay my own legal fees. the
12:40 pm
government spent £600,000 defending an illegal policy before collapsing judicial review and public time and money has been shot pattern is undeniable. the government refused to hand over documentation in the civil case. it required a commission to extract it from. the permanent secretary was brought to give evidence under oath just to extract documents that she had a duty to provide to the courts. the government ignored the provisions of the search warrant in the criminal case and despite the impact on the administration ofjustice still withheld key documents which should have been put before the jury. this committee has been blocked and tackled at every turn by calculated and deliberate suppression of key evidence. even parliament, our
12:41 pm
scottish parliament, has been defied, despite two votes demanding legal advice the public had paid for. my evidence has been published and then subsequently censured by the crown office. and even today, i appear before you under the request of prosecution... not to tell the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the trains could be content. the crown office eight could be... the ability of any witness before parliament to tell the truth and who fulfil the oath is effectively being questioned by the crown office. the truth is that those who demand to
12:42 pm
see evidence have invested a great dinner public money in attempting to hide that evidence. when this enquiry ends, neutered though it may be, i will consider that i had discharged my duties as citizen and former first minister and then it will be up to others to consider their own positions in light of what this committee decides. this enquiry, in my opinion, is a chance to assert what type of scotland we are trying to create. we want a better country for achieving our parliament. the move to independence which i have sought all my political life and continue to seek must be accompanied by inch to tuitions that are strong, capable and robust against citizens —— for citizens...
12:43 pm
it is the bedrock of our democracy, of justice and fairness. it is the bedrock of our democracy, ofjustice and fairness. thank you. thank you, mr salmon. can i also thank you thank you, mr salmond. the committee has agreed that we will pursue that evidence session in that manner. i am interested to read your evidence heard, about fairness at work and your policy. can you tell us how this came about. also in relation to the trade unions, and some of the evidence we've taken from the fda about informal solutions that were used to correct
12:44 pm
potential problems. can you tells more about that!— more about that! thank you, convener- — more about that! thank you, convener- i _ more about that! thank you, convener. i will— more about that! thank you, convener. i will turn - more about that! thank you, convener. i will turn to - more about that! thank you, convener. i will turn to your| convener. i will turn to your question in a second. but, as we agreed, i am question in a second. but, as we agreed, iam required question in a second. but, as we agreed, i am required to explain to those watching under legal advice to read out a short legal statement. i have two constraints placed upon me by the crown office. first under an orderfor by the crown office. first under an order for contempt by the crown office. first under an orderfor contempt of by the crown office. first under an order for contempt of court act 1981, the intervention of the crown take crowd of ——... they would like to meet in march and april which have a direct bearing on the events being examined by this committee. the evidence will not now be heard fully today in this parliament, despite being freely available online elsewhere. in my estimation, that's very damaging for the work of this committee and for a public
12:45 pm
seeking answers. it is an intervention which has drawn widespread criticism, including i note this morning, from lord hope, president of the court of session. secondly, in relation to the blocking of evidence from this committee, i would draw attention to this committee of the decision by the crown office demonstrating the conduct of key individuals in this enquiry under reference the section 162 the criminaljustice and licensing at scotland, 2010. this provision, and i know this because i was first minister when it was introduced, was not passed by the parliament to prevent parliamentary inquiries getting to the truth of the matter is the utmost public interest. it was being misused in its current context and the application of these provisions... excuse me convener, the application of these provisions and the threat of these provisions and the threat of prosecution made me if i offer that evidence, is my estimation both
12:46 pm
extraordinary and unwarranted. yes, i was involved in the origins of the fairness to work policy. it emerged over a period of 18 months. it involves detailed discussions over that period of time. it was a well considered, develop policy. it was original in its concept and the first in which public administration in these islands which brought ministers into effectively the same policy and civil servants and it was finally passed, i think, in the summer of 2010. i finally passed, i think, in the summer of 2010.— finally passed, i think, in the summer of 2010. i wonder if you could talk— summer of 2010. i wonder if you could talk about _ summer of 2010. i wonder if you could talk about how— summer of 2010. i wonder if you could talk about how it - summer of 2010. i wonder if you could talk about how it came - summer of 2010. i wonder if you i could talk about how it came about and in relation to the trade union involvement in some of the concerns that you had in your evidence that the fda had raised about the lack of
12:47 pm
i expected and supplied for the committee admitted of the partnership board from the 23rd of november 2000 and nine, partnership board from the 23rd of november2000 and nine, not expressive very well because that is submitted that the unions are expressing concerns that they are made over a number of years, from the minute is available to the committee, which goes right back to the origins of the scottish government, the scottish executive, the former scottish office, going back 20 years and more. and they had expressed concern about ministerial offices in particular, the behaviour offices in particular, the behaviour of a number of ministers, the concern in particular was the idea that civil servants working in the ministerial offices, that private sector, were working probably harder and longer than anyone else in the
12:48 pm
civil service. and i think that was the major contention. the aim and purpose of the unions, as it was explained to me, was the brain ministers into effectively the same policy as civil service. and therefore, ministers were added to therefore, ministers were added to the policy, which became famous at work. and it was passed in 2010. i can answer in more detail if you would like. can answer in more detail if you would like-— would like. thank you, i think maruaret would like. thank you, i think margaret mitchell— would like. thank you, i think margaret mitchell has - would like. thank you, i think i margaret mitchell has questions would like. thank you, i think - margaret mitchell has questions as well. , ., ., margaret mitchell has questions as well. ,., ., ., ., ., margaret mitchell has questions as well. . �* ., ., ., well. good afternoon. before i go on to hase well. good afternoon. before i go on to phase one. _ well. good afternoon. before i go on to phase one. i'm — well. good afternoon. before i go on to phase one, i'm very _ well. good afternoon. before i go on to phase one, i'm very conscious - well. good afternoon. before i go on to phase one, i'm very conscious of. to phase one, i'm very conscious of what _ to phase one, i'm very conscious of what you've — to phase one, i'm very conscious of what you've said. you are here as a key witness, — what you've said. you are here as a key witness, having been the first minister— key witness, having been the first minister from 2008—2014, and in the judicial— minister from 2008—2014, and in the judicial review which was found, as he said. _ judicial review which was found, as he said. to — judicial review which was found, as he said, to be unlawful. and you also _ he said, to be unlawful. and you also mentioned the frustration that
12:49 pm
this parliamentary committee, as an inquiry— this parliamentary committee, as an inquiry committee, has experienced sometimes — inquiry committee, has experienced sometimes downright refusal and other— sometimes downright refusal and other times providing material, which _ other times providing material, which way— other times providing material, which way back when we met in private — which way back when we met in private which would be to establish our remit, — private which would be to establish our remit, which would be now. decide — our remit, which would be now. decide doing that to make sure that what we _ decide doing that to make sure that what we could make it public, we would _ what we could make it public, we would be — what we could make it public, we would be hitting the ground running. semi question is to you, and i understand and agree entirely that democratic accountability and this parliament's ability to hold any government of the day to account, if it feels— government of the day to account, if it feels it _ government of the day to account, if it feels it has acted unlawfully, if it feels it has acted unlawfully, if it feels— it feels it has acted unlawfully, if it feels it — it feels it has acted unlawfully, if it feels it has acted unlawfully, if it feels it has abused its power, or if it is— it feels it has abused its power, or if it is merely so incompetent that it is tantamount to that. you've
12:50 pm
suggested that you think the powers or there _ suggested that you think the powers or there is _ suggested that you think the powers or there is a present government that are — or there is a present government that are not using them properly, so can you _ that are not using them properly, so can you explain to me, where are the powers— can you explain to me, where are the powers that _ can you explain to me, where are the powers that allow us to move forward from the _ powers that allow us to move forward from the position, as again you setting — from the position, as again you setting your opening statement, that the deputy first minister representing the government has refused _ representing the government has refused to issue against the will of parliament, to issue legal advice, external— parliament, to issue legal advice, external legal advice, as you say, paid by— external legal advice, as you say, paid by the — external legal advice, as you say, paid by the taxpayer. and has refused — paid by the taxpayer. and has refused to give us, or been very late in— refused to give us, or been very late in giving us, information that we need — late in giving us, information that we need now. late in giving us, information that we need now-— late in giving us, information that we need now. ~ , ., we need now. well, their number of oints we need now. well, their number of points there- _ we need now. well, their number of points there. first _ we need now. well, their number of points there. first on _ we need now. well, their number of points there. first on the _ points there. first on the institutional point, i think the parliament has the ability to assert itself in opposition at the present moment. it is not for me —— to
12:51 pm
assert itself in the position at the present moment, affecting the conduct of ministers and instructing ministers to do things on pain of further motions. but there are central motions available within the parliament, the question is, is it a parliamentary majority to sustain that. however, icannot parliamentary majority to sustain that. however, i cannot ever think. there is an understandable reason for reluctance to reveal legal advice, as a general rule. but the rules, as drawn up, provide for exceptions in the public interest. and there have been a number of presidents in the past. i think of the contamination inquiry, for example, and although every instance is going to be different, and i think most people judging the current issue would say that after two parliamentary votes, the not legal advice should and must be re—furnished. it may be that something should be written into
12:52 pm
either the ministerial code or, for that matter, into the standing orders of the parliament to make that clear. i am just amazed that you would have to go that far to ensure that is done. the normal assumption would be that ministers would follow a clearly expressed will of the parliament when they are able to do so. will of the parliament when they are able to do so-_ able to do so. that is helpful, but can i ask you _ able to do so. that is helpful, but can i ask you this _ able to do so. that is helpful, but can i ask you this further - able to do so. that is helpful, but i can i ask you this further question? do you _ can i ask you this further question? do you consider that the rebels, or the checks— do you consider that the rebels, or the checks and balances that are in place. _ the checks and balances that are in place. are — the checks and balances that are in place, are robust enough to ensure the proper— place, are robust enough to ensure the proper division of power between the proper division of power between the executive of the day and the parliament of the day holding that executive — parliament of the day holding that executive to account? and the divisions— executive to account? and the divisions of power on the account of people _ divisions of power on the account of people that — divisions of power on the account of people that we are looking at and remit, _ people that we are looking at and remit, the — people that we are looking at and remit, the first minister, the scottish— remit, the first minister, the scottish government, the special advisers. — scottish government, the special advisers, and are independent crown prosecution— advisers, and are independent crown prosecution service, we know in
12:53 pm
england. — prosecution service, we know in england, for example, there is a separate — england, for example, there is a separate director of public prosecution. here the lord advocate has a _ prosecution. here the lord advocate has a dual— prosecution. here the lord advocate has a dual role. so are you convinced _ has a dual role. so are you convinced that the system as it is, decentralised government, which i think— decentralised government, which i think you — decentralised government, which i think you said that you introduce and perhaps regretted —— de—centralized government, and you perhaps— de—centralized government, and you perhaps regretted introducing, —— the centralised government, are you looking _ the centralised government, are you looking at— the centralised government, are you looking at this regardless of whatever kind of government were looking _ whatever kind of government were looking at. — whatever kind of government were looking at, coalition, conservative government, orwhether looking at, coalition, conservative government, or whether it is an snp or some _ government, or whether it is an snp or some other combination? well, government, or whether it is an snp or some other combination?- or some other combination? well, i certainly don't _ or some other combination? well, i certainly don't regret _ or some other combination? well, i certainly don't regret this _ certainly don't regret this institution and my part in bringing it into being, and i still have an ambition under this institution that it would go further towards independence. that is my view. but any institution is going to learn
12:54 pm
lessons from experience. the parliament has changed its procedures over the years and a number of ways. for example, the independent supervision of the ministerial code was something that i introduced, that was a good thing, it was a good thing, but his example of how you can develop your procedures. i have to say i hadn't really contemplated the idea that a government would refuse to obey two parliamentary votes. i canjust about see the argument for saying, or put it to the test again to see if that is the parliament's will, i can just about see that, but two parliamentary votes in terms of the legal advice which the public had paid for, which is parliament dunn pertinent to parliamentary inquiry, is not something —— pertinent to parliamentary inquiry, is not something i would've done. in terms of institutional malice, yes, i think there is an argument for the separating of the government adviser role at the lord advocate as the
12:55 pm
chief prosecutor of scotland. i think there is an argument for that. i sort of made a move towards a when i sort of made a move towards a when i became first minister in that the lord advocate didn't normally attend cabinet, only attended cabinet when he had advice or she had advice to dispense, i think that is a good thing, i am dispense, i think that is a good thing, iam not dispense, i think that is a good thing, i am not certain that has been fully adhered to sense, but that was my practice. perhaps it should go further. my own view that we shouldn't infuse institutional failure —— confuse institutional failure —— confuse institutional failure with personnel. i think the leadership of these institutions have serious questions to answer. and when you get to the stage a government behaves unlawfully, this is not something that happens very often, i am on the record politically when governments have been here and behaved unlawfully, regarding the as a huge and heinous thing to have happened. it is not a slight matter, some consequential should follow from unlawful conduct. thank you for that. note, mr sam
12:56 pm
and, _ thank you for that. note, mr sam and. on _ thank you for that. note, mr sam and, on page three of your submission —— mr examine, you see on this policy— submission —— mr examine, you see on this policy which you seem to be suggesting that isn't as good as it gets _ suggesting that isn't as good as it gets you — suggesting that isn't as good as it gets. you can correct me if that is not a _ gets. you can correct me if that is not a good — gets. you can correct me if that is not a good assumption that there were _ not a good assumption that there were no— not a good assumption that there were no formal complaints against any minister under this policy and it was— any minister under this policy and it was never invoked. can i suggest to you _ it was never invoked. can i suggest to you that— it was never invoked. can i suggest to you that formal complaints under this policy— to you that formal complaints under this policy set quite a high bar? they— this policy set quite a high bar? they had — this policy set quite a high bar? they had to be in writing, and if they— they had to be in writing, and if they were — they had to be in writing, and if they were against, and they clearly were, _ they were against, and they clearly were, we _ they were against, and they clearly were, we know that from the fte reports. — were, we know that from the fte reports, there were a period of time from _ reports, there were a period of time from 2010-2014, reports, there were a period of time from 2010—2014, they had to be put in writing _ from 2010—2014, they had to be put in writing and they had to be against _ in writing and they had to be against someone who was very powerful— against someone who was very powerful as a minister or even a first _ powerful as a minister or even a first minister. and therefore that
12:57 pm
was a _ first minister. and therefore that was a bar— first minister. and therefore that was a bar that perhaps should be looked _ was a bar that perhaps should be looked at. — was a bar that perhaps should be looked at, but we do know, if you could _ looked at, but we do know, if you could just — looked at, but we do know, if you could just put this into your answer as well, _ could just put this into your answer as well, that what was done, barbara allison— as well, that what was done, barbara allison told _ as well, that what was done, barbara allison told us this, the former permanent secretary told us, that they tried — permanent secretary told us, that they tried to resolve any issues, whether— they tried to resolve any issues, whether we're concerns, some people would _ whether we're concerns, some people would call _ whether we're concerns, some people would call complaints, if not formal complaints, and an informal manner. perhaps _ complaints, and an informal manner. perhaps using mediation. i wonder if you could _ perhaps using mediation. i wonder if you could talk to that and just confirm — you could talk to that and just confirm did that work well, wasn't in place. — confirm did that work well, wasn't in place, and then it would be good to know— in place, and then it would be good to know if— in place, and then it would be good to know if so, tell me how that worked — to know if so, tell me how that worked with mac who took the lead? was a _ worked with mac who took the lead? was a director of hr? we know the deputy— was a director of hr? we know the deputy first minister, which she involved? — deputy first minister, which she involved? and we know that you had at the _ involved? and we know that you had at the formal complete stage... gk,
12:58 pm
at the formal complete stage... 0k, can i 'ust at the formal complete stage... 0k, can ijust say — at the formal complete stage... ok can ijust say before fearless at can i just say before fearless at work in 2010 there is no process, personal process —— personnel process for holding ministers to account to be on the receiving end of complaints. that was the amen ambition of the unions. what happened before that, and i should say this example was cited by the unions at the time, with concern that a former previous minister in an administration how it was dealt with... it an administration how it was dealt with... , ., ., with... it is time now to say goodbye — with... it is time now to say goodbye to _ with... it is time now to say goodbye to viewers - with... it is time now to say goodbye to viewers on - with... it is time now to say goodbye to viewers on bbc| with... it is time now to say - goodbye to viewers on bbc two, but you can go on watching the statement by alex salmond on the bbc. there was an issue _ by alex salmond on the bbc. there was an issue with _ by alex salmond on the bbc. there was an issue with that, _ by alex salmond on the bbc. there was an issue with that, and the - was an issue with that, and the issueis was an issue with that, and the issue is that is that there was a statuette base for the ministerial code. and statuette, the prime minister or the first minister has a responsibility for any minister in his or her cabinet. and you cannot
12:59 pm
circumvent these databases at the ministerial code by putting forward a fearless at work policy. so the task was to accommodate the wishes of the union administers in the policy with the statutory basis at the ministerial code. and, listen, i wouldn't say it it is perfect, certainly capable of being revised and developed and improved. i am sure it is, but that hasn't happened. it has been effectively wiped out altogether, which i think is a very wretched beat step. we are now in a situation where, as far —— which i think is a very negative step, and fearless at work still applies to minister. it is far as harassment is concerned, there is effectively no policy because a policy that was developed in 2017 has been the subject of myjudicial review and declared unlawful. so it
1:00 pm
is now in limbo, so that is a totally unsatisfactory situation. and the point that i was making is that it would be an improvement right now to reintroduce fearless work to cover, as a previously did, ministers. i was astonished when the permanent secretary gave evidence of the committee and said she was an expert on fearless work. and said it didn't cover harassment. the first section of what it covers is bullying and harassment. it does cover bullying and harassment and it is important is it moment for the civil service, is important is it moment for the civilservice, it is important is it moment for the civil service, it isjust is important is it moment for the civil service, it is just not enforced as as harassment concerns with ministers. so totally unsatisfactory situation, something that whenever people think about this inquiry or the events of the last few years, should have been sorted out. you cannot have a policy in limbo, but in limbo it must certainly is. i thought it was

18 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on