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tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 27, 2021 4:00pm-4:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines at four... trumpet plays last post. tributes are paid to captain sir tom moore at his funeral — family members say his spirit will live on. the chancellor plans new measures to help people buy their own homes as he prepares his budget for next week. anas sarwar has been announced as the new scottish labour leader. he takes charge of the party ahead of the scottish parliament election on 6th may. ministers in england launch
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a campaign to reassure parents it's safe for children to return to the classroom. festival organisers call on the government for more support to ensure events can take place this summer. hello good afternoon, welcome to bbc news. the funeral of the record—breaking charity fundraiser, captain sir tom moore, has been held in bedford. the 100—year—old came to prominence after raising almost £33 million for nhs charities by walking laps of his garden during the first lockdown. he died earlier this month, days after testing positive for coronavirus. our correspondentjohn maguire has the story.
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they were there by his side when he made his most famous journey, and today, they were with him again as he made his finaljourney. soldiers from the yorkshire regiment, the modern equivalent of captain sir tom moore's wartime unit, paid tribute with full military honours. on the coffin, his medals, including his knighthood, and a specially commissioned officer's sword, on one side, the regimental motto, "fortune favours the brave." on the other, his motto, "tomorrow will be a good day." and in clear blue skies above bedford cemetery, the silence was broken by a fly—past from a wartime dakota. to us, he was a veteran and a record—breaking fundraiser, who walked 100 laps of his back garden to mark his 100th birthday, raising most £40 million for nhs charities in the process, but for his daughters, lucy and hannah, he was first
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and foremost a father. daddy, you would always tell us, "best foot forward," and true to your word, that is just what you did last year. when you raised a fortune for the nhs and walking your way into the nation's hearts. in the last days and hours we had together, you talked with pride about the lasting legacy of hope that people said you had created, brought to life with the foundation in your name. you declared to me and the nursing staff that you had a lot more fundraising in you and that you would be back soon as you felt better. we are all so proud of everything you have achieved and promised to keep your legacy alive. thank you for all the special times we have shared. 0ur relationship cannot be broken by death. you will be with me always. and for his grandchildren, benji and georgia, who have grown up living with their grandad, it was a time to remember cherished moments.
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there is a lesson i have learned from living with you these past 13 years. it is the power of positivity and kindness. i truly do not believe i would be the person i am today without your sound guidance. we are now going to take... and he became a favourite for millions around the world who are inspired by his words and deeds — to walk, to be kind, and to support good causes. # walk on through the winds...# reassuring as all that we would never walk alone. well, i've been speaking tojohn about how captain tom's family wanted today to be a celebration of his life, rather than a sombre occasion. that was definitely the tone that captain sir tom had wanted himself. obviously, the one that his daughters, lucy and hannah, had put into practice, very much putting his wishes into practice and also, what the celebrant who ran
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the service wanted to achieve. that balance between reflection, but also celebration. of course, there is grief, but there is a lot of happiness. what we heard during the funeral, something that perhaps many people had not heard before, was about the man, his first 99 years before captain tom became the legend that we are all so familiar with this year, around the world. the small stories about his cheekiness, about his humanity, his kindness, his humility, how he always looked out for the children, how he would repair their toys when they were broken, or talked about their school days and sports matches. how he would be a guiding light for his adult daughters throughout their lives. a real grounded, traditional yorkshire man, and very proud of his yorkshire roots. i think that really shone through today. it has made me think about why his story has been so huge, travelled right around the world, why he gave interviews to something like 120, 130 countries.
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perhaps it is because of that, people can identify in him, that humility, that humour and that humanity. that really shone through everything that he achieved in the last ten months of his life. john, have the family given any indication of what they hope will be his legacy? a foundation has been set up in his name, the captain tom foundation, quite early on, actually, when the fundraising went from that initial target ofjust £100, to walk a lap of his garden, £1 for every lap. ajoke, really, from his son—in—law to keep him busy and active during lockdown. 0nce those figures are starting to really gather pace with the money raised for nhs charities, to get into the millions and then tens of millions, they realised that they had a unique opportunity to speak
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to the world with all of those interviews that he was doing, so they sat down and they thought and spoke to captain tom of all the things that were important to him. some of the factors in his life, not regrets, but some of the things he realised that a lot more effort needs to be put into to try to rectify them, to make people's lives better. that will be the captain tom foundation, looking at things like dementia, loneliness, helping education. its work will continue and could continue for generations to come. when we think about some of the large charities we know the names of, barnardos, joseph rowntree foundation, for example, perhaps people do not understand who those people were initially, but they know their names now because they are helping so many people every day. let us bring you now the latest covid—19 statistics we have from the uk government. this is obviously of infections and also deaths recorded infections and also deaths recorded in the last 2a hours. we have a
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total of 71131; infections recorded in the 24 total of 71131; infections recorded in the 2a hours to saturday. bf} the 24 hours to saturday. 290 deaths. that _ the 24 hours to saturday. 290 deaths. that is _ the 24 hours to saturday. 290 deaths. that is of _ the 24 hours to saturday. 290 deaths. that is of people who had previously — deaths. that is of people who had previously tested _ deaths. that is of people who had previously tested positive - deaths. that is of people who had previously tested positive for- previously tested positive for covid-19 _ previously tested positive for covid-19 stop _ previously tested positive for covid—19 stop as _ previously tested positive for covid—19 stop as a _ previously tested positive for covid—19 stop as a result - previously tested positive for covid—19 stop as a result of. covid—19 stop as a result of receiving _ covid—19 stop as a result of receiving a _ covid—19 stop as a result of receiving a test _ covid—19 stop as a result of receiving a test result - covid—19 stop as a result of receiving a test result in i covid—19 stop as a result ofl receiving a test result in the covid—19 stop as a result of- receiving a test result in the last 28 days — receiving a test result in the last 28 da s. i ~ receiving a test result in the last 28 da s. j~ , receiving a test result in the last 28das. j~ , ., ., 28 days. -- 28 days prior to their death. those _ 28 days. -- 28 days prior to their death. those deaths _ 28 days. -- 28 days prior to their death. those deaths are - 28 days. -- 28 days prior to their death. those deaths are not - death. those deaths are not necessarily caused by coronavirus, but it is people that had that, so it is the only reliable thing we can get this stage. excess death figures we expect will become clearer for the whole of the pandemic so far and those are the latest figures. 0n those are the latest figures. on sundays, of course, we get a sense of how the week has panned out, and we will bring that to you as soon as we will bring that to you as soon as we get it tomorrow on bbc news. the chancellor, rishi sunak, has warned that the uk has been left "exposed" to increases in the cost of borrowing as a result of the coronavirus pandemic , and says he must level with people
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about the enormous strain on public finances when he announces his second budget this week. 0ur political correspondent, jonathan blake, gave me more details on what to expect on wednesday. some actual words in black—and—white from the chancellor this morning which is rare in the run—up to a budget. but it comes with a pretty heavy hint, i think, that the chancellor is trying to deliver in his interview with the financial times, that he will use the budget on wednesday to at least start to prepare people for how he plans to readdress the balance in the public finances. possibly even take steps towards doing that. the context here is that he has borrowed billions on billions during the pandemic to fund the furlough scheme and other support measures put in place. he's been able to do that relatively cheaply because interest rates are so low, but when he talks about the economy being exposed, what he means is, if interest rates were to go up in the near or medium—term future, then suddenly that debt would become a much more expensive debt and potentially an unsustainable one
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for the government to maintain. he wants to find ways of bringing the burden of debt down and how does he do that? there is pressure from all sides in his own party, never mind anywhere else. there are conservative backbenchers saying that now is not the time to raise taxes, the economy is still fragile, and that we need to keep on investing. then we have kenneth clarke, the former conservative chancellor, now lord clark on the radio this morning saying that he needs to look at income tax, vat, national insurance. but those are things that the tories said in their manifesto in the last election that they would not touch. i do not expect him to go there, it is more likely, it is all speculation at the moment, it is more likely corporation tax and taxes which would perhaps affect businesses a little bit. what you might call tinkering around the edges, rather than big tax bombshells. a warning nevertheless from rishi sunak. i suppose the dilemma is compounding.
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notwithstanding, i suppose, he could come back and say, "look, covid—19 changed everything, we made changes that no one can expect us to keep in the changed circumstances." even if he had said that, the prime minister has said there is no return to austerity. if that means ruling out big spending cuts, then tax rises are the only few have the options left. 0nce having borrowed, if we can't cut the spending, it has got to be taxation at some point. yes, it does have to be, as you say. there are only a couple of ways in which the chancellor can raise money, he can either borrow it or put up taxes. he has borrowed so much money and is uncomfortable with that amount of debt. he will have to look at raising taxes at some point. he may not do it all in this budget, he almost certainly will not, but the longer he leaves it, of course, the closer we get to the next election for the 2024 calendar. and which conservative mp would want to answer on the doorstep for big tax rises in the run—up to that? it's a very tricky balancing act that he has to do. what he's going through clearly is that there is an uncomfortable
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feeling in government about the level of debt that has been built up during the pandemic and sooner or later, all of that spending to keep the economy afloat is going to come at a price. staying with politics... anas sarwar has been announced as the new scottish labour leader. glasgow msp mr sarwar defeated monica lennon, the only other candidate. mr sarwar takes charge of the party ahead of the scottish parliament election, which is scheduled to be held on 6th may. just in the last election, they got 90% of the vote. the next will be held on the 6th of may. —— 19% of the vote. he is the first minority ethnic leader of a major politcal party in the uk. he says his party have a lot to do to rebuild trust with scottish people. i said today, directly to the people of scotland, that i know we have got lots of work to do to rebuild your trust in us, as a political party. i recognise that over recent times, you have not had the scottish labour party
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you deserve, and i'm going to work day and night to give scotland the labour party i believe it needs and i believe it deserves, so we can rebuild our country. you mention the election not far away, and i think going into the election, the focus has got to be and what unites us as a country, rather than what divides us. that is what my politics is all about i want to bring our diverse community together, so we can rebuild the country we love that i think if we focus on what unites us rather than what divides us, we can build a better scotland. it is a very concrete example, as you said, bringing communities together as a long established and well integrated the first, second, now third generation of immigrants into scotland has been. 0bviously, notjust immigrants from other parts of the uk, but from right around the world, like your previous generation like from yourfather�*s generation and so on. what message can you deliver to those many scots who seem to have been won over
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by the argument for independence? at least if the broad thrust of opinion polls is to be believed, certainly the numbers have grown, but there appears to be something of a trend, not just isolated polls. how do you address that? the first thing i would say is on your first point, someone that looks like me, sounds like me from my background, from muslim heritage, being elected as a lead of the biggest political party in the uk, does not say something about me, it says something great about scotland and the scottish people. i want to work with all of them to build a bigger country. 0n the point of independence, i think truly, right now, we should seek to unite our country and to heal the wounds our country has and i do not think nicola sturgeon herself would be advocating for a referendum right now she did not have about healing the wounds on her own political party,
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rather than healing the wounds in our country. what people are worried about right now is keeping safe, when they are going to get the vaccine, their child's education and mental health, cancer operations and diagnosis, the screening, the planet they are going to leave their children, other grandchildren due to the climate change. all of these things, whether they will have a job to go back to after we come through covid—19, these are all the things i think people are worried about right now. i want our politicians to work together to address those priorities of the people, so that we can have what i would advocate, a covid—19 recovery parliament over the next five years. anas sarwar are talking to me in the last hour on. bbc news. nine new cases of covid—19 have been detected in the isle of man — four weeks after the government there lifted all social distancing restrictions. the public are now being advised to take precautions including avoiding household mixing, staying home where possible, and not to visit a health or care setting unless absolutely necessary. those who tested positive are already self—isolating. ministers in england have launched a campaign to reassure parents it's safe for children to return to the classroom. the back—to—school adverts will highlight extra measures, such as testing and masks,
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being introduced ahead of schools reopening fully on 8th march in england, which is a week on monday. 0ur correspondent, jon donnison, has the details. these are some of the reasons the government in england think it's important to get young people back to school. teachers�* unions, though, are urging caution. our view is that it is the right time to go back into school. we would have had a phased return because that is what we see in wales, in northern ireland and in scotland. we haven't really seen the evidence for why it's so different in england. 0n the other hand, this is all about managing risks. and the risks of children not being in school are very significant as well. so, yes, it is the right time, but let's be realistic and recognise that it must be done with a real sense of honesty and of caution. and the unions are unhappy that the government has rejected the idea of prioritising teachers for vaccinations. instead, age will continue to be the main factor driving
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the vaccination timetable. the government has pledged to offer the vaccine to everyone over 50, as well as those in specific at—risk groups, by mid april. it will then work down through the age groups, starting with those aged 40—49, then 30—39, and finally 18—29 — aiming that all adults should have been offered at least a firstjab by the end ofjuly. but despite the rapid progress on jabs, at the latest downing street briefing, a warning not to become complacent. it's a bit like being 3—0 up in a game and thinking, "well, we can't possibly lose this now." but how many times have you seen the other side take it 4—3? do not wreck this now. it is too early to relax. and as we head towards spring, although cases are continuing to fall on a national level, in one in five local council areas, infections have actually started to slightly rise again.
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jon donnison, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... tributes are paid to captain sir tom moore at his funeral — family members say his spirit will live on. the chancellor plans new measures to help people buy their own homes as he prepares his budget for next week. anas sarwar has been announced as the new scottish labour leader. he takes charge of the party ahead of the scottish parliament election on 6th of may. those of the headlines at 4:18 p m. let's have a look at the sport. not long until the —— not long until dietz bought a of wales are trying to take the triple crown, but ireland's match against italy has just finished and they have
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dominated. it tookjust 11 minutes before gary ian rose to score the first of their six tries in a four to 810 when in rome. hugo keenan raced through to score the second while the bonus points were scored by the forwards with will connors crossing over twice to earn ireland their first win of the's tournament. italy have now gone six years without a victory. bristol bears are still top of the premiership with a win over leicester tigers. premiership with a win over leicestertigers. both premiership with a win over leicester tigers. both tries came in the first—half, second—tier from a centre peer 0'connor, leicester are down in eighth place. scallop's hopes of reaching next season's premiership the win over edinburgh, david black and's date breakaway try that the welsh side in front in the second half. they will need to beat bolton before holding off a spirited comeback for edinburgh. can anyone catch manchester city? it is another
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winner for the league leaders as victory over west ham in the lunchtime kick—off goes from john stone having put the 13 points between them and that nearest bitter rivals manchester united. i will correspond a response. for manchester city, the numbers are extraordinary. they are 13 points clear and have 120 in a row. every goal takes them closer to the title and two records. —— 20 in a row. it came across from kevin 0'brien who may be the world's best part of the ball. this one made it easy for even ruben diaz to score and he was a defender. in a sexy in six years at west ham, antonio has played all over the pitch, but now as a striker, he is on the right place. this equaliser was the first goal city had let nps in december. for a while, theirfinishing absence, while, their finishing absence, sergio while, theirfinishing absence, sergio aguero got a first start in a few months, but looked out of practice. instead, his side looked elsewhere and once again, the centre
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back came forward. england'sjohn stone is having his best ever season, and keep goals out and has now scored for himself. west ham came close to a late response, but city now is on a run being watched around the world. bayern munich got 23 straight wins last season and it is thought the world record is 24. for now, it is not about you can catch them, but how far they can go. drama and some confusion at the hawthorns. west brom is a player gets rated. they were 1—0 up after 15 minutes. pascal then missed a penalty to chance the equaliser. they then thought they had scored from a free kick outside the box. but it was bizarrely disallowed because the referee said he had not blown the whistle before the kick was taken. very strange scenes there at the hawthorns. leeds veins as the let villa later while leeds take on wolves. and some fixtures in the
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scottish premiership under way, celtic versus aberdeen. this is their first match without neil lennonin their first match without neil lennon in charge after his resignation and it is still 1—0 two cells in —— celtic after 60 minutes. manager is in the dugout at celtic park. watford have missed out on the chance of moving into the championships automatic promotion places after losing one nil at bournemouth. arnold scored the only game in the second half to give bournemouth the when. there were ugly scenes as a full time with both teams finishing the game with ten men. he was kicked out atjefferson lerma and in the after mac martha, jack welch was shown a second yellow card for his part in the melee. tour de france champion who writes for team united emirates has beaten british�*s adam yates. yates began
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the day in second place, after winning last year, but this crash were 24 miles to go jeopardise his possession. however, he managed to finish mainly and safely in the central bunch. keenan built to built the stage seven. nothing for archer who confirmed the victory in his home race. more details on all those stories on the bbc sport website, but that is all from now. the latest vaccination figures which the government data has been provided in the last few minutes. it runs up until the end of friday and it shows thatjust until the end of friday and it shows that just over until the end of friday and it shows thatjust over now 20 million 450,858 first doses have been given as the dab ofjazz in the uk. —— 20,450,858. that is a rise in the previous day, so that is probably what on was from reported on friday.
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of those, the majority are faced of those, the majority are faced doses. that was the first doses, the 5004000, and so there are also 32,773 second doses given to some people. there arose —— those are the latest figures, something approaching 20.5 million injections having been given of one of the authorised coronavirus vaccine. the us house of representatives has voted to pass presidentjoe biden�*s 1.9 trillion dollar coronavirus aid bill. the republicans — who say it is too expensive — had fought to get it defeated in committees before it reached the house floor. 0f of course, the democrats have the floor. the president calls it his american rescue plan. it would pay for vaccines and medical supplies and send a new round of emergency financial aid to households, small businesses and state and local governments.
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at the top of that hour, president biden gave these remarks in the white house, saying that the bill meant that the country was one step closer to recovering from the end pact of the pandemic. —— impact of the pandemic. has pact of the pandemic. -- impact of the pandemic— pact of the pandemic. -- impact of the pandemic. has made it clear that the pandemic. has made it clear that they support — the pandemic. has made it clear that they support my _ the pandemic. has made it clear that they support my american _ the pandemic. has made it clear that they support my american plan. - the pandemic. has made it clear that they support my american plan. in i they support my american plan. in they support my american plan. in the house of representatives, they took the first steps to making a reality. i want to thankjust a few moments, nancy pelosi for extraordinary leadership and all those who supported our plan. with their vote, we are one step closer to vaccinating the nation, we are one step closer to putting $1400 in the pockets of americans, and we are one step closer to extending and employment benefits for millions of americans who are sure they would lose them. one step closer to helping millions of americans feed theirfamilies and keep helping millions of americans feed their families and keep a roof over their families and keep a roof over their head. 0ne their families and keep a roof over their head. one step closer to getting our kids safely back in school. 0ne getting our kids safely back in school. one step closer to getting
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state and local government that money they need to prevent massive lay—offs for essential workers. now the mood in the united states senate will receive quick action. we have no time to waste. if we act now, decisively, quickly and boldly, we can finally get ahead of this virus, we can finally get our economy moving again. the people of this economy have suffered far too much for too long. we need to relieve that suffering. the american rescue plan does just that. it relieves the suffering. it is time to act. think you for being here. that suffering. it is time to act. think you for being here.— you for being here. that was president — you for being here. that was president white _ you for being here. that was president white house - you for being here. that was president white house after| you for being here. that was i president white house after his covid relief bill was confirmed. police in exeter say preparations are under way for the controlled explosion of a suspected second world war bomb found in the city. thousands of people in the area have had to leave their homes. it is just as a precaution.
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0fficers hope the work will be finished by the end of the day. now, let's take a look at the weather prospects. looking fine and settled thanks to the weather front affecting parts of the weather front affecting parts of the country today. great skies for parts of scotland and northern ireland with the best, and some drizzle. a huge contrast further south, england and wales is mostly bright with plenty of sunshine. after the chilly start, some stronger sunshine is getting through, so it will feel quite mild out there. similarly over the last few days, dry with some cloud and sunshine and night—time temperatures are chilly. that is different over the northern temperatures as we move through the second part the day. high—pressure moves across the board. we have a little bit of cloud across scotland and northern ireland, that weather front is there, mostly clear skies. ireland, that weather front is there, mostly clearskies. so ireland, that weather front is there, mostly clear skies. so mcleod
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could perhaps move across into east anglia and eastern england for the end of the night. the clear sky is chilly with pockets of frost. a bit less code for scotland and northern ireland because a bit more cloud is there. the high pressure is with us as we move into part two of the weekend, the weather front is lost as well in northern areas, so after some cloud starts to break up across scotland and northern ireland, it should be a sunny day through sunday. england and wales, plenty of sunshine after a clear chilly frosty start, a bit more affecting eastern india, so temperatures could be a bit lower, 6—7. some sunshine and 10-12 bit lower, 6—7. some sunshine and 10—12 or bit lower, 6—7. some sunshine and 10-12 or 13 bit lower, 6—7. some sunshine and 10—12 or 13 degrees will be the highest. as we go through sunday evening and night, it looks like we could see some more substantial mid mist and cloud coming across the north sea through the night, fort worth further north, scotland and northern ireland should season claim spells, but it will be cold and a touch of frost. there will be more in the way of cloud in the south and
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east. we start many places off on monday morning like this, rather grey with is merck. at least it is mainly dry. if i run the pressure chart on monday and tuesday, you can see high—pressure dominating. this weather front mayjust move forward and affects some parts of the countryjust and affects some parts of the country just to and affects some parts of the countryjust to bring a few showers. i think the most of this week upcoming is going to be dry, with the high pressure. some sunshine and in northern and western areas, but a bit chilly by the end of the week. for all. hello, you're watching bbc news. the headlines. tributes have been played to captors a tonne more as his funeral service this lunchtime. family members say his spirit will live on. the chancellor plans new measures to help people buy their own homes as he prepares his budget for next week.
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anas sarwar has been announced as the new scottish labour leader. he takes charge of the party ahead of the scottish parliament election less tha n less than ten weeks ahead of the elections on the 6th of may. ministers in england launch a campaign to reassure parents it's safe for children to return to the classroom. festival organisers call on the government for more support to ensure events can take place this summer. now on bbc news, the media show. a spat between the australian government and facebook resulted in the silicon valley giant blocking every news organisation from their platform in australia. but what does this display of might from facebook mean for other countries preparing to take on big tech? plus the boss of new station boom radio on whether niche, age—based services are the future of radio.

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