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tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 28, 2021 5:00pm-6:00pm GMT

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this is bbc news, the headlines at 5: plans for a £5 billion grant scheme in england for high street businesses hit by covid—19, as the chancellor says he'll continue to protect people through the pandemic. it's difficult out there for many of these businesses. they've been brilliant at trying to adapt. we want to support them as they reopen and i want people to be reassured that we will have support in place to help them move along the prime minister's they've been brilliant at trying to adapt. road map as we move forward on that path. more than 20 million people in the uk have now received their first dose of a coronavirus vaccine. free rapid covid tests to be offered to families in england as children go back to school. gunfire the bloodiest day
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of the military coup in myanmar — the un says security forces have shot dead at least 18 protesters. and the coronation street actorjohnny briggs, who played mike baldwin in the itv soap, has died at the age of 85. good afternoon. the chancellor rishi sunak says people should be reassured by his plans in this week's budget. mr sunak said he would continue to support families and businesses hit by coronavirus, but wanted to level with people that more challenging times could lie ahead as we emerge from the pandemic. he also announced a £5 billion grant scheme, to help pubs, restaurants, shops, and other businesses
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in england to re—open. here's our political correspondentjonathan blake. closed for business and struggling to survive, but some comfort for companies hit hard by the pandemic as the government offers £5 billion worth of grants part, the chancellor says, of his promise to do whatever it takes to keep the economy going. and ahead of the budget a signal that he'll keep spending to offer that support for now. my priority is to keep supporting british families, businesses and people through this crisis. i said at the beginning i would do whatever it took to do exactly that and i remain committed to that. borrow, borrow, borrow? the right thing to do right now is to support the economy, but i also want to level with people about the challenges we face. coronavirus has been an enormous shock both to our economy and to our public finances and i think it is right to be honest with people about that challenge and be clear about what our plan to address that is. so at some point tax
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rises seem likely. company profits could take a hit if corporation tax were to go up and it is reported income tax thresholds may be frozen, meaning more people pay a higher rate. too soon, say labour, who claim the chancellor has got an eye on the next election. when we talk to businesses right across the country, as i have, what they are really concerned about is confidence. they don't want to see a chancellor who is focused on politics, who is focused on getting any changes through right now so he can wash his hands of them before the next general election. instead they want that focus on jobs and businesses and sadly that is not what we have seen from this chancellor. mr sunak denied telling tory mps he'd rather raise taxes now and be able to cut them later. i don't recognise that and i think given the shock that we've had over the last year and the economic uncertainty we face, it would be brave for people to know exactly what was going to happen in three years.
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the chancellor is clearly uncomfortable with the level of debt built up over the last year, but even talking about tax rises to try to reduce the burden of all that borrowing makes many conservative mps uneasy. so rishi sunak will have to balance their concerns with his desire to maintain a reputation for managing the economy responsibly. with the worst of the pandemic hopefully over, decisions by the chancellor in wednesday's budget will shape its lasting impact on the country's finances and our own. jonathan blake, bbc news. joining me now to discuss rishi sunak�*s plans is helen thomas, a financial consultant and former adviser to george osborne. thank you forjoining us. when you work to the george osborne, he was always focusing on a budget surplus. my always focusing on a budget surplus. my goodness, those days seem a long time ago now. what do you think the chancellor should be trying to
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achieve on wednesday, in terms of balancing the economics and the politics? balancing the economics and the olitics? ~ ., _, , ., politics? well, of course, we are in a completely _ politics? well, of course, we are in a completely different _ politics? well, of course, we are in a completely different world - politics? well, of course, we are in a completely different world from | a completely different world from anything we have seen in the last ten years. even in the last century. so this is quite a time for the chancellor to stand up and announce what he's going to do next week, when we are actually still in the thick of all of this. we have got to the beginning of the end, making progress on the vaccinations, but it's not clear of course what shape the economy will be in when we get through into the second half of the year. through into the second half of the ear. ., , ., year. how should he levelwith --eole? year. how should he levelwith peeple? i _ year. how should he levelwith people? i think _ year. how should he levelwith people? i think everyone - year. how should he level with | people? i think everyone knows that this e e people? i think everyone knows that this eye watering _ people? i think everyone knows that this eye watering level _ people? i think everyone knows that this eye watering level of _ people? i think everyone knows that this eye watering level of debt - people? i think everyone knows that this eye watering level of debt has i this eye watering level of debt has been built up. as you have to do in a kind of national emergency. it's a question or timing, what can the economy withstand? one of the difficulties here, and you heard rishi sunak mentioning there, three
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years until the next election, there could be many more years than back before the economy is really in a good healthy shape looking forward. how worried should he be about rising interest rates?— rising interest rates? well, the office of budgetary _ office of budgetary responsibility, among many others, has already flagged the vulnerability when you have this huge debt, if interest rates rise, the cost of servicing the debt gets pretty nasty. of course on the one hand they have the fact the bank of england are doing quantitative easing, which keeps a lid on bond yields. i5 quantitative easing, which keeps a lid on bond yields.— lid on bond yields. is there a limit to that, though? _ lid on bond yields. is there a limit to that, though? well, _ lid on bond yields. is there a limit to that, though? well, we - lid on bond yields. is there a limit to that, though? well, we are - lid on bond yields. is there a limit to that, though? well, we are in l to that, though? well, we are in uncharted _ to that, though? well, we are in uncharted territory. _ to that, though? well, we are in uncharted territory. you - to that, though? well, we are in uncharted territory. you end - to that, though? well, we are in uncharted territory. you end upl uncharted territory. you end up intentionally with inflation, which can also cause problems. basically, there's only a couple of ways out of
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debt, that is growth or inflation or trying to cut it back somehow. yes, i think everyone is aware that we'll need to be dealt with in the future. but we are still really in the early foothills of this emergency. taxes are auoin foothills of this emergency. taxes are going to _ foothills of this emergency. taxes are going to go — foothills of this emergency. taxes are going to go no. _ foothills of this emergency. taxes are going to go up, aren't - foothills of this emergency. taxes are going to go up, aren't they? l foothills of this emergency. taxes are going to go up, aren't they? i | are going to go up, aren't they? i think people understand that ultimately there will probably be some tax rises one way or the other. so against the tory manifesto of 2019? ~ �* ., ., , , ., ~ so against the tory manifesto of 2019? . �* ., ., , , ., ~ ., 2019? well, i'm not here to speak on behalf of the — 2019? well, i'm not here to speak on behalf of the party. _ 2019? well, i'm not here to speak on behalf of the party. they _ 2019? well, i'm not here to speak on behalf of the party. they made - 2019? well, i'm not here to speak on behalf of the party. they made that l behalf of the party. they made that clear in their manifesto. but the world has changed since then. and there will be an election in the next few years and if people don't like it, they get the chance to vote them out and go for something else. to be fair, the potential we are hearing about reading the level at which people will pay tax, that's very common. it used to happen an awful lot in decades gone by. —— freezing the level. it is a bit
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harsh to consider it a tax rise. it is a classic thing that happens, sometimes the levels don't catch up. in fact, the conservatives raised the point at which people started paying tax over the last few years in the first. he is walking a tightrope, rishi sunak. he is trying to keep the economy going while trying to look at the debt being sustainable in the long—term. it's a very tricky proposition. sustainable in the long-term. it's a very tricky proposition.— very tricky proposition. helen thomas. _ very tricky proposition. helen thomas, thanks _ very tricky proposition. helen thomas, thanks for _ very tricky proposition. helen thomas, thanks forjoining i very tricky proposition. helen i thomas, thanks forjoining us very tricky proposition. helen i thomas, thanks forjoining us on very tricky proposition. helen - thomas, thanks forjoining us on bbc news. the latest uk government figures show that another 6,035 people have tested positive for coronavirus in the latest 2a hour period. that's down from last sunday when 9,834 positive cases were reported. a further 144 people have died within 28 days of a positive coronavirus test in the uk — that's down from 215 deaths, reported this time last week. that number does tend to be lower at the weekend.
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and, as we've been hearing, more than 20 million people have now had their first dose of a coronavirus vaccine. earlier on twitter, the health secretary matt hancock said, "i'm delighted more than 20 million people across the uk have now been vaccinated. a magnificent achievement for the country. the vaccine is our route out. when you get the call, get the jab!" nearly two million people aged 60 to 63 in england are being invited to book a coronavirus vaccine. nhs england says people in that age bracket will start receiving letters explaining how to book a jab. the government is aiming to offer a first dose to all adults by the end ofjuly. twice—weekly rapid coronavirus tests are to be made available to families in england when children return to school. adults working with children, such as bus drivers and after—school club leaders, will also be offered them.
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it's hoped the programme will reduce the chances of cases increasing when pupils return to classrooms on march 8th. our health correspondent naomi grimley reports. if you live with a school—age child in england, get ready to start using these — the 30—minute tests also called lateral flow tests are already used in universities and by key workers. and secondary schools will be supplied with them as they open their doors again. but this latest announcement means all children and anyone who lives with them, as well as people like school bus drivers and carers, will be offered two tests per person each week. health officials hope it will uncover hidden cases of the virus and break the chains of transmission. testing has expanded greatly over the last few months and it is one important component of our battle against coronavirus. if anyone tests positive, they will still need a laboratory—assessed
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test to double—check the result. naomi grimley, bbc news. professor stephen powis is national medical director for nhs england. hejoins us now. vaccination is going well. there was a dip in supplies in the last week but it seems to have picked up a bit. the latest news coming from scotland, i wonder if we can start with that. a new variant, discoveries of three cases of the manaus brazilian variant. in this part of the process going forward, professor, where every week or so we are going to hear of these dangerous variants and it's a question or sitting and waiting and testing to make sure we can stay on top?— can stay on top? yes, this is a new virus for the _ can stay on top? yes, this is a new virus for the human _ can stay on top? yes, this is a new virus for the human population, i can stay on top? yes, this is a newl virus for the human population, and new viruses mutate and adapt when they come into the human population. we expected to see this. we will see
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lots of minor variants occurring, and some well be important. so it's important that we continue to sequence. the good news in the uk is we have a lot of ability to sequence samples and get the mutations and the genetic code. we have good contact tracing in place as well. and the third bit of good news is the new vaccines being used can be adapted very rapidly. so it's likely that if we do need to change the vaccine, it can be done in months rather than years, which was the case with the more traditional vaccines. �* ., . . , case with the more traditional vaccines. �* . .. , _, vaccines. and new vaccines coming onto the market _ vaccines. and new vaccines coming onto the market as _ vaccines. and new vaccines coming onto the market as we _ vaccines. and new vaccines coming onto the market as we speak, i vaccines. and new vaccines coming i onto the market as we speak, johnson onto the market as we speak, johnson &johnson's single—dose vaccine, we have ordered several million in the uk. do we know the split so far between pfizer and oxford astrazeneca, and does that matter bearing in mind they use different technologies? lilo. bearing in mind they use different technologies?— technologies? no, i don't think it does. fundamentally, _ technologies? no, i don't think it does. fundamentally, of- technologies? no, i don't think it does. fundamentally, of course,| technologies? no, i don't think it i does. fundamentally, of course, they use the same genetic code, the same
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bit of the virus. theyjust have different ways of delivering it into the cell. the data we are seeing is they are both highly effective in clinical trials but even more importantly, very effective the setting of patients, millions, we have seen data from scotland, england and israel who have vaccinated a large number of their population. it is notjust cutting down the effects of the disease in terms of getting it, but also effectively cutting down hospitalisation, which is really important. hospitalisation, which is really important-— hospitalisation, which is really imortant. , ., ., ~ important. schools go back a week tomorrow. — important. schools go back a week tomorrow, lateral— important. schools go back a week tomorrow, lateral flow _ important. schools go back a week tomorrow, lateral flow tests i important. schools go back a week tomorrow, lateral flow tests being | tomorrow, lateral flow tests being sent out to families and indeed the wider bubbles as well. is that a tacit admission that the r number bubbly willjump higher than it is perhaps now when schools go back? —— probably willjump. is that an
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assumption? probably will 'ump. is that an assumption?— probably will “ump. is that an assumtion? ., assumption? schools going back increases contact, _ assumption? schools going back increases contact, and _ assumption? schools going back increases contact, and whenever assumption? schools going back i increases contact, and whenever that happens we would expect r to go up a bit, orat least happens we would expect r to go up a bit, or at least not all as much. that's why this is really important to be done in stages and measures are released gradually, looking at the data, all the way. it is why the vaccination programme is so important, that will protect individuals but also allow society to reopen. testing is a key part of that. health care workers, as we heard in your report, have been testing frequently for many months with these devices. and it happens, i have a box here that i use a couple of times a week when i am going into hospitals. it is all these measures together, the social distancing measures as they get relaxed slowly, the testing, it all comes together in the fight against the virus. fin comes together in the fight against the virus. ., ., ., ~ , ., the virus. on that note, thank you very much — the virus. on that note, thank you very much indeed, _ the virus. on that note, thank you very much indeed, professor- the virus. on that note, thank you i very much indeed, professor powis.
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the headlines on bbc news. the chancellor plans a £5 billion support scheme for high street businesses in england hit by the covid—19 pandemic. more than 20 million people in the uk have now received a first dose of the coronavirus vaccine. and rapid covid tests are to be offered to families in england — as children go back to school a week tomorrow. children across the uk are preparing to head back to school in a few days' time, after several months away from classes during lockdown. and experts are warning that the big return could be accompanied by a surge in child mental health cases, due to the pressures of the pandemic. we can talk now to the psychotherapist, lucy beresford. i was reading in the observer today that one in six children, it is believed according to some surveys,
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have mental health issues. how serious is this? it’s have mental health issues. how serious is this? it's unbelievably serious. there _ serious is this? it's unbelievably serious. there was _ serious is this? it's unbelievably serious. there was a _ serious is this? it's unbelievably serious. there was a study i serious is this? it's unbelievably serious. there was a study put l serious. there was a study put out by the nhs before lockdown which spoke of this one in six number. that was before lockdown, and we know that lockdown has exacerbated, all three of them, have exacerbated the demands on young people and the impact that has on their mental health. of course, the story you had just before you spoke to me was about the impact of children going back to school. children don't exist in a vacuum, they will be in homes with televisions on, they will hear their parents talking about the plans being made to get children back to school. in some cases, it will increase tensions that will perhaps provoke anxiety, it will make some children feel incredibly sad orfrightened make some children feel incredibly sad or frightened about the fact they are going to be leaving their parents after having spent an extended period of time with their
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parents. a whole new world of things will open up, wearing masks in the corridor, extra hand sanitiser, and my worry is the government is not thinking far enough ahead about not just how it can help children now but help them going forward in the future. it but help them going forward in the future. , , ., ., future. it seems that eating disorders. _ future. it seems that eating disorders. i _ future. it seems that eating disorders, i was _ future. it seems that eating disorders, i was reading, i future. it seems that eating i disorders, iwas reading, have future. it seems that eating - disorders, i was reading, have gone down slightly. i couldn't work that one out. perhaps you have an answer for that? what is your personal experience of people and the cases you are dealing with about the sort of issues that children are preoccupied with?- of issues that children are preoccupied with? of issues that children are --reoccuied with? ~ , ., preoccupied with? well, there is a wor in: preoccupied with? well, there is a worrying issue _ preoccupied with? well, there is a worrying issue around _ preoccupied with? well, there is a worrying issue around eating i worrying issue around eating disorders, because what happened in the summer was that there was indeed an apparent reduction in people presenting with eating issues. but as soon as the children went back to school in september and october, what the teachers were noticing is there was actually a spike in eating
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disorders. what we are worried about is a similar situation appears to be happening at the moment, in that there has been a reduction in people seeking help pacific people eating disorders, i have to say, because there hasn't been a reduction in people eating help but other mental health issues. —— specific eating disorders. teachers say the state of anxiety that some children may be in, but actually it is another difficulty in the eating disorder category. but no, unfortunately, there has been an increase in the number of children presenting with other issues, sleeplessness, loneliness, depression, anxiety, and all of the charities and many of children's clinics are noticing this increase. in some cases, open door is a charity in london, they have had a 70—75% increase in the number of people getting in touch on the previous year. that is a shocking
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statistic. what i would love to see is notjust things like the children's commissioner, who suggested we need an nhs counsellor in schools may be by 2023. that is not ambitious enough. we need to have these councillors in schools very quickly but we also need to get mental health on the curriculum so children can start learning the warning signs, spotting it in their friends, seeing it in themselves. and teachers feeling better equipped to deal with this topic. lucas to deal with this topic. lucy beresford. _ to deal with this topic. lucy beresford, thank _ to deal with this topic. lucy beresford, thank you i to deal with this topic. lucy beresford, thank you very l to deal with this topic. lucy beresford, thank you very much. police in myanmar have opened fire on protesters in the deadliest day of demonstrations since the february 1st coup. the un human rights office says at least 18 people have been killed. security forces used rubber bullets and live ammunition against demonstrators in at least three cities — yangon, buggo and dawei. the foreign office has condemned the violence as "abhorrent". nyan chan ay reports from yangon, the country's largest city. this is what is happening
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after deadly protests in several places in yangon today. people remain defiant in the ongoing fight for democracy. as you see, here in the central city. people continue to protest and block the main road to prevent the security forces from coming. today, the security forces were actually out early taking position at many protest sites across the city. they tried to contain the protest in small streets and townships, even before anti—coup protesters were being gathered all together. there were reports of shooting in several places, including near the university, the major gathering points. the circumstances of the shootings in several places, however, are not clear.
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but we have seen a number of photos of people who appear to be fatally wounded. some reports said that a number of protesters were killed in yangon, as well as some other cities across the country. police appear to be using stun grenades, tear gas and live rounds. several bloodied people were seen in images from other regions as well, which were circulated on social media pages. it was not clear if they were hit by rubber bullets or live fire. so far, we can confirm that a teacher who was protesting in yangon died of a heart attack after police used a sound boom. the witnesses and rescue workers said reportedly two men were also killed in a suburb of yangon.
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we are still trying to confirm the number of deaths and injured people. despite the crackdowns, thousands of protesters remain on the streets in the afternoon. in many places, people are setting up barricades and carrying shields to protect themselves. this weekend crackdown is potentially one of the most deadliest since the coup has taken place four weeks ago. it is expected to raise numbers of casualties as well as those who got arrested. nyein chan aye, bbc news, yangon, myanmar. the foreign secretary dominic raab has condemned the decision to charge 47 pro— democracy activists and opposition figures in hong kong with conspiracy to commit subversion under the national security law. the charges are in relation to attempts lastjuly to organise unofficial primary votes to select opposition candidates ahead of legislative elections.
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the authorities said the accused had aimed to �*paralyse the government'. mr raab said the charges shows in the starkest terms the law being used to eliminate political dissent rather than restore order — contrary to what the chinese government promised. former us president donald trump will be the main attraction at a conservative conference in florida later — in his first public appearance since leaving the white house injanuary. the annual conservative political action conference — known as cpac — is the first big gathering of republican party supporters since the presidential election and is seen as a key event determining the future direction of the conservative movement in the united states. our north america reporter, anthony zurcher, has more from orlando, where the conference is taking place. the attendees by a large support donald trump, and the people i talk to have been perfectly open to the idea that if donald trump runs again
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in 2024, they will have the support. the poll is back that up. there will be a straw poll later today where we will see exactly how many of the attendees think donald trump will be the next presidential nominee. just judging not only on the mood in the convention hall, but listening to the politicians who have spoken, they are saying donald trump shouldn't go anywhere. all of them are still looking to him as a leader of the party, and i think that is telling. i5 of the party, and i think that is tellinu. , ., , telling. is it him, donald trump senior, telling. is it him, donald trump senior. or— telling. is it him, donald trump senior. or is — telling. is it him, donald trump senior, or is it _ telling. is it him, donald trump senior, or is it any _ telling. is it him, donald trump senior, or is it any trump? i i telling. is it him, donald trump i senior, or is it any trump? i talked to one supporter _ senior, or is it any trump? i talked to one supporter a _ senior, or is it any trump? i talked to one supporter a couple - senior, or is it any trump? i talked to one supporter a couple of i senior, or is it any trump? i talked to one supporter a couple of daysl to one supporter a couple of days ago who said he was the trump 2024 but that it could be donald senior, donald junior, a banker donald trump spoke on friday, he had... donald trump senior has all the support and enthusiasm within the
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base. to hear any kind of a dissenting voice within the republican party. i think we are going to hearfrom donald trump later today an attack on those dissenting voices within the republican party. he is going to call them at a handful of establishment political hacks and try to diminish their influence and lay claim to the entire republican... they are the ones talking about this battle for the soul of the republican party post trump. i wonder how much it reflects the mainstream republican movement? this has always been grassroots, the activists. _ this has always been grassroots, the activists. a _ this has always been grassroots, the activists, a lot of the younger voices. — activists, a lot of the younger voices. a _ activists, a lot of the younger voices, a lot of the sniggers. maybe it is not— voices, a lot of the sniggers. maybe it is not the — voices, a lot of the sniggers. maybe it is not the most accurate snapshot. the rank and file across the countrv — snapshot. the rank and file across
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the country. but if you look at the polls. _ the country. but if you look at the polls. the — the country. but if you look at the polls, the local state and republican parties, they are indicating they continue to support donald _ indicating they continue to support donald trump. if you look at the voices— donald trump. if you look at the voices who — donald trump. if you look at the voices who have criticised donald trump, _ voices who have criticised donald trump, mitt romney, liz cheney in wyoming, — trump, mitt romney, liz cheney in wyoming, state parties or local parties. — wyoming, state parties or local parties. it— wyoming, state parties or local parties, it is an indication that the people active in republican politics. — the people active in republican politics, maybe not necessarily all the voters. — politics, maybe not necessarily all the voters, the ones in the primary campaigns— the voters, the ones in the primary campaigns which will be pivotal coming — campaigns which will be pivotal coming up next year and in three years— coming up next year and in three years if— coming up next year and in three years if donald trump runs again, they are _ years if donald trump runs again, they are the ones still wholeheartedly behind donald trump. in a few minutes, viewers on bbc one willjoin us for a round—up of the news with reeta chakrabarti. but first, time for a look at the weather with stav danaos. hello there. it was a chilly start to our sunday with some frost and some low cloud and fog around but, for many, the sunshine is out in abundance, and it's a lovely part two of the weekend for most of us. however, we did have some low cloud, some fog across parts
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of south—east england, most of that has cleared now and it has turned sunny and, for many parts of england and wales, it is a sunny afternoon and end to the day. also north—east scotland, but other parts of scotland and northern ireland seeing a bit more in the way of cloud. now, this settled weather is continuing because of this area of high pressure. it's bringing us light winds generally but some stronger winds affecting the channel islands, cornwall and devon at times, an easterly wind there and a stronger south—westerly wind there for the northern and western isles. so, after a fine end to the day for many, we'll start to see that low cloud and fog rolling back in across more areas of england and wales, i think, through the night. there's a bit of fog also through the central belt of scotland and parts of northern ireland, but some lengthy, clear spells for much of wales, also northern england and southern scotland, so here temperatures will be below freezing, a touch of frost around, and it will be chillier than where we have the cloud. so, for monday, then, we are starting the day off again on a chilly note, rather grey, misty and murky for a good portion of england and wales but, slowly,
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that cloud will tend to burn away towards the east. some good spells of sunshine developing across southern england and south wales, and probably a sunny day in store for much of scotland and northern ireland. the general theme is, where you have the sunshine, temperatures will reach double figures, otherwise quite chilly where you hold on to the low cloud, mist and fog. it's a repeat performance on tuesday. again, another rather grey, misty, chilly start, but we should see the sunshine developing, particularly across southern, northern and western areas. tending to stay quite grey across some north sea coasts. and again, double figure values where you have the sunshine, chilly where you have that cloud. but it'll be turning cooler across northern areas as we move towards the end of the week. this little feature could just bring a few showers on wednesday and thursday to more southern parts of britain, and then this new area of high pressure building in across iceland will introduce drier weather again, but also much colder air which will down on a north or north—easterly wind. you can see the blue colours enveloping the whole of the by the time we reach friday.
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so, for wednesday, perhaps into thursday, a few showers likely across southern parts of wales and into england. it's dry for many and then turning chillierfor all by the end of the week.
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the chancellor pledges to continue financial support for businesses and families in this week's budget, but says he'll be honest about the challenges ahead. an early announcement of £5 billion in grants to help pubs, restaurants and other businesses — but a warning too... my priority is to keep supporting british families, businesses and people through this crisis. but i also want to level with people about the challenges we face. we'll be examining how much
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difference today's handout will make to struggling businesses. also this evening: more than 20 million people across the uk have now received their first dose of coronavirus vaccine. a violent crackdown by troops in myanmar — at least 18 protesters are killed in demonstrations against the military coup. i turned the charm on. and tributes to the coronation street actorjohnny briggs who's died aged 85. good afternoon. ahead of the budget on wednesday, the chancellor rishi sunak has signalled the government will continue to support people and businesses through the economic crisis triggered by the pandemic
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and he announced a grant scheme worth £5 billion to help pubs, restaurants, shops and other businesses in england to re—open. but, with the government spending a massive £271 billion this year on fighting covid and its effects on the economy, mr sunak also said he wanted to level with people about the challenges ahead. here's our political correspondent damian grammaticus. it's correspondent damian grammaticus. in the air, a s a it's in the air, a sense of change, a hint of spring and a pandemic waning. but still, there's months left to go until restrictions left so the chancellor was signalling the support in place for hard—pressed firms and families will stay. so weighing on his mind is the debt, 270 billion and rising, all of which will have to be paid. mr; 270 billion and rising, all of which will have to be paid.— 270 billion and rising, all of which will have to be paid. my priority is to keep supporting _ will have to be paid. my priority is to keep supporting british - will have to be paid. my priority is i to keep supporting british families, businesses and people through this
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crisis. i said at the beginning i would do that and i remain committed to that. �* ., ., would do that and i remain committed to that. 1, ., ,., ., would do that and i remain committed tothat. ., ., ., would do that and i remain committed to that-— the i to that. borrow, borrow, borrow. the riaht to that. borrow, borrow, borrow. the ri . ht thin to that. borrow, borrow, borrow. the right thing to — to that. borrow, borrow, borrow. the right thing to do _ to that. borrow, borrow, borrow. the right thing to do is _ to that. borrow, borrow, borrow. the right thing to do is to _ to that. borrow, borrow, borrow. the right thing to do is to support - to that. borrow, borrow, borrow. the right thing to do is to support the i right thing to do is to support the economy. but i want to be honest about the challenges we face. coronavirus has had a shock to our economy and public finances and it is right to be honest about that challenge and to be clear what our plan to address that is.— challenge and to be clear what our plan to address that is. labour said he is planning _ plan to address that is. labour said he is planning to — plan to address that is. labour said he is planning to increase - he is planning to increase corporation tax, and wants to do it soon so he can cut it again before the next election. he should be focusing on national needs and not party ones. focusing on national needs and not party ones-— party ones. when we talk to businesses _ party ones. when we talk to businesses across _ party ones. when we talk to businesses across the i party ones. when we talk to i businesses across the country, as i have, what they are concerned about is confidence. they don't want to see a chancellor focused on politics, who is focused on getting any changes through now so he can wash his hands of them before the next general election. instead, they want the focus on jobs and businesses and that is not what we
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have seen from the chancellor. rishi sunak said that _ have seen from the chancellor. rishi sunak said that was _ have seen from the chancellor. rishi sunak said that was not his plan. i don't recognise that and anyone given the shock we have had over the last year and the economic uncertainty we have faced, it would be brave people to know exactly what was going to happen in three years. labour says the government's handing of the pandemic and the timing of lockdowns contributed to this country and the downturn of any major economy and raising taxes now could choke off any recovery. rishi sunak is concerned about the enormous amount of borrowing and it is important for a conservative government to be seen to be acting responsibly. i government to be seen to be acting responsihly-— responsibly. i think certain financial— responsibly. i think certain financial spending - responsibly. i think certain financial spending needs i responsibly. i think certain | financial spending needs to responsibly. i think certain i financial spending needs to be prioritised to certain industries. more than raising taxes and paying it off? raise taxes to certain people. i know there is definitely some friends in some industries, consultancy, they are sitting at home raking it in. this consultancy, they are sitting at home raking it in.— consultancy, they are sitting at home raking it in. this has been a dramatic it _ home raking it in. this has been a dramatic it to _ home raking it in. this has been a dramatic it to small _ home raking it in. this has been a dramatic it to small businesses i dramatic it to small businesses across— dramatic it to small businesses across the _ dramatic it to small businesses across the uk. giving them support
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enough _ across the uk. giving them support enough to— across the uk. giving them support enough to start again and then slowly— enough to start again and then slowly weaning them off so they don't _ slowly weaning them off so they don't crash and burn. with brexit and the _ don't crash and burn. with brexit and the pandemic, it is important to -et and the pandemic, it is important to get the _ and the pandemic, it is important to get the economy back on track. rishi sunak is reported _ get the economy back on track. i si sunak is reported that he may freeze income tax threshold so over time people are likely to find themselves paying more at the higher rate. but sooner or later, the debt will have to be addressed. as we've been hearing, the one budget measure that has been announced is £5 billion for high street shops and businesses in england to support them as they reopen after lockdown. it's been welcomed by many, but others say they will still struggle without more support and tax breaks, as our business correspondent katie prescott reports. a terrace, tables, sunshine, all that's missing from this bar is the punters. but with the prospect of welcoming them back here soon, this publican says he's got a spring in his step. i think the demand is great
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from customers and that's really encouraging. and the demand is great from our staff, there are already messages saying, when is my first shift, when am i coming back? demand is great from our suppliers, they are saying, we need to open our businesses as well, the window cleaners and the gardeners. everyone needs to get back to work. to help them reopen, the government is offering grants to businesses in england forced to close by covid. scotland, wales and northern ireland will separately receive an extra £800 million in funding. in wednesday's budget, nonessential retailers will receive up to £6,000 for each shop they own. hospitality, gyms and beauty businesses will receive up to £18,000 per premises as they are due to open with more restrictions or later in the year. and overall, 700,000 businesses will be eligible for the funds which will be distributed by local authorities from april. what businesses like these really want to see as they reopen is a far broader package of measures from the budget and information about what will happen to key schemes such as furlough
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and business loans that are due to come to an end. like the owner of this salon, who wants to know if business rates relief will continue. although the £18,000 is fantastic, you know, it's certainly something and it's going to help a lot of people. it's not going to help me very much and the larger salons, many of us are losing over £1000 a day. permanent closing time is also an expensive business for pubs. these little crumbs of acknowledgements and these little grants that come out probably less than cover the cost of shutting for one month. that might be some helpful some small businesses to get them reopening but the truth is, the damage that's been done to balance sheets is very, very severe and will need a much more substantial package than this. but substantial packages are expensive and businesses suspect the chance could look to them in the budget to help plug the hole in the nation's finances as he navigates spending to support
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the economy with balancing the books. katie prescott, bbc news. more than 20 million people in the uk have now had their first coronavirus jab. the news came as public health england said they had identified a handful of new cases of the brazilian variant of the virus. the government has also announced that rapid covid—19 tests are to be made available to families in england when their children return to secondary schools and colleges. 0ur health correspondent katherine burns reports. they have turned up one after the other waiting for their turn and thenjab other waiting for their turn and then jab after other waiting for their turn and thenjab afterjab until other waiting for their turn and then jab afterjab until now, 20 million people have had theirfirst dose. the health secretary reacted earlier on social media. i dose. the health secretary reacted earlier on social media.— earlier on social media. i want to thank every _ earlier on social media. i want to thank every single _ earlier on social media. i want to thank every single person - earlier on social media. i want to thank every single person who i earlier on social media. i want to l thank every single person who has come forward to get the jab. we know
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with increasing confidence in a protective, it protects your community and it also is the route out of this for all of us. but community and it also is the route out of this for all of us.— out of this for all of us. but in the last hour, _ out of this for all of us. but in the last hour, we've - out of this for all of us. but in the last hour, we've had - out of this for all of us. but in i the last hour, we've had news out of this for all of us. but in i the last hour, we've had news of out of this for all of us. but in - the last hour, we've had news of a new variant of concern being found in the uk. t1 was found in brazil in five cases in england and scotland have been linked to travel there. authorities don't have any details on a sixth case because the person involved didn't fill in their test registration form properly. this variant is more _ registration form properly. ti s variant is more transmissible than the other strains we have seen from this virus. what we don't know the response to the vaccine yet, we are concerns this is not covered in the vaccine programme. tiara concerns this is not covered in the vaccine programme.— concerns this is not covered in the vaccine programme. two of the cases are in south — vaccine programme. two of the cases are in south gloucestershire - vaccine programme. two of the cases are in south gloucestershire and - are in south gloucestershire and they will be retested, along with their contacts. search testing will look for any other cases in the area. right now, the plan is still to start easing restrictions next week with schools in england going back. but the government has announced more testing to help stop infections getting into classrooms.
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naomi george's five—year—old daughter will be going back to class on march the 8th. but like all adults living with any people in england, naomi will be encouraged to do this a couple of times a week. it feels strange to be doing this. the | feels strange to be doing this. the tests are not _ feels strange to be doing this. the tests are not compulsory but people in childcare support with pupils, like school bus drivers will also be asked to test themselves. a nasal swab swiped into a liquid solution and then up to half an hour later... it is one line. one line means i am very unlikely to have covid. then it is better than going to pick them up from the testing centre. we will be doing it. it is worth doing it and i will enjoy the peace of mind. find will en'oy the peace of mind. and so, will enjoy the peace of mind. and so, the will enjoy the peace of mind. and so. the race _ will enjoy the peace of mind. and so, the race between us and the virus continues. the speed of the vaccine roll—out and extra testing should both give us an advantage,
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but at the same time, we need to stop any worrying variance taking hold. catherine burns, bbc news. an update on the coronavirus figures now. there were 6,035 new confirmed infections in the latest 24—hour period. it means an average of 8,721 cases per day were recorded over the past week. in the last 2a hours, 144 deaths have been reported — that's people who died within 28 days of a positive covid test. this number is often lower on sundays. on average, 324 deaths were announced every day in the past week. it brings the total number of people who've died to 122,849. the vaccination statistics show 407,503 people had their first dose of a vaccine in the latest 24—hour period. which means, as we've heard, more than 20—million people have now had theirfirstjab. today has been by far the bloodiest
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day on the streets of myanmar since the military seizure of power there last month, with at least 18 people killed as security forces used live rounds and tear gas against protestors. it follows weeks of largely peaceful demonstrations following the coup, in which government leaders, including aung san suu kyi, were overthrown and detained by the army. paul adams reports. four weeks after the military�*s coup... demonstrators remained defiant. myanmar�*s streets are more dangerous. today's violence marked a new ominous turn. the military no longer able to argue it is exercising restraint. in myanmar�*s largest city, yangon, the police were out in force in early,
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reinforced by the army. tear gas and stun grenades had little effect. protesters have erected makeshift barricades and gone is the carnival atmosphere of earlier demonstrations. this is morphing into something more deadly. the military, apparently determined to gain the upper hand. when gunfire runs out, they run for their lives. more live fire and more injuries in the southern city. three people shot dead here. ambulances racing injured protesters to hospital, doctors suddenly overwhelmed. outside, anxious search for news. and all across myanmar, the same demand, the release of the country's elected leader. the whereabouts of aung san suu kyi remain uncertain. she faces another court hearing on monday and her lawyer says he still hasn't been able to meet her. terrified families grab furtive glimpses of events
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outside. it is increasingly difficult and dangerous to record the on the street. the distress and fear are palpable. across the country, the number of arrests is soaring, more than 800 before the weekend, hundreds more in the past two days. the coup has been condemned around the world and new sanctions applied, but so far to little effect. myanmar is descending into chaos with no sign of a way out. paul adams, bbc news. 47 pro—democracy activists in hong kong have been charged with conspiracy to commit subversion in the largest single use of a national security law which was imposed by china last year. the activists had organised unofficial voting to select opposition candidates ahead of elections, which are now postponed. the european union has called for their immediate release from police detention. hollywood is preparing for the golden globe awards, which will be given out
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at a virtual ceremony later. it's the first major event of the awards season, and is often a good indicator for the oscars. �*the crown' has been nominated in six catagories and is expected to do well. for the first time, more women than men have been nominated in the �*best director�* category. the actorjohnny briggs, who played mike baldwin in coronation street for 30 years, has died at the age of 85. he became famous as the charming but ruthless factory boss with a string of failed relationships. david sillito looks back at his career. i'm in charge of all the layabouts. i owned the place. mr baldwin? that's right, jack, mr baldwin. 1976 and the arrival of a weatherfield outsider. factory owner and ladies man, mike baldwin, played byjohnny briggs. i will pick you up about seven. before coronation street, he'd had many roles on the stage and screen. from a brief appearance in the lavender hill mob, to z cars.
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but it was mike baldwin that made him famous. good morning, constable barnes. what's your game? a career that went from stage school in london to roguish factory boss. it gave the women someone to rail against and hate, which what was going on around the country with the strikes. but he still managed to be part of that community. his strikes. but he still managed to be part of that community.— part of that community. his most famous moment, _ part of that community. his most famous moment, the _ part of that community. his most i famous moment, the confrontation with his arch enemy, ken barlow as they fought for the affections of deirdre barlow. with; they fought for the affections of deirdre barlow.— they fought for the affections of deirdre barlow. ~ , , ., , deirdre barlow. why did you put the -hone deirdre barlow. why did you put the phone down — deirdre barlow. why did you put the phone down on _ deirdre barlow. why did you put the phone down on me? _ deirdre barlow. why did you put the phone down on me? it _ deirdre barlow. why did you put the phone down on me? it is _ deirdre barlow. why did you put the phone down on me? it is ken, - deirdre barlow. why did you put the phone down on me? it is ken, i - deirdre barlow. why did you put the | phone down on me? it is ken, i have told him, he — phone down on me? it is ken, i have told him, he knows _ phone down on me? it is ken, i have told him, he knows everything. - told him, he knows everything. manchester united even announced the outcome during a match. get manchester united even announced the outcome during a match.— outcome during a match. get out of my house- — outcome during a match. get out of my house- what — outcome during a match. get out of my house. what are _ outcome during a match. get out of my house. what are you _ outcome during a match. get out of my house. what are you going - outcome during a match. get out of my house. what are you going to i outcome during a match. get out of. my house. what are you going to do, ull the my house. what are you going to do, pull the trigger? _ my house. what are you going to do, pull the trigger? don't _ my house. what are you going to do, pull the trigger? don't make - my house. what are you going to do, pull the trigger? don't make me - my house. what are you going to do, pull the trigger? don't make me do | pull the trigger? don't make me do it. go on,
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pull the trigger? don't make me do it. go on. pull _ pull the trigger? don't make me do it. go on, pull it. _ pull the trigger? don't make me do it. go on, pull it. there _ pull the trigger? don't make me do it. go on, pull it. there was - pull the trigger? don't make me do it. go on, pull it. there was always| it. go on, pull it. there was always a mix of charm _ it. go on, pull it. there was always a mix of charm and _ it. go on, pull it. there was always a mix of charm and menace - it. go on, pull it. there was always a mix of charm and menace and i it. go on, pull it. there was always| a mix of charm and menace and the final scenes on the street were in the arms of his arch enemy, ken barlow. he the arms of his arch enemy, ken barlow. , ., ._ barlow. he paid tribute today, johnn barlow. he paid tribute today, johnny briggs. _ barlow. he paid tribute today, johnny briggs. he _ barlow. he paid tribute today, johnny briggs, he said, - barlow. he paid tribute today, johnny briggs, he said, was i barlow. he paid tribute today, | johnny briggs, he said, was an impeccable actor, a strong character, who will be missed. the actorjohnny briggs, who's died at the age of 85. now with all the sport, here's lizzie greenwood—hughes at the bbc sport centre. good evening. gareth bale scored twice as tottenham got back to winning ways in the premier league with a 4—0 thumping of burnley. but leicester's promising season faltered after they were beaten 3—1 by arsenal. our correspondent andy swiss rounds—up the action. for leicester, a day which promised much but delivered only disappointment. they knew if they beat arsenal they would move to second and when he early tee elements was ushered to after five minutes, the signs were encouraging.
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but the arsenal comeback was soon under way. but the arsenal comeback was soon underway. first, david but the arsenal comeback was soon under way. first, david louise underway. first, david louise steered them level before leicester gave them a helping hand. wilfred ndidi conceding a penalty which was dispatched by alexandre lacazette. after the break, lester's woes continued. harvey barnesjoining their lengthening injury list before arsenal wrapped up the points in a so far erratic season for them, a confidence boosting win. it was a decent day for tottenham, especially gareth bale. 68 seconds once all he needed against burnley. a flying start which got better. the bull finding its way to harry kane with predictable results. fin finding its way to harry kane with predictable results.— predictable results. on his right foot. blistering. _ predictable results. on his right foot. blistering. soon _ predictable results. on his right foot. blistering. soon after- predictable results. on his right| foot. blistering. soon after that, the match was _ foot. blistering. soon after that, the match was effectively - foot. blistering. soon after that, the match was effectively over i foot. blistering. soon after that, | the match was effectively over as lucas moura made it three at the break. but it was gareth bale's performance which rounded things off. the display and the victory that spurs fans had been waiting
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for. andy swiss, bbc news. in the other games... crystal palace against fulham was goalless. and chelsea—man utd is also 0—0 with 35 minutes left. manchester city's women are following their premier league counterparts with an impressive winning streak. they thrashed birmingham city 4—0 for their 8th win a row — which moves them, tojust two points behind leaders chelsea. there were also wins for arsenal and everton. stjohnstone have won the scottish league cup for the first time. they beat livingston in the final at hampden park. shaun rooney's powerful header the only goal of the game. stjohnstone are the first side, other than celtic, to win a major scottish trophy for five seasons. ireland's grand national—winning trainer, gordon elliott says he's "co—operating fully" with an investigation into an image on social media which appears to show him sitting on a dead horse. elliott has trained more than 1,000 winners including, tiger roll, the winner of the past two nationals.
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the image hasn't been verified and the irish horse racing board say their investigation is ongoing. the british horse racing authority called the picture shocking. england's women cricketers' ten—game unbeaten run is over. they lost their final one—day international against new zealand. the world one—day champions were beaten by seven wickets in dunedin. kiwi captain amy satterthwaite hitting a century as her side won with 20 balls to spare. england take the series 2—1. there's more on the bbc sport website but that's it from me. that's it, there's more throughout the evening on the bbc news channel. we're back with the late news at ten. now on bbc one it's time for the news where you are.
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hello. this is bbc news. as more than 20 million people in the uk have received the first dose of the coronavirus vaccine, there has been some hesitancy in ethnic minority communities. but nhs officials say uptake is very good among the british asian community at one particular vaccination centre in north west london. harrow has a large british indian population — and it's thought the community could be less hesitant than some other ethnic minority groups including pakistanis and bangladeshis. anisa kadri reports getting the covid vaccine. it's a relief for a lot of british asians. it's notjust about protecting myself. it's about protecting my loved ones, it's about protecting our wider community, and humanity as a whole. i'm sole carer for my mother, so yeah, it's great.
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within my own family and friends, it's been very, very positive. - it's been received really, really well, but i do have friends who are hesitant, - from the black minority group. while there are concerns about vaccine hesitancy in black and ethnic minority communities, at this vaccination centre in harrow in north—west london, there's been a good turnout of british asians coming to get the jab. it's thought british indians are less vaccine hesitant than some other bame groups. religious reasons... culture reasons, i mean, i would say some level of deprivation also and health literacy. these the full reasons, that she gets that they might impact vaccination the community. this doctor says its key health staff build trust with patients to combat our needs and goals rumours about the vaccine. they may have had a text message
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from their own gp surgery who they know and trust, then phone calls from their own practice staff who they know and trust. so that way we manage to engage our own populations, our own patients. we've gone into our communities as well. so for example we have had webinars by some of our local gps, collaborative webinars with the mosques and the temples. lakshmi, who has an underlying health condition, has just had her jab. she's one of the people so keen to get vaccinated she's turned up without an appointment before in the hope there might be spare vaccine. a lot of whatsapp messages going around saying just turn up and they'll give it to you. i got one of those messages as well, in the hope that we could get it, but unfortunately we were turned away at the door. we are reaching out to patients in order of the priority groups we've been advised to vaccinate people. the advice, then, to have an appointment before coming to yourjab. it's been a year when, for the most part, cinemas have been shut, but that's not stopped hollywood award's season.
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the golden globes take place tonight with the latest instalment of the crown nominated in six categories. but the gowns and tuxedos will have to be worn at home, as it'll be a virtual ceremony because of the pandemic. our los angeles correspondent sophie long reports. what a year for movies! i think you read it wrong. it's, what? a year for movies. tina fey and amy poehler will host for the fourth time, offering some much needed comic relief. they will be on different coasts of the continent, but what is 3,000 miles if not a safe social distance? they will present in semi—empty spaces. the normal celebrity supper has been scuppered but the golden globes will be the same celebration of creativity and talent on and behind the screens, both big and small. mank, a tale of old hollywood and all its glamour and sleaze is the most nominated movie. season four of the crown, the very british portrayal
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of strange royal relations, is likely to reign once again in the television categories. you were one of those lucky people... for the first time, more women than men have been nominated for best director. chloe zhao for nomadland, a very real human journey through the american west. # whispered something in your ear...#. emerald fennel for promising young woman, a feminist film full of vengeance and payback. and regina king for her historical fiction one night in miami. i don't see your name in lights. chadwick boseman has been nominated posthumously for his role as a troubled trumpet player in ma rainey�*s black bottom. what's the problem, officer? borat is back and his creator, sasha baron cohen, is a double globe nominee this year. he could also be recognised for his rather different role in the trial of the chicago 7. there may be no red carpet and far
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fewer champagne corks will pop, but despite the same criticism of the obscure voting body's practices, the golden globes will still be the opening ceremony of the awards season and they could still give some indication as to who is in pole position for those coveted academy awards. sophie long, bbc news, hollywood. time for a look at the weather, with stav. hello, it is turning into a fine, sunny sunday for most of us. a lot of dry weather, certainly. today was action quite chatty when we were out of the sunshine, but a fine end to the sunshine for many areas, particularly with a bit more cloud for scotland, than in wales. we have this high pressure that is going to dominate so it is going to stay generally fine and settled with some sunshine, we will start to see more low cloud and fog through the week and over night, they will remain on the chilly side. we have got our area of high pressure, as we enter the day today, and push on into tonight. it means that the
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clear skies, into tonight. it means that the clearskies, underthose, into tonight. it means that the clear skies, under those, the temperatures will fall. we have light winds as well, with temperatures falling, in the far north and west of scotland as well. cloud will start to in across the north sea mixed with mist and fog, affecting much of central, southern and eastern parts of england. the central belt in parts of scotland as well. the fog then, temperatures tend to stayjust above well. the fog then, temperatures tend to stay just above freezing. over the clear skies, we will see some frost. the sunshine will be here. we will see the fog and a low cloud, that will take its time to buy their way through the morning. it might be stubborn to clear across east wales, eastern england, so particularly close to the coast, the onshore breeze could quite stay chilly. when the sunshine is, again rising to highs of ten or maybe 11 or 12 celsius. we do it all again on tuesday, high pressure again where there is, a great cold and misty foggy morning. that i will then ban back towards coastal areas, so it
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could be quite chilly again across eastern scotland and eastern england, with holding on the cloud. mild in the afternoons and a bit cooler though across the north of the uk. this feature, that's why the front is likely to bring some showers to southern parts of the country as you move through wednesday and thursday, with this new area of high pressure bringing across and it will influence our weather at the end of the week. certainly it will become a joyful, but we will have some colder air coming into it which will affect all of the uk by the time we reach friday. that will be quite noticeable, that when. some showers in the forecast for south wales, southern england on wednesday that it has dry and cold have all of us by the end of the week. —— dry and cold of all of us by the end of the week.
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this is bbc news, the headlines at 6: plans for a £5 billion grant scheme in england for high street businesses hit by covid—19, as the chancellor says he'll continue to protect people through the pandemic. it's difficult out there for many of these businesses. they've been brilliant at trying to adapt. we want to support them as they reopen and i want people to be reassured that we will have support in place to help them move along the prime minister's road map as we move forward on that path. six cases of a coronavirus "variant of concern" that was first detected in brazil have been identified in the uk. more than 20 million people in the uk have now received their first dose of a coronavirus vaccine. free rapid covid tests to be offered to families in england

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