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tv   BBC News at 9  BBCNEWS  April 12, 2021 9:00am-10:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to bbc news, i'm victoria derbyshire. here are the headlines: cheers, boys! pubs and restaurants can now serve customers outside. the prime minister asks us all to "behave responsibly" as england takes its next step out of lockdown. easing of the rules too in wales, where nonessential shops, gyms and beauty salons can all re—open. what are your plans for today? haircut or a drink in a pub? or both? and if you work in a sector that's opening up today, tell us whatjob you do and how you're feeling about getting back into it. also, mps return to the commons from their easter break a day early to pay tribute to the duke of edinburgh. labour demands former prime minister david cameron appears before parliament to answer "serious questions" about his lobbying of current minsters
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for a company he had shares in. nomadland — a drama about a woman who starts a new life on the road in the american midwest — won four baftas last night. and coming up this hour, katie price pays tribute to big brother star nikki grahame, who's died at 38. the tv personality had an eating disorder. the prime minister has asked us all to "behave responsibly" as england takes its next step in easing lockdown restrictions from today. pubs and restaurants can now serve customers outside, and all shops, gyms, hairdressers and beauty salons can re—open. hairdressers some rules have also been relaxed
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hairdressers in wales, scotland and northern ireland. aru na iyengar reports. opening its doors at midnight. regulars at this huddersfield pub have been waiting for this moment for months. what used to be taken for granted now a luxury to be savoured. drinking could only take place outdoors, so was the chilly weather a put—off? it was snowing earlier, but i was still going to come out. just put my coat on! after 14 months of not going anywhere except funerals, it's a great plus. we didn't even know- if anyone was going to come. it's in huddersfield, _ it's midnight, it's freezing cold. and if you look, everyone's come. there isn't a single table that people haven't arrived at. - thousands of businesses are reopening under the next phase of covid restriction easing. in england, shops can open, pubs and restaurants can serve customers outdoors. hairdressers, salons, gyms and outdoor attractions like zoos and theme parks can now be visited. in wales, nonessential shops can reopen today,
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but it will be a few more weeks until pubs can do the same. travel restrictions across the border have been eased, and most children are back in school. and in scotland, most children will return to school unless they're shielding. some are still closed for easter holidays. in northern ireland, all children are back in school. the stay at home message is being relaxed, and up to ten people from two households can meet in a private garden. in a statement, prime minister boris johnson struck a cautious tone. but there's no stopping the enthusiasm of pub landlords as they prepare to pull the pints. but this pub in bexleyheath applied for a temporary licence to open at midnight. i think we've come through the woods, so i'm hoping that this
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is sort of a rebirth almost and that we're open now for the foreseeable. the next big date for hospitality will be may 17th, when hopefully customers will be able to enjoy a meal and a drink indoors. aruna iyengar, bbc news. the easing of lockdown must come as a relief for people in leicester. the city has been under restrictions for more than a year, and martine is there for us this morning. you are looking very relaxed, martine, and also quite cold! yeah, my feet are a little on the nippy side, but i'm sure it will warm up, it is a beautiful day here in leicester, we are in knighton, an historic part of the city, in the gorgeous garden of the craddock arms, in a pub which like many across the country is reopening after weeks of shutdown, along with after weeks of shutdown, along with a lot of shops we will finally be able to shop in for the first time from today. one of those brands we will know very well from the high
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street is the clothing brand joules, and the ceo is here now. based in market harborough, a long time coming, how have you been preparing? it is a long time coming, but we have really been looking forward to it. as you would expect, over the last few weeks, making sure the stores are set up from a product perspective, but also from a health and safety approach to ensure that as customers and colleagues come back, we set out to operate in exactly the right way, and we are really excited about it. you exactly the right way, and we are really excited about it.— exactly the right way, and we are really excited about it. you have to convey that — really excited about it. you have to convey that message _ really excited about it. you have to convey that message to _ really excited about it. you have to convey that message to staff, - really excited about it. you have to convey that message to staff, to i convey that message to staff, to inspire confidence in your customers. how do you do that after weeks and months of us not being able to shop? the weeks and months of us not being able to show— weeks and months of us not being able to shop? the good news is that we have become _ able to shop? the good news is that we have become used _ able to shop? the good news is that we have become used to _ able to shop? the good news is that we have become used to it - able to shop? the good news is that we have become used to it in - we have become used to it in previous reopenings, so we know exactly what we need to do, our fantastic teams are focused on making sure customers feel comfortable. we have all the practices you would expect in terms of queueing, making sure internally
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in stores the set of his right to make sure we can maintain social distancing, but really enjoy a fantastic shopping experience. how confident are _ fantastic shopping experience. how confident are you that people will come back into the store winalot of people have had to get used to shopping online and you have had to move your business that way? you are ri . ht, move your business that way? you are riaht, we move your business that way? you are right. we have — move your business that way? you are right, we have seen _ move your business that way? you are right, we have seen a _ move your business that way? you are right, we have seen a real— right, we have seen a real acceleration of a strong pathway in terms of digital, but a real acceleration of that over the last 12 months, but the physical experience is still important to us as a brand, and i think to customers as a brand, and i think to customers as well. . . as a brand, and i think to customers as well. ., ., , ., �* as well. have a well well you'll stores have — as well. have a well well you'll stores have fared _ as well. have a well well you'll stores have fared over- as well. have a well well you'll stores have fared over this - as well. have a well well you'll - stores have fared over this period? we have been hearing that up to 80,000 shops could be empty. —— how well will you'll stores have fared over this period? you well will you'll stores have fared over this period?— well will you'll stores have fared over this period? you are absolutely riaht, our over this period? you are absolutely right. our focus _ over this period? you are absolutely right, our focus over _ over this period? you are absolutely right, our focus over the _ over this period? you are absolutely right, our focus over the last - over this period? you are absolutely right, our focus over the last 12 - right, our focus over the last 12 months is been trading the channels that we can as well as we can, and i am delighted with the progress and the efforts that the teams have put
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in place, but today we are opening 122 stores, we are actually opening three new stores today, so we are committed to that important part that the physical experience can have in overall shopping. at the end of the day, it is for customers to choose, wejust of the day, it is for customers to choose, we just have to make sure we have the best shopping environment, physically or digitally, and we are in a good place with a long way to go. in a good place with a long way to co. in a good place with a long way to o, , in a good place with a long way to co. , , ., , , , ., go. there will be people desperate to net out go. there will be people desperate to get out and _ go. there will be people desperate to get out and shop _ go. there will be people desperate to get out and shop and _ go. there will be people desperate to get out and shop and spend - go. there will be people desperate i to get out and shop and spend money they have not been able to, but a lot of people have lost theirjobs and are struggling, so how confident are you that there will be the footfall to make sure that, you know, your stock is selling? look, we have seen. _ know, your stock is selling? look, we have seen, from _ know, your stock is selling? look, we have seen, from a _ know, your stock is selling? look, we have seen, from a digital- we have seen, from a digital perspective, we have seen strong momentum throughout the whole of the pandemic, and the brand is really relevant in terms of people's lives going forward. ourjob isjust relevant in terms of people's lives going forward. ourjob is just to make sure we have the best product,
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the best experience possible, and i am comfortable in that position, but you are right that it will be tough for a lot of people, we just have to make sure we put our best foot forward and create a fantastic and safe shopping experience. the best of luck to you. _ safe shopping experience. the best of luck to you, thank _ safe shopping experience. the best of luck to you, thank you _ safe shopping experience. the best of luck to you, thank you for - of luck to you, thank you for joining us in craddock arms, a bit early for a pint, we will make do with a coffee! we are here in leicester all day, speaking to people as the restrictions ease in england, but for now, victoria, back to you. cheers, martin, talk to you later. —— martine. people in wales can now travel to and from the rest of the uk, and nonessential shops, along with close—contact services including tattooists and beauticians, can reopen. tomos morgan is in tintern, a village on the border. tomos, this is a day many people have been waiting for. yeah, so this is the wild hare behind me, they have self—contained accommodation and have been open for accommodation and have been open for
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a couple of weeks, but this place and many other tourist accommodations and wales are heavily reliant on people crossing the border into wales. the guy who owns this place was suggesting that up to 80% of his business, people who stay here, come from over the border, so it is only really from today he thinks he will be making any money here. anotherfacilityjust thinks he will be making any money here. another facilityjust up the road hasn't opened until today because of that reason. now, this is a pub with rooms, and of course in wales, although outdoor hospitality is reopening in england, it will not be in wales until the end of the month, so envious eyes are looking over the border. they have got their marquee up and ready for the 26th here. so outdoor hospitality not opening until then, and the same for gyms, so there has been frustration from that sector as well in wales. and you mentioned some other things
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is easing today, all education, face—to—face education, schools have restarted from today, and all shops across the high street and close contact beauty have also started. hairdressers were actually already open, so they will remain as usual. so a day for wales, but not quite as big asjust over the so a day for wales, but not quite as big as just over the border, so a day for wales, but not quite as big asjust over the border, a stone's throw over the river here in tintern today. lets us know your plans, particularly if you are going back to work, send me an e—mail or message me on instagram or twitter. the prime minister will lead tributes to the duke of edinburgh in the commons later, as parliament is recalled a day early from its easter break. princess anne said her father had left a "legacy which can inspire us all". prince andrew said the queen had described prince philip's death as "having left a huge void in her life". our royal correspondent daniela relph has this report. it'll be a week of reflection here in windsor as the town prepares for the duke of edinburgh's funeral.
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over the weekend, his children attended church in windsor great park and spoke personally of their grief and loss. it's very, very sad. but i have to say that the extraordinary tributes and the memories that everybody has had and been willing to share has been so fantastic. and itjust goes to show he might have been ourfather, grandfather, father—in—law. but but he meant so much to so many other people. it's so lovely for so many people to learn about what he did, because i think it's actually, quite a lot of things that have come out would have surprised some people. the countess also spoke to a state staff who knew the duke. she told them his death had been very peaceful. she said it was as if someone had taken him by the hand and off he went.
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princess anne paid her own tribute, releasing this photo of her and herfather at the london olympics in 2012. of his death, she said, "you know it's going to happen, but you're never really ready." "we will miss him, but he leaves a legacy which can inspire us all." the family focus is now on protecting and supporting the queen as she mourns. her son prince andrew said, after 73 years of marriage, she felt there was now a huge void in her life. daniela replph, bbc news, windsor. let's talk to danielpha who's in windsor, where the funeral will take place on saturday. and prince philip planned much of his funeral. i now, it sounds a bit strange, doesn't it, victoria? but with these big events, it is not a state secret that a lot of the planning had happened before hand over the years, and he very much is going to get the funeral that he wanted, perhaps even more so because of the covid restrictions which mean it will have
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to be scaled down, and it will lack some of the pomp and ceremony that had originally been planned. but he very much has had a hand on exactly what the service will look and feel like, especially this information at the weekend that his coffin will be born on a land rover that has been specially adapted by the duke of edinburgh for that purpose. he wanted his coffin on a land rover, and he has adapted the vehicle, designed it himself and helped engineer it himself. so that little detail is just one of the nuggets we have at the moment, but i think is more information comes out over the week, we will see more and more that the duke of edinburgh very much had a hand in what the service will look and feel like.— and feel like. some websites and newsoapers _ and feel like. some websites and newsoapers are _ and feel like. some websites and newspapers are reporting - and feel like. some websites and newspapers are reporting that. and feel like. some websites and - newspapers are reporting that prince harry has already arrived in the uk, which would make sense because of quarantine ahead of the funeral, and of course we had sirjohn major suggesting that the funeral might be an appropriate place for harry and william to heal the rift. yes.
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william to healthe rift. yes, that's right- _ william to healthe rift. yes, that's right. i— william to healthe rift. yes, that's right. i think - william to healthe rift. yes, that's right. | think it - william to healthe rift. yes, that's right. i think it now i william to heal the rift. yes, i that's right. i think it now seems very likely, especially if you do the maths around self—isolation, that harry will be back in the uk. there were reports he was seen at heathrow yesterday afternoon, and he needs five days of isolating and then taking a test in order to be able to safely attend the funeral at the weekend. and yeah, all eyes will be on him and his relationship with his father and his brother william particularly, at the weekend. will we get any sense of the tensions that have clearly been going on, especially after the interview with oprah winfrey? i very much doubt it, i think what we will see, publicly anyway, is very much a united front. thank you, daniela relph. former prime minister david cameron has said he has "important lessons" to learn over his lobbying work on behalf of a financial firm, which has since collapsed. it follows weeks of criticism that he contacted ministers about greensill capital. mr cameron says he didn't break any rules but says he accepts he should
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have gone through "only the most formal of channels". the labour party says many serious questions remain unanswered. let's talk to our political correspondentjonathan blake. david cameron, after almost a month of silence, released a 2000 word statement, what did he say? yes. statement, what did he say? yes, alon: statement, what did he say? yes, along statement _ statement, what did he say? yes, along statement from _ statement, what did he say? yes along statement from david cameron, breaking his silence, as you say, after weeks of reports in the sunday times and the financial times mostly, shedding light on the day candidate for greensill capital, that company run by the australian financier at lex greensill, which has since gone bust. and those details included text messages between david cameron and chancellor rishi sunak and other treasury ministers, e—mail exchanges with treasury officials and also going for what was described as a private drink with now health secretary matt hancock. but david cameron has addressed the issue in that long statement, put out last night, and he acknowledges that people have
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concerns about the ease and nature of the contact he and others lobbying government are able to have, but he said he thought it right, at a time of national emergency, as he put it, a national crisis, to make representations on behalf of a company which was financing, in turn, a large number of firms. as for whether he did anything wrong or not, he's very clear to say that he broke no rules or codes of conduct but that there are lessons to be learned, he says, from the whole affair, and as a former prime minister, he accepts that he should not have communicated with government in anything other than only the most formal channels, to leave, as he says, no room for misinterpretation. but while he says he regrets the jobs lost in the collapse of greensill and he is sorry for those affected, there is no apology from david cameron for his actions. no apology from david cameron for his actions-— no apology from david cameron for his actions-— his actions. labour want him to a- ear his actions. labour want him to appear before _ his actions. labour want him to appear before parliament i his actions. labour want him to appear before parliament to i his actions. labour want him to i appear before parliament to answer
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questions, they say there are plenty of questions and answered. yes. questions, they say there are plenty of questions and answered. yes, and labour of questions and answered. yes, and labour have — of questions and answered. yes, and labour have been _ of questions and answered. yes, and labour have been pushing _ of questions and answered. yes, and labour have been pushing this i labour have been pushing this throughout, very much seizing on it as a political point, and as you say, they are calling for david cameron to answer questions. they said last night, in response to david cameron's statement, that there are many serious questions and answered. as for how and when he might answer some of those questions, so far no house of commons select committee has called him in for questioning, that might be one way that he could face questions from mps on all of these issues. he is not putting himself up for interview so far, it doesn't seem that he is ready and willing to come and answer these questions in public, aside from his statement last night, but the issue is rumbling on, and the former labour prime minister gordon brown is one of those saying that the rules now need to change. i can't comment on the individual detail of this, but for me there are principles about public service. it cannot ever become
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a platform for private gain. ministers must never be lobbying, former ministers, prime ministers, must never be lobbying for commercial purposes. current ministers should not be entertaining such lobbying. and if we can't succeed in achieving this, stopping it by the flexibility of the rules, we're going to have to pass laws to make sure that, at least for, say, five years, no serving or former prime minister or minister is ever lobbying for any commercial purpose within government. it simply brings public service into disrepute. reaction too this morning from senior conservative backbench mp sue bernard jenkin, who has called the whole story corrosive and devastating and said the changes are needed to the civil service code and the ministerial code. so while david cameron clearly seems to believe, with his statement, that he has answered any questions hanging over him and his actions after he has
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left government, still plenty of concern at westminster about the rules around lobbying and who is able to access government ministers. and of course government ministers are not doing interviews because of the preparations for prince philip's funeral. �* ., funeral. and the timing of the statement _ funeral. and the timing of the statement is _ funeral. and the timing of the statement is something i funeral. and the timing of the statement is something that i funeral. and the timing of the i statement is something that some have questioned, given that it was put out a couple of days after the death of the duke of edinburgh, limiting perhaps the focus on him and this story, as politicians return to westminster and other parliaments around the uk today early from the easter recess here, especially to pay tribute to the duke of edinburgh, and that is something that will be the focus of activity, certainly here at westminster, as the day goes on. the headlines on bbc news: pubs and restaurants can now serve customers outside. the prime minister has asked everyone to "behave responsibly" as england takes its next step out of lockdown. wales is also letting nonessential
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shops to re—open and allowing trips to and from other parts of the uk again. david cameron's facing demands from labour to appear before parliament to answer what the party says are serious questions about his work as a lobbyist. the emergency services in the caribbean island of saint vincent have described the country as looking like a battle zone after the continuing explosions from la soufriere volcano. streets, houses, forests and fields were covered in white ash, and seismologists warn that further eruptions are probable over the next couple of days. will grant reports. darkness has descended over saint vincent since la soufriere erupted — darkness and ash. the initial eruption threw a huge plume of smoke and dust kilometres into the air, which obscured the sun. the volcano's activity later knocked out the power to much of the island. a blanket of white, grey volcanic
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ash now coats everything in sight — homes, buildings, cars and roads. the dust cloud even reached the neighbouring island of barbados, and visibility in some places is extremely limited. saint vincent has closed its airspace, and travel across the wider caribbean has been affected, with many thousands left stranded. i came over here for my mother's funeral. last minute, our flights were cancelled. we tried to get through to the embassy. we've had no luck in getting through. we've had our pre—travel covid tests. we've been told to travel again. we need to have a new covid test within the 72 hours, before we travel to the uk. where we can get these done in this current time, i genuinely don't know. we just don't have a clue. following the first initial explosion, there has been a series of smaller eruptions over the past 48 hours. the question being posed to scientists is, how long
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could this go on for? it's very difficult to say. the eruption in 1979 lasted a few months. an eruption in 1982 lasted ten months, not continuously. so i expect we'll see quiet periods and then periods when there's perhaps explosions occurring again, which are going to produce more ash, which will be spread across the island. although la soufriere is the most active volcano in the eastern caribbean, it has only erupted five times over the past 300 years. islanders know they are living through a moment of history, but the only aim of residents and authorities alike is to come through it with no loss of life. will grant, bbc news. friends of big brother star nikki grahame have spoken of their heartbreak following her death aged 38. the tv personality from north london had recently been receiving treatment for an eating disorder
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at a specialist clinic after a fundraising campaign organised by friends and fans. let's speak now to tom quinn from the eating disorder charity beat. hello to you. nikki's mum gave an interview in which they suggested covid and the restrictions had made it harder for covid and the restrictions had made it harderfor her covid and the restrictions had made it harder for her daughter to cope with her eating disorder, have you found that with other people? absolutely, our helpline has seen a more than 300% increase in calls over the last day. many people talking about increased anxiety and depression because of lockdown contributing to the eating disorder, and people feeling a lot more isolated. so, unfortunately, nikki wasn't alone in the impact the pandemic and the lockdown was having on their eating disorder. and pandemic and the lockdown was having on their eating disorder.— on their eating disorder. and in fact a mum _ on their eating disorder. and in fact a mum referred _ on their eating disorder. and in | fact a mum referred specifically on their eating disorder. and in i fact a mum referred specifically to loneliness, she said she had terminal loneliness, and also the fact that gyms have been closed.
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yeah, so for many people, their eating disorder is, in effect, a coping mechanism to help them deal with other negative emotion, so when other coping mechanisms, like being able to exercise, see friends and family are no longer available, that has turned many people to their eating, and we have heard, on both scores, from people like a who perhaps felt they were recovered from their eating disorder, then going into relapse, but also people developing an eating disorder for the first time. that developing an eating disorder for the first time.— developing an eating disorder for the first time. that is interesting, develo - in . the first time. that is interesting, developing it _ the first time. that is interesting, developing it for _ the first time. that is interesting, developing it for the _ the first time. that is interesting, developing it for the first - the first time. that is interesting, developing it for the first time, i developing it for the first time, because it is something they can control in a period of uncertainty when none of us is very much in control of anything?— when none of us is very much in control of anything? exactly, we have heard _ control of anything? exactly, we have heard that _ control of anything? exactly, we have heard that many _ control of anything? exactly, we have heard that many times, i control of anything? exactly, we have heard that many times, a i control of anything? exactly, we i have heard that many times, a lot of people feeling like they really have no control, they don't know whether they are going to be able to see friends and family again, when their working situation will be improved, and people are turning to their eating. we've also heard from people who are bingeing, and that is
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contributed by more people stockpiling food, people are perhaps going to the supermarket and getting a lot of food at one time, and so people are more likely to binge, they have found this period very difficult. ., ., ., ., difficult. there are a lot of inaccuracies _ difficult. there are a lot of inaccuracies and _ difficult. there are a lot of i inaccuracies and misconceptions about eating disorders, tom. what are they, and what are they not? well, the most important thing to know is they are mental illnesses, and it is important that we treat them as such. i think too often we think only about the physical consequences that they lead to, so we think, you know, if you are not, for example, very thin, then you can't have anorexia or any other eating disorder. that is absolutely wrong, and that misconception can lead to people not getting treatment quickly enough. what we need to be looking for is those behavioural signs about people's eating, about perhaps becoming socially withdrawn,
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becoming more tired. look for those, and then you can spot an eating disorder more quickly. we actually broadcast a _ disorder more quickly. we actually broadcast a programme _ disorder more quickly. we actually broadcast a programme live i disorder more quickly. we actually broadcast a programme live from | disorder more quickly. we actually i broadcast a programme live from an eating disorder clinic in leeds a couple of years ago, and it was clear then, obviously pre—pandemic, that treatment services and treatment for eating disorders was very patchy across the country. as the pandemic made things worse? unfortunately, yes. you're absolutely right, there really was a postcode lottery when it came to treatment, particularly for adults, before lockdown. what we have heard now is that more and more people are presenting to disorder services, many of them in a much worse state perhaps than before the pandemic. so this crisis that was in place even before lockdown has intensified, and it is critical that we see increased investment in urgently to make sure people get the help they need. if someone is watching right now, listening to talk, and i think they might need help, what should they
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do, tom? the might need help, what should they do, tom? .,, might need help, what should they do, tom? ., , do, tom? the most important thing is to seek help — do, tom? the most important thing is to seek help quickly, _ do, tom? the most important thing is to seek help quickly, as _ do, tom? the most important thing is to seek help quickly, as i _ do, tom? the most important thing is to seek help quickly, as i said, - do, tom? the most important thing is to seek help quickly, as i said, the i to seek help quickly, as i said, the sooner you get help, the better. there is lots of information on our website, and our helpline is open right now, the number is 0808 801 0677. ., ~ right now, the number is 0808 801 0677. . ~ , ., right now, the number is 0808 801 0677. . ~ _, y right now, the number is 0808 801 0677. . ~ y . right now, the number is 0808 801 0677. . y . ., ., 0677. thank you very much, tom, and that number— 0677. thank you very much, tom, and that number again, _ 0677. thank you very much, tom, and that number again, 0808 _ 0677. thank you very much, tom, and that number again, 0808 801- 0677. thank you very much, tom, and that number again, 0808 801 0677. i the film nomadland was the big winner at the bafta awards last night. the ceremony was held without an audience due to covid restrictions. the winners accepted their awards via webcam, although sir anthony hopkins missed his big moment because he was busy painting. our entertainment correspondent colin paterson explains. in a year where cinemagoers had to stay home, best film of the baftas was one all about isolation. nomadland. nomadland, which is not out into the end of the month,
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is about a woman who's lost everything and travels the united states on her own in a van. it won four baftas, including francis mcdormand best actress. i need work. i like work. but sadly, in a year when you didn't even have to turn up to turn up, she still managed not to turn up. we've just received this message via carrier pigeon from frances, who is somewhere in the wilds of north america. and neither did the winner of best actor. sir anthony hopkins for the father. i don't need her or anyone else. i can manage very well on my own. at the age of 83, sir anthony hopkins is now the oldest best actor winner ever. he did not appear on zoo during the ceremony, but did join in the virtual press room afterwards and explained that he is on a long holiday in wales. i was sitting here painting, in fact. | in my room in the hotel. i'm covered in paint. and i heard this cheer go up from next door, _ and i thought, _ what the hell has happened? i thought they were - watching a football match. and they came in i and said, well done.
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while the best stage invasion of the night happened after the star of rocks, bukky bakray, won the rising star award, and her on—screen mother and her actual mother fumi couldn't contain themselves. next up, the oscars, and nomadland is now the clear favourite. but a word of warning. the last six films to win at the baftas have failed to repeat at the oscars. i wonder if frances mcdormand will bother to turn up. colin paterson, bbc news. furlough congratulations to all the winners, i saw rocks at the cinema when restrictions were eased, it is so good. richard says, my local pub opened at 9am and is serving beer from 12, we will be there right away
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for a few drinks and lunch. i hope you have a wonderful time, richard. let's find out what the weather will be like for you. hello again. some of us woke up this morning to some sleet and some snow. now, that will continue to push away towards the south and the south—east, clearing early afternoon, leaving us with a largely dry day, a fair bit of sunshine, and some scattered showers. most of the showers will be of rain, but in some of the heavier bursts, you might see a wee bit of wintriness. temperatures — six in the north, about ten or 11 as we can further south. through this evening and overnight, temperatures falling away quite rapidly. the showers will also fade. but out towards the west, there will be thicker cloud producing some showers, and that cloud will help maintain the temperature level as we go through the night. but for many of us, another widespread frost, with temperatures falling below freezing, possibly minus five, minus six in parts of the highlands. now, tomorrow we start off on that frosty night, but a lot of sunshine, a lot of dry weather. through the day, a bit more cloud will develop,
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and we'll see more showers than we are going to today, with temperatures of six in the north to 12—13 as we come down towards the south. hello this is bbc news the headlines: pubs and restaurants can now serve customers outside — the prime minister has asked everyone to "behave responsibly" as england takes its next step out of lockdown. wales is also letting non—essential shops to re—open, and allowing trips to and from other parts of the uk again. david cameron's facing demands from labour to appear before parliament, to answer what the party says are serious questions
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about his work as a lobbyist. mps will return to the commons from their easter break a day early, to pay tribute to the duke of edinburgh. and nomadland — a drama about a woman who starts a new life on the road in the american midwest — won four baftas last night. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's jane dougall. good morning... what a day for hideki matsuyama, who claimed one of golf�*s most coveted prizes — the green jacket that will forever mark him as a masters champion. he's the first japanese man to win a major. andy swiss was watching the action. a moment of victory, and history. for hideki matsuyama, and forjapan, a first masters title, but not without a little drama. it had seemed a victory procession.
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matsuyama was four clear with just four holes left. but then he found the water... ..and his playing partner, xander schauffele, found a birdie. suddenly the american wasjust two behind. but at the very next hole it was schauffele's turn to make a costly error, and his hopes disappeared with it. still it wasn't over though, as the unheralded will zalatoris posted a target — some performance on his masters debut. but after his wobble, matsuyama held his nerve and tapped in for triumph. the celebrations might have been understated, but the achievement was huge — the first japanese man to win any major championship, a moment for him and for his country to savour. andy swiss, bbc news. congratulations, hideki. thank you. both managers had some strong words, after manchester united's win at tottenham in the premier league — with united boss ole
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gunnar solskjaer saying the referee had been conned. edison cavani was first to put the ball in the net for united, but spurs were unhappy with this incident in the build up, son heung—min apparently hit in the face. the goal was ruled out, and son then put tottenham ahead, but united came back to win 3—1 — cavani among the scorers and the managers had very different views on that disallowed goal. i always use the analogy that, if that was my son and he gets that from one of his mates and he stays down, and he needs ten other mates to help up three minutes after, he's not going to get food for a few days, because that is embarrassing. son is very lucky that his father is a better person than ole. i'm very, very disappointed. and because with me, like we say in portugal, bread is bread and cheese is cheese,
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i told already ole what i think about his comments. i love a managerial spat! the race for the champions league spots is incredibly close — and that defeat for tottenham leaves them outside the top four — but west ham are back in, just a point behind leicester thanks to a 3—2 win at the london stadium — two more goals for the in—form jesse lingard. leicester's preparations were hampered, with james maddison, hamza choudhury and ayoze perez all left out for breaching covid—19 protocols. they're good boys, they're all good lads. i work closely with them and there's no animosity, there's nothing like that. but we have a value to how we work on a daily basis, and how we prepare for games, and if anyone falls short of that, then we have to move on without them. newcastle manager steve bruce described their 2—1 win over burnley as a huge result. it lifts them six points clear
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of the relegation zone. allan saint maximan scored the winner and showed us what socially distanced dancefloors might look like when the nightclubs are allowed to reopen. sheffield united's relegation could be confirmed as soon as next weekend. their latest defeat came at home to arsenal. alexandre lacazette with two for the gunners as they won 3—0, to move them into the top half of the table. the scottish champions rangers are still on course to finish the season unbeaten and their 100% home record is intact too, after they beat hibs at ibrox. ryan kent's spectacular strike helping them to a 2—1victory. that's all the sport for now.
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back to our top story now. as england takes its next step in easing lockdown restrictions from today, pubs and restaurants can now serve customers outside — and beauty salons and hair dressers can also re—open. danjohnson has been at a salon in south london. a step back towards profitability for small businesses. so many people have been so desperate to get back to see their hairdresser. maybe to have that home haircut horror taken care of. let's have a chat with lydia who was first in the chair here in south london this morning. you've already got a fair bit of hair off, lydia, how was it feeling? yeah, very good. it's nice to be back in the chair and have a good, decent haircut. how much did you need it? very, very desperate. i was over six months due, so, yeah. this were you tempted to try and snip it yourself, no, leave it to the professionals to do that for me, i think. chuckles
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all tom's work. yeah. you got a busy day ahead, tom? yeah we are fully booked now. for the rest of the day. and for the rest of the week. what do you do for small talk? i suppose you haven't seen each other for a long time, but you can't talk about holidays, can you? chuckles ok, nice one, thanks, guys. let's go over here and see yes. hello. how are you doing? yeah, i'm good, thanks. what are you having this morning? i am getting some colour done. getting my roots sorted out, as you can see, yeah, just a bit of life put back in, basically. how pleased i knew to be back in and able to see camilla? very, very pleased. i took it upon myself to try and do a few things myself. how did that go? well, i tried cutting a fringe. it's very wonky, so can hopefully get that sorted. are you comfortable coming back in and having somebody working up close? yeah, i mean, i got my mask on and everything, so, yeah, it's fine. 0k. good luck. we look forward to seeing your results a little bit later. let's have a quick word with camilla if we can just interrupt you?
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yeah, sure. it's a busy day, busy morning, lots of people keen to get back in. all day. the whole month, the whole week, every day, so, yeah, i don't see it ending, but it's good, because, yeah, after three months of break. lots of appointments booked, right? lots of appointments booked. we are fully booked until, i think, june? wow. you said thousands of people have booked. yeah, thousands, 8000 bookings in total across ten salons. yeah, it's amazing. you are one of the most popular people around. yes, we are! people want to get back in and see you. yes, but it's amazing to see how clients missed us, and how they are waiting, and cannot wait to see us, so it's amazing. how much work are you going to have to do to try to recover from the haircuts people may have attempted from home? yeah, the thing is, now clients are more keen for changes. they want to cut lots of hair, like, lydia did, and big colour changes. so, yeah, appointments take longer. plus, we extended appointments to take care of the clients, don't cross too many clients at the same time. of course, you've got to space people out. exactly. give people time. masks, visors, all of that. yes, social distancing, yes. absolutely. well, we will let you
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get back on with it. thank you. i know you've got lots of people to see. busy day in store for hairdressers up and down the country, and i am hopeful while i am here i might be able to get in the chair because it has been a while. it is certainly longer than it has ever been. i could definitely do with a cut myself. there have been so many tributes to prince philip over the past few days. community affairs correspondent has been to meet some of those working towards their duke of those working towards their duke of edinburgh in the woods of hertfordshire. wait, where are we going, harry? up here or up there? to finally be able to go up to the loft and grab your bag, full of all your d of e stuff, it's honestly incredible. wearing the rucksack again, you get the map, you get the compass, and you're just like, i want to go now. back outdoors on a group
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expedition for the first time since the pandemic hit. can i see the map? it's amazing. like, our gold practice was the week before everything shut down because of covid. and to come out now and watch so many young people start their expeditions themselves, and get started, is just brilliant to see. i really need a bottle of water, i'm not going to lie! sidney and jamie, along with more than 6.1 million people, have taken part in duke of edinburgh programmes in the uk since it started 65 years ago. well, the duke of edinburgh award has changed my life completely with the skills that i've learned, the people i've met. i'm now a different person to when i started my award. i'm quite a non—academic person and i definitely struggled in school, knowing that everybody around me could do everything that i couldn't. and then to come out on d of e and to know that actually, when i put my mind to something that wasn't academic, i really could achieve it. and for those lucky enough to meet prince philip, fond memories. many times there'd be strict protocol that everyone is told to follow. and he didn't keep to that.
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on one occasion when i was conducting a band for the goldenjubilee in 2002, and he broke out of the line to come and talk to the kids in the band. and then the band had to stop playing, obviously. and then he said, "what are you playing next?" and i said, "well, it's meant to be god save the queen, sir." and he went, "well, i better get back in my place then." barry, on the left, was one of the first people to complete the duke of edinburgh expedition. it's been my life's. .. youth work, apart from my job, has been my life. what would you say to someone who hasn't yet signed up to the duke of edinburgh scheme? do it! whatever you do, don't turn down the opportunity. back on the trail, some reflections on prince philip. his award has changed my life in every single way. the impact it's had on me and the impact it's had on so many young people, i think, thank you probably isn't enough.
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let's talk more about this with mickey ambrose, who's an ambassador for the duke of edinburgh's award. good morning. how are you? good morninu. good morning. how are you? good morning- tell— good morning. how are you? good morning. tell us _ good morning. how are you? good morning. tell us about _ good morning. how are you? good morning. tell us about your - morning. tell us about your involvement _ morning. tell us about your involvement in _ morning. tell us about your involvement in the - morning. tell us about yourj involvement in the scheme. morning. tell us about your i involvement in the scheme. a few ears auo involvement in the scheme. a few years ago i _ involvement in the scheme. a few years ago i was — involvement in the scheme. a few years ago i was invited _ involvement in the scheme. a few years ago i was invited to - involvement in the scheme. a few years ago i was invited to be i involvement in the scheme. a few years ago i was invited to be a i years ago i was invited to be a presenter of the duke of end brit awards to all of the young people who got the gold certificate. they can request to receive it at kensington palace. i was fortunate to be given that opportunity to do that. because i think it is such a great award that young people, as you havejust great award that young people, as you have just heard from many people, to take part in. you know, 14 to people, to take part in. you know, 1a to 21t—year—olds can take part in it. my part of it all is meeting young people, inspiring them, and it was fantastic. teiiii young people, inspiring them, and it was fantastic.— was fantastic. tell us about the time ou was fantastic. tell us about the time you arranged _ was fantastic. tell us about the time you arranged for- was fantastic. tell us about the time you arranged for your i was fantastic. tell us about the l time you arranged for your mum was fantastic. tell us about the i time you arranged for your mum to meet prince philip. you time you arranged for your mum to meet prince philip.— time you arranged for your mum to meet prince philip. you can see her in the background, _ meet prince philip. you can see her in the background, god _ meet prince philip. you can see her in the background, god rest- meet prince philip. you can see her in the background, god rest her- in the background, god rest her soul. ., , , ., ., .,
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soul. gorgeous photo there thanks very much- — she came from dominique in the west indies. she came over in the 50s. we lived in a councilflat, five indies. she came over in the 50s. we lived in a council flat, five of us. i said to her, do you want to come with me to the palace, i'm giving the awards? in her accent she said, child, is the palace cold? i'm not going if it's cold. i said, mum, child, is the palace cold? i'm not going if it's cold. isaid, mum, you love the royalfamily. we going if it's cold. isaid, mum, you love the royal family. we used to watch the speech on christmas day then watch top of the pops afterwards. she came with my nephew. when you come into the room, you meet the parents, the young people, fantastic rapport he had with young people. they were inspired by him. this is a man who stood shoulder to shoulder in world war ii. he used those life skills to help those young people, and i cannot take my hat often more to him for doing that. i said to his royal highness, this is my mum. he said mona, that
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was her name, and my goodness, she didn't stop moaning. she said, how do you know my name? and he said that he knows the name of everybody comes to the palace. they talked about the west indies because he had been there. they talked about fresh fish. she told him that they try and sell her stale fish at the market. they laughed about that. she loved being there. from a council estate to being there, what a big story for somebody like me. about a month later, in december, my mum passed away, unfortunately.— away, unfortunately. were you able to tell prince _ away, unfortunately. were you able to tell prince philip _ away, unfortunately. were you able to tell prince philip that _ away, unfortunately. were you able to tell prince philip that she - away, unfortunately. were you able to tell prince philip that she died i to tell prince philip that she died not long after?— to tell prince philip that she died not long after?- don't i to tell prince philip that she died not long after?- don't say| not long after? sorry. don't say sor . not long after? sorry. don't say sorry- as _ not long after? sorry. don't say sorry- as the — not long after? sorry. don't say sorry. as the first _ not long after? sorry. don't say sorry. as the first time - not long after? sorry. don't say sorry. as the first time i've i not long after? sorry. don't say| sorry. as the first time i've seen not long after? sorry. don't say i sorry. as the first time i've seen a me. sorry. as the first time i've seen a -ae~ of sorry. as the first time i've seen a page of my _ sorry. as the first time i've seen a page of my mum _ sorry. as the first time i've seen a page of my mum in _ sorry. as the first time i've seen a page of my mum in a _ sorry. as the first time i've seen a page of my mum in a while. i sorry. as the first time i've seen a | page of my mum in a while. sorry.
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sorry. as the first time i've seen a i page of my mum in a while. sorry. a few months later, i said that she had passed away in her sleep. i was with her. he was very gracious. he just had this persona. he really engaged with young people. as your other interviewees have just said, go to the website because it is fantastic, the duke of edinburgh website. you have people doing fantastic work with young people. ruth marvel who is now the new ceo of the duke of edinburgh awards. i know she is looking to get around 350,000 young people signed up. you know, young people, iam 350,000 young people signed up. you know, young people, i am telling you now, go on it, it will give you resilience, motivation, it will inspire you, it is great for your cv. you will pick up so many life skills that will save you for the rest of your life.—
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skills that will save you for the rest of your life. also, my kids are doinu rest of your life. also, my kids are doin: it rest of your life. also, my kids are doing it now. _ rest of your life. also, my kids are doing it now, one _ rest of your life. also, my kids are doing it now, one is _ rest of your life. also, my kids are doing it now, one is doing - rest of your life. also, my kids are doing it now, one is doing a - rest of your life. also, my kids are i doing it now, one is doing a bronze, one is doing the gold, they have fun, they go on camping expeditions with no parents are no phones, and they have an absolute ball. ihell. with no parents are no phones, and they have an absolute ball. well, in m da we they have an absolute ball. well, in my day we didn't — they have an absolute ball. well, in my day we didn't have _ they have an absolute ball. well, in my day we didn't have mobile - they have an absolute ball. well, in i my day we didn't have mobile phones. when i give my talks to some of the schools in east london, i say you are so lucky you have google. when i went to the library, we got five library tickets and a bit, now they just copy and paste everything from google. i am joking, just copy and paste everything from google. iamjoking, of just copy and paste everything from google. i am joking, of course! chuckles things have moved forward for young people. they are not taught life skills in school. to go out, to meet different people, and it is all cultures, you know, the queen was the dash is the head of the commonwealth. prince philip met all cultures. —— the queen is the head of the commonwealth. he inspired them. the same skills he had in the trenches in world war ii with his comrades, young people mustn't forget that our soldiers fought for
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us, for this country, for democracy, and we should use it in a positive way, not the way is some young people are doing it. they need to get off their backside, basically, go on the duke of edinburgh awards, get in touch with ruth marvel and her team, and get in touch with ruth marvel and herteam, and sign get in touch with ruth marvel and her team, and sign up. find get in touch with ruth marvel and her team, and sign up.— her team, and sign up. and it is bein: her team, and sign up. and it is being done _ her team, and sign up. and it is being done in — her team, and sign up. and it is being done in 140 _ her team, and sign up. and it is being done in 140 countries. - being done in 140 countries. thousands and thousands of young people have done it, which is testament to how fantastic and popular the scheme is.- testament to how fantastic and popular the scheme is. yes, it is life changing- — popular the scheme is. yes, it is life changing. it _ popular the scheme is. yes, it is life changing. it really _ popular the scheme is. yes, it is life changing. it really is - popular the scheme is. yes, it is life changing. it really is life - life changing. it really is life changing. i can sit here and tell you that. trust me. i will be having my 60th birthday on the 2nd of august. my 60th birthday on the 2nd of au . ust. ., my 60th birthday on the 2nd of au~ust. ., . my 60th birthday on the 2nd of au. ust, ., ., ., ., “ my 60th birthday on the 2nd of au~ust. ., ., ., ., ~ ., ., my 60th birthday on the 2nd of au~ust. ., ., ., august. you are looking good for it! it is all of the _ august. you are looking good for it! it is all of the cardio _ august. you are looking good for it! it is all of the cardio and _ august. you are looking good for it! it is all of the cardio and the - it is all of the cardio and the fitness training! his royal highness retired from public duty on the 2nd of august, which is quite ironic. it's a life changing experience for all young people. iworked it's a life changing experience for all young people. i worked at a school in bethnal green which was unfortunately closed down by the
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local authority. the young people there, the 500 people, were moved to other schools. some young people like matilda maccormack lost her opportunity to do the duke of edinburgh awards. i hope they can do it somewhere else. for young people now, get on the website, duke of edinburgh awards, have a great look at what is offered, because it is an empowering project. it is so empowering. empowering pro'ect. it is so empowering._ empowering pro'ect. it is so empowering. empowering pro'ect. it is so em-uowerin. ., ~ , . empowering. thank you very much, micke , empowering. thank you very much, mickey. and — empowering. thank you very much, mickey, and thanks _ empowering. thank you very much, mickey, and thanks for— empowering. thank you very much, mickey, and thanks for telling - empowering. thank you very much, mickey, and thanks for telling us i mickey, and thanks for telling us about mona. we enjoyed your stories. god rest her soul, i'm sure her and prince philip are having a cup of tea up there. congratulations on the bafta, by the way, for the football abuse story. i was a guest on it. that was a few years ago. i really appreciate that. mi that was a few years ago. i really appreciate that.— appreciate that. all of the team. thank you _ appreciate that. all of the team. thank you very _ appreciate that. all of the team. thank you very much. _ appreciate that. all of the team. thank you very much. that - appreciate that. all of the team. thank you very much. that was l appreciate that. all of the team. | thank you very much. that was a great story. it helped a lot of young people, young footballers, and professional footballers, so thank you. professional footballers, so thank ou. . ~' professional footballers, so thank
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ou. . ~ , ., professional footballers, so thank ou. ., , professional footballers, so thank ou. ., ., professional footballers, so thank ou. ., professional footballers, so thank you. thank you. mickey, who is an ambassador— you. thank you. mickey, who is an ambassador for— you. thank you. mickey, who is an ambassador for the _ you. thank you. mickey, who is an ambassador for the duke - you. thank you. mickey, who is an ambassador for the duke of - you. thank you. mickey, who is an - ambassador for the duke of edinburgh ambassadorfor the duke of edinburgh awards. riot police in the united states have used tear gas in clashes with hundreds of protesters in a suburb of minneapolis, after an officer shot a black man dead, who had been pulled over for a traffic violation. the man has been identified by relatives as 20—year—old daunte wright. tensions in minneapolis are high as the trial of the former officer accused of killing george floyd takes place. barbara plett—usher reports. protesters are gathered in a tense stand—off outside the police station. they are shouting, hands up, don't shoot, black lives they matter here. police are trying to push them back with flares and smoke bombs. the protesters are angry about another police shooting of a black man, which took place on sunday. police were trying to arrest the man after pulling him over for a traffic violation. all of this is happening just ten miles north of minneapolis where the trial is under way of the former police
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officer derek chauvin for the killing of george floyd. the testimony, the third week of testimony, is set to begin on monday. the city is on edge, and this incident has just intensified very strong emotions. a tropical cyclone has ripped across a 621 mile stretch of western australia, leaving a trail of damage, and almost wiping out one holiday town. courtney bembridge reports. this is the moment the storm made landfall in western
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australia's mid west region. it brought heavy rain and wind gusts of up to 170km/h — winds so strong they ripped the roofs of houses, brought down power lines and left a path of debris. some residents said they had to hide in cupboards after their walls were blown in. thousands of homes are still without power. and this is what the town of kalbarri looks like today. woman: just destroyed. 70% of the town has been damaged. it is rare for tropical cyclones to hit this far south in western australia and the houses here are not made to withstand cyclonic conditions. emergency services say they have been inundated with calls for help, but there are no reported deaths or injuries. the storm was downgraded as it started to move inland. man: just the people's roofs up and down the street... it is the same weather system that wreaked havoc in east timor and indonesia last week, killing more than 200 people and causing severe flooding and landslides. courtney bembridge, bbc news.
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it's been sixty years since man went into space for the first time. yuri gagarin's single orbit of the earth was a huge achievement for the ussr — and a propaganda coup. there will be celebrations across russia to mark the anniversary. our moscow correspondent steve rosenberg reports on the moment a new russian hero was born. this is space conquerors park, a few hundred miles south of moscow. it is a celebration of russia's achievements in space exploration, and the reason it was built here is that 60 years ago this place became part of a remarkable story. on the 12th of april 1961, a soviet airforce pilot, yuri gargarin, became the first human to blast into space. and on his descent, gagarin parachuted out of the tiny space capsule he was in.
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and he landed here — this was farmland at the time — much to the surprise of a five—year—old girl who was out in the fields planting potatoes. what do you remember most about this spaceman who's suddenly standing in front of you?
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archive: the next call| was at admiralty house to see the prime minister. mr macmillan said, "he's a delightful fellow," which just about sums up what everybody thought. how does it feel to have been part of history?
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hundreds of people have since travelled into space, but only one man was first, and russians are intensely proud of the fact that that it was their guy, yuri gagarin, who made history with his flight to the stars. steve rosenberg, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. hello again. we've just had the coldest april night in the uk since april 2013, the temperature fell to minus 9.4 celsius in tulloch bridge in the highlands. now, we're going to have frost as we go through the next few nights, but we are looking also at sunshine and showers, some of which will be wintry. you can see the blue hue across the charts, but tuesday and wednesday in the west, not quite as cold. then we see a return to more of a northeasterly coming in off the north sea, so in the east, it will be colder. but what we have today is this weather front draped across some central and western parts of the uk. that's what's produced this morning's snow. some of us woken up to a covering.
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and as we go through the rest of this morning, it will continue to push down towards the south and southeast this afternoon, leaving us with a largely dry afternoon, and some scattered showers. in some of the heavy rains in the north this afternoon, there may still be some wintriness. but for most of us, it should remain dry. temperatures six to about 10—11 degrees, so below average for this stage in april. as we head on through the evening and overnight, temperatures under those clear skies will fall away quite quickly. again, there'll be a few showers to start with. many of them will fade, but thicker cloud across western scotland, northwest england and northern ireland will produce some showers, and here temperatures won't fall away as far. elsewhere, we're looking at temperatures widely below freezing and indeed across parts of northeast scotland, as low as minus five or indeed minus six. so as we head through tomorrow, high pressure is still firmly in charge of our weather, hardly a breath of wind. a bit more cloud bubbling up as we go through the course
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of the day after that frosty start. but to start with, certainly there'll be a lot of sunshine. so with this cloud, a peppering of showers, especially in western areas, but spreading a bit farther eastwards through the course of the afternoon. and temperatures, well, better than today. we're looking at widely between about ten and 12 degrees, with the odd exception to that rule. high pressure still very much with us from tuesday into wednesday, so overnight once again, under clear skies, there will be some frost around, a risk of ice on untreated surfaces just here and there. and after a bright, sunny start through the day again, we will see more clouds spread out and develop, producing the odd shower. but for most, it is going to remain dry. temperatures by then eight to about 13 degrees, but always feeling cooler along the north sea coastline.
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this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. pubs and restaurants can now serve customers outside. the prime minister asks us all to behave responsibly as england takes its next step out of lockdown. iam martine i am martine croxall in leicester, the city that saw the first local lockdown to be imposed, where people faced months of extra restrictions. i'm here in this pub as it reopens to an eager public. easing of the rules too in wales, where nonessential shops, gyms and beauty salons can all re—open. what are your plans for today? haircut ora drink in a pub, or both? and if you work in a sector that's opening up today,
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tell us whatjob you do

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