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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 12, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. pubs and restaurants can now serve customers outside. the prime minister asks us all to behave responsibly as england takes its next step out of lockdown. lam martine i am martine croxall in leicester, the city that saw the first local lockdown to be imposed, where people faced months of extra restrictions. i'm here in this pub as it reopens to an eager public. easing of the rules too in wales, where nonessential shops, gyms and beauty salons can all re—open. what are your plans for today? haircut ora drink in a pub, or both? and if you work in a sector that's opening up today,
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tell us whatjob you do and how you're feeling about getting back into it. labour demands former uk prime minister david cameron appears before parliament, to answer "serious questions" about his lobbying of current minsters for a company he had shares in. hundreds of protesters take to the streets in the us city of minneapolis, angry at the fatal shooting of a black man stopped for a traffic violation. mps return to the commons from their easter break a day early to pay tribute to the duke of edinburgh. i don't need her or anyone else, i can manage — i don't need her or anyone else, i can manage very well on my own. and at the age of 83, sir anthony hopkins becomes the oldest—ever best actor winner at the baftas, but he was blissfully unaware he'd won the award. i was sitting here painting, iwas sitting here painting, in fact, — iwas sitting here painting, in fact, in— iwas sitting here painting, in fact, in my— iwas sitting here painting, in fact, in my hotel. i heard a chair
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io fact, in my hotel. i heard a chair 90 up— fact, in my hotel. i heard a chair 90 up from _ fact, in my hotel. i heard a chair go up from next door, i thought, what _ go up from next door, i thought, what the — go up from next door, i thought, what the hell has happened? i thought— what the hell has happened? i thought they were watching a football match! the prime minister has asked us all to behave responsibly as england takes its next step in easing lockdown restrictions from today. pubs and restaurants can now serve customers outside, and all shops, gyms, hairdressers and beauty salons can re—open. some rules have also been relaxed in wales, scotland and northern ireland. aru na iyengar reports. opening its doors at midnight. regulars at this huddersfield pub have been waiting for this moment for months. what used to be taken for granted now a luxury to be savoured. drinking could only take place outdoors, so was the chilly weather a put—off?
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it was snowing earlier, but i was still going to come out. just put my coat on! after 14 months of not going anywhere except funerals, it's a great plus. we didn't even know- if anyone was going to come. it's in huddersfield, _ it's midnight, it's freezing cold. and if you look, everyone's come. there isn't a single table - that people haven't arrived at. thousands of businesses are reopening under the next phase of covid restriction easing. in england, shops can open, pubs and restaurants can serve customers outdoors. hairdressers, salons, gyms and outdoor attractions like zoos and theme parks can now be visited. in wales, nonessential shops can reopen today, but it will be a few more weeks until pubs can do the same. travel restrictions across the border have been eased, and most children are back in school. and in scotland, most children will return to school unless they're shielding. some are still closed for easter holidays. in northern ireland, all children are back in school. the stay at home message
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is being relaxed, and up to ten people from two households can meet in a private garden. in a statement, prime minister boris johnson struck a cautious tone. but there's no stopping the enthusiasm of pub landlords as they prepare to pull the pints. this pub in bexleyheath applied for a temporary licence to open at midnight. i think we've come through the woods, so i'm hoping that this is sort of a rebirth almost and that we're open now for the foreseeable. the next big date for hospitality will be may 17th, when hopefully customers will be able to enjoy a meal and a drink indoors. aruna iyengar, bbc news. the easing of lockdown must come as a relief for people in leicester. the city is coming out of a year long of lockdown restrictions, and martine croxall is there
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for us this morning. hello, yes, my old stomping ground, the craddock arms and knighton, one of many pubs that has been champing at the bid to reopen, they have a one—way system in place, you start with the obligatory — there it is — sanitising of the hands, if you instructions for you, then you come instructions for you, then you come in the side gate. all of the table and s have qr codes so that you can check into wherever you have chosen to eat and drink. all of these tables, of course, socially distanced, and all the preparations have been done ready for today by johnny wainwright, who is the landlord here at the craddock arms. a beautiful day for it, thankfully, which will help, johnny, but what have you been doing to get ready for today? a, have you been doing to get ready for toda ? �* ., ., have you been doing to get ready for toda ?�* ., ., , ., ., have you been doing to get ready for toda? ., ., , ., ., , today? a lot of preparation, it is amazin: , today? a lot of preparation, it is amazing. the — today? a lot of preparation, it is amazing, the place _ today? a lot of preparation, it is amazing, the place has- today? a lot of preparation, it is amazing, the place has been -
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today? a lot of preparation, it is | amazing, the place has been sort today? a lot of preparation, it is . amazing, the place has been sort of mothballed almost for several months, and they take a lot of restarting. but a huge amount of preparation, and it has gone very well, we have got a great team working with us, and yeah, we are delighted, and it isjust lovely working with us, and yeah, we are delighted, and it is just lovely to know that we are going to be opening again. know that we are going to be opening aaain. ., know that we are going to be opening a.ain_ ., , ., know that we are going to be opening aaain. ., , ., .,, , know that we are going to be opening a.ain_ ., ., , ., again. how popular has it been? you had a booking _ again. how popular has it been? you had a booking system _ again. how popular has it been? you had a booking system that _ again. how popular has it been? you had a booking system that opened i had a booking system that opened yesterday? had a booking system that opened esterda ? ~ ., ., ., , yesterday? within about two hours, we had completely _ yesterday? within about two hours, we had completely been _ yesterday? within about two hours, we had completely been booked - yesterday? within about two hours, | we had completely been booked up, yesterday? within about two hours, . we had completely been booked up, so it is phenomenal, really. itrailiidi we had completely been booked up, so it is phenomenal, really.— it is phenomenal, really. which is . reat, it is phenomenal, really. which is great. and _ it is phenomenal, really. which is great. and i _ it is phenomenal, really. which is great, and i suppose _ it is phenomenal, really. which is great, and i suppose it _ it is phenomenal, really. which is great, and i suppose it shows - it is phenomenal, really. which is great, and i suppose it shows the j great, and i suppose it shows the appetite that people have to get back out and socialise again. yeah, we are lucky. _ back out and socialise again. yeah, we are lucky. it _ back out and socialise again. yeah, we are lucky, it is _ back out and socialise again. yeah, we are lucky, it is a _ back out and socialise again. yeah, we are lucky, it is a great - we are lucky, it is a great community around here, and people have missed it, we have all missed it, to be honest, but it is great to know that we have got light at the end of the tunnel. so know that we have got light at the end of the tunnel. 50 it know that we have got light at the end of the tunnel.— end of the tunnel. so it is all outside at — end of the tunnel. so it is all outside at the _ end of the tunnel. so it is all outside at the moment, - end of the tunnel. so it is all- outside at the moment, everybody has to sit a certain distance apart. what are you able to serve to them? so we are able to have alcohol,
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food, for tables of six, yeah, so tables of six or two households of six can come together, so i table of 12, and, yes, we are doing a reduced i2, and, yes, we are doing a reduced menu, food offering outside, and we will look forward to opening the restaurant fully on may the 17th. how have you managed to survive these months of restrictions? i mean, there has obviously been some government help, but not all businesses have been able to keep on all of the staff. ida. businesses have been able to keep on all of the staff.— all of the staff. no, that is right, the furlough _ all of the staff. no, that is right, the furlough has _ all of the staff. no, that is right, the furlough has been _ all of the staff. no, that is right, the furlough has been an - all of the staff. no, that is right, l the furlough has been an absolute blessing. without that, we would have all struggled. it has been difficult. the grants were very welcome and definitely has helped keep businesses afloat. but welcome and definitely has helped keep businesses afloat.— keep businesses afloat. but as a business, keep businesses afloat. but as a business. you — keep businesses afloat. but as a business, you have _ keep businesses afloat. but as a business, you have still - keep businesses afloat. but as a business, you have still got - keep businesses afloat. but as a i business, you have still got certain responsibilities, to make sure that
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all of those restrictions are maintained and observed? titer? all of those restrictions are maintained and observed? very much so, ve maintained and observed? very much so. very much — maintained and observed? very much so. very much so. _ maintained and observed? very much so, very much so, and _ maintained and observed? very much so, very much so, and it _ maintained and observed? very much so, very much so, and it is _ so, very much so, and it is important that we all try to follow the rules and look forward to, hopefully, during the 26th, i believe, is at the 26th? yes, that is when we _ believe, is at the 26th? yes, that is when we are _ believe, is at the 26th? yes, that is when we are really... - believe, is at the 26th? yes, that is when we are really... we - believe, is at the 26th? yes, that is when we are really... we will l is when we are really... we will have everything _ is when we are really... we will have everything lifted, - is when we are really... we will have everything lifted, so - is when we are really... we will have everything lifted, so it - is when we are really... we will have everything lifted, so it is l have everything lifted, so it is important that we all try our best to get over the last hurdle. yeah, it is a fine — to get over the last hurdle. yeah, it is a fine balance, _ to get over the last hurdle. yeah, it is a fine balance, we _ to get over the last hurdle. yeah, it is a fine balance, we want - to get over the last hurdle. yeah, i it is a fine balance, we want people to come out and spend, but as the prime minister is urging, everyone has to do their bit so we don't bounce back in and out of restrictions.— bounce back in and out of restrictions. yes, it is very costl , restrictions. yes, it is very costly. every _ restrictions. yes, it is very costly, every time - restrictions. yes, it is very costly, every time we - restrictions. yes, it is very costly, every time we go l restrictions. yes, it is very i costly, every time we go back restrictions. yes, it is very - costly, every time we go back into a lockdown, it is incredibly costly, on all businesses, and yeah, we have to try and avoid that at all cost. and so in terms of this summer, dare you look too far ahead to events that you might be able to host? to make sure people know you are back
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in business?— in business? absolutely, we are lookin: in business? absolutely, we are looking forward _ in business? absolutely, we are looking forward to _ in business? absolutely, we are looking forward to offering - in business? absolutely, we are looking forward to offering an i looking forward to offering an outdoor kitchen and bar, that will be completed in a couple of months, and very much so we're looking forward having some music events and, yeah, parties going forward. how hard has it been for people in leicester? it was, as we say, the first city that faced the local restrictions, and they have been in place for the best part of a year in one form or another. i place for the best part of a year in one form or another.— one form or another. i think the last lockdown _ one form or another. i think the last lockdown was _ one form or another. i think the last lockdown was tough, - one form or another. i think the last lockdown was tough, it - one form or another. i think the last lockdown was tough, it wasj last lockdown was tough, it was hard. i think people were just fed up hard. i think people were just fed up with it, and you canjust tell, there is a lot of sort of optimism, and people arejust there is a lot of sort of optimism, and people are just relieved to see and people are just relieved to see an end, and shops are opening, and people arejust trying an end, and shops are opening, and people are just trying to get back to a little bit of normality.- to a little bit of normality. yeah, we all have _ to a little bit of normality. yeah, we all have that _ to a little bit of normality. yeah, we all have that cautious - to a little bit of normality. yeah, - we all have that cautious impatience to socialise, don't we? johnny, we are very grateful to you for hosting
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us in your beautiful garden, johnny wainwright of the craddock arms. we will be here all day reflecting on some of the difficult times for the people of leicester. thank you very much, martine, what has been your best night in the craddock arms over the years? i can't even remember, it was that good! she has got zero memory, must have been a good one! cheers, martine, i will not tell a soul! the prime minister will lead tributes to the duke of edinburgh in the commons later, as parliament is recalled a day early from its easter break. princess anne said her father had left a "legacy which can inspire us all". prince andrew said the queen had described prince philip's death as "having left a huge void in her life". our royal correspondent daniela relph has this report. it'll be a week of reflection here in windsor as the town prepares for the duke of edinburgh's funeral. over the weekend, his children attended church in windsor great park and spoke personally of their grief and loss. it's very, very sad. but i have to say that
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the extraordinary tributes and the memories that everybody has had and been willing to share has been so fantastic. and itjust goes to show he might have been ourfather, grandfather, father—in—law. but he meant so much to so many other people. it's so lovely for so many people to learn about what he did, because i think it's actually, quite a lot of things that have come out would have surprised some people. the countess also spoke to estate staff who knew the duke. she told them his death had been very peaceful. she said it was as if someone had taken him by the hand and off he went. princess anne paid her own tribute, releasing this photo of her and herfather at the london olympics in 2012.
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the family focus is now on protecting and supporting the queen as she mourns. her son prince andrew said after 73 years of marriage, she felt there was now a huge void in her life. daniela replph, bbc news, windsor. one of the hundreds of charities he supported was the burma star memoria fund, which is dedicated to the legacy of all those who served in the allied forces during the burma campaign of the second world war. let's speak to their chairman, viscount slim. your grandfather led to the 14th army in burma. thank you very much for talking to us, before we talk about prince philip, for our younger audiences, can you give them some insight into the burma campaign? yes, i certainly can. the japanese
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went on the rampage long before the second world war started, they invaded korea, they put a puppet government in place in mongolia, and they invited china as well, and they behaved absolutely barbaric lay towards civilian populations, just like the nazi regime did, and there are estimates that they killed somewhere between ten million and 20 million civilians in china during the 1930s before the war even began. when the war did begin, they decided to attack pearl harbor because they felt if they could neutralise the american fleet, that would give them more freedom to roam in southeast asia and conquer other countries, and they were particularly keen to get hold of minerals and oil. they
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invaded burma and inflicted a very large defeat on the commonwealth army, the british led army, and then they regrouped and a0 14th army, the british led army, and then they regrouped and a0 iath army, which at its peak was 1.25 million personnel, and they held the japanese just when they got into india, and over the next 18 months forced the japanese all the way back, inflicting a very major defeat on them. and one of the reasons that was important was because the japanese put the biggest land army into burma of the whole of the second world war, and they used up a great deal of the resource fighting the british led army, the 1ath army. they lost about 300,000 men killed, and if it hadn't been for 1ath army making that stand, then the japanese could have applied their resources to the pacific and made those battles even tougher than they
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already were.— battles even tougher than they already were. battles even tougher than they alread were. �* ., ' already were. and you said over1 million personnel— already were. and you said over1 million personnel were _ already were. and you said over1 million personnelwere involved, | million personnel were involved, from more than 20 different nations, and this campaign was through thousands and thousands of miles of malaria ridden, deep, densejungle. it was, the front was 700 miles long from the top of england, to the bottom of scotland, just to put it into perspective. supplies were coming from a long way behind, and it was a very major administrative effort to supply the troops. and they did two things which helped that, first, unusually, the army and the air force combined the forces, massed together so that they worked as one unit, and therefore is supplied to the troops in the front line so that they didn't have to
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come back to get the supplies. —— the air force. and they held their ground against the japanese while being supported by them, it was very modern warfare for the time. find being supported by them, it was very modern warfare for the time.- modern warfare for the time. and in terms of prince _ modern warfare for the time. and in terms of prince philip, _ modern warfare for the time. and in terms of prince philip, he _ modern warfare for the time. and in terms of prince philip, he was - modern warfare for the time. and in terms of prince philip, he was a - terms of prince philip, he was a patron of the charity for a0 years, why was it important to him to have that relationship?— that relationship? well, prince phili had that relationship? well, prince philip had a — that relationship? well, prince philip had a very _ that relationship? well, prince philip had a very distinguished| philip had a very distinguished career in the navy during the second world war, he was mentioned in dispatches at cape matapan, and then he served in hms whelp, which was a new class of destroyer which was sent to the pacific, the pacific operation of the royal navy, where his duties were to escort the british carrier force, his duties were to escort the british carrierforce, including ships such as indefatigable and
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illustrious. and he had a distinguished career over the last 15 months of the wall, serving in that area. so, yes, he was our patron for over a0 years, he was very special to us. he wasn'tjust a figurehead, he was really, as far as the veterans were concerned, he was one of them, he fought with them, and he didn'tjust sit there and say nice things, he got very involved. for example, if there was a veterans' march, he didn'tjust sit watching them go past, he used to get out of his chair and walked to the front of the parade and walk with the men, because he belonged with the men, because he belonged with them, he was part of the campaign. and he was dearly loved, i received some very nice messages from members and supporters, he was very important to us and much loved. why was the 1ath army... why is the
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1ath army sometimes described as the forgotten army?— forgotten army? well, i think a lot of it has to — forgotten army? well, i think a lot of it has to do _ forgotten army? well, i think a lot of it has to do with _ forgotten army? well, i think a lot of it has to do with distance, - forgotten army? well, i think a lot of it has to do with distance, and l forgotten army? well, i think a lot of it has to do with distance, and i | of it has to do with distance, and i think a lot of it has to do with what's on your doorstep, and when you are fighting the might of the nazis in europe, and you are being bombed, i think your attention is very much focused on that from your homeland. when you want to serve in burma, it took you six weeks to get there on a troopship, it was a very long way away, and it was not in the forefront of people's minds. i think that's changed towards the end of the war, people began to appreciate what had happened. you have to remember that the campaign in burma, the 1ath army was the largest british led army of the whole of the second world war. this wasn't some sort of sideshow, it was a very major conflict, and i think people are now beginning to appreciate that. but they troops call
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themselves the forgotten army. you mentioned hms whelp, prince philip was actually present in tokyo bay, i understand, when the japanese signed the surrender agreement with the allied forces, and hms whelp then took in prisoners of war who had been held in horrific conditions ljy had been held in horrific conditions by the japanese, and he, prince philip, has talked over the years about how he and his men broke down in tears at the sight of these released prisoners accepting cups of tea. ~ , , , , tea. well, yes, the prisoners were treated abysmally, _ tea. well, yes, the prisoners were treated abysmally, far _ tea. well, yes, the prisoners were treated abysmally, far worse - tea. well, yes, the prisoners were treated abysmally, far worse than | treated abysmally, far worse than any other nation treated prisoners in the second world war. they were starved, they were beaten, they were made to work in very harsh conditions. they were treated to up atrociously, but i think it is interesting to think about tokyo bay, because it was a very important
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part of world history. this was the end, the final end of the biggest global conflict the world had ever seen, and i always imagine it, when you see this force of 300 allied ships sailing into tokyo bay, led by the uss missouri, where the surrender took place, and anchored next to them, two huge british battleships, the george v and the duke of york, and all these other little ships. and then you had, 200 yards away, 2a—year—old prince philip watching the whole ceremony through his binoculars. he was always in the thick of the action, and this was before he was a household name.— and this was before he was a household name. ., ,, , ., , . household name. thank you very much for talkin: household name. thank you very much for talking to — household name. thank you very much for talking to us _ household name. thank you very much for talking to us today, _ household name. thank you very much for talking to us today, we _ household name. thank you very much for talking to us today, we really - for talking to us today, we really appreciate your time. thank you. thank you. viscount slim, whose
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grandfather led the 1ath army in burma, as viscount slim said, over1 million personnel from more than 20 nations, speaking more than 100 languages, with numerous fights, customs and eating habits. riot police in the united states have used tear gas in clashes with hundreds of protesters in a suburb of minneapolis, after an officer shot a black man dead who had been pulled over for a traffic violation. the man has been identified by relatives as 20—year—old daunte wright. tensions in minneapolis are high as the trial of the former officer accused of killing george floyd takes place. barbara plett—usher reports. protesters are gathered in a tense stand—off outside the police station. they are shouting, "hands up, don't shoot, black lives they matter here." police are trying to push them back with flares and smoke bombs. the protesters are angry about another police shooting of a black man which took place on sunday.
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police were trying to arrest the man after pulling him over for a traffic violation. all of this is happening just ten miles north of minneapolis where the trial is under way of the former police officer derek chauvin for the killing of george floyd. the testimony, the third week of testimony, is set to begin on monday. the city is on edge, and this incident has just intensified very strong emotions. the clashes come as local officials in the us state of virginia, have sacked one of the policemen being sued by a black us army lieutenant, after two officers pointed their guns and pepper—sprayed him during a traffic stop. lieutenant caron nazario alleges violations to his constitutional rights — including assault, illegal search and detention. in a statement, the virginia town of windsor
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says it dismissed officerjoe gutierrez after an internal investigation. tim allman reports. get out of the car now! open the door, get out of the car! guns drawn and tensions high, two police officers approach a parked car at a petrol station in the us state of virginia. you received an order! obey it! they flagged the vehicle down, they say, for failing to display license plates. this deemed a high—risk stop. in the driver's seat, wearing his uniform, is army second lieutenant caron nazario. now! what's going on? get out of the car now! officers joe gutierrez and daniel crocker repeatedly called for him to get out of the vehicle. lieutenant nazario repeatedly asks why he's been stopped... i didn't do anything. back up. ..then one of the officers starts using pepper spray. hold on.
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the soldier, who is black and latino, said he was frightened to unbuckle his seat belt, feeling in a confrontation with police he had to keep both hands on display. take your seat belt off and get out of the car! eventually, he got out of his car, was forced to the ground and handcuffed. put your hands behind your back. in the end, he would be released without charge, but lieutenant nazario is no longer happy to let things lie. if we hold enough of these officers accountable for these actions, eventually, we won't have another incident like this. and i think that's what one of my client's major aims are with this litigation — to try and stop this kind of behaviour. open the door! get out of the car! a sentiment perhaps shared by the town of windsor. in a statement, local officials announced thatjoe gutierrez had been sacked and other officers will now get additional training. they added they were saddened that an incident like this had cast their community in a negative light. tim allman, bbc news.
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the emergency services in the caribbean island of saint vincent have described the country as looking like a battle zone after the continuing explosions from la soufriere volcano. streets, houses, forests and fields were covered in white ash, and seismologists warn that further eruptions are probable over the next couple of days. will grant reports. darkness has descended over saint vincent since la soufriere erupted — darkness and ash. the initial eruption threw a huge plume of smoke and dust kilometres into the air, which obscured the sun. the volcano's activity later knocked out the power to much of the island. a blanket of white—grey volcanic ash now coats everything in sight — homes, buildings, cars and roads. the dust cloud even reached the neighbouring island of barbados, and visibility in some places is extremely limited.
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saint vincent has closed its airspace, and travel across the wider caribbean has been affected, with many thousands left stranded. i came over here for my mother's funeral. last minute, our flights were cancelled. we tried to get through to the embassy. we've had no luck in getting through. we've had our pre—travel covid tests. we've been told to travel again. we need to have a new covid test within the 72 hours, before we travel to the uk. where we can get these done in this current time, i genuinely don't know. we just don't have a clue. following the first initial explosion, there has been a series of smaller eruptions over the past a8 hours. the question being posed to scientists is, how long could this go on for? it's very difficult to say. the eruption in 1979 lasted a few months. an eruption in 1982 lasted ten months, although not continuously. so i expect we'll see quiet periods and then periods when there's perhaps explosions occurring again, which are going to produce more ash, which will be
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spread across the island. although la soufriere is the most active volcano in the eastern caribbean, it has only erupted five times over the past 300 years. islanders know they are living through a moment of history, but the only aim of residents and authorities alike is to come through it with no loss of life. will grant, bbc news. a tropical cyclone has ripped across a 621 mile stretch of western australia, leaving a trail of damage and almost wiping out one holiday town. courtney bembridge reports. this is the moment the storm made landfall in western australia's mid west region. it brought heavy rain and wind gusts of up to 170km/h — winds so strong they ripped the roofs off houses,
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brought down power lines, and left a path of debris. some residents said they had to hide in cupboards after their walls were blown in. thousands of homes are still without power. and this is what the town of kalbarri looks like today. just destroyed. 70% of the town has been damaged. it is rare for tropical cyclones to hit this far south in western australia, and the houses here are not made to withstand cyclonic conditions. emergency services say they have been inundated with calls for help, but there are no reported deaths or injuries. the storm was downgraded as it started to move inland. just the people's roofs up and down the street... it is the same weather system that wreaked havoc in east timor and indonesia last week, killing more than 200 people and causing severe flooding and landslides. courtney bembridge, bbc news.
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germany has drafted legislation that would shift the power to impose covid—19 restrictions to the federal government from regional leaders to combat a surge in infections. another 13,000 infections were confirmed on sunday, bringing the total number past 3 million since the pandemic began. it could be implemented as soon as friday of this week. elections in peru have been dominated by the pandemic. none of the 16 candidates will win on first round votes, so the two leading candidates will now face a runoff when results are announced. voting is mandatory in the country, and it's expected that as many as 15% of the electorate failed to fill in their voting slips in protest at the government's handling of the pandemic. we will talk in the next half hour
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about the bafta awards in britain, and we will also talk to a senior conservative mp about the scandal that the former conservative prime minister david cameron is involved in regarding the lobbying. the headlines on bbc news... pubs and restaurants can now serve customers outside — the prime minister has asked everyone to "behave responsibly" as england takes its next step out of lockdown. wales is also letting non—essential shops to re—open, and allowing trips to and from other parts of the uk again. former uk prime minister, david cameron's facing demands from labour to appear before parliament, to answer what the party says are serious questions about his work as a lobbyist. mps will return to the commons from their easter break a day early, to pay tribute to the duke of edinburgh. and nomadland — a drama about a woman who starts a new life on the road in the american midwest — won four baftas last night.
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the government is urging us to behave responsibly as lockdown restrictions are eased. non—essential retail, gym and beauty salons are opening in england — and it's good news for the highstreet. our business presenter ben thompson is outside regent arcade in cheltenham. things are looking busy there. there is a fun fair atmosphere here this morning. the sun is out. there was snow on the journey up here. it's a bit chilly. but the sun is out and so are people for the shops, cafes, and restaurants, which can, from today, reopening some shape or form. there is a busker, the local merry—go—round, business is brisk, but it's been a tough year for so many businesses that have had to be closed for so long. laura runs a website to promoting some of the
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small businesses with ideas and advice for people over the course of lockdown, what they may do in cheltenham. good morning. how has the last year been, because it's been pretty tough for everyone, but talk to me about the website and what you've been able to do? it has what you've been able to do? it has been difficult _ what you've been able to do? it has been difficult for _ what you've been able to do? it has been difficult for sure. _ what you've been able to do? it has been difficult for sure. when - what you've been able to do? it has been difficult for sure. when it - been difficult for sure. when it first started happening, we thought about putting a holding page up on the site and closing it for a short while. but it is supposed to be a resource for family so we decided to keep it going at parks, walks, anything people were able to do, lots of online activities and things like that. as stuff started to open, we changed it a bit, added some of the attractions, we've been switching it up like that over time. and it has been about adapting. all of the businesses here that are finally open. you've been having a lot of conversations with businesses about getting ready today. are they ready, people are back, but are the shops ready?— ready, people are back, but are the shops ready? they are raring to go. so excited- — shops ready? they are raring to go. so excited. everywhere _ shops ready? they are raring to go. so excited. everywhere is _
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shops ready? they are raring to go. so excited. everywhere is buzzing. l so excited. everywhere is buzzing. balloons, decorations, it's great. we have talked a lot about our changing habits in lockdown. a third of all of the stuff we buy is now done online. do places like this have a future? will people still shop locally? i have a future? will people still shop locally?— shop locally? i think so. the drivers know _ shop locally? i think so. the drivers know about - shop locally? i think so. the - drivers know about independent, keeping it local, loving what is next to you. —— the drive is about independent. that has been the drive for the past year and i think that will continue. by, for the past year and i think that will continue.— for the past year and i think that will continue. a lot of towns have seen a benefit. _ will continue. a lot of towns have seen a benefit. with _ will continue. a lot of towns have seen a benefit. with people - will continue. a lot of towns have i seen a benefit. with people working from home, people aren't commuting, so places like this aren't empty between nine and five. what are businesses telling you about that, about our desire to shop more locally? about our desire to shop more locall ? , . , about our desire to shop more locall ? , ., , ., ., locally? they are seeing that more. peole locally? they are seeing that more. people want — locally? they are seeing that more. people want to _ locally? they are seeing that more. people want to know _ locally? they are seeing that more. people want to know what - locally? they are seeing that more. people want to know what is - locally? they are seeing that more. people want to know what is local l locally? they are seeing that more. | people want to know what is local to them, what is open, how they can get to you, and if you are open for business. i think it is going to be different and i think it is going to be a great year. figs different and i think it is going to be a great year-— be a great year. as far as local businesses _ be a great year. as far as local businesses are _ be a great year. as far as local businesses are concerned, - be a great year. as far as local businesses are concerned, i i be a great year. as far as local. businesses are concerned, i know you've done a lot of work with them to promote them, and why people might want to support the businesses
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in their local area, and that might be one of the benefits from the lockdown, we will think more about the businesses that are living, working, selling here, and that money stays locally. absolutely, there will be _ money stays locally. absolutely, there will be lots _ money stays locally. absolutely, there will be lots of _ money stays locally. absolutely, there will be lots of people - money stays locally. absolutely, i there will be lots of people coming in from the outside area when people are able to. cheltenham has always been like a big shopping centre. but giving it local, and loving local, thatis giving it local, and loving local, that is going to be the focus. lovely to see you. good luck. i know you have a tonne of work to do. lovely to see. thanks, laura. that is what laura has been doing to help some of those businesses here in cheltenham, to be ready for today, just walking down the high street a little earlier there were of queues outside the barber shop. some of the shops here on the high street there are queues, of course, because they are queues, of course, because they are trying to keep people distanced and making sure they are not at any sort of risk. retail is as it is ready, it is covid a safe, hospitality can only have people outside for the time being until mid may when they can start getting people back inside. nonetheless, if cheltenham is anything to go by this
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morning, trade is brisk, people are out. there is a lot of pent up money to be spent. businesses here hoping to be spent. businesses here hoping to cash in on a bit of that. thanks very much, ben. former prime minister david cameron has said he has "important lessons" to learn over his lobbying work on behalf of a financial firm, which has since collapsed. it follows weeks of criticism that he contacted ministers about greensill capital. mr cameron says he didn't break any rules but says he accepts he should have gone through "only the most formal of channels". the labour party says many serious questions remain unanswered. well we can speak now to the conservative mp sir benard jenkin who's chair of the house of commons liaison committee. hello. what do you think about what david cameron did?— david cameron did? well, i'm not auoin to david cameron did? well, i'm not going to be _ david cameron did? well, i'm not going to be drawn _ david cameron did? well, i'm not going to be drawn on _ david cameron did? well, i'm not going to be drawn on that, - david cameron did? well, i'm not. going to be drawn on that, frankly. why? going to be drawn on that, frankly. wh ? ., . , , , ., why? the article i published today in the times _
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why? the article i published today in the times is _ why? the article i published today in the times is about _ why? the article i published today in the times is about what - why? the article i published today in the times is about what the - in the times is about what the government should do about what happens in government. —— the times newspaper. the fact is, lobbying is part and parcel of any democratic system. constituents, businesses, everybody is lobbying on the government for things they want or things they think the government should do. question is, when there are questions of conflict, how did ministers respond? there is not enough conversation about this. what was greensill capital doing with a business card in the cabinet office when he was just a private businessman? —— what was david cameron doing. he was at a special adviser. he wasn't a minister. what did he want out of it? what was he getting out of it? it is that sort of influence over ministers and officials i think we need to be more open about and talk about and, if necessary, regulate changes to the
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ministerial code and civil service code. ~ . ~ ministerial code and civil service code. ~ ., ,, ., ministerial code and civil service code. . ., ~' ., code. we will talk about those suggestions- _ code. we will talk about those suggestions. do _ code. we will talk about those suggestions. do you _ code. we will talk about those suggestions. do you not - code. we will talk about those suggestions. do you not want| code. we will talk about those l suggestions. do you not want to code. we will talk about those - suggestions. do you not want to be drawn on david cameron because you don't want to be seen to be criticising him? do you think it's ok... i criticising him? do you think it's ok. .. , ., criticising him? do you think it's 0k... , ., ., criticising him? do you think it's ok... ., ., , 0k. .. i will give you an example if ou 'ust 0k. .. i will give you an example if you just talk _ 0k. .. i will give you an example if you just talk about _ 0k. .. i will give you an example if you just talk about the _ 0k. .. i will give you an example if you just talk about the lobbyists. l you just talk about the lobbyists. gordon brown said on radio four this morning that all ministers should be banned from lobbying for five years after they have left government. is it ok for david cameron, tony blair, and gordon brown to be lobbying in government now? question is, what are they actually doing? the answer is, nobody should be using their inside contacts they gained at any point. but you can't legislate for that. you cannot have a law which is enforceable ten years after you have left a job which restricts what you can do. itjust wouldn't work. and what's the problem we are really worried about? we are worried about the people in public office making the people in public office making the wrong decisions because they are under the influence of the wrong
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people. let under the influence of the wrong eo - le. . , ~ under the influence of the wrong ..eole, under the influence of the wrong --eole. ., ., people. let me ask you about... that's what _ people. let me ask you about... that's what we _ people. let me ask you about... that's what we need _ people. let me ask you about... that's what we need to - people. let me ask you about... that's what we need to tackle... what about those in office, do you think rishi sunak, who was the chancellor david cameron was texting, behaved responsibly? do you think matt hancock, the health secretary, who went for a private drink with david cameron behaved appropriately? i drink with david cameron behaved appropriately?— drink with david cameron behaved appropriately? i think the behaviour can be improved. _ appropriately? i think the behaviour can be improved. i— appropriately? i think the behaviour can be improved. i see _ appropriately? i think the behaviour can be improved. i see no _ appropriately? i think the behaviour can be improved. i see no evidence| can be improved. i see no evidence rishi sunak agreed anything. as a result of the lobbying. he referred it all very properly to his officials. you could even argue, i mean i haven't spoken to him about this, but he might have been embarrassed about the way david cameron was approaching him. wondering what he should do. it should be possible for him to say this is inappropriate, i cannot respond to this, it needs to go through the proper channels... mira; through the proper channels... why do ou through the proper channels... why do you think — through the proper channels... why do you think he _ through the proper channels... why do you think he didn't? this - through the proper channels... why do you think he didn't? this has - do you think he didn't? this has been going _ do you think he didn't? this has been going on _ do you think he didn't? this has been going on for— do you think he didn't? this has been going on for years - do you think he didn't? this has been going on for years under l do you think he didn't? this has i been going on for years under both parties, very casual. remember the
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formula 1 affair under tony blair. i formula 1 affair under tony blair. i do remember it. it doesn't mean current ministers should behave the same as previous governments. why do you think rishi sunak did entertain david cameron overtaxed? because it was olite david cameron overtaxed? because it was polite and — david cameron overtaxed? because it was polite and helpful. _ david cameron overtaxed? because it was polite and helpful. -- _ david cameron overtaxed? because it was polite and helpful. -- over- was polite and helpful. —— over text. david cameron was equally concerned about the jobs which would be lost in british industry at greensill capital. i don't think to assume everybody is 100% ill motivated. i assume everybody is 100% ill motivated-— assume everybody is 10096 ill motivated. ., ., , , ., motivated. i am not suggesting that. it is the motivated. i am not suggesting that. it is the way — motivated. i am not suggesting that. it is the way it _ motivated. i am not suggesting that. it is the way it looks. _ motivated. i am not suggesting that. it is the way it looks. you _ motivated. i am not suggesting that. it is the way it looks. you think - it is the way it looks. you think about the businesses that have been struggling over the last year who might give their right arm to be able to text the chancellor and say, look, i need some help here. i look, i need some help here. i totally agree with you. this is why this is unacceptable. that's why we've got to change the culture. how do you change the culture? it starts in government, it starts with the attitude of officials, and attitude of ministers, and the way they behave when they are lobbied. by concentrating on those who are
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lobbying, instead of those being lobbied, we are actually missing the point. lobbied, we are actually missing the oint. . �* , lobbied, we are actually missing the oint, ., �*, ., lobbied, we are actually missing the oint. ., �*, ., ., ., point. that's a fair point. you will know that — point. that's a fair point. you will know that labour _ point. that's a fair point. you will know that labour want _ point. that's a fair point. you will know that labour want david - point. that's a fair point. you will- know that labour want david cameron to appear before parliament in some form or other. just to get to the bottom of it, really, they say full transparency reasons, they say there are still serious questions to be answered. would you back that? i answered. would you back that? i want to consider that. i think the main thing is we should... select committees are there to hold the government to account, not private citizens. david cameron is now no more than a private citizen. what we need to do is make sure the government gets a proper conversation going on in government. when there is a new... when the prime minister has a new adviser on the ministerial interest, because he resigned last year, the first priority should be for him to conduct or how to conduct an enquiry into all of this. what greensill was
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doing there, to make sure this kind of thing does not happen again. thank you very much for your time this morning. the film nomadland was the big winner at the bafta awards last night. the ceremony was held without an audience due to covid restrictions. the winners accepted their awards via webcam — although sir anthony hopkins missed his big moment because he was busy painting. our entertainment correspondent colin paterson explains. applause in a year where cinemagoers had to stay home, best film of the baftas was one all about isolation. nomadland. nomadland, which is not out into the end of the month, is about a woman who's lost everything and travels the united states on her own in a van. it won four baftas, including francis mcdormand best actress. it won four baftas, including frances mcdormand best actress. i need work. i like work. but sadly, in a year when you didn't even have to turn up to turn up, she still managed not to turn up.
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we've just received this message via carrier pigeon from frances, who is somewhere in the wilds of north america. and neither did the winner of best actor. sir anthony hopkins for the father. i don't need her or anyone else. i can manage very well on my own. at the age of 83, sir anthony hopkins is now the oldest best actor winner ever. he did not appear on zoo during the ceremony, but did join in the virtual press room afterwards and explained that he is on a long holiday in wales. i was sitting here painting, in fact. | in my room in the hotel. i'm covered in paint. and i heard this cheer go up from next door, _ and i thought, _ what the hell has happened? i thought they were - watching a football match. and they came in i and said, well done. next up, the oscars, and nomadland is now the clear favourite. but a word of warning. the last six films to win at the baftas have failed to repeat at the oscars. i wonder if frances mcdormand will bother to turn up. colin paterson, bbc news.
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larushka ivan—zadeh is the chief film critic from the metro. shall we talk about rocks? it's a wonderful film. _ shall we talk about rocks? it's a wonderfulfilm. it _ shall we talk about rocks? it's a wonderfulfilm. it is _ shall we talk about rocks? it's a wonderful film. it is available. i shall we talk about rocks? it's a wonderfulfilm. it is available. it| wonderfulfilm. it is available. it was leading the pack with seven nominations, same as nomadland. it won best casting. the director, the writer, and the director of casting went into the east end desperate to find non—actors. just real teenagers living in london life. they saw thousands of children, thousands of girls, picked bukky bakray who not
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only was nominated for a rising star last night but was up for best actress against francis mcdormand. no acting experience. spent a year with these girls doing a workshop working through, trying to be authentic. —— frances mcdormand. it really is remarkable. bukky bakray, my goodness, she is 18, no acting experience, and here she is up for a best actor nomination.— best actor nomination. astonishing. did they use — best actor nomination. astonishing. did they use formal— best actor nomination. astonishing. did they use formal scripts - best actor nomination. astonishing. did they use formal scripts or - best actor nomination. astonishing. did they use formal scripts or was i did they use formal scripts or was there lots of improvisation? the writer did have _ there lots of improvisation? tie: writer did have a script. there lots of improvisation? ti9: writer did have a script. when i interview bukky bakray she said that they were encouraged to go off script, make it sound like them, make it naturalistic. i asked bukky bakray if she did drama school. she said she didn't take gcse in drama because she did not think there was a future there.
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chuckles incredible story. what would you pick out from the other awards. it was great to see nomadland winning. only the second woman ever to win best director after, and the first woman of colour to win, unsurprisingly. it is great to see promising young woman win, which was outstanding film for emerald fennell. that was exciting. new in terms of directing, but she was in call the midwife, and the crown. , , , ,, ., was in call the midwife, and the crown. , , ., ., ., crown. yes, she is known as camilla from the crown. _ crown. yes, she is known as camilla from the crown. aptly _ crown. yes, she is known as camilla from the crown. aptly named - crown. yes, she is known as camilla from the crown. aptly named film, | from the crown. aptly named film, promising young woman. it's a fantastically dark rape revenge satire. it's coming out this week, i think, so people will be able to watch that worldwide. 9nd think, so people will be able to watch that worldwide.- watch that worldwide. and sir anthony hopkins, _ watch that worldwide. and sir anthony hopkins, aged - watch that worldwide. and sir
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anthony hopkins, aged 83. i watch that worldwide. and sir i anthony hopkins, aged 83. the watch that worldwide. and sir - anthony hopkins, aged 83. the oldest winner of the best actor award at the baftas. winner of the best actor award at the baftas-_ winner of the best actor award at the baftas. , , , , the baftas. this is his third. maybe that is why he _ the baftas. this is his third. maybe that is why he was, _ the baftas. this is his third. maybe that is why he was, like, _ the baftas. this is his third. maybe that is why he was, like, i _ the baftas. this is his third. maybe that is why he was, like, i am - the baftas. this is his third. maybe that is why he was, like, i am not i that is why he was, like, i am not going to win this time. the fact he was painting next door and came in. could you not have had it on in the background just in case. chuckles but it was a great night for diversity. oldertalent but it was a great night for diversity. older talent like sir anthony hopkins, and also the actress in minari, she won at the age of 73. diversity was at the forefront last night, putting the hashtag after so white to rest. absolutely. and social economic background if we are looking at rocks. in that sense, really good.
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-- bafta so white. the headlines on bbc news... pubs and restaurants can now serve customers outside — the prime minister has asked everyone to "behave responsibly" as england takes its next step out of lockdown. wales is also letting non—essential shops to re—open, and allowing trips to and from other parts of the uk again. former uk prime minister, david cameron's facing demands from labour to appear before parliament, to answer what the party says are serious questions about his work as a lobbyist. the people of malta have also been mourning the death of the duke of edinburgh. it was the duke's home for two years when he and his then princess wife were posted there as a young naval officer in 19a9. it marked the start of a special bond with the country. 70 years on, prince philip remains deep in the affections of many maltese, as our europe correspondent nick beake has been discovering. the young royals fell
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in love with the majesty of malta 70 years ago, and the feeling was mutual. today, this once british island is remembering the prince. archive: the father of a future monarch sets to take over his new command. posted here in 19a9, this was to be prince philip's last active military service before his duty became service to his wife. archive: together again in malta. home for two years was the splendid villa guardamangia — some of the happiest moments of their lives, the queen later recalled. after a0 years of neglect, the maltese government has bought and is now restoring the property. a tribute to the british crown, but also to the prince and his personality. maltese are very warm people. they are not formal, they are very informal. usually, the monarchy has to be formal so sometimes when the duke would make lapses in his comments and perhaps go a bit too far
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and receive certain criticism, the maltese would like this because they would say even the duke is human. we have a photograph over here and you can see the duke of edinburgh and you can see the queen, as princess elizabeth. my father and mother are there... the newlyweds from britain were embraced by the maltese mobility, including nicholas de piro's father, a baron, the newlyweds from britain were embraced by the maltese nobility, including nicholas de piro's father, a baron, whose job and title amused the duke of ediburgh. he said, "by the way, what do you actually do when you're not being a baron?" and i said, "what did you say?" and he said, "well, i didn't know what to say." i said perhaps a little bit like what do you do when you are not being a duke!" archive: the guests of honour the princess and the duke. the dazzling ballroom of 1950s multiple a world away from austere postwar britain. this was a couple yet to bear the full weight and responsibilities of the crown.
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it wasn'tjust on the dance floor of this grand hotel that prince philip made his mark. he took centre stage when the country gained independence from the uk in 196a and his regular visits over the decades, both with and without the queen, secured his place in modern maltese history. archive: in the distance they can see hms chequers... this was his last trip, six years ago. an island of fond memories, outbidding a friend this was his last trip, six years ago. an island of fond memories, now bidding a friend a final farewell. nick beake, bbc news. prince philip was born on the greek island of corfu. after a coup in 1922, his father, prince andrew of greece, was banished from the country by a revolutionary court. still, the duke is being remembered on the island following his passing. our correspondent, jenny hill has more on the prince's connection to corfu. this of course is where it all began. the church you can see behind me is the greek orthodox church in which the young prince philip
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of greece was baptised. his family home isn't far from where i am standing. but, of course, the young prince didn't spend very long on this island. he was just 18 months old when his family was forced to flee among conflict and great political instability. a dramatic escape by all accounts having a british warship. the young prince, apparently, carried to safety in the kind of wooden crate used to transport oranges. it was the beginning of a pretty turbulent childhood for prince philip as his family moved around all over europe, and they actually split up. we are told the duke of edinburgh never returned to the island of his birth. nevertheless, they will tell you here that they still feel a pretty strong connection to the duke, to the british royal family. i spoke with the mayor of corfu who sent a special letter
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of condolence to the queen, the british royal family, who says that they do still feel that time. there is an expat population here in corfu. in addition to that, this island is apparently a favourite destination of prince charles, the duke of edinburgh's son. he said to be a regular visitor. just last month he paid an official visit to the mainland during that trip to athens. he talked of his deep affection for this part of the world, and the familial connection he still feels for it. it's been 60 years since man went into space for the first time. yuri gagarin's single orbit of the earth was a huge achievement for the ussr — and a propaganda coup. there will be celebrations across russia to mark the anniversary. our moscow correspondent steve rosenberg reports on the moment a new russian hero was born. this is space conquerors park, a few hundred miles south of moscow. it is a celebration of russia's
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achievements in space exploration, and the reason it was built here is that 60 years ago this place became part of a remarkable story. on the 12th of april 1961, a soviet airforce pilot, yuri gargarin, became the first human to blast into space. and on his descent, gagarin parachuted out of the tiny space capsule he was in. and on his descent, gagarin parachuted out of the tiny space capsule he was in. and he landed here — this was farmland at the time — much to the surprise of a five—year—old girl who was out in the fields planting potatoes.
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what do you remember most about this spaceman who's suddenly standing in front of you?
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archive: the next call| was at admiralty house to see the prime minister. mr macmillan said, "he's a delightful fellow," which just about sums up what everybody thought. how does it feel to have been part of history? hundreds of people have since travelled into space, but only one man was first, and russians are intensely proud of the fact that that it was their guy, yuri gagarin, who made history with his flight to the stars. steve rosenberg, bbc news. thousands of people came to the ganges for prayer. up to 5 million people are expected on certain days. authorities have made it mandatory for everybody entering the area to
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take covid—19 tests, but many devotees gathered by the river without wearing a mask in densely packed crowds. you're watching bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. hello again. we've just had the coldest april night in the uk since april 2013, the temperature fell to minus 9.a celsius in tulloch bridge in the highlands. now, we're going to have frost as we go through the next few nights, but we are looking also at sunshine and showers, some of which will be wintry. you can see the blue hue across the charts, but tuesday and wednesday in the west, not quite as cold. then we see a return to more of a northeasterly coming in off the north sea, so in the east, it will be colder. but what we have today is this weather front draped across some central and western parts of the uk. that's what's produced this morning's snow. some of us woken up to a covering. and as we go through the rest of this morning, it will continue
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to push down towards the south and southeast this afternoon, leaving us with a largely dry afternoon, and some scattered showers. in some of the heavy rains in the north this afternoon, there may still be some wintriness. but for most of us, it should remain dry. temperatures six to about 10—11 degrees, so below average for this stage in april. as we head on through the evening and overnight, temperatures under those clear skies will fall away quite quickly. again, there'll be a few showers to start with. many of them will fade, but thicker cloud across western scotland, northwest england and northern ireland will produce some showers, and here temperatures won't fall away as far. elsewhere, we're looking at temperatures widely below freezing and indeed across parts of northeast scotland, as low as minus five or indeed minus six. so as we head through tomorrow, high pressure is still firmly in charge of our weather, hardly a breath of wind. a bit more cloud bubbling up as we go through the course of the day after that frosty start. but to start with, certainly there'll be a lot of sunshine. so with this cloud, a peppering of showers, especially in western areas, but spreading a bit
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farther eastwards through the course of the afternoon. and temperatures, well, better than today. we're looking at widely between about ten and 12 degrees, with the odd exception to that rule. high pressure still very much with us from tuesday into wednesday, so overnight once again, under clear skies, there will be some frost around, a risk of ice on untreated surfaces just here and there. and after a bright, sunny start through the day again, we will see more clouds spread out and develop, producing the odd shower. but for most, it is going to remain dry. temperatures by then eight to about 13 degrees, but always feeling cooler along the north sea coastline.
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this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at 11: long queues in the high streets as shops reopen — borisjohnson asks everyone to "behave responsibly" as england takes its next step out of lockdown. easing of the rules too in wales, where non—essential shops, gyms and beauty salons can all re—open. labour demands david cameron appears before parliament, to answer "serious questions" about his lobbying of current minsters for a company he had shares in. let's cross to holyrood, where members of the scottish parliament are paying tribute to the duke of edinburgh. may ask you all to stand and join me in one minute's silence.
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thank you very much. thank you, colleagues — thank you very much. thank you, colleagues i_ thank you very much. thank you, colleagues. i now invite to the first _ colleagues. i now invite to the first minister, if i can, to move and _ first minister, if i can, to move and do — first minister, if i can, to move and do speak to the motion. first minister, ifi can, to move and do speak to the motion. residing officer, the tributes _ and do speak to the motion. residing officer, the tributes paid _ and do speak to the motion. residing officer, the tributes paid to _ and do speak to the motion. residing officer, the tributes paid to the - officer, the tributes paid to the duke of edinburgh over these past three days show the affection in which he was held, here in scotland, across the united kingdom and around the world. on behalf of the people of scotland, i express my deepest sympathy to her majesty the queen, who is grieving the loss of her strength and stay, her husband of almost 7a years. and also to his children and the wider royal family. before he became the public figure so familiar to all of us today, the duke of edinburgh had already led a life of distinction. like so many of his generation, he endured difficulties and faced danger is that generations since can barely come ahead. as a naval officer in
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world war ii, he was mentioned in dispatches for his part in a battle. in 19a3, his courage and quick thinking helped save hms wallace from attack in the mediterranean. during a two—year spell, he was responsible for escorting merchant vessels on a route known as u—boat alley because of the attacks from german vessels. because of these contributions alone, he like all of our veterans is owed a significant debt of gratitude. the second world war was just the debt of gratitude. the second world war wasjust the beginning of debt of gratitude. the second world war was just the beginning of the duke of edinburgh's life of public service. from 19a7, he was the queen �*s constant companion, and then he was her consort. he became the longer serving consort in british history. that role in a
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constitutional monarchy cannot be an easy one, particularly perhaps for someone who is spirited and energetic by temperament. of course, he faced the additional challenge of being the husband of a powerful woman at the time and that was even more of an exception than it is today. that reversal of the more traditional dynamic was highly unusual in the 19 a0s, 1950s and 19605, unusual in the 19 a0s, 1950s and 1960s, and even now is not as common as it might be. yet the duke of edinburgh was devoted to supporting the queen. they were a true partnership. indeed, like first ministers before me, i got to witness the strength of that partnership in close quarters. i always enjoyed my conversations with the duke of edinburgh on these visits, and all of the occasions that i met him. i was struck by how different he was in private to the way he was sometimes characterised in public. he was a thoughtful man,
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deeply interesting, and fiercely intelligent. he was also a serious bookworm, which i am as well, so talking about the books we were reading was often for me a real highlight of our conversations. prince philip was, without doubt, a devoted consort to the queen. but he also carved out a distinctive individual role. he took a particular interest in industry and science, and he was far—sighted in his early support for conservation. as far back as 1969, in a speech here in edinburgh, he warned of the risks virtually indestructible plastics. in 1956, he founded the duke of edinburgh award scheme, which now every year provides opportunity, hope and inspiration to more than1 million opportunity, hope and inspiration to more than 1 million young people opportunity, hope and inspiration to more than1 million young people in more than1 million young people in more than1 million young people in more than 100 different countries across the world. in addition, the duke of edinburgh was patron of more than 800 charities. at the time of
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his retirement from royal duties, he had completed well over 20,000 engagements. many of these were here in scotland, a country that he loved from a very early age. he was educated here, talk to sale by a scottish trawler skipper and was based here for two years during the war. when the duke received the freedom of the city of edinburgh, he spoke of the benefits that scotland had given him. some of his first duties with the royal household were undertaken here in scotland. injuly 19a7, just a week after the announcement of his engagement to that then princess elizabeth, the couple travelled here to edinburgh. since then, he has been present at many of the key moments of our modern history, including the official opening of our scottish parliament. he has served many
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scottish charities and organisations, he was chancellor of the university of edinburgh for more than 50 years. throughout all of that time, the public has held him in great affection. on that first royal visit to edinburgh in 19a7, people gathered across the street in the forecourt of holyrood palace and celebrated the royal engagement with country dancing. more than 70 years later, shortly after he had announced his retirement from public life, i witness the warmth of the reception he received as he accompanied the queen to the opening of the queensferry crossing. he was determined to attend it, he was fascinated and impressed by the feats of engineering that each of the three forth bridges represented. one of his early engagements in scotland shortly after the queen's correlation was to plant a cherry tree in the grounds of canongate kirk, across the road from here. it
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stands opposite the tree planted by the queen a year previously. they are just about to bloom, as the queen a year previously. they arejust about to bloom, as i'm sure they will do each spring for decades to come. i am equally sure that not just in the weeks ahead but many weeks from now, people will think fondly of the duke of edinburgh as they pass canongate kirk and look across to holyrood palace. it is right that our parliament pays tribute to him today. in doing so, we mourn his passing and we extend our deepest since the two her majesty the queen and to their family. we reflect on his distant wish wartime record, his love and support for the queen and his decades of public service to scotland, the united kingdom and the commonwealth. above all, we celebrate and we honour an extraordinary life or stop i moved a motion in my name.— extraordinary life or stop i moved a motion in my name. thank you very much, first — motion in my name. thank you very much, first minister. _ motion in my name. thank you very much, first minister. i— motion in my name. thank you very much, first minister. i call- motion in my name. thank you very much, first minister. i call on - motion in my name. thank you very much, first minister. i call on ruth| much, first minister. i call on ruth davies _ much, first minister. i call on ruth davies. , , , . davies. grief is the price we pay for love. the _
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davies. grief is the price we pay for love. the queen _ davies. grief is the price we pay for love. the queen was - davies. grief is the price we pay i for love. the queen was speaking davies. grief is the price we pay - for love. the queen was speaking on behalf of the nation when she said those words 20 years ago. grief is the price we pay for love. i cannot imagine what it is like to be married to someone for 73 years, and i cannot imagine what it is to have to get up and face every future day without them. what that absence feels like. i think the recognition of the enormity of such a loss has led so many in the past few days to look past the titles and a1 gun salute and have such a sense of feeling for her majesty on a human level. for most of us in this chamber and outside it, our picture of his royal highness the duke of edinburgh is often elderly man, active, vigorous, gruff, witty, still able to stand ramrod straight, but by the fact of reaching 99 years old a person has been of pensionable age for decades. so for my generation and those after, the dashing young naval officer in his 20s, that husband made consort, that
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prince philip only exists in use footage. here is a man that was born before the discovery of penicillin, before the discovery of penicillin, before the discovery of penicillin, before the creation of the united nations or the invention of the television orjet engine. a moderniser he was in life as in work. how many men in the 1950s gave up work. how many men in the 1950s gave up theirjobs for their wife's up their jobs for their wife's career, up theirjobs for their wife's career, how many walked behind their spouse or accepted that their children would never take their surname? is barack obama wrote, he showed the world what it meant to be a supportive husband to a powerful woman. if that was all he had done, undertaking his bow at the coronation to be a leech man in life and limb, that would have been enough —— liegeman in life and limb.
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he was a natural sailor and horseman. yet interests and passions on issues that he wanted to drive forward, and he focused on engineering, youth, outdoors and conservation. a life that could have easily have been a shallow wave, a ribbon—cutting before moving on to the next one, he showed dedication to the organisations he champion. 20 years as the president of w b f uk, which he helped found. —— wwf that he helped found. while he was a huge supporter of the university's academic excellence, opening buildings and conferring degrees, he was a particular supporter of the
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sometimes wild celebrations surrounding the installation of any new rector, getting them into trouble when one such affair was too sedate for his liking. he supported the botanic gardens, the royal zoological society and the royal british legion. he was no stranger to holyrood, both the palace and the parliament, numerous leaf hosting representatives from the latter in the former. the duke turned to the tory leader to ask if she had a pair of knickers made out of the tartan, and quite properly she retorted, i couldn't possibly comment and even if i did, i couldn't possibly exhibit them. it is no wonder that when asked to sum up his grandparents connection, prince william said preset, he makes her laugh. there is been coverage in the
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duke's death, much of it coloured by people's own views on the institution of the monarchy. anyone who in their life fought in world war ii, set up an organisation to help young people build resilience and change the course of their lives for the better, who helped found the world's largest conservation charity to save endangered species act gave of his time to help 800 individual charities and who was still working well into his 90s, deserves to have that life recognised. as the queen remarked on their golden wedding anniversary, he does not take easily to components, so he would probably hate all the fuss. so to achieve all of that, while undertaking your greatestjob of that, while undertaking your greatest job and of that, while undertaking your greatestjob and duty, to be partner, friend and confident for 73 years to the monarchy, always two steps behind, supporting the queen, being her strength and stay all these years, is a life of remarkable public service. as an exiled prince, he came to scotland as a boy and his time here checked the man he would
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become. his relationship with scotland endured and it was woven into the service he gave to the united kingdom and commonwealth. on behalf of myself and my party, i will support this motion of condolence. i offer our sincere condolences to her children, grandchildren, great—grandchildren and two her majesty the queen. thank and two her ma'esty the queen. thank ou. you. may i you. — may i associate these you. may i associate these benches with the tribute paid to his royal highness, prince philip, the duke of edinburgh. we lost and extort no public servant to dedicated his life to our country and transformed lives across the world. on behalf of the entire scottish labour party, i offer my condolences to everyone morning here and across the commonwealth, all his loved ones, the royalfamily, his children,
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grandchildren, and great—grandchildren, and in particular her majesty the queen. for more than seven decades, prince philip was a constant at the queen's side. none of us can even begin to understand the pressure of being monarch, in what has been described as a lonelyjob. much has been written about how she cherished the support of a husband. while their lives have been different to ours, we can sympathise what it means to lose a loved one. the queen has lost her beloved husband after spending more than 70 years together. i can't even imagine how that must feel, add my thoughts and prayers are with her majesty in the difficult times ahead. unlike others in the chamber, i never had the privilege of meeting prince philip, so i am afraid i don't have any personal anecdotes
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that i can contribute to the tributes that people have heard today and in recent days. i was struck by one personal anecdote that some i have heard in recent days on tv and radio. it came from a man called john watts, who was jailed at the age of 17. he recalled that there were lots of alcohol and no aspirations for people like me, is what he said. while in prison, he came across the duke of edinburgh award, which he said gave him a sense of new direction. he camped out for the first award not on a scottish mountain side but in a tent on the artificial grass on the prison football pitch. john went on to get the bronze, silver and gold award while serving a six—year sentence. the skill he learned during the programme was cooking, and upon leaving prison he set up his own catering business, now helping other young people to learn new skills and find newjobs. it
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saved my life, john said last week. that is one life that the prince helped save. there will be countless others from different walks of life. there are millions of other young people from all walks of life who are reaching their full potential thanks to the duke of end of award, from the prince's own school, and across the uk and the world. i'm sure i'm not the only parent who has helped their children with the duke of edible award across the country as well. when he launched the boards, he said, if you can get a young person to succeed in any one activity, that feeling will spread into many others. in the difficult year faced into many others. in the difficult yearfaced by into many others. in the difficult year faced by many young people during the pandemic, his words are just as relevant today. a reminder of the elective national mission we
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face in the years ahead to make your every child forfull step face in the years ahead to make your every child for full step potential. i recognise his lasting contribution to our country. i extend my sympathies to everyone who has loved a loved one in this most difficult of years. thank you.— a loved one in this most difficult of years. thank you. thank you. i now call patrick _ of years. thank you. thank you. i now call patrick harvey. - of years. thank you. thank you. i now call patrick harvey. thank i of years. thank you. thank you. i i now call patrick harvey. thank you. ma i 'oin now call patrick harvey. thank you. may ijoin the _ now call patrick harvey. thank you. may i join the other— now call patrick harvey. thank you. may i join the other leaders - now call patrick harvey. thank you. may i join the other leaders and i may ijoin the other leaders and offering my sincere condolences to prince philip's family, friends and all of those who will miss him. in this chamber, as in this country, we do not all share the same views of the monarchy. all the same feelings today. it would be wrong to pretend that we did. as a party that wishes for an elected head of state, we reflected carefully on whether and
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how we should take part in today's proceedings. butjust as it would be wrong to give a performance of feeling not sincerely felt, it would equally be felt to imply by our absence any kind of personal disrespect to those who have lost someone important to them, whether personally or otherwise. this has been a year of terrible loss for the world. including up to 150,000 deaths across the uk, most of them announced without ceremony as daily statistics. the toll has been heaviest on those with least. but while there is no great leveller in how we live our lives, we are today reminded that there is no extreme of wealth, privilege or status which can protect us from mortality. every human being is indeed equal in this respect, death comes to us all, and every family faces the pain of loss. so regardless of our different
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views, respect and compassion are due in equal measure to everyone of us at such times. such moments bring pain to family and friends and for a public figure like prince philip, others will share that paint to a greater or lesser degree. death is also part of life's cycle, bringing also part of life's cycle, bringing a change of generations was not those who come after will build on the legacy of what they have been left but will also rethink, reinvent and alter course. they still own much to those who went before, who may have lived by different values. many have spoken about prince philip's environment till —ism. today's environmental movement overwhelmingly places responsibility for the global crisis on the powerful, and would not seek to reconcile conservation with the blood sport of the wealthy. it is still the case that a debt is owed to those whose environmentalism did
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achieve global awareness, even if it was shaped by different values than today's. it is said that prince philip wished to modernise the monarchy, and no doubt in time it will again consider if it can do so. how a royalfamily will again consider if it can do so. how a royal family can keep will again consider if it can do so. how a royalfamily can keep pace with the modern democratic society it is meant to serve, and respect they diversity of that society in its words and deeds. others will question whether it can. that debate is not for today, today is to extend our thoughts to his family and all those who are grieving for the loved ones in a spirit of respect of the equal value of every human life. thank you. equal value of every human life. thank you-— equal value of every human life. thank ou. . . thank you. can i call willie rennie? i wish to associate _ thank you. can i call willie rennie? i wish to associate myself _ thank you. can i call willie rennie? i wish to associate myself with - thank you. can i call willie rennie? i wish to associate myself with all. i wish to associate myself with all of the fitting tributes from today and over the weekend? i used to wear and over the weekend? i used to wear a badge on my lapel, it was a little
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blue man. the duke of edinburgh spotted it at a reception. he bounced up, demanding to know what it was. to show support for the prostate cancer campaign, i said. he looked at me closely, he said, have you got it or are you against it? then he bounced off again. the engagement was only 30 seconds long, but it has stayed with me, to be retold many times over the years. he left a lasting impression is with so many others as well. some less repeatable than others, but so many were fun and memorable. sometimes they were offended, but i don't share the view that he was an offensive man. for so many, he has been part of a family that has provided comfort and stability in what can be a turbulent and intimidating world. decades of
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public service through his 99 years with us. his steadfast presence when so much is changing. his support for the queen, his wife, loyal service to family and country. strength and stay. his weight behind charities, especially the environment. all of those are good things, and we should cherish good things. my two boys have been axis in the duke of end of award, —— have been active. stephen is still working through, with expeditions and cooking, to our great benefit, but also mountain biking as well. his impact on my family has been great. his impact on millions of others has been utterly outstanding. learning new skills, meeting new people, showing
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leadership, building teams, maturing, growing. hundreds of thousands of young people participate in the programme every yearin participate in the programme every year in countries across the globe. in scotland alone, 20,000 started the programme last year. 11,000 achieved awards in that year. the reach is astonishing. it was the duke of edinburgh's inspiration all those years ago, and it has blossomed under his leadership. changing lives for ever. that is a lasting legacy to be proud of. so to the queen and to herfamily, all our thoughts are with you today. for everything prince philip, i think we also thank you. everything prince philip, i think we also thank you-— everything prince philip, i think we also thank you. thank you very much. can i also thank you. thank you very much. can i thank— also thank you. thank you very much. can i thank all— also thank you. thank you very much. can i thank all of— also thank you. thank you very much. can i thank all of the _ also thank you. thank you very much. can i thank all of the party _ also thank you. thank you very much. can i thank all of the party leaders i can i thank all of the party leaders for their— can i thank all of the party leaders for their contributions and all members for attending this morning. that was— members for attending this morning. that was a _ members for attending this morning. that was a special session that has
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been taking place at holyrood as the parliament was recalled. only the sixth time that has happened. lorna gordon is in holyrood. a significant moment? yes, parliament is recalled very rarely. most recently, politicians returned here injanuary most recently, politicians returned here in january to discuss most recently, politicians returned here injanuary to discuss the covid—19 pandemic, but today party leaders returned to pay tribute to the life of prince philip, and to the life of prince philip, and to the contributions he made to society, most notably here in scotland. of course, the first minister said this was a country that prince philip love from a very early age. she said she got to witness the strength of the partnership between her majesty the queen and the duke of edinburgh annually during the first minister's stays at barra moral. she said she found it's full of a thoughtful, deeply interesting, intelligent man,
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and they shared a great love of books. he was present at key moments in scottish history, including the opening of this parliament. it was then the turn of ruth davidson, who was leading for the scottish conservatives here. she recalled the words of the queen, grief is the price we pay for love. she noted, as did nicola sturgeon, that prince philip was supportive of a powerful woman in an era perhaps when that was far less common. she drew attention to the contributions he made in particular supporting the patronage is of organisations here in the city. he was the chancellor of the university here for 57 years. also, of course, she pointed out those moments of humour for which the prince was well known, perhaps here most notably a moment that he
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had with a member of the former scottish conservatives, with eight shared a joke about —— where they see at a joke about tartan. the scottish labour leader said that he had not met prince philip, but he related the story of a man who was imprisoned and found purpose in his life or taking part in the of edinburgh award scheme. he extended his sympathy to everyone in these difficult times, the queen, and those thousands who have lost loved ones to covid—19. patrick harvey, the scottish greens, they wish for an elected head of state, but he said that the debate on retaining the monarchy is not for today, today
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is for paying respect to the royal family and to the queen. that was a sentiment also reflected by willie rennie, the leader of the liberal democrats. he said that prince philip has dedicated his life to decades of public service, and to supporting the queen and the country. he said, just last year, 20,000 people here in scotland, young people, started the duke of edinburgh programme. that programme change lives for ever, and it was a lasting legacy for which the duke of edinburgh could be proud. thank lasting legacy for which the duke of edinburgh could be proud. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. hello again. some of us woke up this morning to some sleet and some snow. now, that will continue to push away towards the south and the south—east, clearing early afternoon, leaving us with a largely dry day, a fair bit of sunshine, and some scattered showers. most of the showers will be of rain, but in some of the heavier bursts, you might see
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a rebate of wintriness. temperatures — six in the north, about ten or 11 as we come further south. through this evening and overnight, temperatures falling away quite rapidly. the showers will also fade. but out towards the west, there will be thicker cloud producing some showers, and that cloud will help maintain the temperature level as we go through the night. but for many of us, another widespread frost, with temperatures falling below freezing, possibly minus five, minus six in parts of the highlands. now, tomorrow we start off on that frosty night, but a lot of sunshine, a lot of dry weather. through the day, a bit more cloud will develop, and we'll see more showers than we are going to today, with temperatures of six in the north to 12—13 as we come down towards the south.
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hello. this is bbc news with lukwesa burak. the headlines... long queues in the high streets as shops reopen. borisjohnson asks everyone to "behave responsibly" as england takes its next step out of lockdown. wales is also letting non—essential shops to re—open, and allowing trips to and from other parts of the uk again.
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david cameron's facing demands from labour to appear before parliament, to answer what the party says are serious questions about his work as a lobbyist. mps will return to the commons from their easter break a day early, to pay tribute to the duke of edinburgh. and nomadland — a drama about a woman who starts a new life on the road in the american midwest — won four baftas last night. sport, and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's austin. good morning. tottenham hotspur say they are going to conduct a review into racist abuse of footballers on social media, after their forward son—hueng min was targeted online. son was abused after tottanham's 3—1 defeat
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to manchester united yesterday. the forward was caught in the face by scott mctominay in an incident that saw united have a goal disallowed. in a statement, tottenham say "the abuse has been reported to the platforms" and that their review, alongside the premier league, will "determine the most effective course of action." well, on the field, sheffield united's relegation from the premier league could be confirmed as soon as next weekend. they've only won four games all season. their latest defeat coming at home to arsenal — alex lacazette with two goals for the gunners as they won 3—0. sheffield united are bottom of the table, 18 points from safety, with just 21 left to play for. if they lose at wolves on saturday, they're all but down but interim manager paul heckingbottam says that's not an excuse for heads to drop. everyone has got something to play full. everyone has got their own situation, as well as the team's.
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the moment you want a breather, you are not prepared to give 100%, you are not prepared to give 100%, you are not prepared to give 100%, you are not good for the team when noted for the club. we have to make sure thatis for the club. we have to make sure that is the message. everything else can be a distraction if you let it. hideki matsuyama says he hopes his masters win at augusta will "open the floodgates" for golfers from japan. matsuyama became the first japanese man to win a major title — with his green jacket now forever marking him a masters champion. but after going into sunday with a a—shot lead, the final round wasn't quite as comfortable as he would have liked, as andy swiss reports. a moment of victory, and history. for hideki matsuyama, and forjapan, a first masters title, but not without a little drama. it had seemed a victory procession. matsuyama was four clear with just four holes left. but then he found the water... ..and his playing partner, xander schauffele, found a birdie. suddenly, the american wasjust two behind.
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but at the very next hole it was schauffele's turn to make a costly error, and his hopes disappeared with it. still it wasn't over though, as the unheralded will zalatoris posted a target — some performance on his masters debut. but after his wobble, matsuyama held his nerve and tapped in for triumph. the celebrations might have been understated, but the achievement was huge — the first japanese man to win any major championship, a moment for him and for his country to savour. andy swiss, bbc news. congratulations, hideki. thank you. another bit of golfing history at augusta. matsuyama looked pretty relieved didn't he to slip into the famous green jacket. but he admitted, on that final round, the nerves were there from the first tee to the last putt. and before the tournament, he didn't think he had a chance of winning. congratulations. translation: it has been a struggle this year. - no top tens. i haven't even contented.
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—— contended. i came here with little or no expectation. as the week progressed, as i practised, especially on wednesday, ifelt something again. ifound something in my swing. and when that happens the confidence returns. well, you can get plenty more from matsuyama's win on the bbc sport website — including some of the highlights from his final round. that's bbc.co.uk/sport. but that's all your sport for now. the government is urging us to behave responsibly as lockdown restrictions are eased. non—essential retail, gym and beauty salons are opening in england, and hospitality can serve customers outside. that is quite important for a place like leicester. the easing of lockdown must come as a relief
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for people in leicester, who have been living under some form of restrictions for more than a year. martine croxall is there and has been spending the morning in a pub garden, speaking to locals. the easing of lockdown must come as a relief for people in leicester. leicester was the first place in the country to see a local lockdown, which meant months of extra restrictions. professor brown works for leicester city council and has been navigating all these difficulties. thank you forjoining us here. when you look back on the last year, what are your immediate reflections on it?— reflections on it? when i look on it, like everybody _ reflections on it? when i look on it, like everybody else, - reflections on it? when i look on it, like everybody else, none i reflections on it? when i look on it, like everybody else, none of. reflections on it? when i look on i it, like everybody else, none of us could _ it, like everybody else, none of us could have — it, like everybody else, none of us could have anticipated the scope and magnitude of what took place over the last— magnitude of what took place over the last year. it has been a year of
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adjustment. — the last year. it has been a year of adjustment, a year are very hard work, _ adjustment, a year are very hard work. and — adjustment, a year are very hard work. and a _ adjustment, a year are very hard work, and a year are thus getting used _ work, and a year are thus getting used to— work, and a year are thus getting used to deep and we keep calling the new norm~ _ used to deep and we keep calling the new norm. :, : used to deep and we keep calling the new norm. ., ., ., , ., new norm. how hard had it been for --eole new norm. how hard had it been for people and — new norm. how hard had it been for people and left _ new norm. how hard had it been for people and left there _ new norm. how hard had it been for people and left there to _ new norm. how hard had it been for people and left there to maintain i people and left there to maintain anything like a normal life when to have the extra restrictions in place? ht have the extra restrictions in lace? : , have the extra restrictions in lace? , , ., , place? it has been sexually difficult- — place? it has been sexually difficult. i— place? it has been sexually difficult. i live _ place? it has been sexually difficult. i live in _ place? it has been sexually difficult. i live in the - place? it has been sexually difficult. i live in the city. i place? it has been sexually| difficult. i live in the city. -- difficult. i live in the city. —— extraordinarily difficult. the impact _ extraordinarily difficult. the impact on social, mental well—being, for us, _ impact on social, mental well—being, for us is _ impact on social, mental well—being, for us, is exacerbated. how essential. _ for us, is exacerbated. how essential, how— for us, is exacerbated. how essential, how right - for us, is exacerbated. how essential, how right it - for us, is exacerbated. how essential, how right it is i for us, is exacerbated. how essential, how right it is a i essential, how right it is a decision for leicester to be trapped with these extra restrictions? when you think about the data that could have been shared, could it have been made easier for you to escape some of them? ., ., ., ., ., of them? the more information we had and the more — of them? the more information we had and the more we _ of them? the more information we had and the more we knew— of them? the more information we had and the more we knew about _ of them? the more information we had
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and the more we knew about the - and the more we knew about the virus. _ and the more we knew about the virus. i_ and the more we knew about the virus, i believe it would have made a tremendous difference. the difficulties we have had, i have had sympathy— difficulties we have had, i have had sympathy for everyone involved, it was a _ sympathy for everyone involved, it was a novel— sympathy for everyone involved, it was a novel virus, a new situation. we were _ was a novel virus, a new situation. we were in— was a novel virus, a new situation. we were in a — was a novel virus, a new situation. we were in a local lockdown compared with regional. that was not repeated. i wish we were later down the line _ repeated. i wish we were later down the line and — repeated. i wish we were later down the line and where we were. remind us why leicester _ the line and where we were. remind us why leicester was _ the line and where we were. remind us why leicester was in _ the line and where we were. remind us why leicester was in this - us why leicester was in this particular situation. what is it about the make—up of the city which meant you face these restrictions and higher infection rates? these are two different _ and higher infection rates? these are two different questions - and higher infection rates? these are two different questions anyway. the first _ are two different questions anyway. the first reason as to why it happened over the summer, we were all in this— happened over the summer, we were all in this situation in march. tickets— all in this situation in march. tickets started to come down. what happened _ tickets started to come down. what happened in leicester is that we had a slightly— happened in leicester is that we had a slightly different profile. it
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rises — a slightly different profile. it rises more slowly and forms more slowly _ rises more slowly and forms more slowly. that is difficult when restrictions ease. over the summer we had _ restrictions ease. over the summer we had figures that were considerably higher than other parts of the _ considerably higher than other parts of the country. that is when the conversation around local lockdown is was _ conversation around local lockdown is was in _ conversation around local lockdown is was in place. it is conversation around local lockdown is was in place-— is was in place. it is rather difficult- — is was in place. it is rather difficult. this _ is was in place. it is rather difficult. this is _ is was in place. it is rather difficult. this is loaded i is was in place. it is ratherl difficult. this is loaded with politics. as a public health professional, how much betterfor you would it have been had there been less centralisation of the response and a greater ability to respond locally, acting on your local knowledge, of what leicester city is like?— city is like? absolutely. not a olitical city is like? absolutely. not a political point _ city is like? absolutely. not a political point but _ city is like? absolutely. not a political point but we - city is like? absolutely. not a political point but we know i city is like? absolutely. not a i political point but we know that localisation works better for us. we know _ localisation works better for us. we know our— localisation works better for us. we know our population, we know where they are, _ know our population, we know where they are, we — know our population, we know where they are, we know where to test and contact _ they are, we know where to test and contact tracers that there has been more _ contact tracers that there has been more of— contact tracers that there has been more of a — contact tracers that there has been more of a need to getting some of those _ more of a need to getting some of those into— more of a need to getting some of those into the local setting. we
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would _ those into the local setting. we would have wanted to do that from the start — would have wanted to do that from the start. 35m would have wanted to do that from the start. : , , , ., the start. an immense sense of relief that _ the start. an immense sense of relief that restrictions _ the start. an immense sense of relief that restrictions are i relief that restrictions are beginning to ease. how well—placed is the city not to keep bouncing backin is the city not to keep bouncing back in and out from the lessons you have learned not to say these restrictions imposed again, hopefully?— restrictions imposed again, hopefully? restrictions imposed again, ho efull ? . , ., hopefully? there are things we have in lace. hopefully? there are things we have in place- there _ hopefully? there are things we have in place. there was _ hopefully? there are things we have in place. there was a _ hopefully? there are things we have in place. there was a point - hopefully? there are things we have in place. there was a point about i in place. there was a point about more _ in place. there was a point about more local— in place. there was a point about more local control. that helped us tremendously, having testing widely available, _ tremendously, having testing widely available, that helps us as well. make _ available, that helps us as well. make no — available, that helps us as well. make no mistake. this is a challenging time for us all. coronavirus has not gone away. what i coronavirus has not gone away. what i want _ coronavirus has not gone away. what i want to _ coronavirus has not gone away. what i want to see — coronavirus has not gone away. what i want to see is making sure we realise — i want to see is making sure we realise this _ i want to see is making sure we realise this is not a free pass and not a _ realise this is not a free pass and not a free — realise this is not a free pass and not a free for all. we must learn the lessons _ not a free for all. we must learn the lessons of the past, all of us have _ the lessons of the past, all of us have to — the lessons of the past, all of us have to make sure the step of caution — have to make sure the step of caution is _ have to make sure the step of caution is taken as a start to ease along _ caution is taken as a start to ease along the — caution is taken as a start to ease along the road map.—
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caution is taken as a start to ease along the road map. thank you very much for talking _ along the road map. thank you very much for talking to _ along the road map. thank you very much for talking to us. _ along the road map. thank you very much for talking to us. that - along the road map. thank you very. much for talking to us. that message coming across loud and clear that this is just the coming across loud and clear that this isjust the beginning and coming across loud and clear that this is just the beginning and there are rules we all need to follow. it's a good day for the high street, as shops and salons welcome back customers. our business presenter ben thompson is outside regent arcade in cheltenham. do you know what, we havejust do you know what, we have just got some figures three, talking about that. the figures look impressive. i am sure you can break them down for us. —— footfall. tyre—macro welcome to cheltenham. what we are seeing is reflected in those figures. they are footfall figures. ——
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reflected in those figures. they are footfall figures. --_ footfall figures. -- welcome to cheltenham. _ footfall figures. -- welcome to cheltenham. the _ footfall figures. -- welcome to cheltenham. the figures i footfall figures. -- welcome to cheltenham. the figures have i footfall figures. -- welcome to i cheltenham. the figures have been collated. _ cheltenham. the figures have been collated, giving us an indication of how many— collated, giving us an indication of how many of us are back there. i streets _ how many of us are back there. i streets at — how many of us are back there. i streets at his hundred and 30% on the same — streets at his hundred and 30% on the same time last week. coming from a very— the same time last week. coming from a very low— the same time last week. coming from a very low base with most things shut messages will look impressive. even if_ shut messages will look impressive. even if more people are at than last week, _ even if more people are at than last week, it _ even if more people are at than last week, it will— even if more people are at than last week, it will be a big jump. people are out— week, it will be a big jump. people are out in— week, it will be a big jump. people are out in force, getting back into shops, _ are out in force, getting back into shops cafe — are out in force, getting back into shops, cafe is as well. welcome news for them _ shops, cafe is as well. welcome news for them. take shops, cafe is as well. welcome news forthem. take a shops, cafe is as well. welcome news for them. take a look. there had been _ for them. take a look. there had been a _ for them. take a look. there had been a number of casualties of this pandemic — been a number of casualties of this pandemic. top shop, top man, one of the highest _ pandemic. top shop, top man, one of the highest profile. the still empty now brought up —— bought up by a rival— now brought up —— bought up by a rival online — now brought up —— bought up by a rival online only. good morning,
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emily _ rival online only. good morning, emily if— rival online only. good morning, emily. if how exciting is it? we have been _ emily. if how exciting is it? 9 have been building up to this. so much going on and so many preparations to get to this stage. talking about the preparations we done _ talking about the preparations we done a _ talking about the preparations we done a load of work to be able to reopen — done a load of work to be able to reopen |t— done a load of work to be able to reo en. : , , done a load of work to be able to reoen. , .,~ reopen. it has been in the making since we have _ reopen. it has been in the making since we have closed. _ reopen. it has been in the making since we have closed. 800 - reopen. it has been in the makingi since we have closed. 800 people reopen. it has been in the making i since we have closed. 800 people on the priority list to make sure they have but ten. in terms of safety, we had done everything we can in terms of guidelines. we have in terms of guidelines. it has for our team into two. extending opening hours. we are open seven days a week. we have a private room for vulnerable clients. if anyone is anxious, they had a one—to—one with a stylus. we have separated stations with disposable towels. people in ppa with masks, etc. , , ,., .,
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etc. -- ppe. ie is seeing some real disasters? — etc. -- ppe. ie is seeing some real disasters? we _ etc. -- ppe. ie is seeing some real disasters? we have. _ etc. -- ppe. ie is seeing some real disasters? we have. we _ etc. -- ppe. ie is seeing some real disasters? we have. we have i disasters? we have. we have encouraged — disasters? we have. we have encouraged people _ disasters? we have. we have encouraged people to - disasters? we have. we have encouraged people to stay i disasters? we have. we have i encouraged people to stay away disasters? we have. we have - encouraged people to stay away from the box die and leave the roots to the box die and leave the roots to the professionals that they want to look their best. we have found consumer habits have changed. they have something —— people have wanted something more low maintenance. talk to me about your order book. lots of people _ to me about your order book. lots of people desperate to get their hair cut. people desperate to get their hair cut you're — people desperate to get their hair cut. you're doing it with the rest are _ cut. you're doing it with the rest are talking _ cut. you're doing it with the rest are. talking about bookings, making up are. talking about bookings, making up for— are. talking about bookings, making up for some — are. talking about bookings, making up for some of what you lost last year~ _ up for some of what you lost last ear. , ., ._ .., up for some of what you lost last ear. , ., ._ .. ., ~ year. there is no way we can make that u- year. there is no way we can make that up because — year. there is no way we can make that up because those _ year. there is no way we can make that up because those haircuts i year. there is no way we can make that up because those haircuts are| that up because those haircuts are gone. we are trying to keep the settled business with cash flows and things like that. we have booked up until mid—may, which is fantastic. we have a priority list. people with
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previous bookings have been put in as a priority. there is definitely the demand. people keep returning to rest and keep the loyalty intact. ht rest and keep the loyalty intact. it has been a really tough year. you are telling — has been a really tough year. you are telling me earlier about how much _ are telling me earlier about how much he — are telling me earlier about how much he has been shut this year. a haircut— much he has been shut this year. a haircut is— much he has been shut this year. a haircut is something you cannot make up haircut is something you cannot make up for~ _ haircut is something you cannot make up for~ -- _ haircut is something you cannot make up for. -- you — haircut is something you cannot make up for. —— you have been shut. it is up for. -- you have been shut. it is the first time _ up for. -- you have been shut. it is the first time we _ up for. -- you have been shut. it is the first time we had _ up for. —— you have been shut. tit 3 the first time we had not been in control of our business. we do not know what his round the corner. it is really difficult. it has been tough on our team. they start up again and then stopped. it has been really difficult. the team has been amazing and rolled with the punches. everything they have had to deal has been sad. our clientele has been kind to us. getting excited. goad kind to us. getting excited. good luck. he have _ kind to us. getting excited. good luck. he have loads— kind to us. getting excited. good luck. he have loads of— kind to us. getting excited. good luck. he have loads of work- kind to us. getting excited. good
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luck. he have loads of work still to do. luck. he have loads of work still to do thank— luck. he have loads of work still to do. thank you for talking to us. —— you have _ do. thank you for talking to us. —— you have loads of work. lots of businesses _ you have loads of work. lots of businesses excited about being able to reopen _ businesses excited about being able to reopen. businesses like hairdressers being shut for 200 days last year~ _ hairdressers being shut for 200 days last year. they are excited at getting — last year. they are excited at getting people back and cash flow through— getting people back and cash flow through the business. it was snowing earlier~ _ through the business. it was snowing earlier~ i_ through the business. it was snowing earlier. i need to take a few layers of. i earlier. i need to take a few layers of i have — earlier. i need to take a few layers of. i have noticed shorts around town _ of. i have noticed shorts around town. people are embracing getting back to _ town. people are embracing getting back to the high street in whatever way they— back to the high street in whatever way they want. 35m back to the high street in whatever way they want-— way they want. an unusual and welcome sight _ way they want. an unusual and welcome sight behind - way they want. an unusual and welcome sight behind you. i way they want. an unusual and i welcome sight behind you. thank way they want. an unusual and - welcome sight behind you. thank you. the prime minister will lead tributes to the duke of edinburgh in the commons later, as parliament is recalled a day early from its easter break. princess anne said her father had left a "legacy which can inspire us all". prince andrew said the queen had described prince philip's death as "having left a huge void in her life." our royal correspondent daniela relph has this report.
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it'll be a week of reflection here in windsor as the town prepares for the duke of edinburgh's funeral. over the weekend, his children attended church in windsor great park and spoke personally of their grief and loss. it's very, very sad. but i have to say that the extraordinary tributes and the memories that everybody has had and been willing to share has been so fantastic. and itjust goes to show he might have been ourfather, grandfather, father—in—law. but but he meant so much to so many other people. it's so lovely for so many people to learn about what he did, because i think it's actually, quite a lot of things that have come out would have surprised some people. the countess also spoke to estate staff who knew the duke. she told them his death had been very peaceful. she said it was as if someone had taken him by the hand and off he went.
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princess anne paid her own tribute, releasing this photo of her and herfather at the london olympics in 2012. of his death, she said, "you know it's going to happen, but you're never really ready. "we will miss him, but he leaves a legacy which can inspire us all." the family focus is now on protecting and supporting the queen as she mourns. her son prince andrew said after 73 years of marriage, she felt there was now a huge void in her life. daniela relph, bbc news, windsor. let's speak to the actor and impressionist, jon culshaw, ambassadorfor the duke of edinburgh awards. thank you forjoining us here on bbc news. you have a big smile. we show you during the report with a proud look on yourface you during the report with a proud look on your face in the role you
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have at the moment. ht is look on your face in the role you have at the moment.— have at the moment. it is a wonderful— have at the moment. it is a wonderfulthing. _ have at the moment. it is a wonderfulthing. i- have at the moment. it is a wonderfulthing. i had i have at the moment. it is a| wonderfulthing. i had been have at the moment. it is a i wonderfulthing. i had been an ambassadorfor the duke wonderfulthing. i had been an ambassador for the duke of wonderfulthing. i had been an ambassadorfor the duke of edinburgh awards for it must be 20 years. on the occasions where awards are given, they are very happy occasions. young people complete their awards project and it ends up with a day in the palace where they are going to be awarded. we look to similar days in the future, wonderfully inspiring occasions. do you have your gold? it did not take place in my particular school, in the 80s. i would like to think i made up for that by pitching in with the award scheme in my present days. what was it like working with prince philip on the duke of edinburgh award scheme? what was it like working so closely with him? you met him so many — working so closely with him? you met him so many times. _ working so closely with him? you met him so many times. one _ working so closely with him? you met him so many times. one memory - working so closely with him? you met him so many times. one memory i i working so closely with him? you met i him so many times. one memory i take from the awards presentation days, young people are quite nervous.
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again the palace, they are about to receive a gold award and be presented to the duke of edinburgh. there is a sense of nervousness that goes on. the duke of edinburgh had a way of not simply putting young people at their ease that having them rocking with laughter, such was his rep that he and his chat with them along those lines, and sense of humour. one thing that meant such a lot to him, he wanted to hearfrom the young people about their experience, taking part enabled, how they felt about it, and how they were passing that experience onto others in an encouraging way. he wanted to hear all about that. not just a quick chat and onto the next group. he really cared and wanted to know how they felt.— know how they felt. talking to young artici ants know how they felt. talking to young participants of _ know how they felt. talking to young participants of this _
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know how they felt. talking to young participants of this game, _ know how they felt. talking to young participants of this game, was - know how they felt. talking to young participants of this game, was he - participants of this game, was he hearing what he had set out to achieve? was he hearing, yes, i have done it? what was his reaction once he had had the conversations? it was he had had the conversations? it was one of extreme _ he had had the conversations? it was one of extreme satisfaction - he had had the conversations? it was one of extreme satisfaction and - one of extreme satisfaction and feeling very pleased in a pragmatic way he had. here was an amazing platform. to use that to inspire people notjust in a manner that was a quick hit that any that was going to last their whole life and the next generation would enjoy in the same way. it has been in existence for 66 years or more now. this is... i think that was of immense satisfaction to him. do i think that was of immense satisfaction to him.- i think that was of immense satisfaction to him. do you think that is what _ satisfaction to him. do you think that is what is _ satisfaction to him. do you think that is what is the _ satisfaction to him. do you think that is what is the power - satisfaction to him. do you think that is what is the power of - satisfaction to him. do you think that is what is the power of the l that is what is the power of the duke of edinburgh scheme? that empowerment. we have heard so much about confidence and how it transformed my life. what was the
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magic ingredient?— transformed my life. what was the magic ingredient? there were so many facets to it and — magic ingredient? there were so many facets to it and so _ magic ingredient? there were so many facets to it and so many _ magic ingredient? there were so many facets to it and so many of— magic ingredient? there were so many facets to it and so many of the - facets to it and so many of the projects and parts of the award that young people take on. many aspects, reaching their own potential and achieving things i never thought would be possible. the other aspect of it, helping others and seeing the benefits that brings. many different facets to it which just made the participants feel like they had grown and learned something and taken on, something they can go on later to teach. taken on, something they can go on later to teach-— later to teach. very fulfilling all round. i later to teach. very fulfilling all round- i was — later to teach. very fulfilling all round. i was reading _ later to teach. very fulfilling all round. i was reading some - later to teach. very fulfilling all - round. i was reading some background information on this. it came across, he was saying, he had an idea of encouraging people to follow the things they enjoyed. it was not always about a formal education. where do you think that came from? where do you think that came from? where are you able to put a finger
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on it? a, where are you able to put a finger on it? �* ., ., u, ., where are you able to put a finger on it? �* ., ., ., ,., on it? a formal education is one thin and on it? a formal education is one thing and you — on it? a formal education is one thing and you have _ on it? a formal education is one thing and you have to _ on it? a formal education is one thing and you have to pitch - on it? a formal education is one thing and you have to pitch in i on it? a formal education is one l thing and you have to pitch in with that. there are many more aspects to life in a more practical way, a sense of experience, getting out and get a sense of what you can do. he saw it in that four dimensional way and felt it was very important this was a manner to learn, the academic side as well as getting out there. that pragmatism. when we first started chatting, we talked about youngsters rocking with laughter. he was comfortable to deviate from protocol in the right circumstances. what did the youngsters come away with? they had a good laugh but their impression of him? thea;r with? they had a good laugh but their impression of him? they felt valued, their impression of him? they felt valued. that _ their impression of him? they felt valued, that their _ their impression of him? they felt valued, that their stories - their impression of him? they felt valued, that their stories were - their impression of him? they felt valued, that their stories were of| valued, that their stories were of importance. he wanted to hear what their experiences had been. that
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meant a lot to him that they saw that. they could see how important it was and felt more valued because of that. there was one occasion, backin of that. there was one occasion, back in march 2013, a presentation in a picture gallery at stjames's palace. there was a painting on the wall of a comet, a crescent moon, at the time of the setting sun. in the twilight sky that evening, the comet was visible at the time of the setting sun with a crescent moon. this painting was depicting the night sky from that very night. that is something me and the young people enjoyed talking about. the duke of edinburgh was fascinated by that as well. he said, the painting is of the night sky tonight, that is of
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news to me. i the night sky tonight, that is of news to me— news to me. iwill check. i am impressed _ news to me. iwill check. i am impressed he _ news to me. iwill check. i am impressed he managed - news to me. iwill check. i am impressed he managed to - news to me. iwill check. i am impressed he managed to slip news to me. i will check. i am i impressed he managed to slip in news to me. i will check. i am - impressed he managed to slip in your interest of cosmology. well done. i was coming to that. he did have a trading mind. you say he was a governor in the arena of humour, so you must have got on like a house on fire. he collected political cartoons. he had such a wide and varying range of interests. personally, what reflection do you have on prince philip, your best memories of him? hal have on prince philip, your best memories of him?— have on prince philip, your best memories of him? not 'ust being symbolically * memories of him? not 'ust being symbolically royal— memories of him? not 'ust being symbolically royal but _ memories of him? notjust being symbolically royal but getting i memories of him? notjust being| symbolically royal but getting out there and wanting to experience things, having the immense opinion on things, not being able to... being perfectly willing to say so and a willingness to get out there and a willingness to get out there and shake things and influence things. i
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and shake things and influence thins. , . ., , ., things. i expect applications for the gop is _ things. i expect applications for the gop is going _ things. i expect applications for the gop is going to _ things. i expect applications for the gop is going to be - things. i expect applications for the gop is going to be going i things. i expect applications for the gop is going to be going up things. i expect applications for - the gop is going to be going up now, aren't they? == the gop is going to be going up now, aren't they?— the gop is going to be going up now, aren't they?_ thank - the gop is going to be going up now, aren't they?_ thank you - aren't they? -- d of e. thank you very much — aren't they? -- d of e. thank you very much indeed. _ aren't they? -- d of e. thank you very much indeed. thank - aren't they? -- d of e. thank you very much indeed. thank you. - that was just a quick discussion about the legacy of the duke of edinburgh's awards. let's ta ke let's take you to central london. these are customers enjoying the new easing of restrictions. that is a pad. people enjoying a drink. pub.
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now it's time for a look at the weather. hello again. we've just had the coldest april night in the uk since april 2013, the temperature fell to minus 9.4 celsius in tulloch bridge in the highlands. now, we're going to have frost as we go through the next few nights, but we are looking also at sunshine and showers, some of which will be wintry. you can see the blue hue across the charts, but tuesday and wednesday in the west, not quite as cold. then we see a return to more of a northeasterly coming in off the north sea, so in the east, it will be colder. but what we have today is this weather front draped across some central and western parts of the uk. that's what's produced this morning's snow. some of us woken up to a covering. and as we go through the rest of this morning, it will continue to push down towards the south and southeast this afternoon, leaving us with a largely dry afternoon, and some scattered showers. in some of the heavy rains in the north this afternoon, there may still be some wintriness. but for most of us, it should remain dry. temperatures six to about 10—11 degrees, so below average for this stage in april. as we head on through the evening and overnight, temperatures under those clear skies will fall away quite quickly. again, there'll be a few
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showers to start with. many of them will fade, but thicker cloud across western scotland, northwest england and northern ireland will produce some showers, and here temperatures won't fall away as far. elsewhere, we're looking at temperatures widely below freezing and indeed across parts of northeast scotland, as low as minus five or indeed minus six. so as we head through tomorrow, high pressure is still firmly in charge of our weather, hardly a breath of wind. a bit more cloud bubbling up as we go through the course of the day after that frosty start. but to start with, certainly there'll be a lot of sunshine. so with this cloud, a peppering of showers, especially in western areas, but spreading a bit farther eastwards through the course of the afternoon. and temperatures, well, better than today. we're looking at widely between about ten and 12 degrees, with the odd exception to that rule. high pressure still very much with us from tuesday into wednesday, so overnight once again, under clear skies, there will be some frost around, a risk of ice on untreated surfaces just here and there. and after a bright, sunny start through the day again, we will see more clouds spread out and develop, producing the odd shower.
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but for most, it is going to remain dry. temperatures by then eight to about 13 degrees, but always feeling cooler along the north sea coastline.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: long queues in the high streets as shops reopen — borisjohnson asks everyone to "behave responsibly" as england takes its next step out of lockdown. early figures suggest that high—street footfall is up by more than 230% this morning, so i am in cheltenham, looking at our appetite to go out and spend. easing of the rules too in wales, where non—essential shops, gyms and beauty salons can all re—open. mps return to the commons from their easter break a day early, to pay tribute to the duke of edinburgh. labour demands david cameron appears before parliament, to answer "serious questions" about his lobbying of current minsters for a company he had shares in.
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nomadland. applause and nomadland — a drama about a woman who starts a new life on the road in the american midwest — won four baftas last night. the prime minister has asked us all to "behave responsibly" as england takes its next step in easing lockdown restrictions from today. pubs and restaurants can now serve customers outside — and allshops, gyms, hairdressers and beauty salons can re—open. some rules have also been relaxed in wales, scotland and northern ireland. aru na iyengar reports. opening its doors at midnight. regulars at this huddersfield
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pub have been waiting for this moment for months. what used to be taken for granted now a luxury to be savoured. drinking could only take place outdoors, so was the chilly weather a put—off? it was snowing earlier, but i was still going to come out. just put my coat on! after 14 months of not going anywhere except funerals, it's a great plus. we didn't even know- if anyone was going to come. it's in huddersfield, _ it's midnight, it's freezing cold. and if you look, everyone's come. there isn't a single table that people haven't arrived at. - thousands of businesses are reopening under the next phase of covid restriction easing. in england, shops can open, pubs and restaurants can serve customers outdoors. hairdressers, salons, gyms and outdoor attractions like zoos and theme parks can now be visited. in wales, nonessential shops can reopen today, but it will be a few more weeks until pubs can do the same. travel restrictions across the border have been eased, and most children
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are back in school. and in scotland, most children will return to school unless they're shielding. some are still closed for easter holidays. in northern ireland, all children are back in school. the stay at home message is being relaxed, and up to ten people from two households can meet in a private garden. in a statement, prime minister boris johnson struck a cautious tone. he said, "i urge everyone to continue to behave responsibly and remember, hands, face, space and fresh air to suppress covid as we push on with our vaccination programme." but there's no stopping the enthusiasm of pub landlords as they prepare to pull the pints. this pub in bexleyheath applied for a temporary licence to open at midnight. i think we've come through the woods, so i'm hoping that this is sort of a rebirth, almost, and that we're open now for the foreseeable. the next big date for hospitality will be may the 17th, when hopefully customers will be able to enjoy a meal
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and a drink indoors. aruna iyengar, bbc news. the easing of lockdown must come as a relief for people in leicester, who have been living under some form of restrictions for more than a year. martine croxall is there and has been spending the morning in a pub garden. over the unexpectedly in the spotlight, explaining the various aspects of coronavirus and the pandemic to us as members of the public. one of them is doctorjulian tang, a clinical virologist from the university of leicester. lovely to meet you here in leicester. instead of talking to you down the line. thank you forjoining us. the easing of restrictions, when it comes to pubs and restaurants, is serving out site has several advantages. you have a low—
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site has several advantages. ml. have a low occupancy, low density to reduce the virus, you have the sunlight and the breeze to move the virus away and sterilise it to some extent. so that will reduce the risk of transmission, not to zero, but the vaccine will also help with that if you have been vaccinated. eventually we will be able to eat and drink indoors. they're the challenges lie. how do you lessen risks indoors? if challenges lie. how do you lessen risks indoors?— challenges lie. how do you lessen risks indoors? if we can reproduce some of the _ risks indoors? if we can reproduce some of the situation _ risks indoors? if we can reproduce some of the situation like - risks indoors? if we can reproduce| some of the situation like outside, like opening windows, keeping doors open, reducing the number of people inside, improving ventilation inside, improving ventilation inside, that will help. obviously you cannot have sunlight inside, but if you have people socially distanced, that will help as well. how likely is it that we will see a risk, arise, should i say in infections with the easing of lockdown, no matter how cautious we are with these rules? the lockdown, no matter how cautious we are with these rules?—
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are with these rules? the virus only s - reads to are with these rules? the virus only spreads to moral— are with these rules? the virus only spreads to moral people, _ are with these rules? the virus only spreads to moral people, so - are with these rules? the virus only spreads to moral people, so those l spreads to moral people, so those who have not had the vaccine, those who have not had the vaccine, those who have not had the vaccine, those who have a variant that is resistant to the vaccine. but who have a variant that is resistant to the vaccine.— who have a variant that is resistant to the vaccine. but at the moment, are ou to the vaccine. but at the moment, are you saying _ to the vaccine. but at the moment, are you saying that _ to the vaccine. but at the moment, are you saying that if _ to the vaccine. but at the moment, are you saying that if we _ to the vaccine. but at the moment, are you saying that if we see - to the vaccine. but at the moment, are you saying that if we see an - are you saying that if we see an increase, it is most likely to be in younger people?— increase, it is most likely to be in younger people? most likely, and children are _ younger people? most likely, and children are still _ younger people? most likely, and children are still vulnerable - younger people? most likely, and children are still vulnerable to - younger people? most likely, andj children are still vulnerable to the virus because they haven't been vaccinated. those young adults who haven't been vaccinated yet may be vulnerable and could be reservoirs of the virus. particularly any variant of virus that might be more transmissible. we will have to see how these variants develop, and how the vaccine roll—up develops and how we take up the vaccine. there is
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always a natural failure vaccine, about 5%, so we have to be aware of that. ~ ., about 5%, so we have to be aware of that. . ., ., ., ., ., , that. we are doing a lot of testing out whereas _ that. we are doing a lot of testing out whereas this _ that. we are doing a lot of testing out whereas this time _ that. we are doing a lot of testing out whereas this time last - that. we are doing a lot of testing out whereas this time last year i that. we are doing a lot of testing | out whereas this time last year we were not. is it a case that if you go looking for it and you have the testing capacity, you will find it? for sure. testing capacity, you will find it? forsure. but testing capacity, you will find it? for sure. but then you have an idea of what is working and what is not. if the indoor environment poses a risk, that may need to be altered, that guidance, those guidelines was up that guidance, those guidelines was up you may need to consider the vaccine formulation for new variants will. if you find that children are spread in the virus in a significant manner, you may need to reduce school attendance and crowding. so it all has to be kept under review? given what we know now, the plan out of restrictions, what is the advice he would give to everybody as they start to plan to return to something
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a little bit more like normal? l a little bit more like normal? i think where you are not eating and drinking, if you keep the mask on indoors, even outdoors if you are around a lot of people. ventilation and social distancing is not a guarantee, but you can help control it by wearing a mask. we need to be aware of how new variants are spreading. when you open up international travel, importing new very ats is also important. internationaltravel, importing new very ats is also important.- very ats is also important. thank ou ve very ats is also important. thank you very much — very ats is also important. thank you very much for _ very ats is also important. thank you very much forjoining - very ats is also important. thank you very much forjoining us. i very ats is also important. thank. you very much forjoining us. again, we still need to have the science explained to us, don't we? but temptation to run out and live life as we used to, we are not quite there yet. people in wales can now travel to and from the rest of the uk — and nonessential shops, along with "close contact" services, including tattoists and beauticians, can reopen. tomos morgan is in tintern,
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a village on the border. as you can see behind me, they have got a self—contained accommodation here. they have been open for a couple of weeks, but this place and many accommodations, tourist accommodation in wales, are really heavily reliant on people crossing the border into wales. the guy who owns this place, richard, suggested that up to 80% of his business come from over the border. it is only really today that he will think you will make any money here. another accommodation facility up the road hasn't opened until today because of that reason. this is a pub with rooms, and of course in wales, although outdoor hospitality is reopening in england, it will not be opening in wales until the end of the month. there are envious eyes going across—the—board, even that have the marquee up and ready for the 26th here. outdoor hospitality
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not opening until the 26, and the same for gyms, they will not open until the 3rd of may. there has been some frustration from that sector as well. you mentioned some things easing today. all education, fa ce—to —fa ce easing today. all education, face—to—face education in schools has restarted from today, and shops in the high street, and close contact beauty have also restarted. hairdressers were already open, so those will remain as usual. a big day for wales, but not quite as big as over the border, just a stone's throw over the river here in ten free macro today. it's a good day for the highstreet as shops and salons welcome back customers. our business presenter, ben thompson, is outside regent arcade in cheltenham. it looks magical behind you! good afternoon. welcome to cheltenham. a realfunfair cheltenham. a real funfair atmosphere cheltenham. a realfunfair atmosphere on the high street here
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in cheltenham, it has to be said. the sun is out, people are enjoying themselves, but crucially they are shopping again as nonessential retail can reopen here. you might see the high street is pretty busy, but it is also worth bearing in mind that it hasn't been without its casualty. topshop, a big store, one of the headline casualties of this pandemic. nonetheless, businesses are thrilled to be reopening, getting customers through the door and crucially getting some money through the tills again. let me introduce you to caroline, who runs a party supplies business here. it is a few hours into your first day, you are finally open again, how important is it? it you are finally open again, how important is it?— you are finally open again, how important is it? it is fantastic. we have been — important is it? it is fantastic. we have been waiting _ important is it? it is fantastic. we have been waiting for _ important is it? it is fantastic. we have been waiting for this - important is it? it is fantastic. we have been waiting for this for i important is it? it is fantastic. we have been waiting for this for a i have been waiting for this for a long _ have been waiting for this for a longtime _ have been waiting for this for a long time. we have been closed on and off— long time. we have been closed on and off for— long time. we have been closed on and off for most of the year. we are getting _ and off for most of the year. we are getting our— and off for most of the year. we are getting our shops open again, it is brilliant _ getting our shops open again, it is brilliant he— getting our shops open again, it is brilliant. �* , ., , , ., brilliant. as an independent shop on the hilh brilliant. as an independent shop on the high street. _ brilliant. as an independent shop on the high street, you _ brilliant. as an independent shop on the high street, you have _ brilliant. as an independent shop on the high street, you have been i brilliant. as an independent shop on the high street, you have been ablej the high street, you have been able to get to know your customers a
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little bit and you have change the way your business operates in lockdown. how have you adapted? while we were closed, we set up a click and _ while we were closed, we set up a click and collect people are still partying. — click and collect people are still partying, which is what we do. they were _ partying, which is what we do. they were scared — partying, which is what we do. they were scared to come out, so we did click and _ were scared to come out, so we did click and collect where you could pull up _ click and collect where you could pull up outside our house and they could _ pull up outside our house and they could pull— pull up outside our house and they could pull up and drive them away. that kept _ could pull up and drive them away. that kept us going through the quiet limes _ that kept us going through the quiet times. ., ., ., ., ., ., , times. you have had to adapt the business to _ times. you have had to adapt the business to keep _ times. you have had to adapt the business to keep going. - times. you have had to adapt the business to keep going. a - times. you have had to adapt the business to keep going. a lot i times. you have had to adapt the business to keep going. a lot of i times. you have had to adapt the i business to keep going. a lot of the things you have learned, you will keep doing, what have you learned about the business? you keep doing, what have you learned about the business?— keep doing, what have you learned about the business? you have got to do both, about the business? you have got to do both. be — about the business? you have got to do both, be able _ about the business? you have got to do both, be able to _ about the business? you have got to do both, be able to do _ about the business? you have got to do both, be able to do stuff - about the business? you have got to do both, be able to do stuff online i do both, be able to do stuff online and in _ do both, be able to do stuff online and in the — do both, be able to do stuff online and in the shop. our bread and butter— and in the shop. our bread and butter is— and in the shop. our bread and butter is having the shop open and having _ butter is having the shop open and having the — butter is having the shop open and having the locals coming in, but we need _ having the locals coming in, but we need to— having the locals coming in, but we need to have other avenues of money. we set _ need to have other avenues of money. we set up _ need to have other avenues of money. we set up a _ need to have other avenues of money. we set up a balloon delivery across the country, we should really help us. ., the country, we should really help us. ., ., the country, we should really help us. you look at the people back out ofthe us. you look at the people back out of the high — us. you look at the people back out of the high street _ us. you look at the people back out of the high street today, _ us. you look at the people back out of the high street today, the - of the high street today, the weather is good, it is probably quite easy to forget what a tough year it has been.— year it has been. explain how difficult it _ year it has been. explain how difficult it has _ year it has been. explain how difficult it has been. - year it has been. explain how difficult it has been. it - year it has been. explain how difficult it has been. it has i year it has been. explain how. difficult it has been. it has been really— difficult it has been. it has been really hard, but we always try to
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keep _ really hard, but we always try to keep positive and keep pushing hard and hopefully we can get everyone back out — and hopefully we can get everyone back out. everyone just has to be aware _ back out. everyone just has to be aware that — back out. everyone just has to be aware that as an independent business _ aware that as an independent business in cheltenham, we have to be supported by locals. if everybody can get— be supported by locals. if everybody can get out spending money in the shaps. _ can get out spending money in the shops, that is what we need. talk to me about what _ shops, that is what we need. talk to me about what customers _ shops, that is what we need. talk to me about what customers are - shops, that is what we need. talk to | me about what customers are telling you this morning. there is some suggestion people might be a nervous, and willing to go out, still scared about being in public in relatively busy areas. the prime minister says we have to be cautious. minister says we have to be cautious-— minister says we have to be cautious. . ., ., , ., ., cautious. we have not seen that at all. cautious. we have not seen that at all- people — cautious. we have not seen that at all- people are _ cautious. we have not seen that at all. people are excited _ cautious. we have not seen that at all. people are excited to - cautious. we have not seen that at all. people are excited to be i cautious. we have not seen that at all. people are excited to be out, | all. people are excited to be out, we have — all. people are excited to be out, we have been busy and everybody is excited _ we have been busy and everybody is excited at _ we have been busy and everybody is excited. �* ., , , we have been busy and everybody is excited. . ., , , ., ., , excited. a lot is being made of this --ent-u excited. a lot is being made of this pent-up demand. _ excited. a lot is being made of this pent-up demand, we _ excited. a lot is being made of this pent-up demand, we have - excited. a lot is being made of this pent-up demand, we have cashing| excited. a lot is being made of this i pent-up demand, we have cashing our pent—up demand, we have cashing our pocket because have not been out. are you seeing that in the tills this morning?— this morning? yeah, i think everybody _ this morning? yeah, i think everybody wants _ this morning? yeah, i think everybody wants to - this morning? yeah, i think everybody wants to get i this morning? yeah, i think| everybody wants to get back this morning? yeah, i think- everybody wants to get back to normat — everybody wants to get back to normal. people like socialising and getting _ normal. people like socialising and getting out and chatting. shopping
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is like _ getting out and chatting. shopping is like that anyway. it is notjust about— is like that anyway. it is notjust about spending money, it is about seeing _ about spending money, it is about seeing people and getting back to normat _ seeing people and getting back to normal. so hopefully... seeing people and getting back to normal. so hopefully. . .— seeing people and getting back to normal. so hopefully... thank you for talking — normal. so hopefully... thank you for talking to _ normal. so hopefully... thank you for talking to us _ normal. so hopefully... thank you for talking to us this _ normal. so hopefully... thank you for talking to us this morning i normal. so hopefully... thank you for talking to us this morning for l for talking to us this morning for by no has been ready, so that's macro i know it has been busy. they are trying to adapt what happens next. of course, customers will be nervous about getting out and spending again, but the figures we have this morning, new footfall figures, measuring how many people are out on the high street, suggesting that footfall on the high street is up by more than 230%. we should say that comes from a pretty low base last week, not many people out and about shopping, but nonetheless suggesting that there is an appetite to get back out there, which will be welcome news for all sorts of businesses up and down the country as those nonessential stores can finally reopen.—
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the former prime minister, gordon brown, is calling on the world's richest countries to take urgent action to achieve mass vaccination around the world. he wants the leaders of the g7 to commit to a £22 billion programme, when the group meets in cornwall injune. well, we can speak now to him now, he joins us from fife. thank you very much for speaking to us. you have described this, the need for a herculean push in terms of global vaccination, what would that look like? i think we have done brilliantly to get nearly 70% of adults in britain vaccinated. but if only i% of adults in sub—saharan africa are vaccinated, then no one is really safe. nobody will be safe until everybody is safe. if we don't vaccinate africa and asia and the middle east in 2021 and 2022 and you don't even complete by 2023, the
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disease will spread. it will continue to mutate and will come back to haunt us, affecting lives and livelihoods. so we open up the economy brilliantly now and we have to close down because another version of the virus comes into the country because we haven't had vaccination in some poorer parts of the world. i am saying this is a small price to pay to get the world vaccinated and to make the economy work again and to make people safe. i hope that onjune the 13th, when borisjohnson i hope that onjune the 13th, when boris johnson convenes i hope that onjune the 13th, when borisjohnson convenes this summit, they can agree on a burden sharing formula so each pays a share so we can get vaccination into all the countries where it is not happening at the moment. you countries where it is not happening at the moment.— at the moment. you have quoted a filure of at the moment. you have quoted a figure of £22 _ at the moment. you have quoted a figure of £22 billion _ at the moment. you have quoted a figure of £22 billion per _ at the moment. you have quoted a figure of £22 billion per year. is i figure of £22 billion per year. is that money available? at}! figure of £22 billion per year. is that money available? of course. look, i chaired _ that money available? of course. look, i chaired the _ that money available? of course. look, i chaired the g20 _ that money available? of course. look, i chaired the g20 into i look, i chaired the g20 into thousand nine and we had to raise $1 trillion. this is 22 billion for this year, we will prop have to do it next year. the best way is to
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agree a formula, america paying about 25%, europe and britain another 25%, japan around 8%, and then get the rest of the world, russia, china, the oil states, scandinavia paying their share. the poorer countries who cannot afford to pay, we will help them vaccinate their people so we are free of the scourge of this as well as them. loath? scourge of this as well as them. why is it such a — scourge of this as well as them. why is it such a struggle to get this message across? it is obvious and, like you say, the money is there. so why are we talking about seeing this? it is partly because we adopt this begging bowl that you just ask people, give what you can, and some countries are now saying we are
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giving vaccines but not money, and others are giving money but not vaccines. you really need a more sustained approach because this is a disease that has to be brought under control. just as you need the best science to get the vaccine, aided the best science to get to the full figure without simply relying on a charity fundraiser approach which is what we're doing at the moment was to be testable systematic. the g7 of the wealthiest countries, they can persuade other countries on the basis of their commitment. i believe this could be done within two months. d0 this could be done within two months. , ., ., months. do believe that the ten won programme — months. do believe that the ten won programme has _ months. do believe that the ten won programme has a — months. do believe that the ten won programme has a place _ months. do believe that the ten won programme has a place on _ months. do believe that the ten won programme has a place on this? i months. do believe that the ten won | programme has a place on this? yes, it has been — programme has a place on this? yes, it has been a — programme has a place on this? yes, it has been a good _ programme has a place on this? yes it has been a good innovation because norway, the head of the world health organization, they have all come together and formed this organisation, they are raising money, they have a plan to distribute the vaccine when they can get the money to pay for it. they are also planning to help the production and maybe we can get production and maybe we can get production facilities in africa and other parts of the world where they
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do not exist at the moment. the key they cannot unlock is the money and only the richest countries can start the process of raising the money we need. if you are an american, it would pay you to pay the whole build yourself because it stops the american economy getting back to normal. as britain, it would pay us to pay a large share of it because we cannot trade with the countries with whom we want to trade and we are vulnerable to the virus coming through people visiting our country if we do not bring it under control in different parts of the world. if we had a vaccination programme, we would hope to bring it under control. ., ., , ., ., would hope to bring it under control. ., ., ., control. can i ask you about poorer nations rebuilding _ control. can i ask you about poorer nations rebuilding their _ control. can i ask you about poorer| nations rebuilding their economies. if the g7 meeting, is that cancellation going to be on the table? i cancellation going to be on the table? ~ , cancellation going to be on the table? ~' , ., table? i think debt relief at the moment has — table? i think debt relief at the moment has to _ table? i think debt relief at the moment has to be _ table? i think debt relief at the moment has to be on - table? i think debt relief at the moment has to be on the i table? i think debt relief at the | moment has to be on the table. table? i think debt relief at the - moment has to be on the table. there are countries that are paying more on that interest payments than they
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can spend on health. you have a situation where there is no social distancing, people cannot stay off work, there is no fellow, no protective equipment of the order thatis protective equipment of the order that is needed, but they are paying bills on their debt. we cannot allow this to happen when we have an emergency which is no fault of the poorer countries was up you cannot blame zambia or nigeria or kenyan or ghana for what is happening. they are the victims of what has happened and we have to help them. that would be one part of helping finance the vaccinations, that we give debt relief, so then they can spend the money on health and not interest payments. flan money on health and not interest laments. ., , ., money on health and not interest laments. ., i. ,, ., payments. can i let you know, we have had a _ payments. can i let you know, we have had a development - payments. can i let you know, we l have had a development concerning greensill. you have spoken about it today and also yesterday we heard from david cameron and his statement. we understand that the government will be announcing an independent investigation into what
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happened with mr cameron lobbying for greensill. on this issue, why is it important to you that former ministers follow the rules when it comes to lobbying activities and, if they don't, what should be done about it? i obviously welcome an enquiry because it is important to get to the bottom of this post i don't have the bottom of this post i don't have the detail on what happened with mr cameron, greensilland the detail on what happened with mr cameron, greensill and other people. my cameron, greensill and other people. my general point this morning, and i make it very generally, is that public office should not become the platform for private gain. i don't think that former ministers and prime ministers should be engaged in lobbying for particular commercial companies when they are lobbying their successors, who they know very well and could have privileged access to them. it is something not fair. it gives people the oppression that there is one law for those who are in power and who were close to
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those in power, and one law for the rest of us. i had to be prime and at a time when we had the expenses scandal. although i was not at fault myself, the expenses scandal was something that was a stain on british parliamentary democracy. lobbying in this commercial way could also be a stain on our democracy, and therefore an enquiry is completely appropriate. thank you ve much is completely appropriate. thank you very much for— is completely appropriate. thank you very much for your _ is completely appropriate. thank you very much for your time. _ is completely appropriate. thank you very much for your time. thank i is completely appropriate. thank you very much for your time. thank you. | let me reiterate that breaking news that has come to us was to puke and follow this from our politics corresponded. we are learning that the government is expected to announce an independent investigation into what happened
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with mr cameron's attempts to lobby for greensill. we expect that this afternoon. no further detail, not sure of the scale of the investigation, or who will carry it out. this weekend, the former british prime minister, david cameron, admitting that he made a mistake, but he didn't break any rules when it came to government lobbying for greensill, of which he was under the employment, and it is that fact that means that the regulator is saying that he hasn't actually broken any rules as a third—party lobbyist. the industry watchdog says that the minister was not covered by its rules because he was a greensill and, not a third—party lobbyist. we are learning there will be an announcement later today, this afternoon, of and in —— independent
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investigation. prince andrew has said that the queen has described prince philip's death as having left a huge void in her life. daniela relph has this report. it'll be a week of reflection here in windsor as the town prepares for the duke of edinburgh's funeral. over the weekend, his children attended church in windsor great park and spoke personally of their grief and loss. it's very, very sad.
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but i have to say that the extraordinary tributes and the memories that everybody has had and been willing to share has been so fantastic. and itjust goes to show he might have been ourfather, grandfather, father—in—law. but but he meant so much to so many other people. it's so lovely for so many people to learn about what he did, because i think it's actually, quite a lot of things that have come out would have surprised some people. the countess also spoke to estate staff who knew the duke. she told them his death had been very peaceful. she said it was as if someone had taken him by the hand and off he went. princess anne paid her own tribute, releasing this photo of her and herfather at the london olympics in 2012. of his death, she said, "you know it's going to happen, but you're never really ready. we will miss him, but he leaves a legacy which can inspire us all." the family focus is now on protecting and supporting the queen as she mourns. her son prince andrew said after 73 years of marriage, she felt there was now a huge void
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in her life. daniela relph, bbc news, windsor. the duke was well—known for his love of cricket, and he began playing at a young age. he later went onto serve two terms as president for marylebone cricket club, home to the famous lords cricket ground. we can speak now to guy lavender, the chief executive and secretary of marylebone cricket club. thank you forjoining us on bbc news. he was chair of the cricket club. was it ceremonial, or was he hands—on? club. was it ceremonial, or was he hands-on?— club. was it ceremonial, or was he hands-on? ., ., ., , hands-on? good afternoon. no, he was hands-on. hands-on? good afternoon. no, he was hands-on- like — hands-on? good afternoon. no, he was hands-on. like the _ hands-on? good afternoon. no, he was hands-on. like the rest _ hands-on? good afternoon. no, he was hands-on. like the rest of— hands-on? good afternoon. no, he was hands-on. like the rest of the - hands—on. like the rest of the country, we are greatly saddened by the death of prince philip. we have a long and historic association with him. first and foremost, the duke love cricket. he loved playing, he
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loved being a spectator, and he loved being a spectator, and he loved being a spectator, and he loved being involved in the administration of it. many of your viewers may know he excelled at cricket both on the field as a talented off—spinner, and a hard—hitting batsman in his school days was to pay continue to play when he was in the royal navy and through the 1940s and 1950s. his support for cricket was immense and for us in particular. he served two distant wish terms as our president. his first in 1919 and his second in 1974. his first in 1949 and his second in 1974. ., ., he 1974. how did he get involved? he lot 1974. how did he get involved? he got involved _ 1974. how did he get involved? he got involved through _ 1974. how did he get involved? he got involved through a _ 1974. how did he get involved? he got involved through a mutual i 1974. how did he get involved? hej got involved through a mutual love of cricket. mcc is the finest cricket club in the world, and he was invited to become the president in 1949. he wasjust was invited to become the president in 1949. he was just 28 when he was announced to be president. he was
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delighted and surprised. he got involved in dealing with issues that he thought were important. he was particular concerned with the division, as many of your viewers are aware, between professional and amateur players. he felt this needed to be addressed and it led to the award of honorary life membership to some players of the past. it is documented in now historical records that he felt that this was a really important part of his presidency. in fact, it was apt that the first step that they took was the equality of players. professionally, he was passionate about cricket but also in relation to schoolchildren and encouraging more young people to play the game. he worked hard at mcc to achieve that objective, which tied in nicely with his presidency
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of the national playing association. his legacy for us is significant. much of the work we currently undertake in schools in westminster and further afield can be directly attributed to the impact that he had during his presidential terms. illrulith during his presidential terms. with ties to the commonwealth and cricket, need i say more, once he able to bring and marry those two together in all the progress and steps that he took when it came to inclusion and access? i steps that he took when it came to inclusion and access?— inclusion and access? i think so. durinl inclusion and access? i think so. during his _ inclusion and access? i think so. during his second _ inclusion and access? i think so. during his second term - inclusion and access? i think so. during his second term as i inclusion and access? i think so. - during his second term as president, he was also chairman of the cricket council and the international cricket council. he recognised the importance of sport, and cricket in particular, across the commonwealth. he walked enormously hard to make sure that was delivered and was a reality. during his second presidential term, reality. during his second presidentialterm, he reality. during his second presidential term, he was notable
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for the world cup final in lourdes. he declined the opportunity to make a speech at that point, not wishing to steal the limelight from the players. the duke was a cricket lover players. the duke was a cricket [over at heart. he was a very proud member of our club, he will be sorely missed by all of our members, who really enjoyed seeing him. we saw him on many occasions in both our private and public capacity. we will missing greatly. thank you very much. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt. iam i am expecting devastation in my garden when i get home today. not the full cast for gardeners, is it? more coal to come through tonight. —— the forecast. more sunshine around than yesterday. there will be
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around than yesterday. there will be a few showers, the channel islands, south—west england, wales, northern ireland, there could be seven fleet. temperatures for many still amounts two, three degrees down on where we should be for the time of year. away from that, a widespread frost with -8 from that, a widespread frost with —8 in parts of scotland and —1i in rural parts of england and wales going into tomorrow morning. if you showers already on the go in the west of scotland and the west of england and wales. eastern areas will stay dry with temperatures up on today's values. they will rise further this week.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... long queues in the high streets, as shops reopen. borisjohnson asks everyone to "behave responsibly" as england takes its next step out of lockdown. wales is also letting non—essential shops to re—open, and allowing trips to and from other parts of the uk again. david cameron's facing demands from labour to appear before parliament, to answer what the party says are serious questions about his work as a lobbyist. mps will return to the commons from their easter break a day early, to pay tribute to the duke of edinburgh. and nomadland — a drama about a woman who starts a new life on the road in the american midwest — won four baftas last night. it's time for your questions answered.
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thousands of you have been writing in with your questions about the easing of lockdown, and what it means for you. still lots of questions regarding all of this. we've got two experts with us to help answer them now. with me is professor peter drobac, who is a global health physician at the university of oxford. and linda bauld, who is a professor in public health at the university of edinburgh. thank you to both of you forjoining us here on bbc news. let's start of. i'm getting married in late may and three members of my immediate family want to come to the ceremony from romania. they will have to doses of the vaccine before travelling. information on the government website is confusing. will they be allowed to enter the country and
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will they need to quarantine? fix, will they need to quarantine? great question. we did not exactly know yet. a couple of days ago the transport minister laid out initial guidance on gradual reopening of global travel. there is a traffic light system, green, amberand red other countries on a green light this will be able to travel without quarantine. on the amber list, there is a ten day home quarantine required and the red list, like now, it's more restricted, allowing hotel quarantine. the list of countries depends on a covid situation in each country. if you are planning to try to plan travel which would allow for a ten day home quarantine on arrival for relatives coming to the wedding, presuming that is after the 17th of may. more guidance in the next few
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weeks. �* , ., . ., ., ., may. more guidance in the next few weeks. �* , ., . .,., ., ., weeks. any guidance to add to that? congratulations _ weeks. any guidance to add to that? congratulations on _ weeks. any guidance to add to that? congratulations on your— weeks. any guidance to add to that? congratulations on your forthcoming | congratulations on your forthcoming wedding _ congratulations on your forthcoming wedding. that is brilliant. she will be doing _ wedding. that is brilliant. she will be doing that when more people are allowed _ be doing that when more people are allowed to— be doing that when more people are allowed to attend weddings. at the moment_ allowed to attend weddings. at the moment it is limited and more will be permitted from the 17th of may. i would _ be permitted from the 17th of may. i would encourage people to look on the government website at the global travel— the government website at the global travel taskforce report. there will be a covid—19 passenger charter published — be a covid—19 passenger charter published around mid may to give people _ published around mid may to give people information about what is and is not _ people information about what is and is not possible. the key thing about romenian— is not possible. the key thing about romanian is we do not know which countries _ romanian is we do not know which countries will be on which list. it will take — countries will be on which list. it will take more time until we know that _ will take more time untilwe know that. , ., ., that. the next question from leicestershire. _ that. the next question from leicestershire. steve - that. the next question from leicestershire. steve writes, j that. the next question from i leicestershire. steve writes, do that. the next question from - leicestershire. steve writes, do i need to be socially distant from five members outside? i am
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need to be socially distant from five members outside? i am sure you are looking — five members outside? i am sure you are looking forward _ five members outside? i am sure you are looking forward to _ five members outside? i am sure you are looking forward to take _ are looking forward to take advantage from actual hospitality in england _ advantage from actual hospitality in england today and a bit longer in scotland — england today and a bit longer in scotland. the rule of six, getting together— scotland. the rule of six, getting together with up to six people from different— together with up to six people from different hassles is possible in an outdoor— different hassles is possible in an outdoor hospitality venue. —— households. there will be distancing in terms _ households. there will be distancing in terms of— households. there will be distancing in terms of seating, probably around a metre _ in terms of seating, probably around a metre. anyone living in and around the venue _ a metre. anyone living in and around the venue from the toilet, you must wear— the venue from the toilet, you must wear a _ the venue from the toilet, you must wear a face — the venue from the toilet, you must wear a face covering. ill face coverings _ wear a face covering. ill face coverings when you are not eating and drinking. to minimise risks, you will need _ and drinking. to minimise risks, you will need to— and drinking. to minimise risks, you will need to order while at your table — will need to order while at your table. they sell some of the changes _ table. they sell some of the changes. not back to normal but many more venues _ changes. not back to normal but many more venues opening from today. ash from more venues opening from today. from wiltshire more venues opening from today. .ési from wiltshire asks, more venues opening from today. is from wiltshire asks, when more venues opening from today. is1 from wiltshire asks, when i have more venues opening from today. sis1 from wiltshire asks, when i have to wear a facemask when i go for a haircut and a dead trim?-
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wear a facemask when i go for a haircut and a dead trim? thank you. i will be queueing _ haircut and a dead trim? thank you. i will be queueing up _ haircut and a dead trim? thank you. i will be queueing up with _ haircut and a dead trim? thank you. i will be queueing up with you. -- i haircut and a dead trim? thank you. i will be queueing up with you. -- a| i will be queueing up with you. —— a beard trim. any time you are an indoor public setting, you should wear a face covering unless you are exempt for a variety of medical and other reasons. you and the staff should be wearing face coverings and anticipate hearing that throughout. charlotte has written in from leeds and she said, her daughter here is eight has been invited to a birthday party. lots of children have had to make birthday in lockdown. it is in a garden but is it allowed? i cannot find any specific guidance. lots a garden but is it allowed? i cannot find any specific guidance.- find any specific guidance. lots of auestions find any specific guidance. lots of questions about _ find any specific guidance. lots of questions about what _ find any specific guidance. lots of questions about what children - find any specific guidance. lots ofj questions about what children can and cannot— questions about what children can and cannot do. focusing on england, outdoor— and cannot do. focusing on england, outdoor birthday parties are permitted, including in gardens, that you — permitted, including in gardens, that you are limited by the rule of
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six which, — that you are limited by the rule of six which, in england, still includes _ six which, in england, still includes children. let's say the child _ includes children. let's say the child who's birthday deities and five friends can gather in a garden. that is— five friends can gather in a garden. that is definitely on. a bit of guidance _ that is definitely on. a bit of guidance about negotiating that environment. you will probably need to go— environment. you will probably need to go through a house. minimise the time you _ to go through a house. minimise the time you go— to go through a house. minimise the time you go through that property. where _ time you go through that property. where a _ time you go through that property. where a face covering. if you are using _ where a face covering. if you are using a _ where a face covering. if you are using a toilet, make sure it is clean — using a toilet, make sure it is clean and _ using a toilet, make sure it is clean and you are washing your hands — clean and you are washing your hands. small outdoor birthday parties — hands. small outdoor birthday parties are back on. you hands. small outdoor birthday parties are back on.— hands. small outdoor birthday parties are back on. you are at the university of— parties are back on. you are at the university of edinburgh. _ parties are back on. you are at the university of edinburgh. peter, - parties are back on. you are at the | university of edinburgh. peter, you are at the university of oxford. this question is for both of you. interesting if you could both answer it so we can get a perspective from scotland and england. karen is based in kent. when wales university
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students find out when they can return to campus full—sized to face lectures? return to campus full-sized to face lectures? ., ., , ., , , lectures? there are obviously students around _ lectures? there are obviously students around the - lectures? there are obviously students around the uk - lectures? there are obviously students around the uk who i lectures? there are obviously i students around the uk who are lectures? there are obviously - students around the uk who are eager to get back to classes. —— is full face to face lectures. face—to—face classes will not be included in the face reintroduced today. i understand it to be delayed at least until the 17th of may. university students will not be allowed to return to campus and face—to—face teaching until at least that time. linda admits at the same for yourself? _ linda admits at the same for yourself? students in my faculty and the medical faculty have had some practical— the medical faculty have had some practical courses running. for the vast majority of students were no immediate return at the moment. israel— immediate return at the moment. israel has — immediate return at the moment. israel has got pupils back in lecture _ israel has got pupils back in lecture halls. i expect that in the
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vhs but — lecture halls. i expect that in the vhs but we do not have firm dates, even _ vhs but we do not have firm dates, even in _ vhs but we do not have firm dates, even in scotland.— even in scotland. jenny is in wales. -- nz lecture _ even in scotland. jenny is in wales. -- nz lecture halls. _ even in scotland. jenny is in wales. -- nz lecture halls. do _ even in scotland. jenny is in wales. -- nz lecture halls. do we - even in scotland. jenny is in wales. -- nz lecture halls. do we need - even in scotland. jenny is in wales. -- nz lecture halls. do we need to| —— nz lecture halls. do we need to wear masks, will it be safe? at -- nz lecture halls. do we need to wear masks, will it be safe? at this time, wear masks, will it be safe? at this time. gatherings — wear masks, will it be safe? at this time, gatherings are _ wear masks, will it be safe? at this time, gatherings are permitted - time, gatherings are permitted outdoors, including choir practice, subject— outdoors, including choir practice, subject to — outdoors, including choir practice, subject to the rule of six that linda — subject to the rule of six that linda talked about. gathering indoors will _ linda talked about. gathering indoors will not _ linda talked about. gathering indoors will not happen - linda talked about. gathering | indoors will not happen before linda talked about. gathering - indoors will not happen before the 17th of may, which is the time we would expect rules, including on worship practices to be updated. it is possible by that time it might be permitted. what i would say is we have learned that singing, along with shouting and screaming tentative aerosols of iris. i would expect particular restrictions to be relaxed quite late. —— the virus. at
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least not until everyone was vaccinated. i think that would be a terrific idea.— terrific idea. lots of this takes into consideration _ terrific idea. lots of this takes into consideration day - terrific idea. lots of this takes into consideration day to - terrific idea. lots of this takes into consideration day to day i into consideration day to day activities. helen writes that when can i give a nest in a car to someone who is not in my bubble? == someone who is not in my bubble? -- a nest. someone who is not in my bubble? —— a nest. this has been one of the hardest — a nest. this has been one of the hardest things. you are in a confined _ hardest things. you are in a confined space, with someone you do not live _ confined space, with someone you do not live with — confined space, with someone you do not live with. driving lessons had restarted — not live with. driving lessons had restarted my really good news to lots of _ restarted my really good news to lots of people in england today. in terms _ lots of people in england today. in terms of _ lots of people in england today. in terms of car sharing, there were probably— terms of car sharing, there were probably after the 17th of may. at the moment, not permitted are not encouraged. i think we will see that later in— encouraged. i think we will see that later in the — encouraged. i think we will see that later in the summer. —— and not encouraged _
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later in the summer. —— and not encouraged. let's go to alicia. she writes: _ encouraged. let's go to alicia. she writes: mv— encouraged. let's go to alicia. she writes: my sister lives in england, and she _ writes: my sister lives in england, and she travelled to scotland to attend — and she travelled to scotland to attend my son's wedding on the 27th of may? _ attend my son's wedding on the 27th of may? her sister is in england, can she — of may? her sister is in england, can she go — of may? her sister is in england, can she go to scotland to attend hassan — can she go to scotland to attend hassan 's — can she go to scotland to attend hassan 's wedding on the of may? -- hassan 's wedding on the of may? hassan. there hassan 's wedding on the of may? » hassan. there are caveats on the number of people who can gather at weddings at that time. it should be 30. think about the trip itself. there may be restrictions on hotels and other accommodation. it is possible to travel. make sure you are following guidance throughout. our final question, are following guidance throughout. ourfinal question, one of my are following guidance throughout. our final question, one of my senses in germany, can he comes to my alassane's wedding on the 19th of june? that is diane from leeds. ——
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other sun's wedding. for june? that is diane from leeds. -- other sun's wedding.— other sun's wedding. for people in and out of scotland, _ other sun's wedding. for people in and out of scotland, we _ other sun's wedding. for people in and out of scotland, we won't - other sun's wedding. for people in | and out of scotland, we won't know what _ and out of scotland, we won't know what the _ and out of scotland, we won't know what the first minister will say. we will get _ what the first minister will say. we will get much more information on the 20th— will get much more information on the 20th of— will get much more information on the 20th of april, next week. small changes— the 20th of april, next week. small changes on— the 20th of april, next week. small changes on the 26th. in terms of a son living — changes on the 26th. in terms of a son living in — changes on the 26th. in terms of a son living in germany, similar to the first— son living in germany, similar to the first questions we were covering _ the first questions we were covering. have a look at the global travel _ covering. have a look at the global travel taskforce document. travel between _ travel taskforce document. travel between different parts of europe, more _ between different parts of europe, more of— between different parts of europe, more of that will be possible later in the _ more of that will be possible later in the year. the wedding it on the 19th of— in the year. the wedding it on the 19th ofjune, well after the 17th of may change when more international travel— may change when more international travel will— may change when more international travel will be permitted. it germany's of infection continue decline. — germany's of infection continue decline, they might be one of said green _ decline, they might be one of said green countries, we do not know that yet. green countries, we do not know that vet i_ green countries, we do not know that vet i know— green countries, we do not know that yet. i know how frustrating it is for people _ yet. i know how frustrating it is for people planning celebrations and weddings _ for people planning celebrations and
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weddings later in the year but we cannot— weddings later in the year but we cannot be — weddings later in the year but we cannot be confident at the current time _ cannot be confident at the current time. , . , cannot be confident at the current time. , ., , ., ., cannot be confident at the current time. , . , ., ., ., time. germany going through a third wave at the moment, _ time. germany going through a third wave at the moment, as _ time. germany going through a third wave at the moment, as is _ time. germany going through a third wave at the moment, as is much - time. germany going through a third wave at the moment, as is much of. wave at the moment, as is much of europe. the wedding is not until the 19th ofjune. i promised i would get back to charlotte in leeds. her eight—year—old daughter has been invited to a petty party on the 16th of may. not to sure if it is allowed. —— a birthday party. the news is, is that that a party can be delayed by one day, but that a party can have up to 30 people. that he will be allowed. all the little people, all the friends can get together, which is good news. we'll need cheering up. peterfrom the university of oxford and professor linda bould from the university of edinburgh, thank you so much. thank
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you. edinburgh, thank you so much. thank ou. . ~' edinburgh, thank you so much. thank ou. . ~ , ., the people of malta have also been mourning the death of the duke of edinburgh. it was the duke's home for two years when he and his then princess wife were posted there as a young naval officer in 1919. it marked the start of a special bond with the country. seventy years on, prince philip remains deep in the affections of many maltese, as our europe correspondent nick beake has been discovering. they really to hold the couple very deeply in the heart. the young royals fell in love with the majesty of malta 70 years ago, and the feeling was mutual. today, this once british island is remembering the prince. archive: the father of a future monarch sets to take _ over his new command. posted here in 1919, this was to be prince philip's last
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of military service before his duty became service to his wife. together again in malta. home for two years was the splendid villa guardamangia — some of the happiest moments of their lives, the queen later recalled. after a0 years of neglect, the maltese government has bought and is now restoring the property. a tribute to the british crown, but also to the prince and his personality. maltese are very warm people. they are not formal, they are very informal. obviously, the monarchy has to be formal so sometimes when the duke would make lapses in his comments and perhaps go a bit too far and receive certain criticism, the maltese would like this because they would say even the duke is human. we have a photograph over here and you can see the duke of edinburgh and you can see the queen, as princess elizabeth. my father and mother are there... the newlyweds from britain
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were embraced by the maltese mobility, including nicholas de piro's father, a baron, whose job and title amused the duke of ediburgh. he said, "by the way, what do you actually do when you're not being a baron?" and i said, "what did you say?" and he said, "well, i don't know what to say." i said perhaps a little bit like what do you do when you are not being a duke!" the guests of honour the princess and the duke. the dazzling ballroom of 1950s multiple a world away from austere postwar britain. —— the dazzling ballroom of 1950s malta a world away from austere postwar britain. this was a couple yet to bear the full weight and responsibilities of the crown. it wasn'tjust on the dance floor of this grand hotel that prince philip made his mark. he took centre stage when the country gained independence from the uk in 1964 and his regular visits over the decades, both with and without the queen, secured his place in modern maltese history.
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in the distance they can see hms chequers. this was his last trip, six years ago. an island of fond memories, outbidding a friend a final farewell. nick beake, bbc news. the film nomadland was the big winner at the bafta awards last night. the ceremony was held without an audience due to covid restrictions. the winners accepted their awards via webcam — although sir anthony hopkins missed his big moment because he was busy painting. our entertainment correspondent colin paterson explains. applause. in a year where cinemagoers had to stay home, best film of the baftas was one all about isolation. nomadland. nomadland, which is not out into the end of the month, is about a woman who's lost everything and travels the united states on her own in a van. it won four baftas, including francis mcdormand best actress. i need work. i like work. but sadly, in a year when you didn't
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even have to turn up to turn up, she still managed not to turn up. we've just received this message via carrier pigeon from frances, who is somewhere in the wilds of north america. and neither did the winner of best actor. sir anthony hopkins for the father. i don't need her or anyone else. i can manage very well on my own. at the age of 83, sir anthony hopkins is now the oldest best actor winner ever. he did not appear on zoom during the ceremony, but did join in the virtual press room afterwards, and explained that he is on a long holiday in wales. i was sitting here painting, in fact. | in my room in the hotel. i'm covered in paint. and i heard this cheer go up i from next door, and i thought, "what the hell has happened?" i thought they were - watching a football match. and they came in and said, "well done." i daniel kaluuya was best supporting actor for playing the black panther
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fred hampton injudas and the black messiah. he gave his speech in front of what appeared to be a pint —— pipe collection. love to everyone watching back home. i love you guys, man. peace and love, man. take care of yourself onwards. best supporting actress was south korea's yuh—jung younfrom minari. she was in a mischievous mood. every award is meaningful but this one, especially recognised by british people, known as very snobbish people and they approve me. promising young woman was a double winner. original screenplay and best british film. its director also had the most impressive backdrop. it was a labour of love, certainly. everyone did it pretty much for a packet of crisps. while the best stage invasion of the night happened after the star of rocks, bukky bakray, won the rising star award, and her on—screen mother and her actual mother fumi couldn't contain themselves. cheering.
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next up, the oscars, and nomadland is now the clear favourite. but a word of warning. the last six films to win at the baftas have failed to repeat at the oscars. i wonder if francis mcdormand will bother to turn up. colin paterson, bbc news. it's been 60 years since man went into space for the first time. yuri gagarin's single orbit of the earth was a huge achievement for the ussr — and a propaganda coup. there will be celebrations across russia to mark the anniversary. our moscow correspondent steve rosenberg reports on the moment a new russian hero was born. this is space conquerors park, a few hundred miles south of moscow. it is a celebration of russia's achievements in space exploration, and the reason it was built
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here is that 60 years ago this place became part of a remarkable story. on the 12th of april 1961, a soviet airforce pilot, yuri gargarin, became the first human to blast into space. and on his descent, gagarin parachuted out of the tiny space capsule he was in. and on his descent, gagarin parachuted out of the tiny space capsule he was in. and he landed here — this was farmland at the time — much to the surprise of a five—year—old girl who was out in the fields planting potatoes. what do you remember most about this spaceman
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who's suddenly standing in front of you? archive: the next call| was at admiralty house to see the prime minister. mr macmillan said, "he's
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a delightful fellow," which just about sums up what everybody thought. how does it feel to have been part of history? hundreds of people have since travelled into space, but only one man was first, and russians are intensely proud of the fact that that it was their guy, yuri gagarin, who made history with his flight to the stars. steve rosenberg, bbc news. in a moment, the news at one with ben brown but first, it's time for a look at the weather with matt. hello. some spring warmth in the sun.
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still a case of winter toying with us. this is how some of us started with a covering of snow in wales and parts of england. if you did not have the snow, there was some frost. in parts of highland scotland, we saw temperatures below —9 last night. it was the coldest april night since 2013 and we will not be a million miles off that tonight. a chilly evening out there as we say goodbye to the last of the sunshine. a few showers in the south and west and one or two close to the eastern coast. temperatures will drop further tonight. a bit more cloud in the west. one or two isolated showers. it could mean icy conditions. temperatures at the lowest, in aberdeenshire in scotland, probably around —7, —8, getting to —3 —li in the midlands and southern england. high pressure is still with us. not strong enough to completely prevent showers. if you cross the western isles,
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maybe to the north of northern ireland, just down the western parts of england and wales on tuesday morning. elsewhere a stunning start, a few showers will pop up during the day and more cloud than you will have experienced this afternoon. by and large a dry day for many and rather cool, for many and rather cool, 8 to 12 degrees. down from we should be for the time of year. this is a comparison of where we should be. it should be around 11 to iii celsius in most places around two degrees below that. staying cool and the night still chilly. the chance of mist and fog patches on wednesday. fewer showers, most will stay dry, showers very isolated. sunny spells. feeling cold down the eastern coast. that is because the area of high pressure is shifting a bit and it will allow more of an east to north—easterly wind to develop again. towards east anglia and the south—east that could bring more showers around on thursday. most will be dry, sunny start, a little bit on the chilly side with clouds building up through the day. temperatures at the highest in the west, around 11 to 13 degrees.
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single figure temperatures towards the east. as for the rest of the week, starting to turn milder across the south that range in parts of scotland and northern ireland.
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a big step back to normality in many parts of the uk, with the easing of some key restrictions. cheers, chaps. cheers! in england, pubs have welcomed back customers for outdoor service. some opened on the stroke of midnight. there've been long queues outside many nonessential shops that have finally reopened their doors. while those desperate for a hair cut can get one at last. among them — our correspondent. how much of a mess have i made? just a tad — just a tad, dan, yeah! is it recoverable? restrictions are being eased as well in wales, where nonessential shops and beauty salons can all re—open. we'll have the latest on an important day on the route out of lockdown. also this lunchtime: the government's expected to order an investigation into david cameron's
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controversial lobbying for the finance company greensill.

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