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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 16, 2021 5:00pm-5:45pm BST

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this is bbc news, i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines... final preparations ahead of the duke of edinburgh's funeral tomorrow. the archbishop of canterbury urges the public to support the queen at what he calls a "very profound" moment. she is the queen. she will behave with the extraordinary dignity and extraordinary courage that she always does. and, at the same time, she is saying farewell to someone to whom she was married for 73 years. labour says there are "serious questions to answer" after it emerged the health secretary, matt hancock, has shares in a potential supplier for nhs trusts in england. police, stop! appeals for calm in chicago,
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as footage emerges of a 13—year—old boy being shot dead by police. new figures suggest coronavirus infections in the uk are at their lowest level since september, with around 130,000 people estimated to have had it last week. wild swimmers in scotland enjoy the easing of lockdown, as rules restricting local travel and meeting people outdoors are lifted. and whiter than white — scientists develop a paint that the actress helen mccrory — known for her roles in peaky blinders and harry potter — has died aged 52 from cancer
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hello, and welcome to bbc news. the actress helen mccrory, who starred in harry potterfilms the actress helen mccrory, who starred in harry potter films and the actress helen mccrory, who starred in harry potterfilms and p0 blinders, a television series, has died after a battle with cancer. this has been confirmed by her husband, damien lewis, on twitter. she was 52 years old. let's read you that statement on twitter. he says, "i'm sad to announce that after a bout with cancer, helen mccrory has died peacefully at home surrounded by a wave of love from friends and family. she died as she lived — fearlessly. we loved her and know how lucky we were to have her in our lives. she blazed so brightly. go now, little one, into the air, and thank you." so to
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reiterate, our breaking news there, the british actress helen mccrory has died after a battle with cancer. she starred in harry potter films and also the television series peaky blinders. final preparations are being made for the duke of edinburgh's funeral, which will take place tomorrow at st george's chapel in windsor. the archbishop of canterbury, who will give the blessing at the service, said he hoped the whole nation would reflect on a "profound day" for the royal family. much of the ceremony has been carefully planned by the duke, to reflect his life and interests. the head of britain's armed forces, general sir nick carter, will walk alongside the funeral procession, and said the details of the event had the prince's "fingerprints all over it". 0ur correspondent, sarah campbell, sent this report from windsor. behind the castle walls, final rehearsals are under way. across windsor, extra police
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and wardens are on patrol, as the town prepares for the funeral of one of its best—known residents. more than 700 service personnel have spent the last few days rehearsing precise movements, in tribute to the duke, who was mentioned in dispatches for his bravery and enterprise during the second world war. tomorrow afternoon, the duke's coffin will be borne through the grounds of windsor castle on this, a land rover hearse which the duke helped to design. its dark green colour, that of military vehicles. following the land rover on foot will be members of the royal family. in the front, the princess royal and the prince of wales. behind them, the earl of wessex and the duke of york, and then princes harry and william. in an already much commented upon formation, rather than walking side by side, the two brothers will be separated, with the princess royal's son peter phillips walking between them. as here in 2002, at the funeral of queen elizabeth,
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the queen mother, military uniforms would usually be worn by members of the family entitled to do so. but tomorrow, all the royals will be in civilian dress. it is a neat way of avoiding controversy, which had been building around prince harry and prince andrew, with both having stepped back from royal duties and harry no longer entitled to wear a military uniform. inside the chapel, the service will be attended byjust 30 people, in line with the coronavirus restrictions. all the duke's children and grandchildren will be present, along with three of his german relatives. all, including the queen, will wear masks. the blessing will be given by the archbishop of canterbury. she's the queen. she will behave with the extraordinary dignity and extraordinary courage that she always does. and, at the same time, she is saying farewell to someone to whom she was married for 73 years.
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it will be a difficult day for the queen and her family. prince charles, yesterday visibly moved, has talked about how grateful they all are for the many tributes which have been paid to his father. prince philip was known around the world. but, in windsor, there is a heightened sense of loss. he was the ranger in the great park for many years, and a dog walk would often include a brush with royalty. very, very regularly, you would see him out on his carriage. he would always acknowledge you, he would always say hello to the group of us as we were walking. you could see a real twinkle in his eye. he was definitely a real character. it will be very strange, because we have only ever known prince philip in my life, he's always been here. seeing him racing down here on his carriage one day, i've got a lovely picture. the message remains for the public to watch and listen to the funeral from home, due to the pandemic, helping to facilitate the duke's desire for
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a simple, no fuss funeral. well, we can speak now to our correspondent, helena wilkinson, who's in windsor for us this afternoon. what have the family been doing in the build—up to the funeral tomorrow? the build-up to the funeral tomorrow?— the build-up to the funeral tomorrow? ., , tomorrow? today in the last couple of hours or — tomorrow? today in the last couple of hours or so. _ tomorrow? today in the last couple of hours or so, behind _ tomorrow? today in the last couple of hours or so, behind the - tomorrow? today in the last couple of hours or so, behind the castle i of hours or so, behind the castle walls in the spring sunshine, some of the duke's family have been looking at some of the flowers left by members of the public. the duke's youngest son, prince edward, and also his wife, sophie, and their daughter, lady louise, came to the castle, they spent some time as i say looking at the dozens and dozens of flowers that have been left by members of the public, and also reading some of the messages. you can see some of those pictures now of the family taking some time and reading those messages. we also know
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that the reef has been sent by the prime minister a brief and tribute to prince philip, and the message pays tribute to a man whom the patient destination note... so seeing some of the members of the royalfamily on the seeing some of the members of the royal family on the eve of the duke of edinburgh's funeral here in windsor, which is at 3pm tomorrow afternoon, there's been quite a lot of activity around here today. as you can imagine, some lorries, trucks, buses going in and out of the castle, wreaths being delivered here as well. don't forget the funeral will be on television and on the radio — that requires a huge amount of organisation, so a full rehearsal is taking place here today, we know that some military personnel were taken into the castle a bit earlier on this morning, and they will have practised and practised to perfection to get
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everything absolutely right. and of course, that would've been what the duke would've wanted and expected. here this evening, the queen of courses in residence here ahead of her husband's funeral tomorrow. there will be one minute's national silence tomorrowjust before the funeral at 3pm and that service is expected to last for around 50 minutes. we know thatjust before that, there will be a short procession where the duke of edinburgh's coffin will be carried a short distance and that land rover, as you saw in the package just before us, a land rover that the duke had a huge amount of input adapting and modifying specifically to carry his coffin at his funeral. just to reiterate, the public are being urged and advised not to come to windsor for the very simple reason that they will not be able to see anything at all if they come here. everything — the procession,
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the funeral — will take place behind castle walls tomorrow. the funeral - will take place behind castle walls tomorrow.— castle walls tomorrow. helena, thanks so _ castle walls tomorrow. helena, thanks so much _ castle walls tomorrow. helena, thanks so much for— castle walls tomorrow. helena, thanks so much for that. - we saw the archbishop of canterbury in sarah campbell's report. he will greet the coffin and give the blessing at the duke's funeral service tomorrow. in an interview ahead of the funeral, reeta chakrabarti began by asking him if he felt nervous ahead of occasions like this. oh yes, absolutely. a few weeks ago, i took the funeral of a relative. and i'll be no more nervous than i was then. the nerves are not about the number of people. the nerves are about contributing to this in a way that helps the family see that it's about hope and resurrection. we know that the queen is going to sit alone because of covid restrictions, and she will be doing what tens of thousands of people had
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to do in this last year. what will be the emotional strain on her, do you think? she's the queen. she will behave with the extraordinary dignity and extraordinary courage that she always does. and, at the same time, she's saying farewell to someone to whom she was married to for 73 years. i think that must be a very, very profound thing and anybody�*s life, and i hope that the whole nation — if they believe in that, they'll pray for her, and if they don't, they sympathise in their hearts, offer their condolences to her and hope for her to find strength in what must be an anguished moment. because she is both the monarch
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and a grieving wife? she is a grieving widow. and over the last year, there's literally millions of people around the world who have been in her position. and they will identify, especially in one sense, that part of the burden that her majesty carries is that burden of representing everybody in her person. and that's a heavy burden. so this funeral will be a national event, but also one that resonates very personally for a lot of people? i think it will resonate very deeply for a lot of people. i think there will be tears in many homes, because other names will be on their minds. faces they've lost that they won't see again, funerals that they couldn't go to — as many haven't been able to go to this one. that will break many a heart. there's been a hope from other senior clerics that some of the reported rifts within the family might be healed over this funeral.
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do you share that hope? i think this funeral is absolutely about the duke of edinburgh. and in the hundreds of funerals which i've taken, they have different impacts on people in different ways at the time and later. and this funeral is about looking at the duke's life, being proud of that life. it's about the fact that, whatever is going on in the family, that each one will be feeling a sense of loss. this is clearly a big moment in the nation's life. how do you hope that we will emerge from it? i suspect that what the duke would say is, "now get on with it." and i hope that we will see this moment as something we share
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in in the grief of this very, very hard year that we've all gone through. and then, we'll say the best thing we can do is to do what he did in all his life — just get on with it. that was the archbishop of canterbury speaking to reeta chakrabarti. the headlines on bbc news... final preparations ahead of the duke of edinburgh's funeral tomorrow — the archbishop of canterbury urges the public to support the queen at what he calls a �*very profound' moment labour says there are "serious questions to answer" after it emerged the health secretary, matt hancock, has shares in a potential supplier for nhs trusts in england. the actress helen mccrory, known for her roles in peaky blinders and harry potter, has died aged 52 from cancer. the labour leader says the health secretary has questions to answer,
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surrounding shares he owns in a company which was approved as a potential supplierfor the nhs. a government spokesman said, mr hancock had acted entirely properly. sir keir starmer also repeated his call for a full, transparent and independent inquiry into "what's going on.". earlier, i spoke to our political correspondent greg dawson, who gave me the background to this story. this basically starts with matt hancock declaring last month that he had acquired more than 15% of shares in a company called topwood ltd. this is a company that specialises in shredding documentation. his sister is a director on this company and, in 2019, this company effectively won the right to pitch for business with the nhs in england. matt hancock, of course, was made health secretary for the nhs in 2018, and the question being asked by labour is, when he was appointed
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to that role, should he have declared this family connection? and if he didn't, did he indeed break the ministerial code? we also know that topwood subsequently has been awarded £300,000 worth of contracts by the nhs in wales. it's very important to stress here that matt hancock has no involvement with that, it's a devolved issue and that will be down to the welsh labour government. but we have heard from a department of health spokesperson today, and they've said that matt hancock, before acquiring these shares, did check with the civil service if it would be appropriate. the civil service looked into it and decided there was no conflict of interest. they also say that the health secretary had "no active role in running top would, and therefore no involvement in awarding contracts to it". —— topwood. however, the labour leader, keir starmer, says there are still questions to answer here. every day, there's more evidence of this return to sleaze.
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now obviously, matt hancock needs to answer these specific questions that have arisen today. but we've got to have a full inquiry. we can't have this where, day by day, by day, there's drips and drips of sleaze, cronyism, contracts for mates. there must be a full inquiry because this is the return to sleaze, and it's got to be cleared up. now all of this, of course, started by looking into the relations between politicians, civil servants, and people in private businesses with the revelation that former prime minister david cameron had lobbied on behalf of his employer, greensill capital. we now know today that the national audit office is going to look into the issue of dealings between greensill and the government. that brings the number of investigations into that affair to eight. greg dawson there. in the us, the mayor of chicago has appealed for calm, after the release of footage showing a 13—year—old boy being shot dead by a policeman last month. the video shows adam toledo with his hands up and unarmed —
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although a weapon was later recovered nearby. the teenager's death comes at a time of increased tension in the us about police killings. mark lobel reports. police, stop! a chicago police officer chases 13—year—old adam toledo down a dark alley before shooting him once in the chest. shots fired, shots fired, get an ambulance up here now. the boy's actions at that moment have become a source of contention. initially, it was claimed he was holding a gun. but bodycam footage appears to show no weapon is visible as he raises his hands. those videos speak for themselves. adam, during his last second of life, did not have a gun in his hand. the officer screamed at him, "show me your hands," adam complied, turned around, his hands were empty when he was shot in the chest at the hands of the officer.
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separate cctv footage appears to show the teenager throwing what looks like a gun through a gap in the fence as the officer runs up to him. after the shooting, the policeman calls for an ambulance while urging adam to stay awake. cpr is performed — but it's too late. say his name! daunte wright! tensions are already high due to the fatal police shooting of daunte wright in a minneapolis suburb. add to that the ongoing trial in minneapolis of derek chauvin, the police officer accused of killing george floyd, who on thursday was asked in court if he wants to take the stand. i will invoke my fifth amendment privilege today. the decision whether or not to testify... let me take this off. ..is entirely yours. is this your decision not to testify?
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it is, your honour. all right. following the release of these videos, shops were boarded up in chicago, leaving america with even more uncomfortable questions to answer. can the sons and daughters of slave catchers police the sons and daughters of slaves? and that's part of the problem. where you see the police, in their dna, there is the american history of white supremacy. chicago's mayor condemned what she called her city's legacy of police violence and misconduct, leaving its residents, especially those who are black and brown, as she put it, in a constant state of fearand pain. mark lobel, bbc news. police in the us city of indianapolis say eight people have been killed in a shooting at a fedex facility.
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the gunman then took his own life, leaving local hospitals dealing with many more people with gunshot wounds. police are yet to determine the reason for this latest incident in a nation where, as president biden noted last week, 316 people are shot every single day. the us vice—president kamala harris says there is no question this violence must end. let's get the latest daily figures form the department of health concerning covid—19. in the past 2a hours, 2,596 people have tested positive for covid 19 — a drop of 8.5% in the past seven days. 3a deaths were recorded — that's the total number of deaths within 28 days of a positive test. just over 32.5 million people have now received a first dose of a vaccine — 8,931,547 have received
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their second dose, according to the latest figures. figures from the office for national statistics suggest that around 1—in—500 people across the uk tested positive for coronavirus last week. that figure is down nearly 90% on the levels reported at the start of january. it comes as government scientists estimate the r number to be between 0.7 and 1.0 — which could mean the epidemic is shrinking. but there are concerns about the emerging indian variant, of which there are 77 cases across the uk. 77 cases of the coronavirus variant first detected in india have been identified in the uk. 73 cases have been confirmed in england as well as four cases in scotland. india's covid rates are soaring with almost 1a million confirmed cases but the country isn't currently on the uk's
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travel red list. let's speak to professor peter drobac, expert in infectious diseases from the university of oxford. thank you forjoining us here on bbc news. so the indian variant — what do you make of that making an appearance in the uk? how concerned are you? appearance in the uk? how concerned are ou? . ~ appearance in the uk? how concerned are ou? ., ~ ., ., are you? thank you for having me. there's a lot _ are you? thank you for having me. there's a lot that _ are you? thank you for having me. there's a lot that we _ are you? thank you for having me. there's a lot that we don't - are you? thank you for having me. there's a lot that we don't yet - are you? thank you for having me. | there's a lot that we don't yet know about this particular variant, but what we do know is concerning. so you mentioned india's certain infections over 200,000 infections per day in the country is really buckling under this wave of infections. in this particular variant, appears to be driving at least some of that search, so that always makes us concerned that it might be one of those more infectious variants. the other thing about this particular variant as it
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does contain two mutations on the spike protein that appear to give it one of those advantages where it can evade immunity. it might evade the response that renders the vaccines less effective or immunity less effective, much like the variance from south africa and brazil that we've heard a lot about. now this is not been definitively proven, but there is cause for concern, and now that we've seen cases here, 7/7 is not a big number but they aren't concentrated injust not a big number but they aren't concentrated in just one area, there multiple places across the country suggesting that there is already some community spread. you mentioned some community spread. you mentioned some of the mutations, _ some community spread. you mentioned some of the mutations, i'd _ some community spread. you mentioned some of the mutations, i'd like _ some community spread. you mentioned some of the mutations, i'd like to - some of the mutations, i'd like to touch very quickly before we talk about how this variant will do with the vaccine. re—combinations, or recombinant mutations, there's a lot of concern over that. have we seen that yet within the population where two mutations combined together?
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there's thousands of mutations that have been documented with sars, the virus behind covid—19. what's interesting is that a lot of the mutations actually appear to be replicated, so in different variants that emerge independently in different parts of the world, some of them seem to develop similar mutations or types. now we have seen concerns about some of these so—called double mutants, which is what some people are calling this particular variant from india, where there are two different mutations that together can conspire to give it a real advantage in terms of evading immunity. buti it a real advantage in terms of evading immunity. but i do want to stress that what we know about this is mostly from laboratory testing, where you test the virus on how it performs against neutralising antibodies and a test tube. we don't have real life clinical evidence about, for example, how a vaccine would perform against this particular variant.-
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would perform against this particular variant. you kind of answer to _ particular variant. you kind of answer to my _ particular variant. you kind of answer to my next _ particular variant. you kind of answer to my next question, | answer to my next question, professor. —— answered. does that mean moving forward, it'll be a case of booster after booster, after booster? it of booster after booster, after booster? . , of booster after booster, after booster? ., , ., �* , booster? it may. one thing that's im ortant booster? it may. one thing that's important to _ booster? it may. one thing that's important to emphasise - booster? it may. one thing that's important to emphasise as - booster? it may. one thing that's important to emphasise as we - important to emphasise as we sometimes talk about vaccine escape or evading immunity, and that sounds scary. the variant from south africa shows that some vaccines appear to be less effective, but that's from a very high standard we've become accustomed to with these extraordinary vaccines. they do still have some activity. so what i want to stress is that for 99% of the virus circulating in the uk right now, we have vaccines that are extraordinarily effective — and if anything, this news isjust cause for all of us to get that vaccine when our opportunity arises. we do need to double down on other public health measures to slow the spread of these new variants, and that's why it's notjust about of these new variants, and that's why it's not just about vaccines, but about making sure we have a test
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entry system that's actually functioning, and that we think about how we better want to protect our borders to slow the spread of these variance —— test and trace system. thank you for your time. variance -- test and trace system. thank you for your time.— variance -- test and trace system. thank you for your time. pregnant women should be offered a covid—19 jab at the same time as the rest of the population based on their age and clinical risk group, according to new official advice. thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation said there were "no specific safety concerns" identified with "any brand of covid—19 vaccines" in relation to pregnancy. professor adam finn is a member of thejcvi. we will be hearing from him in a second. but first, i'mjoined by we will be hearing from him in a second. but first, i'm joined by our second. but first, i'mjoined by our health second. but first, i'm joined by our health correspondent, kath burns. tells us to give get this is? if
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you're pregnant right now it's a big deal. because up until this point, the advice has been for women that if they are at high risk of exposure or had some kind of underlying condition, then they should go ahead and get vaccinated. but there wasn't really a blanket advice for the rest of women. now that's change, and that's because in america, 90,000 women have been vaccinated. mainly with pfizer and mentor and a, so now in the uk, thejoint with pfizer and mentor and a, so now in the uk, the joint committee with pfizer and mentor and a, so now in the uk, thejoint committee of vaccinations has told pregnant women to come forward when they are called, have the vaccination, they will be offered it with everyone else —— pfizer and moderna. this is very much being seen as a conversation to be had between women and their health teams, so they're being told to speak to midwives and doctors to get the advice. it’s doctors to get the advice. it's interesting. _ doctors to get the advice. it's interesting, just quickly, up until now, pregnant women haven't been able to get the vaccine? it’s now, pregnant women haven't been able to get the vaccine?— able to get the vaccine? it's been very nuanced _ able to get the vaccine? it's been very nuanced up _ able to get the vaccine? it's been very nuanced up till— able to get the vaccine? it's been very nuanced up till this - able to get the vaccine? it's been very nuanced up till this point, i able to get the vaccine? it's been l very nuanced up till this point, but we've not been in those age groups.
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it is getting depressing now because we're coming down to the age groups where women are more likely to be pregnant. pregnant women will be treated in the same way as everyone else. there's now a preference for them to have pfizer and moderna — not because of problems with any other vaccines, not because of problems with any othervaccines, it not because of problems with any other vaccines, it is important that we say that, it's just these 90,000 women who are vaccinated in america were given mainly these vaccines with no safety concerns. so there is some real confidence in that. so moderna is a vaccine that now — wales has already started using it? with the roll—out has just begun this week, so we've seen very few cases. that is something we will see more and more. the other thing to think about is when to get the vaccine when you are pregnant. the you can have the vaccine at any stage in pregnancy, but it is acknowledged may be women in their first 12 weeks, when there is a chance of miscarriage, may want to hold off on that until they've had
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that scan and seeing their baby is ok. actually, the most high—risk 0k. actually, the most high—risk time for pregnant women tends to after 26 weeks. so if they held off on 12 weeks, they could have their two doses that carry them to that high risk time. pregnant women are not more likely to have covid than other people in their age group, but if they have it, they're more likely to go to intensive care — and if they go to hospital, they have a one in five chance to deliver their baby very early. in five chance to deliver their baby ve earl . ~ �* in five chance to deliver their baby very early-— very early. we've been hearing, professor— very early. we've been hearing, professor adam _ very early. we've been hearing, professor adam then _ very early. we've been hearing, professor adam then has - very early. we've been hearing, professor adam then has been l professor adam then has been speaking, he's a member of thejcvi. this is what he had to say on this news. ~ �* ., ., , news. we've now got some safety information — news. we've now got some safety information from _ news. we've now got some safety information from the _ news. we've now got some safety information from the united - news. we've now got some safety | information from the united states programme, where both the madura and pfizer vaccine are being used extensively over the last few weeks and given _ extensively over the last few weeks and given to very large number of regnant— and given to very large number of regnant women —— moderna. this finally— regnant women —— moderna. this finally means we've got a decent safety _ finally means we've got a decent safety database for at least two of the three — safety database for at least two of the three vaccines that are now being _
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the three vaccines that are now being used in the uk, and that enables— being used in the uk, and that enables us to recommend those for pregnant— enables us to recommend those for pregnant women who will be called forward _ pregnant women who will be called forward now in larger numbers as the programme _ forward now in larger numbers as the programme moves down through the age ranges _ programme moves down through the age ranges the— programme moves down through the age ranues. ~' , programme moves down through the age ranues. ~ , ., , , ranges. the key word is safety, safe , ranges. the key word is safety, safety. safety- _ ranges. the key word is safety, safety, safety. it— ranges. the key word is safety, safety, safety. it is— ranges. the key word is safety, safety, safety. it is about - ranges. the key word is safety, safety, safety. it is about trust| safety, safety. it is about trust and safety- _ safety, safety. it is about trust and safety. pregnant _ safety, safety. it is about trust and safety. pregnant women i safety, safety. it is about trust i and safety. pregnant women feel safety, safety. it is about trust - and safety. pregnant women feel more vulnerable at that stage of their lives anyways, so the reaction to this has been very positive, as you can imagine. the royal college of obstetricians and gynaecologists says this puts us in line with countries like america who have been offering this to pregnant women since december. they've also noted that in ireland, there are recommended to have it in 13—14 weeks for reasons explained. public health england say this is great that it's giving them clarity and they are encouraging people, when it is your time for the vaccine, pregnant or not, please come forward. . ., pregnant or not, please come forward. ., ~ , ., pregnant or not, please come forward. . ~' , ., , pregnant or not, please come forward. ., ~ , . ., forward. thank you very much for
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that. let's bring you that news again that actress helen mccrory, known for her roles in peaky blinders and three harry potter films, has died of cancer at the age of 52.her husband damian lewis on twitter said... "i'm heartbroken to announce that after an heroic battle with cancer, the beautiful and mighty woman that is helen mccrory has died peacefully at home, surrounded by a wave of love from family and friends." "she blazed so brightly. go now, little 0ne, into the air, and thank you." that into the air, and thank you." was a statement from husband that was a statement from the husband of helen mccrory there. now it's time for a look at the weather with the weather is pretty good out there right now and the weekend is not looking bad either. a lot of at least bright weather on the way and probably quite sunny for many of us. at the moment, the temperatures are hovering around about ten to 12 celsius, so again below the average
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for the time of the year and through this evening and overnight the skies will be clear, so once again it is going to turn quite cold. but we do have a southerly breeze here, so that does mean that these western fringes of the uk will be frost free, for example in belfast, six degrees early on saturday morning, whereas many towns and cities further east close to freezing. then tomorrow, lots of sunshine on the way. a bit more cloud towards the north—west here. there is a weather front trying to approach, but it cannot because of a big high pressure over us right now, but it will mean clouds will increase in the north—west of the country as we go through the weekend, so by sunday there might even be some spots of rain in some northern areas. bye— bye. hello this is bbc news with lukwesa burak. the headlines... final preparations ahead of the duke of edinburgh's funeral tomorrow — the archbishop of canterbury urges
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the public to support the queen at what he calls a "very profound" moment. she is the queen. she will behave with the extraordinary dignity and extraordinary courage that she always does. and, at the same time, she is saying farewell to someone to whom she was married for 73 years. labour says there are "serious questions to answer" after it emerged the health secretary, matt hancock, has shares in a potential supplier for nhs trusts in england. appeals for calm in chicago, as footage emerges of a 13 year old boy being shot dead by police. new figures suggest coronavirus infections in the uk are at their lowest level since september — with around 130 are at their lowest
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level since september — with around 130,000 people estimated to have had it last week. the actress helen mccrory — known for her roles in peaky blinders and harry potter — has died aged 52 from cancer. her husband damian lewis announced the news on twitter. i reckon it's high time we catch up on the all—important sport. let's cross to the bbc sport centre. good evening. we start with some sad news — the legendary former wales and british and irish lions captain and coachjohn dawes has died at the age of 80. dawes won 22 caps for wales, captaining them six times and leading them to the grand slam in 1971. he also captained the lions on the 1971 winning tour of new zealand. as coach of wales, dawes won four five nations titles and four triple crowns and was coach of the 1977
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lions in new zealand. next to tennis, and dan evans' incredible run at the monte carlo masters continues. the british number one — who beat novak djokovic yesterday — is now through to the semi finals after coming from a set down to beat the world number 15 david goffin 5—7 6—3 6—4. he hadn't won on clay for four years until this week, and has never got this far in a masters 1000 tournament. he'll face greece's stefanos tsistsipas next for a place in the final. staying with tennis, great britain have won both their opening matches of their play off against mexico as they look to qualify for next years billyjean king cup finals. it's the new name for the fed cup. in the last half hour heather watson beat giuliana 0lmos. 7—5, 6—1 at the national tennis centre in london.
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an impressive straight sets win for her. earlier, things got off to a perfect start for gb with katie boulter — who's had injury problems for a couple of years — easing past marcela zacarias in straight sets — winning 7—5 6—0. this is the best—of—5 this time tomorrow. i have been playing some really good tennis and practice. you know, i felt like when i set up to my survey to bring that out on the court. i was pretty happy with the second set for sure. was pretty happy with the second set forsure. i did was pretty happy with the second set for sure. i did a good job closing to match up. any maps that you play for great britain is a huge honour. you know, i respect everything at time i get to step out on the court. i don't take it for granted. i had the opportunity to do it today and i left it on the line. i got the job done, and by —— i think that's all that matters. england all—rounder ben stokes is going to be out for up to 12 weeks after an x—ray and scan showed he needs surgery on a fractured finger. it means stokes will miss the test series against new zealand, and is also a doubt for england's white ball games against sri lanka
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and pakistan later injune. stokes was injured whilst playing in the indian premier league earlier this week and will fly home tomorrow with his surgery set for monday. england under 21 manager aidy boothroyd is stepping down after four years in the role, just two weeks after the side finished bottom of their group at the european championship. england were one of the favourites for the tournament with a host of big name players to pick from, but went out following defeats to portugal and switzerland. there's a setback for scotland ahead of this summer's euro 2020 after rangers midfielder ryanjack was ruled out due to a calf injury. he played a big part in the play off win over serbia, but rangers manager steven gerrard has confirmed jack needs an operation which will see him miss scotland's first major men's tournament in 23 years which includes a group game against england at wembley. and some formula one action to bring you before we go — valterri bottas was fastest in second practice at the emilia romagna grand prix. the mercedes driver was just point zero one seconds faster than this
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team—mate lewis hamilton, with pierre gasly in third. charles leclerc meanwhile had set the fastest lap, only to lose it for exceeding track limits. things got worse when he ended up crashing in the closing seconds, and disappointment for red bull's max verstappen too, who suffered a mechanical failure early in the session. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. that's bbc.co.uk/sport. that includes details of gb�*s tennis wins today. of course, dan evans great win, he is in this finals of the multicolor masters. we will be back at 6:30pm for sports day. join him if you can. that's all for me. back to you. scientists in the us have developed a paint that is being described as "whiter than whitew — and could help reduce energy use. painting a roof white is a way of keeping buildings cool and reduces the need for air conditioning. the team behind the new paint says its purity will reflect 98% of sunlight — helping to drive down
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carbon emissions. victoria gill reports. cool, heat—reflecting white rooms are already an urban climate solution embraced in cities around the world. in new york, more than ten million square feet of roofs have been coated with white, heat—reflecting paint. but these scientists say their ultra—white paint could make these roofs even cooler. while the whitest currently available paints reflect between 80—90% of sunlight, these researchers say theirs reflects more than 98%. covering a 1,000—square—foot roof with this paint, they estimate, would provide more cooling power than a typical central air—conditioner. every 1% of reflectants you get will translate to ten watts per metre square less heating from the sun. so basically it provides the equivalent 18 kilowatts, and that is a big deal. that is more than a typical air—conditioner does for a house,
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with that same kind of space. the secret to its formulation also makes it relatively cheap to produce. the scientists use high concentrations of a compound called barium sulphate that's already used to make paper. painting buildings white to keep them cool in hot climates is something people have been doing for centuries. but sustainable designers and architects point out that, as a modern, energy saving solution, white roofs have their limits. if we have the possibility to apply them on every single roof surface, in any city, any fabric, or even at ground level, it could have a huge impact in terms of reducing energy consumption of cities, although in particular when we're talking about ground level there would be issues around glare. so it may not be ideal solution. back in 2014, another group of scientists created the blackest possible black coating, a material called vantablack,
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that absorbs so much light it makes every surface look almost invisibly flat. and one museum in the us now wants to put these two breakthroughs side by side, displaying the whitest possible white alongside the blackest black. victoria gill, bbc news. with me now is dr lukas schertel, a light—scattering expert at the university of cambridge. he is here to discuss this further with me. thank you forjoining us here on bbc news. it must be blinding if it is whiter than white. yes, i mean, the whiteness essentially is something great that they achieved but it's probably not they achieved but it's probably not the property that is most surprising from a scientific perspective. it could —— it's really a combination of this so—called atmospheric transmission window, the infrared, and they design the material in a way that actually you can get to a low ambient schooling, and therefore
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have an additional functionality than just looking white, it also cools the substrate where this material is really coded on. and i think what's really nice about this recent achievement is that they try to look at this on a commercial perspective, that means they use a material that is widely available and in principle, could be scalable. you say widely available. so the magic of you say widely available. so the main ., , ., . magic of this, the magic ingredient is barium sulphate. _ is barium sulphate. because this is is barium sulphate. because this i , ., ., because this is being lauded in a ossible because this is being lauded in a possible eta _ because this is being lauded in a possible eta fighting _ because this is being lauded in a possible eta fighting climate - because this is being lauded in a - possible eta fighting climate change and reducing carbon emissions, just thinking about carbon offset. barium sulphate isn't an organic compound. barium itself cannot be found as a free. so there is a lot of processes in the middle of all of us to try and get to the whiter than white. exactly. this is also aware of this study is still not there yet. so i think there needs to be a bit more
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development _ think there needs to be a bit more development put _ think there needs to be a bit more development put into _ think there needs to be a bit more development put into this - think there needs to be a bit more development put into this topic. i development put into this topic. there is a lot more other studies in this overall topic of radiative cooling, we call it come out there that they also try to use more sustainable materials, to produce really white materials. this is a pure bio —based material. so there is a lot of research going on, how to improve that in terms of materials also, and then we have to then at some point, and this is where it is transitioning now, look for a really industrial perspective in terms of cost efficiency and the overall issue, and energy efficiency of the processing process, notjust the active, passive cooling material at the end. so the active, passive cooling material at the end. , , at the end. so this will be most useful for— at the end. so this will be most useful for those _ at the end. so this will be most useful for those in _ at the end. so this will be most useful for those in the - at the end. so this will be mostj useful for those in the southern hemisphere, essentially, isn't it? it's most effective, actually, where
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temperatures and solar radiation are higher, but it's also very effective where applications that by themselves are quite warm, so when you think of how appliance modules, they emit a lot of heat already, and then this process of this cooling is more efficient. so it can have a wide impact. i think as we mentioned before, basically the numbers of the material itself cooling by several degrees might not sound so fascinating, but when you think of the wide use of paint and where it can all be applied, then this can have a real global impact on our energy efficiency. {lilia have a real global impact on our energy efficiency.— energy efficiency. ok, exciting stuff. hopefully _ energy efficiency. ok, exciting stuff. hopefully available - stuff. hopefully available commercially soon. thank you very much indeed. thank you. thank you. now on bbc news its time for the film review. hello, and welcome to the film review with me, anna smith.

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