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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 16, 2021 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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this is bbc news, with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. final preparations ahead of the duke of edinburgh's funeral. the archbishop of canterbury urges the british public to support the queen at what he calls a "very profound" moment. she's the queen. she will behave with the extraordinary dignity and extraordinary courage that she always does. and at the same time, she is saying farewell to someone whom she was married to for 73 years. appeals for calm in chicago, as graphic police footage emerges showing an officer shooting dead a 13 year boy, who appeared unarmed when he was killed. the diplomatic row between russia and the us intensifies, with moscow ordering ten us
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diplomats to leave the country. the uk's vaccine advisers say all pregnant women should be offered a covid vaccine, preferably the pfizer or moderna jab. there is more money in this than there is in all the other parts of our business put together. the british actress helen mccrory, known for her roles in peaky blinders and the harry potter films, has died of cancer at the age of 52. and whiter than white — scientists develop a paint that reflects so much sunlight, it will help drive down carbon emissions. good evening. as final preparations are made for the funeral of the duke of edinburgh tomorrow at windsor castle, the archbishop of canterbury has spoken of what he called an "anguished
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moment" for the queen. justin welby, who will play a key part in the service, told the bbc that the queen, as a grieving widow, now found herself in the same position as millions of others who've lost family members in the pandemic. today, the earl and countess of wessex viewed tributes and flowers left by the public outside st george's chapel in the grounds of windsor castle. we'll have more on the reflections from the archbishop in just a moment, but first from windsor, here's our royal correspondent nicholas witchell. outside st george's chapel within windsor castle, some of the flowers left by members of the public have been laid out on the lawns. close by, a wreath from the prime minister with a card paying tribute to a man to whom the nation owed more than words can say. there were wreaths too from commonwealth nations, from canada and new zealand — countries which the duke had often visited. the earl and countess of wessex and their daughter came to inspect
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the flowers and some of the cards and other tributes which have been left. and this, as the final touches for tomorrow's funeral were being put into place. all the military contingents who are involved in the short ceremonial procession have completed their main preparations. at the centre of the procession will be the land rover hearse, which the duke helped to design. it will be in the castle�*s central quadrangle that the proceedings will begin. the service detachments will be drawn up. a few moments after 2.40pm tomorrow, the duke's coffin will be born from the state entrance to be placed on the land rover. at 2.45pm, the small procession will step off for the eight—minute journey through the castle. some members of the royal family will walk behind the coffin. the queen will follow in a limousine. the route will be lined by the military. at 2.53pm, the coffin will arrive at the west steps of saint george's chapel.
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it will be borne to the top of the steps, where it will pause. at 3pm, a one minute silence will be observed before the coffin enters the chapel for the funeral service. inside the chapel, the queen will sit by herself. like all the 30 members of the congregation, she will wear a mask. at one point, the chapel will echo to the bugle call for action stations — a reminder of the duke's service as an officer in the royal navy in the second world war. in the town of windsor, many of the residents have their own stories of the duke. you would see him out on his carriage, and he would always acknowledge you. he would always say hello to the group of us as we were walking. it will be very strange because we have only ever known prince philip in my life, he has always been here. so a castle which has witnessed many moments in britain's long royal history is ready for another. the weather forecast for tomorrow is good but both the palace and police are hoping that that won't tempt people
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to come to windsor. they have reiterated the point that no part of the funeral will be visible to spectators. the only way to follow it is to watch it on television. audiences around the world will watch and listen as the queen bids farewell to the man she described as her beloved husband. nicholas witchell, bbc news, windsor. daniel is out windsor castle for us. —— daniella ralph. you see much of preparations going on out there tonight? we preparations going on out there toniaht? ~ ., preparations going on out there toniaht? ~ . , .,, preparations going on out there toniaht? ~ . , , ., tonight? we have seen those final preparations. _ tonight? we have seen those final preparations, as _ tonight? we have seen those final preparations, as you _ tonight? we have seen those final preparations, as you would - tonight? we have seen those finali preparations, as you would expect being put into place, and the final rehearsal is happening, particularly around the rehearsal itself within saint george's chapel. it's interesting being here in windsor, a place so used to the big royal event. but it feels very different this time around. this is not a
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celebration, a wedding, ajubilee or birthday. it'll feel very different tomorrow. there will be a sombre, solemn mood here. as we've heard in the report, people will be asked to stay away. there are signs on the roadside urging people away. that's been an urgent message from the authorities since the duke of edinburgh a week ago. it is a bit counterintuitive for a town like windsor which is so used to turning out for the big royal event. but the message is very clear, they want people to stay at home because everything will be going on within the castle walls behind me — the procession and the service will be in private behind those walls, you can hear on the radio or watch it on the tv. it will be a very solemn occasion. i think especially the moment when we see first —— first see the queen tomorrow. it should be just before 3pm on uk time, and what must be for her one of the saddest days of her very long range. daniela, thank you.
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like all other funerals this year, the service for prince philip will be subject to covid restrictions, with the numbers limited to 30 and social distancing rules requiring the queen to sit alone. a little earlier, reeta chakrabarti spoke to the archbishop of canterbury as he prepared for his part in the service — and began by asking him what the emotional impact of the occasion under these strict restrictions will be on the monarch. she's the queen. she will behave with the extraordinary dignity and extraordinary courage that she always does. and, at the same time, she is saying farewell to someone to whom she was married for 73 years. i think that must be a very, very profound thing in anybody�*s life and i hope that the whole nation, if they believe in that, they pray for her, if they don't, they sympathise in the hearts, offer their condolences
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to her and hope for her to find strength in what must be an anguished moment. because she is both the monarch and a grieving wife. she is a grieving widow and, over the last year, there's literally millions of people around the world who have been in her position, and they will identify especially. in one sense, part of the burden that her majesty carries is that burden of representing everyone in her person and that is a heavy burden. so this funeral will be a national event but also one that resonates very personally for a lot of people. i think it will resonate very deeply for a lot of people. i think there will be tears in many homes, because other names will be on their minds, faces they have lost that they don't see again,
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funerals that they couldn't go to, as many haven't been able to go to this one. that will break many a heart. prince william and prince harry will both walk behind the coffin tomorrow, although not side by side. other senior clerics have hoped publicly that the reported rift between them might be healed. does the archbishop agree? i think this funeral is absolutely about the duke of edinburgh and in the hundreds of funerals which i have taken, they have different impacts on people in different ways at the time and later. it's about the fact that whatever is going on in the family that each one will be feeling a sense of loss and that's where we keep our focus. this is clearly a big moment in the nation's life. how do you hope that we will emerge from it? i suspect that what the duke
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would say is, "now get on with it." and i hope that we will see this moment as something we share in in the grief of this very, very hard year that we have all gone through, and then we will say the best thing we can do is to do what he did in all his life — just get on with it. archbishop, thank you. thank you. the mayor of chicago has appealed for calm after the release of footage showing an unarmed 13—year—old boy being shot dead by a policeman last month. the video shows adam toledo with his hands up and with no weapon. the police film shows a handgun near the spot where he fell. the teenager's death comes at a time of continuing high tension in the us about police killings. barbara plett usher reports from chicago. the policeman chases the boy down an alleyway. "raise your hands," he shouts, then a shot is fired. stop! gunshot police had said the boy, adam toledo, was carrying a gun
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but the video shows him raising empty hands before he falls to the ground. 19 seconds from start to finish. shots fired, shots fired. get an ambulance over here now. a distraught officer stillman calls for medical back—up, but they can't save adam. it seems he had dropped his weapon before turning round. those videos speak for themselves. adam, during his last second of life, did not have a gun in his hand. the officer screamed at him, "show me your hands," adam complied, turned around, his hands were empty when he was shot in the chest at the hands of the officer. say his name! daunte white! another shooting this week in minneapolis triggered nights of protests against police. the killing of a young black man at a traffic stop has been one more
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flashpoint in a year of demonstrations for racialjustice. and now they have also started shouting adam toledo's name here. the anger has added to tensions over the george floyd murder trial which is winding down. nojustice, no peace! the city is fortifying itself for possible violence after the verdict. chicago has its own volatile history of police misconduct. city officials had demanded the release of the body cam footage after a public outcry. even as our understanding of this incident continues to evolve, this remains a complicated and nuanced story and we all must proceed with deep empathy and calm. and, importantly, peace. adam toledo died in the alleyway right behind me. he was one of the youngest people to be killed by police in the us in recent years, and his death has stirred up familiar tensions in chicago. there
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were a lot of protests here last year demanding police reform after george floyd was killed ivan and in fact, the city had been prepared for a reaction in the verdict in that trial even before this happened. the mayor and the family have appealed for calm. police in the us city of indianapolis say eight people have been killed in a shooting at a fedex facility. the gunman then took his own life, leaving local hospitals dealing with many more people with gunshot wounds. police are yet to determine the reason for this latest incident in a nation where as president biden noted last week 316 people are shot every single day. the us vice—president kamala harris says there is no question this violence must end. russia has ordered the us ambassador to moscow, john sullivan, to return home for consultations amid a diplomatic spat with washington. moscow has also announced the expulsion of ten us diplomats in a response to sanctions imposed by the us on thursday. a kremlin spokesman denounced what he called washington's addiction to sanctions,
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but said president putin wanted to avoid escalation. for more on this latest escalation, i've been speaking to a former british ambassador to russia, sir tony brenton. there's obviously lots of sound and fury going on at the moment, but both sides are being quite careful. the americans will already have factored in that the russians will throw out ten of their diplomats in response to the expulsions a couple of days ago. and it's not clear what more the russians will do — although they have asked the us ambassador to leave, which raises the temperature. all this takes place in the background of biden having suggested a summit later in the year. and even today after the announcement of the sanctions, the russians were still looking genuinely at that. so there is a way out of this in the sense that if the summit takes place, then there's a thing for people to aim at where they can begin to get tensions down. but i must say this is as
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noisy and destructive as i've ever seen it. �* ., ., , ., , seen it. and given that, how serious a situation is — seen it. and given that, how serious a situation is it? _ seen it. and given that, how serious a situation is it? well, _ seen it. and given that, how serious a situation is it? well, there - seen it. and given that, how serious a situation is it? well, there are - a situation is it? well, there are serious aspects _ a situation is it? well, there are serious aspects to _ a situation is it? well, there are serious aspects to it. _ a situation is it? well, there are serious aspects to it. there - a situation is it? well, there are serious aspects to it. there are | serious aspects to it. there are 80,000 russian troops on the borders of ukraine at the moment. and the temptation, if things really do slide out of control, will be for russia to organise some sort of demonstration in relation to ukraine which could turn things very nasty very quickly. on the american side, the expulsions are anticipated, but if the russians go beyond that and therefore force biden to take further steps himself, step up the sanctions again, for example, that you are back on the downward slide. this is been the story of us russian relations for years. russian publications, us sanctions. more of the same. the question is whether biden can reverse that slide. and the same. the question is whether biden can reverse that slide. and do sanctions actually _ biden can reverse that slide. and do sanctions actually work? _ biden can reverse that slide. and do sanctions actually work? no, - biden can reverse that slide. and do sanctions actually work? no, they i sanctions actually work? no, they don't, sanctions actually work? no, they don't. n0- — sanctions actually work? no, they don't. n0- they — sanctions actually work? no, they don't, no. they have _ sanctions actually work? no, they don't, no. they have never-
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sanctions actually work? no, they| don't, no. they have never worked against russia. there have been 20 orso against russia. there have been 20 or so sanctions actions at one sort of another by the us against russia in the last seven years. russia's policy has not been changed by one john. i don't think americans expect this latest package to affect russian policy. the main part of it is to respond to congress which is very angry with russia, probably to conceal to some extent us embarrassment at their announced withdrawal from afghanistan. and the hope i suspect was to get russia off the us agenda so that biden could focus on things which matter a great deal more to him, ie china and his domestic agenda. a, deal more to him, ie china and his domestic agenda.— domestic agenda. a lot of heat at the moment. _ domestic agenda. a lot of heat at the moment, but— domestic agenda. a lot of heat at the moment, but the _ domestic agenda. a lot of heat at the moment, but the kremlin - domestic agenda. a lot of heat at - the moment, but the kremlin haven't ruled out a possible summit with joe ruled out a possible summit withjoe biden. do you think that could be on the cards in the not—too—distant future? and if so, what would be on the agenda? this future? and if so, what would be on the agenda?— the agenda? this is actually the key test. if the two — the agenda? this is actually the key test. if the two sides _
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the agenda? this is actually the key test. if the two sides can _ the agenda? this is actually the key test. if the two sides can restrain i test. if the two sides can restrain themselves enough to keep the possibility of that summit alive, then there's lots they can do. they've got an ongoing negotiation on strategic nuclear weapons control, they are working together to revive the iran denuclearisation agreement, they are both important players on global climate change. there's a whole bunch of business, and the mere fact of sitting down and the mere fact of sitting down and beginning to do that sort of business again then creates opportunities to lower the temperature in other ways. sir tony britton there. 77 cases of a coronavirus variant first detected in india have been identified in the uk. 73 cases have been confirmed in england as well as four cases in scotland. india's covid rates are soaring with almost ia million confirmed cases but the country isn't currently on the uk's restricted travel red list. well, for more on the indian variant of covid—i9, we can speak now to ravi gupta, who's professor of clinical microbiology at the university of cambridge. thanks very much for being with us.
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tell us more about this variant. well, a strain has emerged in india, the first sequences were from back in november last year. around a month ago, there were stories in the indian press about a double mutant. and what they are referring to is the fact that there is a variant circulating now with two major mutations in the critical part of the virus that interacts with antibodies that we make it, and also the cells that it is trying to infect. and so, one of these is the mutation which is seen in variants emerging from brazil and south africa, and there's another one that's the key mutation in the california variant. so in a way, you have to mutations that really are of concern. in addition to a further mutation that increases the rate at which the virus then produces mature virus — that might increase its
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travel ability or infectiousness. so it's a real mix of mutations of concern. if? it's a real mix of mutations of concern. is, , , it's a real mix of mutations of concern-— it's a real mix of mutations of concern. , , ., . concern. 77 cases so far detected in the uk, you — concern. 77 cases so far detected in the uk. you said — concern. 77 cases so far detected in the uk, you said it's— concern. 77 cases so far detected in the uk, you said it's not _ concern. 77 cases so far detected in the uk, you said it's not quite - the uk, you said it's not quite known about the transmittal ability rate of this yet. how quickly cannot be found out and dealt with? it’s be found out and dealt with? it's alwa s be found out and dealt with? it's always very _ be found out and dealt with? it�*s always very difficult when you have so few cases, of course, from what i've heard, these are isolated cases suggesting multiple introductions from travel. i haven't seen any information about onward transmission within the uk, given that we are opening up the economy and contacts are increasing, i would expect this variant to increase in numbers over the next few weeks. and in india in particular, over half the cases in my hofstra were from this mutant. —— mar hofstra
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do we know if the vaccine being used as effective in this variant? it depends on what vaccine efficacy means. the vaccines will protect against severe disease and death, which is the key thing about vaccines. and of course, they may not stop you becoming infected at low level potentially, and there may be a chance of transmission. so that's the key worry, because as soon as you try to control an epidemic, you may get low—level transmission of such variance that are not susceptible to vaccines. on another level, vaccines will still be working effectively against the disease. ., , ,., ., ,, be working effectively against the disease. ., , ., ,, i. , disease. professor, thank you very much forjoining — disease. professor, thank you very much forjoining us. _ disease. professor, thank you very much forjoining us. thank - disease. professor, thank you very much forjoining us. thank you. i pregnant women should be offered a covid—i9 jab at the same time as the rest of the population based on their age and clinical risk group, according to new official advice. thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation said there were "no specific safety concerns" identified with "any brand of covid—i9 vaccines" in relation to pregnancy. professor adam finn
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is a member of thejcvi. we've now got some safety information from the united states programme, where both the moderna and pfizer vaccine are being used extensively over the last few weeks and given to very large number of regnant women. —— pregnant women. this finally means we've got a decent safety database for at least two of the three vaccines that are now being used in the uk, and that enables us to recommend those for pregnant women who will be called forward now in larger numbers as the programme moves down through the age ranges. the stage and tv actress helen mccrory, who also appeared in the harry potter films, has died from cancer at the age of 52. the man you want went to the police. but we dealt with it. in recent years, she's played the matriach polly grey
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in the hit bbc series peaky blinders. her colleagues and friends have been paying tribute on social media. the author of harry potter, jk rowling, said she was devastated by the news — calling helen mccrory an extraordinary actress and a wonderful woman. the actor michael sheen, who's starred alongside her, said she was "so funny, so passionate, so smart and one of the greatest actors of our time. from the first moment i met her when we were just kids it was obvious she was very special. it was an honour to work with her and know her". the comedian matt lucas, who set up a campaign with helen mccrory to get food directly to front line health staff in the uk during the pandemic, said she "will be remembered not just for her remarkable stage and screen performances, but also for her selflessness and generosity". let's talk to our arts correspondent david sillito. the news broke on twitter a few hours ago, released by her husband, the actor damian lewis. the statement — the actor damian lewis. the statement - _ the actor damian lewis. the statement - i'll _ the actor damian lewis. the statement - i'll read - the actor damian lewis. tue: statement — i'll read that the actor damian lewis. tte: statement — i'll read that in the actor damian lewis. t"t2 statement — i'll read that in a moment, because i think we need to go back to her life. award—winning
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stage actress, a long history with the national theatre, the deep blue sea, they said today they were devastated, devastated by the news. movies, of course the harry potter films. she had a number of political roles, she was sharee blair twice in the queen and also sky fall, and the director, sam mendes, said she was astonishing talent and a fabulous person. and in britain especially, she is best known to tv audiences for playing the slightly terrifying aunt polly, the person who is the brains with her fingers on the purse string of the shelby clan. she also appeared on tvjust a few months ago with that campaign that matt lucas
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was talking about, raising money, providing food for nhs workers in the middle of the pandemic. by her side with her husband, damian lewis. he broke the news today, and i'll redo his statement. he said, "i'm heartbroken to announce after a heroic battle with cancer, the beautiful and mighty woman that was helen mccurry died peacefully at home, surrounded by a wave of love from family and friends —— mccrory. she died and she lived, fearlessly. god we love her, and we know how lucky we were to have her in our lives." he adds, "she plays so brightly. go now, little one, into the air." ,, ., ., ,, ., brightly. go now, little one, into the air." ,, ., ., , , ., ., the air." she had appeared on television _ the air." she had appeared on television and _ the air." she had appeared on television and interviews - the air." she had appeared on television and interviews just| the air." she had appeared on | television and interviewsjust in television and interviews just in the past few weeks, hadn't she? t the past few weeks, hadn't she? i think that has been what was such a shock to people. they didn't know she was ill, so seriously ill. she was in the tv programme roadkill not
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long ago, just last year. so she seemed a vibrant, so young, just 52. an utter shock to everyone to hear that terrible news today, broken today by her husband, damian lewis. we don't know much else about how she died, other than she'd had cancer. ., ., y she died, other than she'd had cancer. ., ., , , ., , cancer. know, the only statements and what we've _ cancer. know, the only statements and what we've heard _ cancer. know, the only statements and what we've heard from - cancer. know, the only statements and what we've heard from damian lewis, as he said, she died peacefully at home surrounded by her family and friends. but you look back on such a career — i saw performances at the national theatre, the deep blue sea, and she played such different roles. i remember herfiery, terrifying played such different roles. i remember her fiery, terrifying as aunt polly, then you saw a different side of her when she presented on the satirical programme have i got news for you, and you saw a different side of her. that's why i think some people are talking about
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her today, the devastation of hearing the news and so unexpected. thank you, david, very much. stay with us here on bbc news, plenty more coming up. the weekend is upon us, and the weather is looking pretty good across most of the uk. here's the good news, the temperatures are going to rise a little bit, just a bit. the mornings will still be fairly chilly. a frosty night tonight, but i think by day, it will at least improve by around 2—3 degrees compared to what we've had in the last few. here is the weather map, from high—pressure close to uk, keeping weather fronts at bay. here's the recent satellite picture. you can see a weather frontjust brushing the outer hebrides there, scotland and also the north of northern ireland. over us, just a scattering of fairweather cloud here and there. so, this evening and overnight, it's a case of clear skies, again, a touch of frost, particularly across central and eastern areas of the uk. but where we have the breeze, just lifting out of the south here,
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i think it'll keep things just about frost free, certainly in belfast and also western parts of scotland. but central and eastern areas, as i say, will be pretty nippy. so here's the weather map for saturday, daytime itself, and you can see that high pressure there. the weather front�*s trying to move in, again, brushing the very far northwest of the uk. so, here, i think at times, a little on the cloudy side, but generally speaking, a case of sunny skies for most of us. in fact, out of the two days, i'd certainly say that saturday is going to be the sunnier day. best temperatures around 14—15 celsius towards the west of the uk. now on sunday, the weather fronts are moving a little bit closer, in fact, they are encroaching into northern ireland and also parts of scotland, which means we are going to see increasing amount of cloud, also the possibility of some light rain or drizzle in places like belfast, also western scotland, maybe even glasgow there. but, generally speaking, i think it's going to be
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more of a cloudy day for england and wales. the best of the sunshine in the far east of the uk. temperatures not bad, around 15 celsius. now, into monday, next week, so, still some mild air around on monday, but tuesday, wednesday, thursday, we'll pick up a northerly again blowing out of the arctic. so that means that eventually next week, after this brief recovery that we're going to see in the temperatures up to around 15—16 celsius, they're going to go back down again. but let's enjoy the warmth this weekend if you can. bye— bye.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. final preparations ahead of the duke of edinburgh's funeral. the archbishop of canterbury urges the public to support the queen and what he calls a very profound moment. appeals for calm in chicago as graphic police footage emerges showing an officer shooting an unarmed boy. a diplomatic grab between russia and the us ordering ten us diplomats to leave the country of russia. the uk's vaccine adviser say all pregnant women should be offered a covert vaccine, preferably the pfizer or modernity at. there is more money in this than there is in all the other parts of our business.—
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there is in all the other parts of our business. the british actress known for _ our business. the british actress known for peaky _ our business. the british actress known for peaky blinders - our business. the british actress known for peaky blinders and - our business. the british actress known for peaky blinders and to | known for peaky blinders and to harry potter films has died of cancer at the age of 52. and whiter than white, scientists develop a paint that reflects so much sunlight, it will help drive down carbon emissions. returning to our main story — the funeral of the duke of edinburgh. as we heard earlier from the archbishop of canterbury, the scale of loss over the last year — combined with covid restrictions — has meant that hundreds of thousands of families haven't been able to say goodbye to loved ones in the way they would have wanted. small funerals, limited wakes and social distancing have made grieving — and commemorating lives — difficult. sian lloyd has been to meet two families who — like the royal family — have recently had to cope with loss. they have lost the people closest to them during a pandemic which has
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left hundreds of thousands bereaved and in morning. everyone says that if you used to walk into a room, he would just, his smile would just lighten up the room... sorry. a year has just passed since raj aggarwal died of covid, but for his wife of 26 years, it seems like yesterday. a family man who loved a party, he ran a chain of convenience stores and was well—known in leicester, here delivering free supplies to the city's glenfield hospital just days before he died. restrictions at that time allowed for only ten family members to attend his funeral, and social distancing regulations prevented people showing comfort in the usual way. at times like this, we like to be together with friends and family, and usually it's quite a big gathering, talking about the good
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times together, and we've lost out on all of that. we haven't been able to share any of our grief with any of our family, and it's been very, very difficult. in peterborough, 72—year—old gary stewart finds peace in the garden that his late wife judith loved so much. i was such a lucky man, you know? i mean, i had 52 years with a woman i adored. and some people never get that. a dinner lady for 25 years and the leader of a local choir, judith was much loved by many. gary could not bring himself to choose the 30 allowed to attend her funeral. four members of the close family were present. if things had been normal, then there would have been a service in church, where everybody would have been there, we would have been singing hymns, and the crem would have had whoever wanted to go. but it was, it was nothing like that. it was just a process
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that we had to go through. gary has set up an online book of condolence. sunita is carrying on with raj�*s charity work, fundraising for the nhs. their way of coping with the challenges this pandemic has brought to their grieving process. sian lloyd, bbc news. labour have written to the head of the civil service to ask him to investigate whether the health secretary matt hancock breached the ministerial code, after it emerged he has shares in a company that can bid for nhs contracts in england. mr hancock declared in the latest register of mps' interests that he acquired more than 15 percent of topwood limited, which specialises in the secure storage and shredding of documents. the government says mr hancock has acted "entirely properly" and has no active role in running the company. a woman who was arrested in connection with sarah everard's maternal world provide fewer vaccines to the uk due to shortfalls
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in its supply chain. uk drugmakers say it will also delay deliveries to canada shortly after the roll—out of the modernityjob in the uk. the permit of health says it's still hoping to hit its target of offering every adult in uk a vaccine by the end ofjuly. a woman who was arrested in connection with sarah everard's abduction and death, has had her bail extended. ms everard went missing while walking home after visiting a friend in clapham, in south london. her body was found hidden in an area of woodland near ashford in kent, a week later. metropolitan police officer, wayne couzens has been charged with her kidnap and murder. the woman who was arrested at the same time on suspicion of assisting an offender, is now bailed to visit a police station in earlyjune. a hundred mps and peers have written to borisjohnson asking him to intervene to help families access medicinal cannabis for their seriously ill children. the law was changed in november 2018 to allow nhs doctors to prescribe the drug, following the high profile campaign run by alfie dingley�*s family, but only three prescriptions have been issued. many families are having to pay thousands of pounds
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for private treatment. the government says it's considering what further action it could take to broaden access to unlicensed cannabis—based products. monkey embryos containing human cells have been made in a laboratory china says it's willing to co—operate with some european countries over the issue of climate change is the argument continues over which of the major economies is the biggest polluter. the president made the pledge during a video summit with the leaders of germany and france. there is movement from the us as well. president biden climate change and boy has been in china this week trying to kick—start talks. ourscience china this week trying to kick—start talks. our science editor reports. china is the world's greatest factory and its biggest polluter, and america is the second largest. together they account for nearly half of global emissions, and there is now a us president determined to change that. we can't wait any longer. we see it with our own eyes, we feel it, we know it in our bones. it is time to act.
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so he is pushing for a lot more green energy and he is reversing the trump years by sending his envoy john kerry worldwide. secretary kerry, can we avert climate catastrophe? - including the uk last month and crucially china just now. we cannot solve the climate issue without china beginning to reduce their emissions. this is the key to the global puzzle. biden has to figure out a way to compel beijing to begin to cut their emissions or all the efforts we are making domestically are going to be ineffectual. one of the big arguments is over which of these two giant polluters should do more. the us points out that it produces about 14% of the global total of emissions while china releases about twice that. but for its part, china says look instead at the accumulation of greenhouse gases since 1750 — america has omitted about a quarter of those while china, which only industrialised relatively recently, has produced far fewer.
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another dispute is over coal. beijing is encouraging others to burn more of it. i filmed these chinese workers at a coal—fired power station in serbia, one of dozens of projects around the world. and this comes as pressure over human rights leads to worsening international relations which may mean china sticks with coal — it's got big reserves which it can rely on. if you are looking to a greater tension across the world and particularly a greater confrontation with the united states, you probably want to hedge your bets and keep a hold of coal because there is so much uncertainty in the world. today chinese television reported on president xi having virtual talks with the leaders of france and germany. climate change was the key topic, the pace of diplomacy on this is accelerating. david shukman, bbc news.
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after months of empty stadiums, fans will return to watching major sports events this weekend with both the world snooker championships and the fa cup semi—finals admitting limited, socially distanced crowds. all spectators will have to meet government requirements to prove they're free of coronavirus, as laura scott reports. remember when sporting moments were celebrated like this? they may soon be again. snooker is leading the way in trying to get fans back. ronnie o'sullivan begins his world championship title defence tomorrow in similar circumstances to how he won the tournament last year — playing to a crowd of 300 at the crucible. that number will climb to a full house come the finals. it is important that we are successful, and because we're sending out a message to all other indoor sports, cinemas, theatres, the data that comes from this is going to be vital to getting to the land of milk and honey. also under the government's events research programme,
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wembley will open its doors to 4,000 local residents and key workers for the fa cup semi final between leicester and southampton. it may seem hard to believe now, but this summer should be a bumper one for sports — with wimbley at the very heart of the action for the euros. the government's road map leaves open the chance of large crowds at the semi finals and final injuly. but with not long to go, this weekend marks an important first step in getting the turnstiles here turning again. anna is one of the lucky few to have got her hands on a ticket. ijust wanted to get back in the stadium just to experience...although it's limited, it's only 4,000 of us, just to get back and expends the aura of the stadium, experience the emotions, the atmosphere. so i'm really looking forward to it. on arrival, ticket holders will need to show proof of a negative lateral flow test done recently at an official sight. they've also have been asked to have pcr tests before and after the events.
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so—called covid passports aren't being used. in order to reduce risk, the government says no one who is clinically extremely vulnerable, under 18 or pregnant is allowed to attend. it really is a bit insulting to people who are undergoing cancer treatment or have a particular diagnosis to assume that they can't make those judgements for themselves. if the pilots goes smoothly and safely, the prize is greater than just helping iconic sporting venues have a chance of being full this summer. the whole live event industry is watching for no mised cues. laura scott, bbc news. joining me now from sale in south manchester is malcolm clarke the chair of the football supporters' association. welcome to. good to have you on the programme. so how are reacting to only local residents will be allowed to the fa cup semi final tomorrow at
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wimbley? to the fa cup semi final tomorrow at wimble ? ~ ~ to the fa cup semi final tomorrow at wimble ? ~ ,, ., , to the fa cup semi final tomorrow at wimble ? ~ ~ .,, ~ to the fa cup semi final tomorrow at wimble ? ~ ~ ~ wimbley? well, i think as mr spock miaht have wimbley? well, i think as mr spock might have seven _ wimbley? well, i think as mr spock might have seven star _ wimbley? well, i think as mr spock might have seven star trek, - wimbley? well, i think as mr spock might have seven star trek, this i wimbley? well, i think as mr spock might have seven star trek, this is| might have seven star trek, this is a crisis, but not as we know it, jim. this is obviouslyjust the first stage of the research programme. this is not a football crowd as we would normally know it, and it will behave in a different way. but nevertheless, it is still good news to see somebody inside the stadium watching a football match and we all hope that this will lead to a greater attendance allowed before the end of the season and over into the euros.— before the end of the season and over into the euros. yes, looking at the euros. — over into the euros. yes, looking at the euros, what _ over into the euros. yes, looking at the euros, what is _ over into the euros. yes, looking at the euros, what is the _ over into the euros. yes, looking at the euros, what is the hope, - over into the euros. yes, looking at the euros, what is the hope, the i the euros, what is the hope, the most realistic best case scenario in terms of fans being allowed in? well, it will all depend, terms of fans being allowed in? well, it willall depend, obviously, on the results of all these test events and other factors. on the results of all these test events and otherfactors. i think on the results of all these test events and other factors. i think we have all learned not to count any chickens with this covert business since it started. but if we can get decent crowds at wimbley for the euros, that will be an important step forward. but it is important,
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obviously, that it should be say. our members and football supporters and members of the communityjust like everybody else, and we don't want to be unsafe. so let's hope that it will be a success and tomorrow is the start of the road back. is tomorrow is the start of the road back. , . , , tomorrow is the start of the road back. , ., , , ., ., back. is there a sense of caution, erha -s back. is there a sense of caution, perhaps trepidation _ back. is there a sense of caution, perhaps trepidation from - back. is there a sense of caution, perhaps trepidation from fans - perhaps trepidation from fans looking ahead to when they might be allowed back in? do you think that actually, there might be fewer numbers than normal?- actually, there might be fewer numbers than normal? well, there is bound to be — numbers than normal? well, there is bound to be some _ numbers than normal? well, there is bound to be some supporters - numbers than normal? well, there is bound to be some supporters who . numbers than normal? well, there is| bound to be some supporters who are nervous about returning. we are just like member communities everywhere else, and certainly come i think some people who may feel vulnerable and not feel comfortable about going back into a crowd may hesitate before they do that quickly. so, the views are a bit varied, just like they are in the rest of the community, and many of us are just looking forward, hopefully, for the chance to come back and see either
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the international teams or club teams as soon as possible. but it must be done safely. hour teams as soon as possible. but it must be done safely. how important is it to the game _ must be done safely. how important is it to the game to _ must be done safely. how important is it to the game to get _ must be done safely. how important is it to the game to get the - must be done safely. how important is it to the game to get the fans - is it to the game to get the fans backin is it to the game to get the fans back in those stadiums?- back in those stadiums? well, absolutely _ back in those stadiums? well, absolutely important. - back in those stadiums? well, absolutely important. i- back in those stadiums? well, absolutely important. i think l absolutely important. i think everybody in football would agree with that. the players, the managers, the clubs, obviously they are losing gate revenue hand over fist and the lower down the pyramid you go, the more serious that is. in the atmospherejust you go, the more serious that is. in the atmosphere just isn't the same mall though, we've gotten used to watching it at home on television or on a laptop, it simply isn't the same as being there. and i think everybody in football would agree with that. ., ., ., with that. chairman of the football association. _ with that. chairman of the football association, thank _ with that. chairman of the football association, thank you _ with that. chairman of the football association, thank you very - with that. chairman of the football association, thank you very much | with that. chairman of the football i association, thank you very much for your time. association, thank you very much for our time. . ~ association, thank you very much for our time. ., ,, i. the scottish liberal democrats have launched their manifesto ahead of next month's holyrood election with a pledge to prioritise the recovery from the pandemic. the party's leader willie rennie said it wasn't the moment to go back to what he called "the divisions of the past" with another independence referendum.
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here's our scotland editor sarah smith. as the smallest party in the last scottish parliament, lib dems have to make an effort to get noticed. today their leader turned barista for the cameras. willie rennie has made colourful photo calls a signature move. we like to organise our visits to send a message... including rather amorous pigs during the last election. you are the smallest party in the scottish parliament, what difference can the liberal democrats make? i can bring people together, i did that in the last year through the pandemic, working with scottish ministers to get things done. we have got £120 million extra for mental health, we got £80 million extra for education, we challenged them on things like the police in previous years. this time, lib dems proposals include...
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the party are also against scottish independence and would oppose another referendum. i don't believe we should have a referendum. i'm not in favour of one, i'm not in favour of independence. if people have voted for a majority of msps who do support independence, how can the liberal democrats stand in the way for democratic choice about scotland's future? because i have said during the election that i am against independence. i will never vote for it, i will never encourage it, i will never support it, because i don't think it is right to divide the country when we should be focusing on recovery from the pandemic. i mean, it is really simple for people, they need to just vote for liberal democrats if they want to stop all this nonsense. the liberal democrats don't see themselves as the next scottish government or even partners in a coalition, but the way the electoral system works here, it is really difficult for any party to get an overall majority, so the smaller parties can sometimes get some of their priorities implemented. sarah smith, bbc news, edinburgh.
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scientists in the us have developed a paint that is being described as "whiter than white" — and could help reduce energy use. painting a roof white is a way of keeping buildings cool and reduces the need for air conditioning. the team behind the new paint says its purity will reflect 98% of sunlight — helping to drive down carbon emissions. victoria gill reports. cool, heat—reflecting white rooms are already an urban climate solution embraced in cities around the world. in new york, more than ten million square feet of roofs have been coated with white, heat—reflecting paint. but these scientists say their ultra—white paint could make these roofs even cooler. while the whitest currently available paints reflect between 80—90% of sunlight, these researchers say theirs reflects more than 98%. covering a 1,000—square—foot roof with this paint, they estimate, would provide more cooling power than a typical central
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air—conditioner. every 1% of reflectants you get will translate to ten watts per metre square less heating from the sun. so basically it provides the equivalent 18 kilowatts, and that is a big deal. that is more than a typical air—conditioner does for a house, with that same kind of space. the secret to its formulation also makes it relatively cheap to produce. the scientists use high concentrations of a compound called barium sulphate that's already used to make paper. painting buildings white to keep them cool in hot climates is something people have been doing for centuries. but sustainable designers and architects point out that, as a modern, energy saving solution, white roofs have their limits. if we have the possibility to apply them on every single roof surface, in any city, any fabric, or even at ground level, it could have a huge impact in terms of reducing energy consumption of cities, although in particular when we're talking about ground level there would be
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issues around glare. so it may not be ideal solution. back in 2014, another group of scientists created the blackest possible black coating, a material called vantablack, that absorbs so much light it makes every surface look almost invisibly flat. and one museum in the us now wants to put these two breakthroughs side by side, displaying the whitest possible white alongside the blackest black. victoria gill, bbc news. let's speak to dr andrew parnell from the university of sheffield, and the grantham centre for sustainable futures. welcome to you. thanks very much for bein: with welcome to you. thanks very much for being with us- — welcome to you. thanks very much for being with us. how— welcome to you. thanks very much for being with us. how painstaking - welcome to you. thanks very much for being with us. how painstaking could l being with us. how painstaking could this be? it being with us. how painstaking could this be? . ., ., being with us. how painstaking could this be? _, ., ., , being with us. how painstaking could this be? ., ., , ., this be? it could have a big part to -la . m this be? it could have a big part to play- my interest _ this be? it could have a big part to play. my interest in _ this be? it could have a big part to play. my interest in it _ this be? it could have a big part to play. my interest in it is _ this be? it could have a big part to play. my interest in it is intense. l play. my interest in it is intense. i think being able to keeping buildings much lower than the ambient temperature would be very exciting, but he do have some concerns about, you know, how you
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can dig up material to make these, and it contains a lot of this barium, so 16% of the film is this material. so there are a few things to do to check the validity of this, how virtuous this might be as a solution to help reduce our carbon footprints in buildings and things. so, yes, it could a variation on a theme of this could have a big part to play in helping to reduce the temperature effects that we see in our built—up urban environments. aha, our built—up urban environments. a much more effective do you think this could be than just normal white paint that any of us can just go pick up? paint that any of us can 'ust go ick u? ~ ~ pick up? well, i think the publishers _ pick up? well, i think the publishers of _ pick up? well, i think the publishers of the - pick up? well, i think the publishers of the papers | pick up? well, i think the - publishers of the papers saves pick up? well, i think the _ publishers of the papers saves about four and half degrees below the ambient temperature, so that was a big deal. if you think about when you go out on a hot day, you can actually call your building by that much, that is a big reduction in the cooling, maybe not so in northern climates, but in other parts of the
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world where heating and modulating the temperature of a building to make it suitable for people to work and live in. so i think of me, that is a good outcome to be able to control that. and just keep that energy back into space, which i think is a very, very neat solution. as we saw in that report, we see some cities where this is being done, new york, california, what proportion of a city or country would need to have their roots painted white to have a massive impact? t painted white to have a massive im act? ~ , . ~ impact? i think there is talk, i mean, impact? i think there is talk, i mean. we _ impact? i think there is talk, i mean. we are _ impact? i think there is talk, i mean, we are actually - impact? i think there is talk, i l mean, we are actually changing impact? i think there is talk, i - mean, we are actually changing the colour of our planet. we are reducing the whiteness of our planet by reducing the ice and snow content of our planets, so actually, we are starting from a loss, actually, so i think being able to change that by 1% would actually get us back to where we probably were. so i think, yeah, all of these do help to
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mitigate what we have actually done to our planets and our global environment, essentially. so i think starting to reduce that would be important. starting to reduce that would be imortant. , ., , , ., ., important. grapes, doctor, thanks very much — important. grapes, doctor, thanks very much for— important. grapes, doctor, thanks very much for talking _ important. grapes, doctor, thanks very much for talking to _ important. grapes, doctor, thanks very much for talking to us - important. grapes, doctor, thanks very much for talking to us about | very much for talking to us about this new whiter than white paint and how effective it could be. for many people living in england, this weekend could be their first chance for a getaway since last year. that's because self—contained accommodation was given the green light to reopen this week, following the latest easing of lockdown restrictions in the country. sarah corker has been speaking to those in the industry — about the rise in popularity of staycations. caravan sales have gone through the roof. more of us are booking holidays in the uk. so manufacturing firms that supply the tourism sector are busier than ever. what's demand been like over the last 12 months? oh, phenomenal.
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ever since about lastjuly, when the world opened up and people could go on holiday in the uk. in the autumn, our sales team processed an entire year, an entire ordinary year's worth, of sales, in six weeks. and i guess the other thing to say is that we are 75 years old this year, and it's never been busier. hull is the caravan—making capital of britain. here in east yorkshire the industry employs more than 10,000 people, and this company is taking on more staff to keep things moving. are you seeing a change, then, in the types of people holidaying in this way, perhaps for the first time? the answer is yes. so we've seen a large influx with younger families looking to just enjoy a good holiday, often going in and hiring a home. from holiday homes in yorkshire to glamping in gloucestershire. this couple opened their business during the pandemic. it's aimed at those wanting to escape to the country.
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what the pandemic has done is re—highlighted the beauty of the british countryside. we've got lots and lots of londoners. a lot of the people who live in the city have got no outside space. the first thing you want to do when you're let out is go somewhere that is completely different and maybe rough it slightly. this safari tent was handmade just down the road in stroud. it's not just canvases for campsites, but outdoor dining too. orders here are up 45%. we've had, you know, a huge increase for all manner of structures, really, for the outdoor hospitality industry, whether it's pubs and restaurants or cafes. we work with a few local breweries, pubs, hotels and cafes, that have looked to do the same. all manner of uses, really, just so that people can then look towards functioning and opening in a much more covid—safe manner. with foreign trips still off the cards, and with views like this, people are rediscovering the joys of holidaying closer to home,
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swapping the costa del sol for the cotswolds. we all need a holiday, don't we? and finally, the story on everyone's lips — it's the latest instalment of caterpillar cake wars. as we reported yesterday, a legal row has broken out over marks and spencer's colin the caterpillar cake, with m&s arguing that aldi's cuthbert the caterpillar cake infringes colin's trademark. well, now, aldi has tweeted a picture of cuthbert apparently in new packaging — behind bars — accompanied by the hashtag #freecuthbert. i have to say those caterpillar cakes are extremely popular in our house. i won't say which brand though. just a reminder, we will have full coverage tomorrow of the funeral of prince philip, the duke of edinburgh. final preparations are under way in windsor castle. so do
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stay tuned to that here on bbc news for all the latest. that's it for me. you can reach me on twitter. thanks for watching. the weekend is upon us, and the weather is looking pretty good across most of the uk. here's the good news, the temperatures are going to rise a little bit, just a bit. the mornings will still be fairly chilly. a frosty night tonight, but i think by day, it will at least improve by around two or three degrees compared to what we've had in the last few. here is the weather map, from high—pressure close to uk, keeping weather fronts at bay. here's the recent satellite picture. you can see a weather frontjust brushing the outer hebrides there, scotland and also the north of northern ireland. over us, just a scattering of fairweather cloud here and there. so, this evening and overnight, it's a case of clear skies, again, a touch of frost, particularly across central and eastern areas of the uk. but where we have the breeze, just lifting out of the south here,
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i think it'll keep things just about frost free, certainly in belfast and also western parts of scotland. but central and eastern areas, as i say, will be pretty nippy. so here's the weather map for saturday, daytime itself, and you can see that high—pressure there. the weather front�*s trying to move in, again, brushing the very far northwest of the uk. so, here, i think at times a little on the cloudy side, but generally speaking, a case of sunny skies for most of us. in fact, out of the two days, i'd certainly say that saturday is going to be the sunnier day. best temperatures around 14 celsius, 14—15 celsius towards the west of the uk. now on sunday, the weather fronts are moving a little bit closer, in fact, they are encroaching into northern ireland and also parts of scotland, which means we are going to see increasing amount of cloud, also the possibility of some light rain or drizzle in places like belfast, also western scotland, maybe even glasgow there. but, generally speaking,
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i think it's going to be more of a cloudy day for england and wales. the best of the sunshine in the far east of the uk. temperatures not bad, around 15 celsius. now, into monday, next week, so, still some mild air around on monday, but tuesday, wednesday, thursday, we'll pick up a northerly again blowing out of the arctic. so that means that eventually next week, after this brief recovery that we're going to see in the temperatures up to around 15—16 celsius, they're going to go back down again. but let's enjoy the warmth this weekend if you can. bye— bye.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... the diplomatic row between russia and the us intensifies. moscow orders ten us diplomats to pack up and leave. china's leader calls for global cooperation in fighting climate change. appeals for calm in chicago, after police release film of the moment an officer shot dead a 13—year—old boy. final preparations for the funeral of the duke of edinburgh. a very personal ceremony planned by the duke himself. hello and welcome if you're
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