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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  April 17, 2021 6:00am-10:01am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with me, charlie stayt, inside the grounds of windsor castle, where today the queen will lead the royal family and the nation in mourning at the funeral of prince philip, the duke of edinburgh. a cherished moment during 73 years of marriage. the service will pay tribute to prince philip's unwavering loyalty to the queen. many aspects of the ceremony were planned by the duke with military precision. the selection of which units, which bands, which music, which medals will be there, so it is very much his funeral, designed by him.
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a cherished moment during 73 years of marriage. her majesty shares one of her favourite photos of herself and her husband, relaxing in the scottish highlands. this is the scene overlooking st george's chapel in windsor. a small group of family members will walk through the castle grounds this afternoon in procession behind the duke's coffin. we'll be looking ahead to the service throughout the programme this morning. and also on breakfast this morning: tributes to the actor helen mccrory, who has died at the age of 52. the authorjk rowling described the news as "simply heartbreaking." the world snooker championship gets underway in sheffield this morning. with fans returning to the crucible theatre, the first indoor sporting event to admit spectators as part of the governement�*s latest pilot scheme. good morning. a quiet weekend of weatherhead. yes, it is a chilly start once again, but there should be some decent spells of sunshine
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for most of us throughout the day. all the details coming up shortly. it's saturday, the 17th of april. good morning from windsor castle, where the funeral of the duke of edinburgh will take place this afternoon, watched by millions of people around the world. it'll be a small family affair, because in line with covid restrictions, only 30 people will be allowed into st george's chapel. the queen will sit alone as she says goodbye to her husband of 73 years. buckingham palace said the service will celebrate and reflect the duke's life, but they have asked members of the public to stay away. on breakfast this morning we'll be hearing from those who knew the duke, and those who've been involved in planning today's events. here's our royal correspondent, nicholas witchell. a husband and wife, a photograph from the queen's private collection, an image from a strong marriage, and an image from a strong marriage, and a reminder that today there is a
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wife saying farewell to a beloved partner of 73 years. inside windsor castle, st. george's chapel has been made ready. the duke of edinburgh's many decorations have been placed on the altar. close by, the seat he used to occupy, the enamelled store plate still in place, but his insignia as a night of the garter has been removed. —— knight. it will be in this section of the chapel, known as the choir, where the 30 members of the congregation will be seated around the cutter felt bearing the duke's coffin. the funeral procession will have made its way to the chapel from the castle�*s quadrangle. just after 2:40pm his coffin will be borne from the state entrance to be placed on the state entrance to be placed on the land rover hearse the duke helped to design. at 2:1i5pm the small procession will step off for the eight minutejourney small procession will step off for the eight minute journey through the castle. some members of the royal
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family will walk behind the coffin. the queen will follow in a limousine. at 2:53pm be coffin will arrive at the west steps of st. george's chapel. it will be borne to the top of the steps, where it will pause. at three o'clock, a one minute silence will be observed for the coffin enters the chapel for funeral service, which will be presided over by the archbishop of canterbury. figs presided over by the archbishop of canterbu . �* , ., presided over by the archbishop of canterbury-— canterbury. as with all funerals, there is a huge _ canterbury. as with all funerals, there is a huge sense _ canterbury. as with all funerals, there is a huge sense of - canterbury. as with all funerals, | there is a huge sense of privilege that you are with the family, any family, at this remarkable point in their lives, where they are grieving someone they loved profoundly. and then, with this funeral, there is also that extra sense of huge privilege, but also pride in his life. the pride is not that i bear, the pride is, here we are celebrating such a wonderful life. within the chapel, the order of service will proceed precisely as
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the duke had prescribed. he chose the duke had prescribed. he chose the music and the readings. there is a lot in there — the music and the readings. there is a lot in there that _ the music and the readings. there is a lot in there that is _ the music and the readings. there is a lot in there that is very _ the music and the readings. there is a lot in there that is very him. - a lot in there that is very him. we've got a land rover that has been designed by him, he has taken a personal interest in every aspect of it, but in particular, the selection of which units, which bands, which music, which medals will be there. so it is very much his funeral, designed by him. the so it is very much his funeral, designed by him.— so it is very much his funeral, designed by him. the service will end with the _ designed by him. the service will end with the lowering _ designed by him. the service will end with the lowering of - designed by him. the service will end with the lowering of his - designed by him. the service will| end with the lowering of his coffin to the royal volta below the chapel. royal marine dealers will sound the last post, and then action stations. —— royal marine buglers. a reminder of the due's years of service in the royal navy, and a reminder to that he was a royal consort with a difference, distinctive to the end. nicholas witchell, bbc news. let's remind you, the service will begin at three o'clock this afternoon, following a minute of silence. the order of service has been
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released by buckingham palace and we can take a look at that now. it says the dean of windsor, who will lead the service, will pay tribute to prince philip's "kindness, humour and humanity." joining me now is our royal correspondent, sarah campbell. sarah, what else does the order of service tell us? these details released just last night, is that right? these details released 'ust last night, is that rightlh these details released 'ust last night, is that right? yes, the order of service was _ night, is that right? yes, the order of service was released _ night, is that right? yes, the order of service was released last - night, is that right? yes, the order of service was released last night, | of service was released last night, and i think together with the details we had released throughout the course of this week, we can see that as the head of the armed forces said yesterday, the duke's imprints are all over it. we saw the pictures of the land rover hearse, of course, a vehicle but he was very much involved with the design, apparently he spent years tweaking it and getting the colour right, getting everything just on the right place. that is a very clear imprint of his. and the order of service, a service that he wanted to have, a deeply religious service, in line, we are
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told by buckingham palace, with royalfamilies told by buckingham palace, with royal families there is told by buckingham palace, with royalfamilies there is no told by buckingham palace, with royal families there is no eulogy, there are no readings by members of there are no readings by members of the royal family, but what does come through, with the hymns, the music, his love for the sea and definitely his love for the sea and definitely his connection with the royal navy. the bidding will be led by the dean of windsor, and he starts off by saying we have been inspired by his unwavering loyalty to our queen, by his service to the nation, and to the commonwealth, by his courage, his fortitude and his faith. he talks about his kindness, his humour, and his humanity. 0ne talks about his kindness, his humour, and his humanity. one of the hymns which will be sung is eternal father, strong to saved, chosen by the duke because it is traditionally associated with seafarers and the maritime services. as the coffin at the end is lowered into the royal vaults, there will be buglers that will play the last post, and they will play the last post, and they will also play action stations. now, this is the call to mount battle stations heard on warships, again,
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very much a reminder of the due's active service as a naval officer during the second world war. —— calls a man battle stations. this calls a man battle stations. as --eole calls a man battle stations. as people will see later in the day, this event is very different from any other. there is a military presence within the walls of the castle, the procession itself, but covid—i9 restrictions will be very apparent as people watch today? absolutely. there will be no public element. i think that is the big difference that would be, from a normal royal funeral, difference that would be, from a normal royalfuneral, we difference that would be, from a normal royal funeral, we would expect a big public element, where people could come together to mourn together, that is what cannot happen because crowds cannot come together. so all of this comedy procession, will be held behind castle walls. as i drove in this morning, there were signs all around windsor saying, basically, don't come, don't gather, so the message throughout the week has been, if you want to leave a tribute there is an online book of condolences, leave it there, donate to charity rather than leaving flowers, and if you want to watch
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the funeral or if you want to listen to the funeral, watch it on television or listen to it on the radio. and it will be, it will be different. it will feel different, inside the chapel, when they would have been 800 mourners will only be 30. i think the archbishop of canterbury, when he was speaking yesterday, was saying that this will be, around the country, people will be, around the country, people will be able to empathise with this because many of us have been to funerals, i think, because many of us have been to funerals, ithink, overthe because many of us have been to funerals, i think, over the last year, which would have had many more people there but instead people will be alone. the queen will be alone, she will be wearing a face mask, there will be nobody to put an arm around her and there will be nobody to put an arm around herand i think there will be nobody to put an arm around her and i think that is what will really make it feel very different. it will really make it feel very different-— different. it is worth telling --eole, different. it is worth telling peeple. as _ different. it is worth telling peeple. as we _ different. it is worth telling people, as we stand - different. it is worth telling people, as we stand here l different. it is worth telling i people, as we stand here this morning, it is a beautiful day, and people will have seen that from the images we have shown you from windsor castle. it is a beautiful day, the setting is spectacular, but necessarily, because the castle itself is a confined space, it will be a very private event, but the
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eyes of the world will be allowed entry television?— eyes of the world will be allowed entry television? indeed. and they will be 700 — entry television? indeed. and they will be 700 also _ entry television? indeed. and they will be 700 also members - entry television? indeed. and they will be 700 also members of- entry television? indeed. and they will be 700 also members of the i will be 700 also members of the forces lining the route, detachments which the duke had personal connection to, where he was the colonel in chief. it will still feel like a royal event, there will still be the military association. but as you say it will be public only as far as the television is concerned. we have been saying all week about not leaving tributes, that has been the message, but people have still wanted to come. windsor is a big tourist town. it has been quite busy this week and i suspect it will probably be quite busy today. as you say, it is a beautiful day, but as long as people are aware they will not be able to see what is going on. sarah, for the moment, thank you very much. the funeral will be watched across the world, but particularly in the commonwealth. 0ur africa correspondent catherine byaru hanga is in the kenyan capital, nairobi. very good morning to you, catherine.
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kenya holds a particular significance for the queen and prince philip, doesn't it? yes it does. good morning, charlie. just while i am speaking to you, right now, just behind the park here is can you's parliament. —— kenya's. when this country gained independence from britain in 1963 prince philip was here taking part in a number of ceremonies, and one of them was the opening of parliament. now, going backa of them was the opening of parliament. now, going back a decade before that, this was the country where the queen found out, but she had actually become queen. she was here on a royal tour with be prince when her father passed away, and here on a royal tour with be prince when herfather passed away, and it was down to prince philip himself to tell her that she was now the monarch. tell her that she was now the monarch-— monarch. catherine, in other circumstances, _ monarch. catherine, in other circumstances, places - monarch. catherine, in other circumstances, places across monarch. catherine, in other- circumstances, places across the world may be marking today's events are very differently. tell us a bit about how they will be remembering the duke of edinburgh there? well.
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the duke of edinburgh there? well, it is uuite a the duke of edinburgh there? well, it is quite a difficult _ the duke of edinburgh there? -ii it is quite a difficult situation for nairobi and for other cities across the continent. because of the coronavirus pandemic, nairobi is under a partial lockdown. people are discouraged from gathering. we understand from the foreign & commonwealth office there will be no official events, and everybody is being directed to the online book of condolence to be able to share memories and pass on their condolences to the royal family. this is a continent which would usually mark on occasion like this most likely with the heads of state taking part in events, together with the high commission here. so coronavirus is having an impact, and most people will be following the event on their televisions here. catherine, thank you very much. you can follow live coverage of the funeral in a special programme from 12:30pm
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here on bbc one, with further coverage from 8:10pm this evening. it will also be broadcast on bbc radio 4 and radio 5 live. coverage starts from 2:00pm. we are here at windsor castle throughout the morning this morning. right now, let's get the rest of the news with naga in the studio. as you saw there, charlie saying that it is going to be a beautiful morning in windsor, and many of us will be experiencing that. here to tell us more about is louise, with the forecast. we are enjoying a bit more sunshine now, aren't we? we are, and it has been acquired team. april has been very dry indeed. no surprises with the forecast as we go through this weekend. chilly mornings, in fact, temperatures across parts of wales, england and scotland as well as “4.
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-5 england and scotland as well as “4. —5 in one or two places as well. but a good deal of dry weather out there as well. you can see the clear skies that we have kept through the night. there is cloud developing out in the atlantic, this weather front is going to make very slow progress creeping into the north—west as we go through the day. but you can see the isobars squeezing together. a bit more of a breeze, perhaps, on exposed western coasts. it is a southerly wind, so that means temperatures will be a little bit up on where we have been in recent days. so yes, actually start, but they will be some sunshine around. a bit of patching mist and fog may be across england, but that eases away readily, and some fair weather cloud developing to the north—west as we go through the day. top likely of around 1a degrees. crowding over into northern ireland and western scotland, but it should stay dry during daylight hours. that rain arrives through the night but it is fairly light and patching is going tojust sit out fairly light and patching is going to just sit out to the north—west stop elsewhere and it clearing skies, that is where we will see temperatures once again falling just below freezing. quite a mild
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starting comparison further north and west, because that's where the cloud is tending to sit. that weather front will be there and that is a slight change as we move into sunday, but we are still under this influence of high—pressure drifting off into scandinavia, and so do most off into scandinavia, and so do most of us that means it is going be relatively dry am settled once again on sunday. more cloud and outbreaks of light and patchy rain moving through central areas of scotland, more cloud pushing into wales and south—western england as well. top temperatures here of around ten or 13 degrees, but the best of the sunshine perhaps to the east of the pennines, where we will see the best of the weather, 15 degrees not out of the weather, 15 degrees not out of the weather, 15 degrees not out of the question. but when the fronts doesn't go very far very fast. in fact, it is not going to push its way further inland. as we go into monday there will be more cloud around potentially, but still a largely dry day, with top temperatures on the warm side still, without southerly breeze, 16 degrees not out of the question. —— with that southerly breeze. there are signs of a change to come. an area
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of high pressure moving on from the north—west, and what that will do is once again, as the winds swing around in a clockwise direction, it may well drive in more of a northerly breeze and cooler air. that doesn't mean there is the potential, as we go through the week, once we have seen temperatures back to where they should be for this time of year, just falling away once again. thanks very much. it does feel like you get a bit of spring and then the cold air comes back to bring us back to reality. let's see some of today's papers, and nearly all of them are looking ahead to today's events in windsor. the daily telegraph leads with that newly released photograph of the duke of edinburgh alongside the queen, together with a quote from the dean of windsor, who will lead today's service. it reads: the sun carries the headline "farewell my prince" alongside the same photograph, which was taken in 2003 by sophie, countess of wessex, in the grounds of balmoral castle.
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"one last moment with her prince" is the headline of the mail. it quotes sources who say the queen has been the "epitome of dignity" in the aftermath of the duke's death. the guardian does not lead on the funeral. it reports on pregnant women being able to take the covid—19 vaccine although that photograph is of helen mccrory, sue has died from cancer at the age of 52. it's time now for this week's travel show. i will be asking if the holiday habits will change post— pandemic. now you are finding that the response is safety, health and wellness plus pirouettes, prima donnas and more. ilil" wellness plus pirouettes, prima donnas and more.— wellness plus pirouettes, prima donnas and more. our rundown of oane donnas and more. our rundown of online events _ donnas and more. our rundown of online events to _ donnas and more. our rundown of online events to keep _ donnas and more. our rundown of online events to keep you - donnas and more. our rundown of online events to keep you going . online events to keep you going until we can
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all go again. hello and welcome to the travel show, coming to you from london's covent garden here in the uk. now, i am on the famous piazza, which is normally heaving with tourists. some 1a million people pass through this patch every year. —— some a0 million people pass through this patch every year. but with the travel restrictions still in place, it's a very different story today. let's kick—off with something a lot of us have been thinking about while we have been stuck at home does make how to make our travel more sustainable. coronavirus' impact on travel has been like nothing we have ever seen before, and it has hit tourist—dependent what's not known yet, though,
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is whether things will bounce back to how they were or whether, when people start travelling again, they will do it differently. covid, in connecting us back with nature, with communities, with ourselves, with the value of holidays, i think we'll see a greater demand for sustainable tourism. up until 2020, the trend towards increasing tourism had been remarkable. it was kind of like this, with that top figure being a record 1.4 billion tourist arrivals in 2018. put into perspective, that's like every woman, man and child in china going away on holiday, or two europes, with the expectation that it could hit 1.8 billion by 2030. but more tourists has meant a lot more pressure on a huge range of things that communities depend on. globally, tourism accounted for a tenth of all the money made around the world.
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cheap flights, home share websites, cruise ships, more disposable income are just a few of the things contributing to the problem. local communities are feeling pushed out, and they're not seeing the benefits. for tourism to be sustainable, we don'tjust think about environmental sustainability — economic and social sustainability is absolutely as important in making sure that tourism works for everybody. and then there's the environment. 0ur travels come at a cost — from the waste we produce, to the water we consume, to the energy we use. the world tourism organization says that three quarters of all tourism emissions are transport—related. add to that the fact that record numbers of people are travelling, and that amounts to 5% of all man—made emissions. the least developed countries in this world, for example — the 50 least developed countries — tourism is probably
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in their top three, if not their top, number one industry. that's how they survive. if we take away aviation from that fact, those guys are not going to be able to live, basically. what's really sustainable for many of the countries in the caribbean is that tourism also provides a wonderful avenue for entrepreneurship. it's a great way for women and young people to have their own business in tourism. so who can take responsibility today and in the future? you could say it really comes down to these three — authorities, businesses and us, the individual travellers. at destinations around the world, taxpayers' money is spent on attracting visitors, and the focus has been on quantity. what we need to understand is whether tourism is delivering a net positive benefit to communities. and, ultimately, communities are the ones that need to be asking themselves, "is tourism delivering what we hope
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for and expect from this particular economic driver?" because otherwise, tourism is in and of itself yet another extractive industry. some local authorities, from venice to dubrovnik, have begun putting greater restrictions on cruise ships, and some are letting locals decide on the future of how tourism impacts their locations. at key west, florida, residents have decided enough is enough. we've had cruise ships in key west for about 30 years. in the last 15 years, the size of ships has really ramped up significantly. ships that are so big, they're stirring up massive amounts of mud and sediment and silt. half of all tourists that come to key west come by cruise ships but only 8% of all tourist spending comes from cruise ships. you know, up to 10,000 people a day in a town of only 25,000 people. the residents were given a public vote to decide
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on whether to restrict large cruise ships and limit cruise passengers' arrival once cruising returns. i think what we saw during the pandemic is what key west could be like without these large cruise ships. we started to remember that, you know, what's so valuable about this place and that we have to protect the environment here. so we — you know, a referendum was put on the ballot and it passed overwhelmingly. we're committed to being a tourist town. that's what we are. but it's got to — it's got to be a balance. for destinations and tourists, covid—19 has made them look at things differently. and i think a year ago, if you had said to visitors choosing some destinations "what's at the top of your list?", the response may well have been the beach. now you're finding that the response is safety, health, wellness, experiences... ..the beach.
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from the businesses, there are some solutions on the horizon. around the world, many are signing up to declare a climate emergency. huge leaps are being made with new inventions, things like fuel based on food waste. airbus is close to having a concept flight powered by hydrogen. and so what can we do as travellers? well, we can travel to fewer and different places for longer and, where possible, fly less. we can limit our impact on local resources, we can engage with local cultures, and we can choose to spend our money on things which directly benefit local people. carbon offsetting can help. the future of tourism will be what we make it, and the same kinds of things that we might do in our own economy, in our own place, if we do them abroad, we're being responsible travellers, and we can change tourism and make it better
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by the way we travel. welcome back to a very rainy covent garden, home to the world's famous royal opera house. these doors have been closed to visitors for some time now. but let's take a look ahead at how they and other attractions will be keeping attractions will us us entertained as the world slowly opens up again. live shows are returning to the royal opera house. audiences can go in person again from mid—may if restrictions continue to lift. its new programme will be published on tuesday. in the meantime, the livestreams it's been posting since the beginning of lockdown will continue until further notice under the hashtag
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#0urhousetoyourhouse. a year later than planned, the olympic torch relay has begun injapan ahead of this summer's olympic and paralympic games. and you can follow it on the official website. it started on march 25th in part of fukushima that was badly affected by the earthquake and tsunami in 2011. highlights of the relay route will be the subtropical island of okinawa in early may, the former imperial capital, kyoto at the end of may, and mount fuji in mid—june. two years ago this month, the world watched as paris's notre—dame cathedral burned. to mark the disaster, the museum of paris website has created an exhibition called notre—dame de paris in more than 100 works. it's a fascinating potted history told through drawings, prints, photos and video of the landmark. and while you've got paris on your mind, the louvre has put its entire collection online for free for the very
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first time. the mona lisa and venus de milo are among the nearly 500,000 exhibits you can get a closer look at. and it's only a few weeks until the academy awards in hollywood. the new academy museum is scheduled to open in la this september. we went to see it being built back in 2019. in 1929, when douglas fairbanks and mary pickford were just starting the academy, they said "it's already time for us to start thinking about a film museum". and here we are, 90 years later. it took a while, but we're at the top, looking over the hollywood that they saw. in the meantime, some of the highlights of the collection have been published online. there's loads more to come later this month, too, to coincide with the awards ceremony on the 26th, including exclusive talks with some of the biggest names infilm—making.
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that's it for this week. coming up next that�*s it for this week. coming up next week— that's it for this week. coming up next week— how the travel industry uses your money to pay for someone else's holiday. and i'm looking for killer whales in norway.— killer whales in norway. there are around 6- — killer whales in norway. there are around 6- eight _ killer whales in norway. there are around 6- eight years. _ killer whales in norway. there are around 6- eight years. 0h, - killer whales in norway. there are around 6- eight years. oh, my . killer whales in norway. there are i around 6- eight years. oh, my days! around 6— eight years. oh, my days! so basically they can be higher than the boat. ~ ., �* so basically they can be higher than the boat. ~ ., ~ i. so basically they can be higher than the boat. ~ ., ~ ., ., the boat. wow! and you can follow some of our— the boat. wow! and you can follow some of our recent _ the boat. wow! and you can follow some of our recent adventures - the boat. wow! and you can follow some of our recent adventures on | the boat. wow! and you can follow i some of our recent adventures on the bbc iplayer and we are at all of the usual places on social media and hopefully we will be back out on the road again very soon. take care. goodbye.
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good morning. you're watching bbc breakfast with naga in the studio and me, charlie stayt, here at windsor castle, where the funeral procession for the duke of edinburgh will begin at 2:a5pm this afternoon. you can probably see behind me, the sun is rising over this place now. we will be explaining some of what will be happening today. one of those walking in front of the coffin will be general sir patrick sanders, commander of strategic command.
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earlier this week i sat down with the general to ask his thoughts on this occasion, and his memories of the duke. general sir patrick sanders, welcome. first thing, i would like to say for you, obviously, the events will be a very personal honour for you? events will be a very personal honourforyou? it events will be a very personal honour for you?— events will be a very personal honour for you? it will. both in my osition honour for you? it will. both in my position as — honour for you? it will. both in my position as one _ honour for you? it will. both in my position as one of— honour for you? it will. both in my position as one of the _ honour for you? it will. both in my position as one of the chiefs - honour for you? it will. both in my position as one of the chiefs of - position as one of the chiefs of staff, the heads of the armed forces in the uk, and also as colonel commandant of the rifles, which has had an association with his royal highness for 68 years, and being able to stand and march in front of the coffin is part of the funeral procession feels like a huge honour and a significant responsibility. he always said he wanted a no fuss funeral. that is something we have heard quite a lot. tell us what that has meant in practice, and what you understand by what he meant? there is a lot in that — understand by what he meant? there is a lot in that it _ understand by what he meant? there is a lot in that it is _ understand by what he meant? there is a lot in that it is very _ understand by what he meant? there is a lot in that it is very him, - understand by what he meant? there is a lot in that it is very him, you - is a lot in that it is very him, you know? we have got a land rover that
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has been designed by him, that has been maintained byjug while land rover, scrupulously, i understand. there is a backup in case it goes wrong, we were talking about it yesterday, what happens if it breaks down, do we stop and start again? the answer is no. painted in particular colours. and of course he has been, you know, he has taken a personal interest in every aspect of it, but in particular, the selection of which units, which bounds, which music, which medals will be there. so it is very much his funeral, designed by him.— so it is very much his funeral, designed by him. there are hymns that will be — designed by him. there are hymns that will be sung, _ designed by him. there are hymns that will be sung, but _ designed by him. there are hymns that will be sung, but just - designed by him. there are hymns that will be sung, butjust by - designed by him. there are hymns that will be sung, butjust by fourl that will be sung, butjust by four members of a choir. the that will be sung, but 'ust by four members of a choir. the programme of music that will — members of a choir. the programme of music that will be _ members of a choir. the programme of music that will be played, _ members of a choir. the programme of music that will be played, from - members of a choir. the programme of music that will be played, from the - music that will be played, from the moment the soldiers form up in the quadrangle at st. george's, the hymns that are played before he comes out, so, i vowed to be my country, jerusalem, for those in peril on the sea, and of course nimrod. i was standing at the rehearsal yesterday, and you hear those first notes of nimrod and the
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hairs go up on the back of your neck. you get a lump in your throat. it is difficult to stifle a tear as you think about the duke and the impact on the royal family and the whole nation, and you stand there, a little stiffer, a little straighter, determined to do right by him. i can't imagine what it must be like to have to bury your husband, you know, you spent a lifetime together, and to be sitting in a pew on your own, that really feels desperately sad. you know, i lost my own father a year ago. there is not a day that goes by when i don't think of him. there is a hole in my life. i imagine it is exactly the same for the royal family and our heart goes out to them. this the royal family and our heart goes out to them-— out to them. this is a royal funeral that is like — out to them. this is a royal funeral that is like no _ out to them. this is a royal funeral that is like no other. _ out to them. this is a royal funeral that is like no other. i— out to them. this is a royal funeral that is like no other. i mean, - out to them. this is a royal funeral that is like no other. i mean, it - out to them. this is a royal funeral that is like no other. i mean, it is. that is like no other. i mean, it is first and for— that is like no other. i mean, it is first and for most _ that is like no other. i mean, it is first and for most a _ that is like no other. i mean, it is first and for most a family - that is like no other. i mean, it is| first and for most a family funeral. we are all very conscious of that and we don't want to intrude. i mean, i would claim that we feel part of that family, but extended family in the armed forces, the connection that we have with the
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duke of edinburgh was very personal, very deep, it went back a very long time. but there is a moment when his coffin will be born into st. george's chapel and the doors will close, that it becomes very much a personal or private family affair. and we will very quietly and discreetly fall out and allow the family to grieve. aha, discreetly fall out and allow the family to grieve.— discreetly fall out and allow the family to grieve. a lot of people have been _ family to grieve. a lot of people have been sharing _ family to grieve. a lot of people have been sharing their- family to grieve. a lot of people l have been sharing their personal recollections of him. he two had met a number of times over the years. tell us a bit about that? i a number of times over the years. tell us a bit about that?— tell us a bit about that? i think the first time _ tell us a bit about that? i think the first time i _ tell us a bit about that? i think the first time i met _ tell us a bit about that? i think the first time i met the - tell us a bit about that? i think the first time i met the duke, i j the first time i met the duke, i didn't really get it right. so i fall into that category of people who said something banal or stupid and you find yourself subjected to a look that makes you realise you said something pretty stupid, so i asked him what he had thought of a picture that had just been unveiled of him, and he pointed out to me, in no uncertain terms, it didn't really matter what he thought of it, it was what everybody else thought that
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counted. t what everybody else thought that counted. ., , what everybody else thought that counted. ~ , ,., what everybody else thought that counted. ~ , ., , counted. ithink it is so lovely, as we have been _ counted. ithink it is so lovely, as we have been talking, _ counted. ithink it is so lovely, as we have been talking, but - counted. ithink it is so lovely, as we have been talking, but what l counted. ithink it is so lovely, as| we have been talking, but what is counted. i think it is so lovely, as i we have been talking, but what is so very solomon personally funeral for a family, you have been able to smile and you have been able to, i think that is something we have seen quite a bit, when people had been talking about him, those who knew him, even members of his own family, when you hear the tributes there is always that element to it. you couldn't have _ always that element to it. you couldn't have a _ always that element to it. hm. couldn't have a conversation with the duke without seeing a twinkle in his eye, every interaction. and the thing that always struck me about him was that he was focused entirely on the person in front of him and he was able to engage with people as individuals, it didn't matter what your rank was, what your station in life was, it didn't matter what your experience was, he was interested in you. and he treated everybody the same. and each of those exchanges invariably involved some kind of banter, some kind of personal
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anecdotes, some kind of quip. you could always hear laughter wherever the duke was. ilil" could always hear laughter wherever the duke was-— could always hear laughter wherever the duke was. our thanks to general sir patrick sanders, _ the duke was. our thanks to general sir patrick sanders, sharing - the duke was. our thanks to general sir patrick sanders, sharing some i the duke was. our thanks to general sir patrick sanders, sharing some of| sir patrick sanders, sharing some of his own personal experiences. as we were talking, one of the things i realised, and people have realised this by now, very much so, the detail of what has gone on to the planning, so changed from what otherwise might have been the case, from three o'clock this afternoon, of course. and the general also was very keen to point out the parallels, the royal family, and we have heard this many times, they are very aware that many other families have suffered bereavement over the past year or so, and the restrictions on generals, this is one of the parallels with other people's lives as well, and it will be directly as we see events unfold later this afternoon. we will pick up later this afternoon. we will pick up with a few people who have known the duke over the last couple of years, one of the great love is shared by the duke of edinburgh and her majesty, of course, was horses.
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her majesty, of course, was horses. he gave up playing polo and when he gaveit he gave up playing polo and when he gave it up he took up carriage driving. 0ne gave it up he took up carriage driving. one of the people that he met in that field was rowena moyse, who joins me from met in that field was rowena moyse, whojoins me from swansea. good morning to you. you had a connection over the years the a sport that the duke of edinburgh love? ~ , ,., , sport that the duke of edinburgh love? absolutely, yes. and we were ve luc love? absolutely, yes. and we were very lucky to — love? absolutely, yes. and we were very lucky to have — love? absolutely, yes. and we were very lucky to have him _ love? absolutely, yes. and we were very lucky to have him instigated . very lucky to have him instigated the sport and bring carriage driving to this country. you know, carriage drivers feeling his loss as much as anyone, because he was so, you know, he was such a lovely person to have around, always encouraging, helpful and, as said earlier, interested and everybody in the sport, you know. i have been in the sport for a long time and ijust, you know, the little girl from wales, almost, but
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he was, if he spoke to me, he always made me feel important. you know, he had that ability to show real interests in anybody and everybody. many occasions i can remember him just coming over, you know, i had a lovely jackets with welsh lovelyjackets with welsh dragons on, and he came overjust amused at the jackets. he could make anybody feel important. my last memories of him are him following us around winds are park at an international competition and he was following me, driving my team of ponies. well, what an honour to have him following and watching my competition. he really had that knack of making you feel important. whoever you are. and, of course, he did so much for the sport of carriage driving. and
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in so many different ways. he had a tremendous sense of fun, you know. he bought a pony club games to the country, the children to enjoy ponies more, you know. what he has done for the equestrian world is endless. you know, everything from the prince philip games to the duke of edinburgh awards, they all impacts on, you know, all our lives. my impacts on, you know, all our lives. my career is based on carriage driving, so we owe him a great dad, and he will be sorely missed, because he was just such a nice person to have around. very interested in whatever anyone was doing. you know, he helps many people, i was teaching a customer of mine just recently and she said
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about how her first competition, she was walking around and not —— an obstacle at a competition and she thought she was talking to somebody walking alongside her, asking her the route, and she realised it was prince philip walking alongside her. he quite happily explained the obstacle to her and walked the rest of the route with her. so he was quite heavy and willing to help everybody. very inclusive. rowena, i am very mindful _ everybody. very inclusive. rowena, i am very mindful that _ everybody. very inclusive. rowena, i am very mindful that for— everybody. very inclusive. rowena, i am very mindful that for a _ everybody. very inclusive. rowena, i am very mindful that for a lot - everybody. very inclusive. rowena, i am very mindful that for a lot of - am very mindful that for a lot of people who will think of the duke of edinburgh in formal capacities, but you saw him in a very different capacity, very relaxed, in different circumstances?— circumstances? absolutely. one memory of _ circumstances? absolutely. one memory of him _ circumstances? absolutely. one memory of him was _ circumstances? absolutely. one memory of him was actually - circumstances? absolutely. one memory of him was actually at l circumstances? absolutely. one i memory of him was actually at one circumstances? absolutely. one - memory of him was actually at one of these events where he was just sitting in his land rover, near his horses with his, you know, his head
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on his arm, fast asleep, with nobody around. and it was lovely to think about, you know, he was there without security all around him, just heavy and relaxed. lovely to see, you know? he wasjust very much one of the carriage driving cloud and people didn't bother him, he was allowed his time there.— allowed his time there. rowena, we are very lucky. _ allowed his time there. rowena, we are very lucky. we — allowed his time there. rowena, we are very lucky, we are _ allowed his time there. rowena, we are very lucky, we are in _ allowed his time there. rowena, we are very lucky, we are in the - are very lucky, we are in the grounds of winds are castle here this morning, but i see that you are at home in swansea. what will you be doing today? we at home in swansea. what will you be doing today?— doing today? we will be watching on television, but _ doing today? we will be watching on television, but i _ doing today? we will be watching on television, but i have _ doing today? we will be watching on television, but i have actually - doing today? we will be watching on television, but i have actually got. television, but i have actually got carriage driving lessons to teach today, but they are all definitely leaving time for us to watch the funeral on television, you know. i
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mean, it has impacted, well, my life greatly, my whole career is about carriage driving. so we will be watching, and my most heartfelt sympathies go out to the queen and the royal family from all of us here at the carriage driving centre. rowena, it has been lovely to talk to you this morning.— to you this morning. thank you. thank you _ to you this morning. thank you. thank you very _ to you this morning. thank you. thank you very much. _ to you this morning. thank you. thank you very much. so - to you this morning. thank you. thank you very much. so that l to you this morning. thank you. l thank you very much. so that was rowena moyse, who as you heard, spent many heavy times carriage racing at the duke of edinburgh was passionate about that sport. we are going to give you a sense of the occasion here today, as everybody has explained, such a very different royal occasion, a very personal funeral, just 30 people will be in the chapel, just 30 very close
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family and i should explain, very calm at a winds are. sarah, our royal correspondence, was saying earlier on, in other circumstances, they would have been drowsy. —— there would have been crowds here. it is quiet in the town itself but we are blessed with a beautiful day with clear skies. it is a beautiful setting for the events that will unfold. three o'clock this afternoon, the funeral service itself. so from here in winds are, for the time being, i will hand you back to the studios and to naga. charlie, thank you. beautiful scenes over winds are, and as charlie was saying, they will be no gatherings of crowds there, people are being urged to stay away from the funeral as it will be a private event, considering the covid structures as well. stark contrast, perhaps, john, good morning, the introduction of more crowds in sport? and this is
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part of a government trial, we saw this with the snooker.— this with the snooker. absolutely, eah, this with the snooker. absolutely, yeah. snooker _ this with the snooker. absolutely, yeah, snooker is _ this with the snooker. absolutely, yeah, snooker is being _ this with the snooker. absolutely, yeah, snooker is being used - this with the snooker. absolutely, yeah, snooker is being used as i this with the snooker. absolutely, l yeah, snooker is being used as one of those test events in the sporting arena to trial the return of fans. this is certainly something that is going to be ramped up over the coming weeks. yes, good morning, the snooker begins as fans return to the crucible theatre as part of the government's pilot scheme. the defending champion, ronnie 0'sullivan, begins proceedings at 10:00. he's called on protection from the organisers from fans looking for selfies and autographs. all spectators have had to pass a test with the venue a third full today, before building up to a full house for the final in two weeks' time. it is exciting to be part of this process, you know? i was talking to andrew lloyd webber the other day and he was like, come on, get the crowds back in my theatres! and i was like, andrew, i'm doing my best! it is important that we are successful. because we are sending out a message to all other indoor
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sports, cinemas, theatres, the data that comes from this is going to be vital to get into the land of milk and honey of normality. if we are still up for the final, after the year we have been through, at the crucible, with 500 million people watching us around the world, i think i'm going to put that down as one of our greatest moments. yes, all eyes on the crucible today, at the snooker. the snooker�*s one of four big sporting events being used to trial the return of fans. another is tomorrow's fa cup semifinal at wembley between southampton and leicester — around 4,000 spectators made up of local residents and nhs workers will attend. it'll be empty for the first semifinal this evening between chelsea and manchester city. it's one of four trophies pep guardiola's side are chasing this season, the manager trying to quell talk of that. you want to talk about the future and the future and the future if football is present. it is what we have to do today. everybody is
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involved with talking and talking on social media with the players and we have to talk on the grass, it is the only way they can defend their prestige and win all the present and all of the future. it is as simple as that. tottenham face manchester city in the league cup final a week tomorrow, vying for one of those four trophies, but will they be without harry kane? their influential striker was forced off the field late on against everton after this collision. he's suffered with bad ankle injuries in the past that have kept him on the sidelines. before that, he showed his importance with two goals in a 2—2 draw at goodison park in the premier league, his second a brilliant strike cancelling out two goals from gylfi sigurdsson. the weekjust gets better and betterfor dan evans, the british number one, who beat novak djokovic on thursday. he's now through to the semifinals of the monte carlo masters. he came back from a set down to beat the world number 15 david goffin in a decider. pure joy from evans at the end. he hadn't won on clay for four
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years until this week, and has never got this far in a masters tournament. he has a tough test to come. he'll face greece's stefanos tsitsipas later today for a place in the final. he is the highest ranked player left in the tournament. great britain's billiejean king cup tie with mexico continues today with the british team in control having won both their opening singles matches. heather watson beat giuliana 0lmos 7—5, 6—1 in roehampton, while katie boulter also won her rubber to put great britain in a commanding position ahead of today's doubles. the reverse singles also taking place today. victory would take them to within one round of next year's finals. good luck to them today and dan evans as well. what a character on the court and what a week it has been for him. john, thank you. we saw the indoor tennis but people perhaps thinking about getting up this weekend now that there is a little more sunshine and louise have the latest. a gorgeous picture behind you.
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it tells the story actually, frost on the ground but beautiful blue sky and sunshine and this is in east anglia and as you can see suffolk but a bit different further north and west with a little more clout unfortunately here and that is because of the satellite picture, as you can see, the frontal system putting into the north—west. it will take its time so for most of us we are under the influence of high pressure, a southerly wind dragging and slightly milder air by clouding over a little with the weather front arriving later on in the day so it will bring more cloud into northern ireland and the far north—west of scotland but elsewhere it is a beautiful day. lots of sunshine coming through, light winds and just a little bit of fair weather cloud may be developing into the afternoon but temperatures will be on the up, around 11—14 and maybe 15 as a high. the rain will not arrive until later on today. through the evening and overnight, it will push its way into western scotland and northern ireland. it will act like a blanket and prevent those temperatures from
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falling too low. elsewhere where we have the clearest guys we cannot rule out the risk of frost forming once again, particularly in sheltered rural areas. tomorrow does look like we will keep a lot of dry weather in the forecast, the frontal system not moving very far very fast but it will bring outbreaks of rain, albeit light and patchy across northern and central scotland. into northern ireland as well. maybe more cloud pushing into wealth in south—west england as well. anywhere to the east of the pennines is likely to see the best of the sunshine and the best of the warmth on sunday, 15 is the expected high. weather front really is going to weaken off as we head into monday. still sitting out into the so monday again a largely fine day. more cloud about, i suspect, again a largely fine day. more cloud about, isuspect, on again a largely fine day. more cloud about, i suspect, on monday but still warm with a southerly wind coming through. top temperatures of 16 degrees. coming through. top temperatures of 16 decrees. a, ., coming through. top temperatures of 16 decrees. ~ ., ., ., coming through. top temperatures of 16 decrees. a, ., ., ., 16 degrees. more from me later on. see ou 16 degrees. more from me later on. see you later. _ 16 degrees. more from me later on. see you later, thank— 16 degrees. more from me later on. see you later, thank you. _ time now for the latest technogy news. here's this week's edition of click.
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welcome to click. we're into the second year of the sofa shows now so it's time can you see anything different? i can't see anything. is it your hair again? no, it's not the hair — the hair is always changing. no, keep looking. keep looking. what can it be? i will, but what i do know is that you've been having all of the fun this week. i certainly have! i've been walking a dog! now, do you know, during lockdown, everyone seems to have bought a dog, right? i know. i actually signed up to the borrowmydoggie app, where you can look after someone else's, but no—one replied to my messages. seriously? what on earth did you write? well, i think the problem may have been that i was too focused on "this will be great fun for my eight—year—old" rather than "i am a person who you really
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want to look after your dog". both chuckle. no! you've really got to love a dog to borrow a dog, haven't you? no, well, this is a story about walking a dog, even if you don't really like dogs. the now famous frame of spot the dog, built by robot specialists boston dynamics. these youtube videos released by the company have been entertaining us for the past four or five years as the group have developed increasingly complex and animal—like movements. it's now possible, believe it or not, to take spot for a walk from your own home. all you need is one of these, and that's what i am going to do right now. so i can see spot's point of view and cody, who's filming us. i don't know why i'm waving to her — she can't see me. and if ijust waggle these sticks, i can actually... laughs. ..run straight towards cody and immediately, she picks the camera up because she thinks i'm gonna walk into her. 0k.
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so in theory, this is as easy as controlling any kind of in—game character. just with more serious consequences if i put it in the sea or something. the lag is nowhere near as bad as i thought it was going to be. 0ver there is the golden gate bridge! look at that! oh, come on! he gets through the gate 5,000 miles away! we have a person, so i can — i can move up and then i can kind of go into pose mode and play with him. i can wag my tail. giggles. i can do a downward dog and an upward dog. hello. and this thing does have collision detection on it so if i accidentally put it into a bench or a wall, the robot should stop beforehand. so up until now, spot has attracted the attention of the military and the police —
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they are controversially looking at using robotics in combat and in law enforcement — but now, boston dynamics has put spot up for sale to companies and developers. the idea is they buy one and they programme it to do whatever they want. the question is what do they want? let's talk to spot's real ownerjeff linnell. what are people's reactions to spot normally? i mean, they've all got their phones out here — look at that. is this their normal reaction? you know, it is. it's actually — it's pretty binary. dogs love it or hate it and are fascinated by it —— dogs love it or hate it and people are fascinated by it and bring their phones out, or they completely ignore it and go on about their lives. it's one or the other. this — this dog here has — has cocked its ears. i'm gonna — i'm gonna to try wagging my tail. spot's on sale for about $75,000 — or about £55,000 in the uk — so my first question is who's
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going to buy it and what for? a key one is for inspections — if you need to go look at a gauge in a remote area, maybe it is on an oil derrick or some piece of infrastructure that's hard to access. 0bviously security is an application but spot is a general purpose mobility platform. it's the one robot that can kind of get anywhere, so what you want to do with it and what you want to put on it is really up to the end user, and people are coming up with all sort of things. 0ne company that is already taking the lead of spot is cteh, a rescue service using spot to go into areas that are too spot is first and foremost about safety by distance. you know, we have people on the shoreline taking samples of water to be sent off for analysis and while we're doing that, if there's — if there's the fear that we need to be water sampling in the first place, then it is possible that even being in the area could be dangerous for those people. now with spot, we can do those same
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kind of things but before we've ever had to have a human suit up. all right, stairs mode. oh, my word! look! no way! he made it! i think we're gonna see them in our work life. you'll see them in warehouses, you'll see them in the back of a grocery store doing inventory, so it's starting to happen. reads: "do not enter. area closed to the public." do a little spin on the spot, why not? # do a little dance. # make a little move. one of the things we're interested in in putting this dog out there, right on the streets, is what do — what do people think of it? how do they react to it? here we go. i'm just going to do some tricks for him now because, you know, he wanted me to go and smell his hand, so i'm gonna wag my tail at him. wow! look at that! whoa! laughs. they're applauding me
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for doing tricks! spot's been tremendously successful for us. all sorts of folks are deploying spots and we have kind of a turnkey integration that lets a company get set up and have this capability right out of the box, so it is intuitive — i mean, you picked it up in 30 seconds and, you know, you've walked a couple of miles today with — with literally no training. jeff, thanks so much for letting me play with spot. i am happy to dog sit anytime. my pleasure! for the last few weeks, i've been putting four cloud gaming services to the test to see where we're at and whether cloud gaming could replace the pc or console. before i get into some comparisons, here's a look at the services i have been testing, because, as you'll see, they're all very different in scope. playstation now has been around the longest and is a netflix—style, all—you—can—eat buffet of games.
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for 8.99 a month, you can stream more then 700 games to your ps4 or ps5 console or a windows pc, which sony says is the only way to access playstation—exclusive games without a playstation. xbox cloud gaming is currently in beta. it's a new part of xbox game pass ultimate — another all—you—can—eat buffet with hundreds of games for 10.99 a month. at the moment, if you play on an xbox or windows pc, you have to download the games as usual. but now, you can stream more than 100 of them to an android smartphone or tablet. nvidia's geforce now is a very different proposition. there's no all—inclusive library of games. instead, you can stream pc games you've already bought elsewhere on stores such as steam and epic games. it's aimed at pc gamers who might not have the latest graphics card, or want to play their pc games somewhere else, like on a phone or macbook. and then there's stadia from google. out of all the services, this is the closest to mimicking a full console experience without the console. it has its own store where you can buy individual games for a one—off fee and then stream them to your phone, tv, laptop,
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and more, for free. for 8.99 a month, pro subscribers can stream in ultra—high definition 4k and claim some free games every month. so as you can see, already we've got a huge range of different business models and a variety of supported devices and places to play. first things first, does this actually work? when you're gaming, any delay between pressing a button and seeing the action on screen as unacceptable. —— the action on screen is unacceptable. surely putting your computer miles away in the cloud adds some latency? well, yes, it does, but honestly not enough that i could perceive. nvidia was the only company willing to put a figure on it for me. it said that sending your commands to the data centre and a picture being sent back adds about 20ms of latency. that might be important for competitive pro gamers but it's not really perceptible for casual play. everyone's experience will vary, but i never noticed any latency on any of the four services. you can see the action on the screen is reacting as soon as i move my finger on the touchpad.
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all of them have recommended minimum internet speeds to make sure everything runs smoothly and i was testing them on a 50 megabits connection at home that could comfortably accommodate them. so let's look at some of those promised benefits of cloud gaming. and the first is top—of—the—range graphics without expensive equipment. at the moment, stadia is the only one offering 4k to pro subscribers, and it looks really crisp on my 4k tv. you do sometimes notice compression artefacts in the picture, like this blockiness. that wouldn't be there if the game was being rendered locally. now, that's the kind of thing you see sometimes when you're streaming movies and, to be honest, it didn't spoil my enjoyment of the game. geforce now offers up 1080p high definition, which looks great on my tv as well, while the two all—you—can—eat services max out at 720p. i actually think that's fine for xbox, which is focusing on android phones at the moment and, honestly, ps now looked absolutely fine on my pc, even though i was sat closer to the monitor. the graphics looked really sharp. in the race for everything to go ak, we can forget that there's more to graphics than just
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resolution and honestly, i thought all four of these services looked great. geforce now subscribers also get ray—tracing enabled on some games for more realistic lighting effects. here's another game. look at the reflections on the floor with ray—tracing off and now on. everything just shines a bit more. for comparison, here's the same area on stadia without ray—tracing so you can see the difference. but, honestly, i think both look great and deliver on the promise of high quality graphics without a top—of the—range pc. obviously, the most important thing is the games. if you're already a playstation or xbox gamer, their cloud services can offer a lot of value. there's a lot to play, and there are blockbuster games on all four services. honestly, you would have to dig around and see what catches your eye and, as is always the way, you probably won't find all your favourite games on just one service. so is this the future of gaming? well, if playstation and xbox lean into this a bit more, i can see a future where people hop between different services on a month—to—month basis, playing the games they like and then maybe cancelling their subscription, like some people do with movie streaming services — although i'm not sure of that
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will be in sony or microsoft's interests. what stadia has showed me is that putting a full console—style ecosystem into the cloud really can work, as long as your internet connection is good enough. that's it for the shortcut of click. the full—length version is waiting for you on iplayer. as ever, you can keep up with the team on social media. find us on youtube, instagram, facebook and twitter at @bbcclick. thanks for watching and we'll see you soon. bye— bye.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast, with me, charlie stayt. inside the grounds of winds are castle, where today the queen will leave the royal family and the nation in mourning at the funeral of prince philip, the duke of edinburgh. this service will pay tribute to prince philip's unwavering loyalty to the queen. newly released pictures show many aspects of the ceremony. were planned by the duke himself, with military precision. the selection of which units, which bands, which music, which medals will be there. so it is very much his funeral, designed by him. aha, his funeral, designed by him. a cherished moment during 73 years of marriage. her majesty �*s shares one of her favourite photos of herself and her husband relaxing in the scottish islands. —— highlands. this
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is st. george's chapel in windsor. a small group of family members were walked through the castle grounds this afternoon in procession behind the duke's coffin. we will be looking ahead to the service throughout the programme this morning. throughout the programme this morninu. �* ., , ., ., morning. also on the programme, concerns about _ morning. also on the programme, concerns about a _ morning. also on the programme, concerns about a new— morning. also on the programme, concerns about a new indian - morning. also on the programme, l concerns about a new indian variant of coronavirus. health officials here say it is now under investigation. in here say it is now under investigation.— here say it is now under investigation. here say it is now under investiuation. , ,., ., investigation. in sport, the world snooker championship _ investigation. in sport, the world snooker championship gets - investigation. in sport, the world | snooker championship gets under investigation. in sport, the world - snooker championship gets under way in sheffield this morning with fans returning — in sheffield this morning with fans returning to the crucible theatre, the first _ returning to the crucible theatre, the first indoor sporting event to admit _ the first indoor sporting event to admit spectators as part of the government's latest pilot scheme. good _ government's latest pilot scheme. good morning. a quiet weekend of weather— good morning. a quiet weekend of weather ahead. _ good morning. a quiet weekend of weather ahead. yes, _ good morning. a quiet weekend of weatherahead. yes, it— good morning. a quiet weekend of weather ahead. yes, it is- good morning. a quiet weekend of weather ahead. yes, it is a - good morning. a quiet weekend of weather ahead. yes, it is a chilly. weather ahead. yes, it is a chilly start— weather ahead. yes, it is a chilly start once — weather ahead. yes, it is a chilly start once again, _ weather ahead. yes, it is a chilly start once again, but— weather ahead. yes, it is a chilly start once again, but they - weather ahead. yes, it is a chillyj start once again, but they should weather ahead. yes, it is a chilly. start once again, but they should be some _ start once again, but they should be some decent— start once again, but they should be some decent spells _ start once again, but they should be some decent spells of— start once again, but they should be some decent spells of sunshine - some decent spells of sunshine for most of us — some decent spells of sunshine for most of us throughout _ some decent spells of sunshine for most of us throughout the - some decent spells of sunshine for most of us throughout the day. - most of us throughout the day. all the details coming up shortly. -
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it is saturday, april 17. good morning from windsor castle, where the funeral of the duke of edinburgh will take place this afternoon. watched by millions of people around the world, it will be a small family affair, because in line with covid restrictions, only 30 people will be allowed into st. george's chapel. the queen will sit alone. she says goodbye to her husband of 73 years. buckingham palace says the service will celebrate and reflect the duke's life, but they have asked members of the public to stay away. 0n members of the public to stay away. on request this morning, we will be hearing from those who knew the duke, and those who have been closely involved in planning today's events. here is our royal correspondence, nicholas mitchell. a husband and wife, a photograph from the queen's private collection, an image from a strong marriage — and a reminder that today there is a wife saying farewell to a beloved partner of 73 years. inside windsor castle,
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st george's chapel has been made ready. the duke of edinburgh's many decorations have been placed on the altar. close by, the seat he used to occupy, the enamelled stall—plate still in place, but his insignia as a knight of the garter has been removed. it will be in this section of the chapel, known as the choir, where the 30 members of the congregation will be seated around the catafalque bearing the duke's coffin. the funeral procession will have made its way to the chapel from the castle's quadrangle. just after 2:40pm, his coffin will be borne from the state entrance to be placed on the land rover hearse the duke helped to design. at 2:1i5pm the small procession will step off for the eight—minute journey through the castle. some members of the royal family will walk behind the coffin. the queen will follow
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in a limousine. at 2:53pm, the coffin will arrive at the west steps of st george's chapel. it will be borne to the top of the steps, where it will pause. at 3:00pm, a one minute silence will be observed before the coffin enters the chapel for funeral service, which will be presided over by the archbishop of canterbury. as with all funerals, there's a huge sense of privilege that you're with the family, any family, at this remarkable point in their lives, where they're grieving someone they loved profoundly. and then with this funeral, there is also that extra sense of huge privilege, but also pride in his life. the pride is not that i'm there, the pride is, here we are celebrating such a wonderful life. within the chapel, the order of service will proceed precisely as the duke had prescribed. he chose the music and the readings.
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there's a lot in there that is very him. you know, we've got the land rover that has been designed by him, he's taken a personal interest in every aspect of it, but in particular, the selection of which units, which bands, which music, which medals will be there. so it is very much his funeral, designed by him. the service will end with the lowering of his coffin to the royal vault below the chapel. royal marine buglers will sound the last post, and then, action stations. a reminder of the duke's years of service in the royal navy. a reminder, too, that he was a royal consort with a difference — distinctive to the end. nicholas witchell, bbc news. so, just a reminderfor you. the service itself will begin at 3pm this afternoon, following a minutes silence. and as you saw, the order
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of service has been released by buckingham palace. we can take a look at that now. inside, it has a message from the dean of windsor, who will leave the service, paying tribute to prince philip's kindness, humour and humanity. welcomejoining humour and humanity. welcome joining me humour and humanity. welcomejoining me here in windsor this morning as our royal correspondence, sarah campbell. morning. the order of service gives us a bit more detail on what will happen. it service gives us a bit more detail on what will happen.— service gives us a bit more detail on what will happen. it does. as you sa , it on what will happen. it does. as you say. it was — on what will happen. it does. as you say, it was released _ on what will happen. it does. as you say, it was released last _ on what will happen. it does. as you say, it was released last night. - say, it was released last night. dean of windsor there paying tribute to the duke i'm talking about his unwavering loyalty to the queen, which of course will be remembered today. this, it is clear, is very much the service fee duke wanted to have. we know it is in accordance with his wishes. it is a deeply religious service. in line, actually, with royalfunerals, they will be no readings by members of the royal family, no eulogy. the music, there is a theme throughout the order of service, of the maritime, of the sea, a nod to his
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time with the royal navy. 0ne maritime, of the sea, a nod to his time with the royal navy. one of the hymns, he has chosen the music here, eternal father, strong to save, it is traditionally associated with seafarers and the maritime arm services. when the coffin is lowered into the royal vaults, bugles play the last post. —— buglers. they will also play action stations, the call to man the battle stations on warships, a nod back to the duke of edinburgh's service in the royal navy of the second world war. it will feel different to royal funerals in the past, largely due to covid restrictions. we know that the number of mourners which could have been invited would have been 800, now it is just dirty. so it be close members of the family, the grandchildren and espouses, and of course three members of the duke of edinburgh's german family. the queen will sit alone, socially distanced, and all of the mourners will be wearing masks. so it will look and
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feel different, but of course they will still be this huge military involvement, more than 700 members of the armed forces will be involved. so it will still be a spectacle, it will still feel like a royal funeral, spectacle, it will still feel like a royalfuneral, but it spectacle, it will still feel like a royal funeral, but it is very much a reflection of the life and the service of the duke of edinburgh. it is probably useful, sarah, from our position here, to give people a sense of how things will unfold. literally, the logistics. because we are within the grounds of windsor castle here, but inside the walls themselves, there is a procession that will go from the area behind us here to the chapel itself. yes. here to the chapel itself. yes, exactl . here to the chapel itself. yes, exactly- let's _ here to the chapel itself. yes, exactly. let's take _ here to the chapel itself. yes, exactly. let's take you - here to the chapel itself. yes, | exactly. let's take you through here to the chapel itself. ye: exactly. let's take you through some of those findings. just before 2:45 p.m., the coffin, which is draped in the duke's personal standard, along with his sword, his naval and a wreath of flowers, that will be taken out of the state apartments and placed on the land rover hearse we have heard so much about. the picture you can see there, you can imagine the procession, there will
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be the land rover hearse, the grenadier guards will come down, this route will be lined by detachments from the armed forces, so those who have had a connection with the duke of edinburgh over the years, it will come down through the grounds of windsor castle, followed by the queen, who will be in a state bentley, and then the procession will come down following the land rover hearse, will be several members, nine members of the royal family, walking on foot. they will be led by prince charles and princess anne from the duke's children, behind them william and harry, separated by peter phillips, the queen's grandson. and then the company will be brought, that is the king street royal horse artillery, the sound, they will be firing minute guns as this procession is happening. the bell in the tower will toll as it travels through the windsor grounds, gets to the west steps of st. george's chapel, just before three p.m. as you say, they will then be that minutes silence, guns will be fired here, they will
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be fired in cities across the united kingdom to mark the beginning and the end of that minute's silence, denver service itself will start. it is due to last 50 minutes. —— then that service itself will start. sarah, thank you. the duke's funeral will be watched by millions of people around the world, but particularly so in the commonwealth. we can speak now to our south—east —— our south asia correspondent in india. good morning to you. prince philip made several very memorable royal visits to india. tell us a bit about his legacy?— royal visits to india. tell us a bit about his legacy? well, as you say, charlie, prince _ about his legacy? well, as you say, charlie, prince philip _ about his legacy? well, as you say, charlie, prince philip visited - about his legacy? well, as you say, charlie, prince philip visited india i charlie, prince philip visited india where i am right now, and the wider south asia region, on a number of occasions. in fact, south asia region, on a number of occasions. infact, he south asia region, on a number of occasions. in fact, he came in 1959 on a solo visit, when he visited india and pakistan, and in india here he was greeted by prime minister nehru, and as you say, he came with a number of occasions with
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her majesty the queen as well. 0lder her majesty the queen as well. older generations of south asians will certainly remember those visits, but perhaps younger people in the region may not recall them. what i found so striking, charlie, in the last week, is actually uncovering a deeper legacy that the duke of edinburgh leaves. that is through his award scheme, known as the international award here. now, more than 150,000 students have taken part in the duke of edinburgh's international award in south asia, and i was speaking to some of them this week. i spoke to a young woman in sri lanka, who said that the scheme transformed her life. she said often, in countries in this region, there was an emphasis on formal education. but what the duke of edinburgh award scheme gave her was the chance to branch out into extracurricular activities, by doing those activities, by doing those activities which you have to do on the scheme. she got to visit different parts of her country and also by doing the community service and volunteering work, she said it gave a huge amount of confidence. i
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thought it was quite striking that you have a woman in her 20s paying tribute to prince philip through that scheme. i also spoke to the teacher of a blind boy �*s academy in calcutta, which has put hundreds of students through the duke of edinburgh award, and he also said the opportunity for students at the academy to interact with the wider community really transformed lives. so i think that is the lasting legacy in south asia, prince philip described his scheme as a do—it—yourself growing up kid, and i think even after his death, people will continue to grow through his scheme. . ., will continue to grow through his scheme. ., ,, , ., will continue to grow through his scheme. . ~' , ., , will continue to grow through his scheme. ., ,, i. , . will continue to grow through his scheme. . ,, , . ., scheme. thank you very much for that. scheme. thank you very much for that- let's _ scheme. thank you very much for that- let's go _ scheme. thank you very much for that. let's go to _ scheme. thank you very much for that. let's go to another- scheme. thank you very much for that. let's go to another part - scheme. thank you very much for that. let's go to another part of l that. let's go to another part of the commonwealth now. we can speak to our australia correspondent, shaimaa khalil, in sydney. this is of course a country the duke of edinburgh knew well? absolutely. the duke of edinburgh _ edinburgh knew well? absolutely. the duke of edinburgh came _ edinburgh knew well? absolutely. the duke of edinburgh came here - edinburgh knew well? absolutely. the duke of edinburgh came here more i duke of edinburgh came here more than 20 times over 70 years, and in that time he had really forged a
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close relationship with the country and its people. there is a great deal of admiration and respect for him here, and a great deal of sadness, of course, at the news of his death. the flag over the sydney harbour bridge is flying at half mast again today. when the news broke of the doubt, tributes came from all over, from dignitaries, politicians and the public as well. it was also marked on sunday's services across australia, and we were at st andrews cathedral here in sydney, a cathedral that the duke and the queen had visited many times on the royal visits, and you could just see how personal it felt for so many people. we spoke of a woman who appeared quite saddened. she said she wanted to come and pray for the duke, pray for the queen, and the royal family, and she spoke of her memories of those royal visits. australians like to describe the duke as a larrikin, somebody who speaks his mind, says it as it is. he will be remembered for his robust sense of humour, and yes, of course, gaffes. but also for character,
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being able to connect with people, and i think most fondly he will be remembered as a longtime friend to australia. the archbishop of canterburyjustin welby will play a key part in today's service. he's been speaking to the bbc ahead of the ceremony and started by reflecting on the duke's personality. he was someone he was someone who he was someone who had lots of — you were never bored with him. you could not, he could not bore someone if he set out to do it. if he spoke, if he—it was one of his talents, he saw into things because he studied so hard and spoke so— and read so widely and so when you preached, you heard the — he would give his opinion and he expected you to be able to answer him back. i think one of the things is we really have to avoid judging from anything
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external. she is the queen. she will behave with the extraordinary dignity and extraordinary courage that she always does. and at the same time, she is saying farewell to someone to who she was married for 73 years. i think that must be a very, very profound thing in anybody�*s life. and i hope that the whole nation and around the world, to say look at this, when the camera is focused on her, as it will be from time to time, but they — they does make if they believe in that, they pray for her and if they don't, i sympathise in their hearts, offer their condolences to her and the hope for her to find strength in what must be an anguished moment.
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0ver what must be an anguished moment. over the last year, there is literally millions of people around the world and in this country hundreds of thousands, who have been in her position. i think it will resonate very deeply for a lot of people. i think there will be tears in many homes because other names will be on their mind. faces they have lost that they don't see again. funerals that they could not go to, as many have not been able to go to this one because it is limited to 30 in the congregation. that will break many a heart. and i hope that we will see this moment as something we share in and the grief of this very, very hard here that we have all gone through. and then we will say the best thing we can do is to do what he did in all his life, just get on with it. he did in all his life, 'ust get on with it. ., , .,
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with it. thoughts there of the archbishop — with it. thoughts there of the archbishop of _ with it. thoughts there of the archbishop of canterbury. - with it. thoughts there of the i archbishop of canterbury. let's remind you of the timings today. you can follow live coverage of the funeral in a special programme from 12:30 here on bbc one, with further coverage from 8:10 this evening. it will also be broadcast on bbc radio 4 and radio 5 live. coverage starts from 2pm. you may have heard in the background there, quite a few comings and goings here this morning. as you know, the public have been asked to stay away and it is required in windsor, walking up here this morning, they are not expecting people to arrive and that is very much the message and i think as you can see inside, we are in the grounds outside windsor castle itself but as you can see, the comment tranquillity inside windsor castle itself —— calm and tranquillity. beautiful blue skies
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here, the temps —— temperature is rising and it is a stunning day and a magnificent setting for events later in the afternoon. for the moment, that's all from here at windsor castle. charlie, thank you. as charlie was describing, you can see a beautiful morning across windsor today with the sun rising and many of us are going to be experiencing some sunshine today and louise has all of the details and you were saying earlier this pick typifies what is happening across much of the country today? —— picture. much of the country today? -- icture. ., .., much of the country today? -- icture. ., , ., ,, much of the country today? -- icture. ., , .«r , much of the country today? -- icture. ., , , , picture. you can 'ust make up this frost on the — picture. you can just make up this frost on the grass _ picture. you can just make up this frost on the grass here _ picture. you can just make up this frost on the grass here from - picture. you can just make up this frost on the grass here from this i frost on the grass here from this weather watcher picture, temperatures are fallen below freezing across wales, england and parts of scotland. further north and west there is a little more in the way of cloud and that will be the story as we go through the day. a weather front is starting to push in from the atlantic, taking all day before it really arrives, but it will bring more in the way of cloud
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as it moved in from the atlantic. a little bit more of a breeze with those isobars squeezing together. for most of us, we are under this influence of high pressure and delight southerly breeze will mean with the sunshine around, the temperatures are going to respond. despite a chilly start will see those temperatures peaking up as we go through the day. some fair weather cloud may be developing through the afternoon but it will be largely dry and temperatures should be between 11 and 14, maybe 15 if we are lucky. the rain will arrive by the end of the days are perhaps not until after dark and even then it will be pushing into the west of northern ireland and the north—west of scotland. this will act like a blanket and prevent those temperatures from falling below freezing but the sheltered eastern areas on the gamble for those temperatures starting to dip close to just below freezing. light rain across eastern areas and a weather front will continue to drift slowly into the north—west, meaning more
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clout and patchy rain across much of northern and central scotland through the day and into northern ireland and eventually more cloud into wales in south—west england as well as we go through the afternoon so really, eastern england to the east of the pennines is where we are likely to see the best of the sunshine and potentially the warmth, 15 once again the high as we move into sunday. by monday, the weather front is still sitting up to the north—west, moving very far at all. we have a southerly breeze developing, more cloud across the country on monday but again, still for the majority, a great deal of dry weather with top temperatures around 15 or 16. that is a little bit milder than it has beenjust recently. moving out of monday, it looks likely that we will continue to see an area of high pressure pushing in from the atlantic and thatis pushing in from the atlantic and that is going to help we can off frontal system considerably but also going to bring more of a northerly component to the weather so that
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means the cold air is set to return briefly across much of the country so we will, through the middle part of the week ahead, see a dip with those temperatures so we finally get temperatures back to where they should be for this time of year, naga, but it looks like through the middle part of the week we are back to a chillierfield. == middle part of the week we are back to a chillier field.— to a chillier field. -- feel. louise. — to a chillier field. -- feel. louise, thank _ to a chillier field. -- feel. louise, thank you. - more than 1,000 people gathered in chicago last night to protest against the fatal shooting of a 13—year—old boy by a police officer. adam toledo was shot last month but the release of body camera video footage has reignited ongoing tensions about police killings in the us. barbara plett usher has the story. the policeman chases the boy down an alleyway, raise your hand, he shouts, and then a shot is fired. stop! shouts, and then a shot is fired. sto -i ., . , shouts, and then a shot is fired.
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sto! .,. ~ ., stop! police entered the boy, adam toledo, was carrying a gun but the video shows him raising empty hands before he falls the ground. 19 seconds from start to finish. shots fired! shots _ seconds from start to finish. shots fired! shots fired! _ seconds from start to finish. shots fired! shots fired! get _ seconds from start to finish. shots fired! shots fired! get an - seconds from start to finish. shots i fired! shots fired! get an ambulance here now! the _ fired! shots fired! get an ambulance here now! the distraught _ fired! shots fired! get an ambulance here now! the distraught officer - here now! the distraught officer calls for medical backup but they cannot save adam. it seems he had dropped his weapon before turning around. it was community activists who fought hard to see the video to find out exactly what happened. seldom find out exactly what happened. adam kee -s find out exactly what happened. adam keeps running. — find out exactly what happened. adam keeps running. he _ find out exactly what happened. adam keeps running, he goes _ find out exactly what happened. c—n keeps running, he goes inside here and as he goes inside the offices tell him stop, turn, put your hands up. he put his hands up and he gets shot and he lancia. iloathed up. he put his hands up and he gets shot and he lancia.— up. he put his hands up and he gets shot and he lancia. what do you make ofthe shot and he lancia. what do you make of the fact that — shot and he lancia. what do you make of the fact that there _ shot and he lancia. what do you make of the fact that there was _ shot and he lancia. what do you make of the fact that there was a _ shot and he lancia. what do you make of the fact that there was a gun? -- i of the fact that there was a gun? -- run of the fact that there was a gun? » gun found? in most of the time we see police planting this kind of stuff and we don't trust them and he properly could have adopted but again, he complied. the properly could have adopted but again, he complied.— again, he complied. the officer ordered him — again, he complied. the officer ordered him to _ again, he complied. the officer ordered him to stop, _ again, he complied. the officer ordered him to stop, he - again, he complied. the officer i ordered him to stop, he stopped, again, he complied. the officer - ordered him to stop, he stopped, he raised his hands, so he could have tackled him and done other things
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instead of killing a child. he did not have shoot him? he instead of killing a child. he did not have shoot him?— instead of killing a child. he did not have shoot him? he did not have to shoot him- — not have shoot him? he did not have to shoot him. the _ not have shoot him? he did not have to shoot him. the police _ not have shoot him? he did not have to shoot him. the police union - to shoot him. the police union defended the officer, saying he had to make a split—2nd decision of whether to file. to make a split-2nd decision of whether to file.— to make a split-2nd decision of whether to file. another shooting this week in _ whether to file. another shooting this week in minneapolis - whether to file. another shooting | this week in minneapolis triggered nights of protest against police. the killing of a young black man at a traffic stop has become one more flashpoint in a year of demonstrations for racialjustice. and now, they have also started shutting adam toledo's name here. i justice! no peace! in chicago, his name has stirred up regular tensions, regular protests here last year after the killing of george floyd and the city had been appearing for a reaction to the verdict of the trial before this happened. verdict of the trial before this happened-— verdict of the trial before this hauened. ., ., ., , verdict of the trial before this ha ened. ._ ., ., ., , ., happened. the mayor and family are ura in: happened. the mayor and family are urging calm- — barbara plett usher, bbc news. it's the first weekend since lockdown rules were eased across much of the uk — but we're still being warned to exercise caution if we're out and about. let's take stock of the latest covid developments with one of our regular breakfast gps, doctor sarahjarvis.
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good morning to you. so look, we're hearing about a new variant which is unsurprising because of course there are many variants but a new variant that has been investigated here in the uk. what can you tell us about it? ~ the uk. what can you tell us about it? . ., the uk. what can you tell us about it? . . ., ., , the uk. what can you tell us about it? . ., ._ ., the uk. what can you tell us about it? ., ., ._ ., , ., it? we have already had several cases of the _ it? we have already had several cases of the south _ it? we have already had several cases of the south african - it? we have already had several. cases of the south african variant which we have known about for some time now and of course we've had cases there in lambeth and wandsworth that have spread, a case in southwark and barnet so they are doing pop—up testing and in some cases house—to—house testing but we have also got this indian variant and that variant is a real concern because they have seen a sharp spike of cases in india and they think this variant, which perhaps not surprisingly does make because we have heard it many times now and we have heard it many times now and we have become expert at it has mutations in the spike protein which may help it first to get into cells more easily which might make it more infectious and secondly, may help it
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to avoid immunity from the vaccination. we have now got about 73 cases in england confirmed and about four cases in scotland and surge testing is going on in all of the places where it has been identified. $5 the places where it has been identified.— identified. as well, lots of speculation _ identified. as well, lots of speculation about - identified. as well, lots of speculation about who - identified. as well, lots of speculation about who is l identified. as well, lots of _ speculation about who is vaccinated. 0ne speculation about who is vaccinated. one of the concerns was because of the trials and data for pregnant women not being available that there was doubt about who and when could receive the vaccine in terms of pregnancy, and that has changed now? it has indeed. there has never been any suggestion that the vaccine does make that we knew the vaccine was not safe for pregnant women and we know that for instance of the flu vaccine and hooping cough vaccine can actively protect both a pregnant woman and her baby. the difference was of course that we didn't until now have studies which showed that it was safe. what we have now seen is two things. firstly, we have had
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over 90,000 women have been vaccinated during pregnancy. mostly in the usa. there has not been any evidence of any harm there. they have mostly had the so—called mrna vaccines, the pfizer—biontech vaccines, the pfizer—biontech vaccine and the moderna vaccine that we have in the uk, so thejcvi has said we have now got evidence that there is 90,000 women have been vaccinated, far more than we would normally have in a trial, and there is no evidence of harm and therefore we should look at what their background risk is and if they would have been vaccinated if they were not pregnant, they should be offered vaccination if they are pregnant. ideally, with the pfizer—biontech all the moderna vaccine. 0ne ideally, with the pfizer—biontech all the moderna vaccine. one of the things that may have influenced our decision is that a paper came out in the last couple of days from the lancet, suggesting that we know that pregnant women are not more likely to get covid—19 but they may be more severely affected, particularly in certain groups and particularly in the last three months of pregnancy. what we have seen for instance in
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spain is that in the second wave, they were 30% more people in hospital over all for the second memberfirst hospital over all for the second member first wave but ten times for pregnant women in hospital. and there are some concerns that they may have been more badly affected by the second wave. brute may have been more badly affected by the second wave.— the second wave. we don't know why, ossibl the second wave. we don't know why, possibly because _ the second wave. we don't know why, possibly because of _ the second wave. we don't know why, possibly because of more _ the second wave. we don't know why, possibly because of more infectious i possibly because of more infectious variants. also, and we are running through kind of territory here, i think, because there is so much that has come out in terms of the vaccine, lots of concern about blood clots, of course, and vaccine hesitancy, particularly around the astrazeneca, 0xford—astrazeneca vaccine. there has been a study by oxford university now, taking a look at the risk of developing a blood clot if you have covid—19. compared to if you take the vaccine. clot if you have covid-19. compared to if you take the vaccine.— to if you take the vaccine. yeah, and it really _ to if you take the vaccine. yeah, and it really does _ to if you take the vaccine. yeah, and it really does provide - to if you take the vaccine. yeah, and it really does provide us - to if you take the vaccine. yeah, | and it really does provide us with to if you take the vaccine. yeah, i and it really does provide us with a stark reminder ofjust what and it really does provide us with a stark reminder of just what this virus can do if you get infected by
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it. this looked at over 500,000 people who have been infected by covid—19 and it found that the risk of this very rare blood clot called microsoft two, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis was about 40 in a million in people who have covid —— cvt. but in people who have covid —— cvt. but in perspective they found the people having the mrna vaccine, it was about four in a million and people having the astrazeneca vaccine was about five in 1 having the astrazeneca vaccine was about five in1 million. what it tells us is that if you get the virus, you are between eight and ten times more likely to get this to be severe clot than if you have the vaccine. ., ., , ., vaccine. doctor sarah jarvis, always aood to vaccine. doctor sarah jarvis, always good to talk — vaccine. doctor sarah jarvis, always good to talk to _ vaccine. doctor sarah jarvis, always good to talk to you, _ vaccine. doctor sarah jarvis, always good to talk to you, thank- vaccine. doctor sarah jarvis, always good to talk to you, thank you - vaccine. doctor sarah jarvis, always good to talk to you, thank you for i good to talk to you, thank you for taking us through that. coming up to 730, you are watching bbc breakfast. charlie is at windsor castle of course ahead of the funeral of the duke of edinburgh later today and we will have more of that coming up.
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good morning. you're watching bbc breakfast with naga munchetty in the studio and me, charlie stayt, here at windsor castle, where the funeral of the duke of edinburgh will take place this afternoon. just 30 guests will attend, in line with covid restrictions, and the public has been asked to stay away. but the people of windsor are preparing to mark the occasion in their own way, as graham satchell
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has been finding out. at their barracks in windsor, state trumpeters from the band of the household cavalry are having their final rehearsal for this afternoon's ceremony. trumpets play. these trumpeters have played at royal weddings, state banquets, the opening of parliament. there is a real pride being involved in today's service. it real pride being involved in today's service. , . real pride being involved in today's service. ., ., ., service. it is a huge national event, service. it is a huge national event. you _ service. it is a huge national event, you kind _ service. it is a huge national event, you kind of— service. it is a huge national event, you kind of buildup i service. it is a huge national| event, you kind of buildup to service. it is a huge national- event, you kind of buildup to these events throughout your whole career. so i am exceptionally privileged to be part of it. it is so i am exceptionally privileged to be part of it— be part of it. it is a little bit nerve-wracking. _ be part of it. it is a little bit nerve-wracking. but - be part of it. it is a little bit nerve-wracking. but you i be part of it. it is a little bit i nerve-wracking. but you hear be part of it. it is a little bit - nerve-wracking. but you hear so nerve—wracking. but you hear so much: _ nerve—wracking. but you hear so much, so — nerve—wracking. but you hear so much, so many stories, especially now, _ much, so many stories, especially now. of— much, so many stories, especially now, of what he did for the duke of edinburgh — now, of what he did for the duke of edinburgh awards, what he did for the military, and such a very inspirational man. the trumpeters
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have met prince _ inspirational man. the trumpeters have met prince philip _ inspirational man. the trumpeters have met prince philip over - inspirational man. the trumpeters have met prince philip over and i inspirational man. the trumpeters i have met prince philip over and over again, and remember his playful sense of humour. iie again, and remember his playful sense of humour.— again, and remember his playful sense of humour. ., ., ., ,, sense of humour. he would often walk throu~h sense of humour. he would often walk through and — sense of humour. he would often walk through and while _ sense of humour. he would often walk through and while we _ sense of humour. he would often walk through and while we were _ sense of humour. he would often walk through and while we were playing - sense of humour. he would often walk through and while we were playing he| through and while we were playing he would go, what is on the flipside? referring to the old lps of the tune of what your plan, to see what was on the flipside, and then walk off mischievously grinning. he was always a real pleasure to be around, and work in the presence of. from the roof terrace _ and work in the presence of. from the roof terrace of _ and work in the presence of. from the roof terrace of castle - and work in the presence of. from the roof terrace of castle the - the roof terrace of castle the retirement home, they have quite a few of windsor castle. the residence you have all been vaccinated and are in one large bubble, so can watch today's funeral without social distancing. they have fond memories here of a man who made windsor his home. . , ., here of a man who made windsor his home. . ,., ., here of a man who made windsor his home. . ., ., home. living in windsor, for almost 50 ears, home. living in windsor, for almost 50 years. you _ home. living in windsor, for almost 50 years, you actually _ home. living in windsor, for almost 50 years, you actually feel - home. living in windsor, for almost 50 years, you actually feel very - 50 years, you actually feel very close to the royal family here. you know, we sort of feel as though they are sort of part of our family. i always thought he was a man's man. i
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loved _ always thought he was a man's man. i loved his attitude. he was part of our lives — loved his attitude. he was part of our lives. everyday life, notjust special — our lives. everyday life, notjust special occasions. all the time, it was. _ special occasions. all the time, it was. there — special occasions. all the time, it was, there the duke! and that you could _ was, there the duke! and that you could wave — was, there the duke! and that you could wave at you. he was, there the duke! and that you could wave at you.— could wave at you. he was such a charismatic. _ could wave at you. he was such a charismatic, charming, _ could wave at you. he was such a charismatic, charming, such - could wave at you. he was such a charismatic, charming, such a - could wave at you. he was such a i charismatic, charming, such a great sense _ charismatic, charming, such a great sense of— charismatic, charming, such a great sense of humour. _ charismatic, charming, such a great sense of humour, that _ charismatic, charming, such a great sense of humour, that you - charismatic, charming, such a great sense of humour, that you just - sense of humour, that you just wanted — sense of humour, that you just wanted to— sense of humour, that you just wanted to be _ sense of humour, that you just wanted to be here, _ sense of humour, that you just wanted to be here, you - sense of humour, that you justj wanted to be here, you wanted sense of humour, that you just i wanted to be here, you wanted to sense of humour, that you just - wanted to be here, you wanted to be here for— wanted to be here, you wanted to be here for the — wanted to be here, you wanted to be here for the queen _ wanted to be here, you wanted to be here for the queen and _ wanted to be here, you wanted to be here for the queen and her- wanted to be here, you wanted to be here for the queen and her family. wanted to be here, you wanted to be here for the queen and her family asj here for the queen and her family as well. _ here for the queen and her family as well. you _ here for the queen and her family as well. you want— here for the queen and her family as well. you want to _ here for the queen and her family as well, you want to try— here for the queen and her family as well, you want to try to _ here for the queen and her family as well, you want to try to do _ here for the queen and her family as well, you want to try to do your- well, you want to try to do your bit. obviously. _ well, you want to try to do your bit. obviously, living _ well, you want to try to do your bit. obviously, living in- well, you want to try to do your. bit. obviously, living in windsor, i feelthat— bit. obviously, living in windsor, i feel that that _ bit. obviously, living in windsor, i feel that that is _ bit. obviously, living in windsor, i feel that that is right, _ bit. obviously, living in windsor, i feel that that is right, don't - bit. obviously, living in windsor, i feel that that is right, don't you? i feel that that is right, don't you? at the _ feel that that is right, don't you? at the duke _ feel that that is right, don't you? at the duke of _ feel that that is right, don't you? at the duke of attenborough - feel that that is right, don't you? | at the duke of attenborough pub, landlady is putting the final touches in place. she is hoping to send the duke off in style. we are invitin: all send the duke off in style. we are inviting all the _ send the duke off in style. we are inviting all the regulars, _ send the duke off in style. we are inviting all the regulars, as - send the duke off in style. we are inviting all the regulars, as manyl inviting all the regulars, as many as we can safely get in the tent, and we will be raising a glass to toast him, when you lose family you always have a wake, et cetera, and he has been my part of ourfamily. it will be watched worldwide. and,
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you know. — it will be watched worldwide. and, you know, it is a mark of respect and he _ you know, it is a mark of respect and he deserves it. he didn't want to fuss— and he deserves it. he didn't want to fuss and — and he deserves it. he didn't want to fuss and the pageantry, so he did .et to fuss and the pageantry, so he did get what _ to fuss and the pageantry, so he did get what he — to fuss and the pageantry, so he did get what he wanted. it is a moment of history _ get what he wanted. it is a moment of history it— get what he wanted. it is a moment of histo . . get what he wanted. it is a moment ofhisto . , ., ., of history. it is the passing of an era, of history. it is the passing of an era. almost- _ of history. it is the passing of an era, almost. he _ of history. it is the passing of an era, almost. he was _ of history. it is the passing of an era, almost. he was a _ of history. it is the passing of an era, almost. he was a part - of history. it is the passing of an era, almost. he was a part of i of history. it is the passing of an| era, almost. he was a part of my history. — era, almost. he was a part of my history. and _ era, almost. he was a part of my history. and i_ era, almost. he was a part of my history, and i think— era, almost. he was a part of my history, and i think i _ era, almost. he was a part of my history, and i think i shall- era, almost. he was a part of my history, and i think i shall missi history, and i think i shall miss him _ history, and i think! shall miss him. . history, and i think! shall miss him. , ., him. there will be quite a bit of piping. googling and _ him. there will be quite a bit of| piping, googling and trumpeting him. there will be quite a bit of i piping, googling and trumpeting out today's funeral to reflect the duke's military past. after the royal marines play the last post, the state trumpeters will play this, love adele. —— the rebel. —— revelle. it signifies the start of a new day is one chapter of history comes to a close. graham satchell, bbc news, windsor. it is probably worth saying for the people who don't know windsor well, you can see the castle here behind me, lit up in
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beautiful sunlight now, but the castle itself is so close to the town, and as you heard from those people, that we were talking to a moment ago, they really do feel like they are very connected to the royal family here, and you can see the outside of the castle there. it will be a contrast today because people have been asked to stay away. in other circumstances around the outside of the walls, you would expect many people to be gathering. but i can tell you now, looking down the outside of the walls here, there are very, very few people gathering. just as the police and the royal household had asked. you can all see the images from inside the castle walls itself, that is where the ceremony will take place and the procession will take place. that is at three o'clock later today. looking at the skies here, actually, i am seeing that there are very few planes flying anywhere at the moment. you will know that because of covid. but the silence that is
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happening later today, heathrow has said they will not be flying planes at that time, so there will be a real sense of occasion, and i think we can also show you an image of buckingham palace. of course, events very much on windsor today, but we know over the past week or ten days, people have been gathering at buckingham palace, many flowers have been left and then removed. here, to windsor castle, where members of the royal family have been able to see them privately and see some of the messages that people have sent. let's pick up now with former bbc royal correspondencejennie bond, joining us from devon. good morning to you. i want to bring us back, in a way, many people are talking about the duke of edinburgh, this is a very special day, but for a lot of people, their first thoughts today will be for her majesty the queen.— thoughts today will be for her majesty the queen. indeed. she is sa in: majesty the queen. indeed. she is saying goodbye _ majesty the queen. indeed. she is saying goodbye today, _ majesty the queen. indeed. she is saying goodbye today, which i majesty the queen. indeed. she is
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saying goodbye today, which must| majesty the queen. indeed. she is i saying goodbye today, which must be one of the saddest days of her life, to the love of her life. they have been together for such a very long time. she kind of felt to him when she wasjust a time. she kind of felt to him when she was just a teenager, not far from here, actually, because i am in south devon, and just down the road is dartmouth naval college, and that is dartmouth naval college, and that is where she first set eyes on him. i feel is where she first set eyes on him. ifeel for is where she first set eyes on him. i feel for the is where she first set eyes on him. ifeel for the queen is where she first set eyes on him. i feel for the queen today in a huge way, but i do think the heart start the funeral, because of covid largely, that the duke is going to have,is largely, that the duke is going to have, is a blessing for her. she doesn't have to meet and greet 800 people. she is a very private woman. i have only seen her cry once, and that was that the decommissioning of britannia, and i think to be isolated, she will be sitting alone in the chapel with her thoughts and her reflections, that is probably what she would have wanted. aha, her reflections, that is probably what she would have wanted. a little bit about the — what she would have wanted. a little bit about the duke _ what she would have wanted. a little bit about the duke of _ what she would have wanted. a little bit about the duke of edinburgh i bit about the duke of edinburgh himself. lots of people are saying that partly because of covid, but he
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was closely involved in whatever would have happened in connection with his own funeral. it is very much a reflection of him? it is, es. much a reflection of him? it is, yes- the _ much a reflection of him? it is, yes. the nautical— much a reflection of him? it is, yes. the nautical theme, i much a reflection of him? it is, yes. the nauticaltheme, his. much a reflection of him? it is, i yes. the nauticaltheme, his own yes. the nautical theme, his own heritage, one of the hymnns, it is a funeral hymn from the greek and russian orthodox churches, the sounding of the call to action by the bugler. yes, he was involved. the queen mother was involved in her funeral as well. it is a bit of a tradition. i think that you got more involved than anybody else, particularly with the land rover we have heard about. but that is so in keeping with him, he was so hands—on about everything he did, every because he got involved in, goodness me, at home and around the world, really getting stuck into whatever he was doing. teiiii really getting stuck into whatever he was doing-— he was doing. tell us more, you followed for _ he was doing. tell us more, you followed for many _ he was doing. tell us more, you followed for many years - he was doing. tell us more, you followed for many years the i he was doing. tell us more, you i followed for many years the royal family, and we have heard from so many people, sometimes people who just met him for a moment in time, some who knew him very well, how do
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you reflect now on the duke of edinburgh, his role, and the way that he handled royal business in a way that was so different from other people? way that was so different from other eo - le? . way that was so different from other eo . le? , ., , , people? yes, i did. honestly, i think of how — people? yes, i did. honestly, i think of how he _ people? yes, i did. honestly, i think of how he lightened i people? yes, i did. honestly, i think of how he lightened the i people? yes, i did. honestly, i- think of how he lightened the mood of the royal tour, he always had a joke about something, about things going wrong, he loved that when things went wrong. i remember, we were in russia, the first time we visited russia, ithink were in russia, the first time we visited russia, i think it was 1995. the security was so intense that the russians had swept red square clean of practically everybody. it was just a tiny crowd. the duke walked over and spoke to some of them. one after another was british. and he said, are there any so—and—so russians around? he was quite annoyed. and i remember in pakistan, he always liked to have the last word, and of course he was not terribly fond ofjournalists. mind
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you, thought we didn't get him, he thought we didn't have a sense of humour. in pakistan it was as sensitive tour to india as well. it was diplomatically very difficult. i have been doing a lot of research about this, and he said, you, do research? don't be ridiculous, you lot don't do research. he did like to have the last word. in tasmania, there was tomato gate, which made him have a giggle. we all got terribly worked up about the fact that a tomato at a garden party had been lobbed towards him and had clipped the side of his panama hat. we didn't see it, he didn't really notice it at all. it was only on the press bus on the way back to the hotel that the alarm was raised and somebody said they had been a tomato throne. so we all look through our footage and found this fleeting red flash, which had done no harm to anyone whatsoever and had gone unnoticed. but we turned it into tomato gate, which i'm sure he thought was very funny. the number
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of times, jennie, _ thought was very funny. the number of times, jennie, that _ thought was very funny. the number of times, jennie, that people - thought was very funny. the number of times, jennie, that people smile i of times, jennie, that people smile about telling their anecdotes about meeting him in the past, just bringing it back to today's events, and many people have alluded to this, you mentioned a moment ago yourself. in other circumstances, this might well, this clearly would have been a very different occasion. what we will see today will be some military pageantry involving the procession and there will be a clear military presence there, and then there will be a moment in time when this becomes a very private, albeit seen by the world, personal funeral, with very few people there? yes. seen by the world, personal funeral, with very few people there?- with very few people there? yes. i think it is as _ with very few people there? yes. i think it is as he _ with very few people there? yes. i think it is as he would _ with very few people there? yes. i think it is as he would have - with very few people there? yes. i think it is as he would have liked, | think it is as he would have liked, you know? he always said, don't talk about yourself, nobody is interested in new, talk about your work. that was the advice you gave to his children. he would be quite
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embarrassed that people would be talking about him. although i am glad there is no eulogy at the service, we will be hearing words from the dean of windsor who is going to talk about his life of service, his courage, his kindness and his humour, and i hope very much that particularly young people, having had so much about the duke this week, having a different idea about who he was, much more rounded idea of the deep thinking intellectual and funny and, as the right reverend david connor will say, very kind man that he was. jennie, thank you very much. thank you for sharing your memories with us this morning. good to speak to you. here at windsor castle, you will see from the image behind me we have bright, bright sunshine this morning. it has really changed, the temperature is warming up. it is going to be a stunning day in this magnificent setting. i now handed back to you in the studio, naga.
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thank you very much, charlie. beautiful scenes at windsor, but no crowds, people being urged to stay away from the event this afternoon, for the funeral of the duke of edinburgh, contrasting, though, quite interestingly, john, with crowds being introduced back into sport. this is that at my crucible. that's right. circuit is one of a number of events being trialed with the safe return of spectators. we will see a number of other sports doing the same as well, football is well in the coming days. good morning. the weld snooker championship is allowing fans to attend in the latest easing of restrictions. the pilot is successful it could help the unlocking of other indoor events. all spectators at the crucible theatre, which will be one third full today, have had to pass covid testing. there remains some monies, defending champion ronnie o'sullivan expressing concerns about being approached by fans. it is the first indoor sporting events to readmit spectators with the latest easing of restrictions, with the final expected to be played in front of a
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full house. it's exciting to be part of this process, you know? i don't want to namedrop, i was talking to andrew lloyd webber the other day and he was like, "come on, get me crowds back in my theatres!" and i'm like, "andrew, i'm doing my best!" it is important that we're successful. because we're sending out a message to all other indoor sports, cinemas, theatres, the data that comes from this is going to be vital to get into the land of milk and honey of normality. if we're full up on the final, after the year we've been through, at the crucible, with 500 million people watching us around the world, i think i'm going to put that down as one of our greatest moments. yes, the snooker is one of four big sporting events being used to trial the return of fans. another is tomorrow's fa cup semi—final between southampton and leicester at wembley. around 400 spectators, made up wembley. around 400 spectators, made up of local residents and nhs workers, will attend. it will be empty for the first semi—final this evening between chelsea and
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manchester city, in one of four treaties that pep guardiola's cid chasing the season. the manager tried to talk about. —— tried to quell talk. will they be without star striker harry kane? very influential forward was forced off late in their draw against everton after this collision. bad ankle injuries have kept him on the sidelines for long periods in the past. he showed his importance as well on the field with two goals in their premier league match at goodison park last night. the weekjust gets better and betterfor dan evans — the british number one, who beat novak djokovic on thursday, is now through to the semifinals of the monte carlo masters. he came back from a set down to beat the world number 15 david goffin in a decider. pure joy from evans at the end. he hadn't won on clay for four years until this week and has never got this far in a masters tournament. he'll face greece's stefanos tsitsipas later today for a place
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in the final. on the type of form you would not bet against him beating the odds and producing another big upset. just en'o in: producing another big upset. just enjoying his energy. i do not think the opponents enjoying it! the opponents en'oying it! exactly. it can be nervous— the opponents enjoying it! exactly. it can be nervous at _ the opponents enjoying it! exactly. it can be nervous at times, - the opponents enjoying it! exactly. it can be nervous at times, can't i it can be nervous at times, can't it? it it can be nervous at times, can't it? , ., ~ it can be nervous at times, can't it? , ., m, it? it can be. thank you. beautiful thins at it? it can be. thank you. beautiful things at windsor _ things at windsor this morning of course with the sunshine ahead of the funeral of the duke of edinburgh and the scene is pretty much when it comes to the weather like that around the country, louise. correct? it is, a cold start and a frosty start but one of those beautiful mornings where there is very little in the way of cloud in the sky for most of most of us. this is actin and there was cloud further north and west
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weather front is slowly approaching from the atlantic so here the sunshine is not as promising —— acton.. that will gradually thicken through the afternoon so for most of temperatures have fallen down to —4 -5 temperatures have fallen down to —4 —5 in places so a one but much in the way of wind and the sunshine is pretty strong at this time of year so it will help to lift those temperatures nicely but in the afternoon we could may well see a maximum of around 14 or 15. thicker cloud the further north and west you are, but weather front will continue to push some rain into scotland and northern ireland by the end of the day to overnight. we keep the clear skies though across england and wales so for many, once again it is going to be a chilly start, perhaps not quite as cold as this morning, but a good deal of dry weather around. weatherfront but a good deal of dry weather around. weather front will continue to bring outbreaks of rain into the far north—west. fairly light and patchy and moving its way across scotland through the day, maybe
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aberdeenshire down to the south—east staying dry and bright. clouding over across wales and south—west england into the afternoon but the east of the pennines, it may well stay dry and sunny for much of the afternoon and with a light southerly breeze, we are likely to see temperatures peaking at 15, where they should be for this time of year. they should be for this time of ear. ., , ., , .,, they should be for this time of ear. ., , ., , ., , year. lots of people would be leased year. lots of people would be pleased with _ year. lots of people would be pleased with that. _ year. lots of people would be pleased with that. thank i year. lots of people would bej pleased with that. thank you, louise. newswatch has been off air since december because of the pandemic, but now it's back. here's samira ahmed with this week's edition. hello and welcome to newswatch with me, samira ahmed. has bbc news got the balance right in reporting the potential risk of rare blood clots after taking a covid vaccine? the bbc�*s medical editor fergus walsh, who spent most of the past year covering the pandemic, tells us how he approaches that challenge.
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we are back after our planned return to the airwaves last week was delayed by the special programming put in place following the death of the duke of edinburgh. as this weekend is prince philip's funeral. we are going to discuss the audience reaction to the coverage on the programme next week. on this edition, the subject is covid—19. here's the bbc�*s medical editor fergus walsh, around the time he last came on newswatch in march 2020. it's increasingly likely that we will see outbreaks of the new coronavirus centred here in the uk. france and germany have seen their cases suddenly doubled. both have warned of impending epidemics. if that happens here, expect more school closures, the postponing of sporting events and other mass gatherings. fast forward 13 months to this week, when the focus has been on the decision by us authorities to pause the use of thejohnson & johnson covid vaccine.
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the vaccine, which in europe is branded as jansen, was approved in the us in late february. since then, there have been six incidents of very rare clots in the brain out of 6.8 million doses, so less than one case per million people immunised. all were women under 50, one of them died, and one is critically ill. that issue of the possible links between very rare blood clots and vaccines, such as those produced byjohnson &johnson and astrazeneca, is an acutely difficult one for journalists and arouses strong emotions among the audience. some viewers like andrew morse feel the bbc has made too much of the possible connection. and bass lemons a similar concern
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after seeing this story online a couple of weeks ago. but others find fault in the opposite direction. carrie marsh, though, wasn't accusing bbc news
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of being on the wrong side of the fence but wondered: well, i'mjoined now via webcam by fergus walsh, who is the bbc�*s medical editor. thank you for coming on newswatch. let's start with the issue of different vaccines, different regulatory authorities around the world, and then changing reports of possible risks, so how do you decide what to report, and when? so i've been reporting risk for a long time now and it's a tricky area. i've always made it clear that no medicine, whether it's aspirin or vaccines, have —
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they all carry a certain level of risk and you have to balance that against the benefit. and when stories began to emerge, both in the uk and in europe, in particular about the astrazeneca — the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine — and when they are reputable reports based on the safety data, the safety monitoring data, we have a duty to report that. but also to set it into context. i really think the viewers and listeners and readers don't expect our reporting to simply be black and white. there are shades there, and it's about presenting the balance of the risk against the benefits. are you worried at all that some viewers feel that the bbc might be feeding vaccine hesitancy? well, i hope not. and i can remember i think it was a couple of weeks ago —
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it was on the six and ten o'clock news — when the sort of definitive or the latest raft of reports came out about the link between clots and between the vaccine, and the vaccine advisory group ,thejcvi in the uk, suggested that people under 30 here get an alternative jab. and there — it was important to present any risk within context. so i knew that that report what was coming out and that morning, i contacted a professor at the winton group in cambridge, who is an absolute world expert on communicating at risk. and actually, when the government then presented its data, i noticed that they had also asked him to look at the risk versus benefit. and just to give you the context, for the group under 30 who had the highest potential risk of a clot, it's about one in 90,000 or one in 100,000 people who have the astrazeneca vaccine might get a clot, which is roughly
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the same risk as people in their 20s run every three months from dying in a road accident. now, obviously, if you're one of those people that has the clot, then that can potentially be, you know, life—changing, but it — i think it sets it in context. fergus, we know that many people don't really read much beyond the headline and so, with the best will in the world, is there a danger that the bbc inevitably will be oversimplifying a complex issue in its reporting? i don't think so, because people do look beyond the headlines. i mean, this has been — there has been saturation coverage of the pandemic, which some may feel that we've given too much coverage to the coronavirus pandemic, and so, i think that anybody who really wants to look
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at the potential risk, and given that 32 million people have had at least one dose of vaccine, i think people are prepared to go beyond simply a top—line headline. and even in our headlines, we had one last week and online saying what are the risk versus the benefits? we tried to be quite clear. the bbc is, of course, a public service broadcaster. does the government's nhs vaccine drive put you in an awkward position? some viewers feel the bbc is doing the governments job for it. well, yeah. that's an interesting comment. i think it's pretty clear that the nhs immunisation programme for covid has been a huge success here. and it's been a key part and will play in absolutely crucial role in bringing the outbreak under control in the uk. so it — as a whole,
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it's hard to knock that. but when you got the detail, if there are problems vaccines, if there are problems with supplies or if people are not getting their vaccine, then we will absolutely report that. so the fact that the immunisation programme is going very well, that means the coverage is generally positive. but if it was going badly, i can tell you, we would be highlighting that too. now, in your career, you've covered, you know, mers and sars and we are a year now into covid—19 and i was thinking we've got all these new variants are still emerging. how would you assess where things are in the pandemic and where the story might go? well, crystal—ball gazing we this — we should give a big health warning on that, whatever him about to say now, but i'm optimistic that with immunisation, that we in the uk are going to be in a far better
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place within the next couple of months towards the summer — a transformation and a much more near—normal life that we've had in the last 18 months. but globally, there is still a huge, hugejob to do. fergus walsh, thank you so much. finally, bbc one's sunday night drama line of duty has been a big ratings hit and it even got a mention in this week's prime minister's questions but many viewers have been confused by some of the acronyms used by characters in the latest series. the fast—paced action—packed show follows the work of ac 12, the unit investigating corruption within the police itself, and bandies aboutjargon such as ocg or organised crime group, and chis, which stands for a covert human intelligent sores. we've always thought of ourselves on newswatch is a sort of ac 12 equivalent, here to police bbc news from the inside.
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but our colleagues at radio derby also saw a parallel with the work they do, and made this video. phone rings. radio derby told us they were inspired to make that spoof in part to dispel the myth that local radio stations take themselves too seriously. beyond that, they weren't prepared to answer any questions without a lawyer present. if you'd like us to expose
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what you see as wrongdoing on the part of bbc news, or to highlight what you like about the output, then please e—mail. or post your thoughts on twitter @newswatchbbc. you can call us. and do have a look at our website for previous interviews. that's all from us. we will be back to hear your thoughts about bbc news good morning, welcome to breakfast with me charlie stayt, inside the grounds of windsor castle, where today the queen will lead the royal family and the nation in mourning, at the funeral of prince philip, the duke of edinburgh.
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the service will pay tribute to prince philip's "unwavering loyalty" to the queen. newly released pictures show many aspects of the ceremony were planned by the duke himself, with military precision. the selection of which units, which bands, which music, which medals will be there, so it is very much his funeral, designed by him. a cherished moment during 73 years of marriage. her majesty shares one of her favourite photos of herself and her husband, relaxing in the scottish highlands. this is st george's chapel in windsor. a small group of family members will walk through the castle grounds this afternoon in procession behind the duke's coffin. we're looking ahead to the service throughout the programme this morning. and also on breakfast. a first friday night out in months. we'll have a report from leeds
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as people enjoy the easing of england's lockdown restrictions. the world snooker championship gets under way in sheffield this morning. with fans returning to the crucible theatre, the first indoor sporting event to admit spectators as part of the government's latest pilot scheme. good morning. a quiet weekend of weather ahead. a chilly start once again, but there should be some decent spells of sunshine for most of us throughout the day. all of the details shortly. it's saturday the 17th of april. good morning from windsor castle, where the funeral of the duke of edinburgh will take place this afternoon, watched by millions of people around the world. it'll be a small family affair, because in line with covid restricitons, only 30 people will be allowed into st george's chapel.
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the queen will sit alone as she says goodbye to her husband of 73 years. buckingham palace said the service will celebrate and reflect the duke's life, but they have asked members of the public to stay away. on breakfast this morning we're hearing from those who knew the duke, and those who've been involved in planning today's events. here's our royal correspondent nicholas witchell. a husband and wife, a photograph from the queen's private collection, an image from a strong marriage. and a reminder that today there is a wife saying farewell to a beloved partner of 73 years. inside windsor castle, st george's chapel has been made ready. the duke of edinburgh's many decorations have been placed on the altar. close by, the seat he used to occupy, the enamelled stall plate is in place.
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but his insignia as a knight of the garter has been removed. it will be in this section of the chapel, known as the quire, where the 30 members of the congregation will be seated around the catafalque bearing the duke's coffin. the funeral procession will have made its way to the chapel from the castle's quadrangle. just after 2:40pm, his coffin will be borne from the state entrance to be placed on the land rover hearse the duke helped to design. at 2:45pm, a small procession will set off for the eight minute journey through the castle. some members of the royalfamily will walk behind the coffin. the queen will follow in a limousine. at 2:53pm, the coffin will arrive at the west steps of st george's chapel. it will be borne to the top of the steps where it will pause. at three o'clock, a one—minute silence will be observed, before the coffin enters the chapel for the funeral service, which will be presided over by the archbishop of canterbury.
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as with all funerals, there is a huge sense of privilege that you're with the family, any family, at this remarkable point in their lives. where they are grieving someone they loved profoundly. and then with this funeral, there is also that extra sense of huge privilege, but also pride in his life. the pride is not that i'm there, the pride is, here we are, celebrating such a wonderful life. within the chapel, the order of service will proceed precisely as the duke had prescribed. he chose the music and the readings. there's a lot in there that is very him. we've got a land rover that has been designed by him. he's taken a personal interest in every aspect of it, but in particular, the selection of which units, which bands, which music, which medals will be there. so it will be very much his
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funeral, designed by him. the service will end with the lowering of his coffin to the royal vault below the chapel. royal marine buglers will sound the last post, and then action stations, a reminder of the duke's years of service in the royal navy. a reminder, too, that he was a royal consort with a difference. distinctive to the end. nicholas witchell, bbc news. a reminder that the service will begin at three o'clock this afternoon, following a nationwide minute's silence. the order of service has been released by buckingham palace and we can take a look at that now. inside it has a message from the dean of windsor, who will lead the service, paying tribute to prince philip's "kindness, humour and humanity". joining me now is our royal correspondent sarah campbell.
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good royal correspondent sarah campbell. morning. be sunshine, good morning. beautiful, bright sunshine, where the saying, a spectacular morning. talk to is a bit more about what we know about the service itself. the bit more about what we know about the service itself.— the service itself. the order of service was — the service itself. the order of service was released - the service itself. the order of service was released late i the service itself. the order of service was released late last| the service itself. the order of i service was released late last night and in common with all of the details which you have been gradually revealing over the week, we can sense the duke's hand in the order of service. it is a deeply religious service and quite a simple service. in line with royal funerals, no eulogy or readings by members of the royal family, funerals, no eulogy or readings by members of the royalfamily, so it will be read by the dean of westminster and led by the dean of westminster and led by the dean of westminster and led by the dean of westminster and the archbishop of canterbury. there are nods to his maritime past, his love of the sea, some of the hymns that he has chosen, will be eternal father, strong to save,, which is linked to
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the navy. buglers will play action stations, the call for people to get to action stations on warships. there are lots of personal touches on the service, we have seen the land rover hearse, very much his idea, involved in the design of that land rover hearse which will bear his coffin through the grounds of windsor castle through the top of the picture down to the parade ground. it will stop at the west steps of st george's chapel, where you will have the minutes silence. and his hearse will be followed by members of the royal family on foot, the prince of wales, princess anne, the prince of wales, princess anne, the prince of of york, and then the duke of cambridge and the duke of sussex with peter phillips between
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them. and behind them, the queen in them. and behind them, the queen in the state bentley. the palace say it will have been scaled down but still be a fitting tribute to the duke. there will still be a military presence, more than 700 members of the armed forces, many links to regiments he was closely associated with over his long years of service will line the procession route. it is worth saying, members of the military we have spoken to and the royal household themselves are saying there will be a change in tone during the build—up to the event itself, where you have the military element, inside the walls of the castle, and then a moment when they enter the chapel at which point it becomes a very intimate, albeit with the cameras showing the pictures around the world, a very different feel to the occasion. yes. different feel to the occasion. yes, i think different feel to the occasion. yes, i think you — different feel to the occasion. yes, i think you are _ different feel to the occasion. yes, i think you are right. _ different feel to the occasion. yes, i think you are right. with - different feel to the occasion. is: i think you are right. with the procession you will have the king's troop royal horse artillery, the
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bell tolling, the band of the grenadier guards, you will have the procession lined route, but once inside st george's chapel, where as one might have had 800 mourners in the original plan filling the chapel, instead, there will be just 30, all of them including the queen in masks, and socially distanced. so the queen will be sitting on her own in the quire. a small, intimate family affair but with this military element as well and nods to the military. so obviously the most important things, we have learned over the last week, to the duke, family and military.— over the last week, to the duke, family and military. thank you very much. the duke's service with the armed forces will be reflected in the funeral, not least in that unique hearse made from a converted land rover. the duke was very involved in the construction and engineering, going back many, many years.
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i'm joined now by the british army's chief of staff, lieutena nt—colonel erica bridge. she's just outside the castle grounds here in windsor. a little way down the walls of the castle from where we are standing here. erica, good morning, you know all about planning for royal events, and the military presence for this scaled—down event has a different tone to it this time around. goad tone to it this time around. good mornin: , tone to it this time around. good morning, charlie. _ tone to it this time around. good morning, charlie. yes, _ tone to it this time around. good morning, charlie. yes, it - tone to it this time around. good morning, charlie. yes, it does. i tone to it this time around. (13pm morning, charlie. yes, it does. what is really important about today? events is it is very much in line with the wishes of his royal highness the duke of edinburgh, and thatis highness the duke of edinburgh, and that is very important for those people taking part. because he knew their part in the plan. and i think they will be doing their very best to carry out, to the very high standards that we know that they can produce today. and for all of them, it will be just an enormous honour
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and a privilege to be able to pay tribute to him on the half of all three services today. —— on behalf of all three services today. fine three services today. -- on behalf of all three services today.- of all three services today. one of the thin . s of all three services today. one of the things that _ of all three services today. one of the things that people _ of all three services today. one of the things that people are - of all three services today. one of the things that people are very i the things that people are very mindful of is the cross over to other peoples lives and during the pandemic, many loved ones have been lost, and they have been working in terms of funeral arrangements in terms of funeral arrangements in terms of funeral arrangements in terms of covid restrictions and that will apply here for the funeral we will apply here for the funeral we will watch unfold from 3pm. absolutely, and i think the plan has had to be adapted. as you say, there will be a scaled—down number of troops who will be out there today. but the really important thing is that all of those organisations which had a very close affiliation with the duke of edinburgh will be represented today in some form or another so for them it is very important to know that they are participating in today's tribute to his royal highness. first
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participating in today's tribute to his royal highness.— his royal highness. first and foremost. — his royal highness. first and foremost, this _ his royal highness. first and foremost, this is _ his royal highness. first and foremost, this is a _ his royal highness. first and foremost, this is a family i his royal highness. first and i foremost, this is a family grieving the loss of a loved one. but i know that we have spoken to members of the military who will be in the procession, very closely linked to what is going on, and they were saying that even in the rehearsals, which you know are meticulous, every detail is followed, that they could feel the emotion of the occasion. i imagine everybody out there today, there will be a number of moments of real reflection. perhaps as the land rover goes past, perhaps as they hear the military music, they will hear the military music, they will hear perhaps their regimental marches being played by the various bands. and i think you are absolutely right, many of those people out there today will have been involved in the response to the pandemic, whether as part of helping with the vaccination roll—out, some will have been on operations, and
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some will have lost friends and family. so the main focus absolutely is his royal highness, and perhaps the links they might have had with him, any of those soldiers, sailors and airmen on patrol today will have met him when they saw him at their unit so that will be front and foremost in their minds today. fairly early on in the planning procedure, we were told that members of the royal family will not be wearing royal uniform. that was a decision taken quite early on. absolutely, and as you say, this is the royal family. absolutely, and as you say, this is the royalfamily. it is absolutely, and as you say, this is the royal family. it is absolutely up the royal family. it is absolutely up to their wishes so we will respect absolutely how they would like to run. ., ., ., like to run. lieutenant colonel erica bridge. _ like to run. lieutenant colonel erica bridge, thank— like to run. lieutenant colonel erica bridge, thank you - like to run. lieutenant colonel erica bridge, thank you for i like to run. lieutenant colonel. erica bridge, thank you for your time this morning joining us here at windsor castle. you can follow the
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live coverage of the funeral. a special programme starting at half past midday on bbc one. there will be coverage from ten past eight this evening on bbc two. it will be also broadcast on bbc radio 4 and radio five live, coverage from tpm. —— 2pm. you will be seeing above me, it is a beautiful day here at windsor castle. in this spectacular setting. we are in the grounds outside the walls, you can see the image there within the walls. that is where the procession itself will take place, and you can see windsor castle itself, looking magnificent in their
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bright sunshine. ahead of the event, the service itself is at 3pm this afternoon. naga will hand you back to the studio now. thank you, charlie, beautifulseeing the sunshine there in st george's chapel, so let's talk to louise to find out what is happening with the weather. sunshine across the uk but still very cold on the ground? it is, it is one of those picturesque spring mornings, cold and frosty as you can see here by this weather watcher picture, mother nature is struggling a little. blue sky and sunshine for most of us. the only exception is north and west, thickening cloud continuing through the day affecting the far north—west of scotland and northern ireland. that is because this mass of cloud is an area of low pressure which
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will gradually bring some rain. ahead of it, blue sky and sunshine for pretty much most of the country. and with a light southerly breeze in the sunshine quite strong, the temperatures will pick up quite swiftly. after a chilly start, high is of 14, 15 degrees in one or two places. thickening cloud in the north or west, this weather front will continue to sweep in across the far north of scotland and northern ireland. elsewhere still under the influence of high pressure so low single figure is quite likely once again tomorrow morning. that cloud acting like a blanket, temperatures up acting like a blanket, temperatures up at five or six first thing. that means rain around for scotland and northern ireland only and not that much in the way of significant rainfall. it will be quite light and patchy. into the north—west of the great glen, drifting east, so eastern scotland towards the borders should stay fine and dry. clouding
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over through wales and south—west england through the afternoon. east of the pennines, we will keep some sunshine and warmth. temperatures responding with highs of 15 degrees. the weather story does not change very fast at all. as we move out of sunday into monday, the front is still there in the far north—west, and it will start to die down and elsewhere we keep quite a lot of cloud around. as we go through monday, temperatures with a light southerly breeze, temperatures peaking at 15 or 16. into tuesday, the weather front will start to ease away and there is an area of high pressure building from the north—west behind it. so the current high pressure drifts off into scandinavia. this week whether front eases away and high pressure building to the north—west will then allow more of a northerly flow. the cold air coming back. after tempted
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bouncing back, as you can see through the middle part of the week, just a little bit chillier. this is the centre of london, bt tower is commemorating the funeral of his royal highness the prince philip the duke of edinburgh. he died at the age of 99 and is being buried today. a one—minute silence being held across the country and 3pm when the funeral takes place. sunshine for many of us across the country today. but a frosty start for many this morning. the sun set coming through. that is the view over central london. —— the sun is certainly coming through. last night saw the long—awaited return in england of a time—honoured pastime, a friday evening in the pub. or at least outside the pub because indoor areas remain off—limits for now. danjohnson was in the centre
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of leeds to see how it went. it's been a while since leeds saw a celebration like this. it's my birthday! restrictions have been lifted, and we are so happy. everything is going back to normal. hell yeah, preach! we're getting our lives back, we're really here for this. amen! yeah, quite good, isn't it, to be fair. it's obviously quite different to what we're used to and whatnot, but it's nice to be back out and about, you know, back in leeds. generally speaking, it's felt quite safe and controlled. we're not worried as such. there are still restrictions. it's alfresco dining with table service. under the watch of the police and council covid marshals. in my role as a city centre manager, this is what i live for. this is what we want. much more relaxed city centre. people coming back to enjoy our city. what about come closing time,
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11 o'clock, when everyone has had a few drinks, when the discipline starts to drop, is that going to be a problem? i'm not worried about that, to be honest, because i know leeds and i know that people are generally responsible. we wouldn't do this unless we were actually certain it was the right thing to do. we've taken our forecasted revenue in three days for the entire week. so it's gone really well, we're really happy. surprisingly, there hasn't been any drama or kick off or anything, everyone has been great, so, yeah, happy to be back. i'd like to think that people have taken what we've learned - from the last few spikes - of going overboard, and what that creates, and hopefully, we'll do the right thing | and try to be a little i bit sensible this time. and down by the canal, it was a lovely sunny afternoon. england is making this move ahead of the rest of the uk. so good that we took half a day off. how long is it since you were able to do this? in august, didn't we? it's been quite some time, it feels great.
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it's amazing, we've been blessed with the weather, obviously. i it's been really busy, we had over 2000 bookings for this week. i as soon as we opened i the bookings, the response was pretty overwhelming. we were getting hundreds in on the first day. - and it's great to be back. we like having our food and drink brought to us! when the sun goes down, so does the temperature. we've been out since one o'clock. one o'clock? yeah, it were lovely when it was sunny, but it's now getting very, very cold and we're going home. really good time, but extremely cold. you're not regretting it, are you? no, i'm not regretting it, no, good to be out. and current restrictions mean some other frustrations. we booked. we thought we booked. we thought we booked about three weeks ago to come out with friends who we've not seen for years. and they are there waiting for us and literally, we are having to go back home now, haven't we?
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you've got to book everywhere now, haven't you? how's that going, then? no, i don't like that. i don't. because we really respect all. of the staff working at the bars, they're obviously doing a really - hard job and trying to manage a lot of people at a difficult time. and they're doingl a greatjob with it. there are plenty of people out, though it's not exactly heaving, not as busy as it would have been when i was a student here. that's a while ago now. you get the sense that people are testing the water a bit, just seeing what it's like. and on the whole, it's really calm. people are being sensible. they're sticking by the rules. so then, it's just a question of how late you stay out, and how you choose to get home. danjohnson, bbc news, leeds. pubs in scotland remain closed but some restrictions are easing this weekend.
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groups of up to six people, from six different households, can now meet up beyond their local area, as long as they stay outdoors. someone who'll be itching to do just that is bekah cork, who is chair of glasgow young walkers. shejoins me now. good morning to you. tell me, the weather is good, how excited are you about getting out this weekend? goad about getting out this weekend? good mornin: , about getting out this weekend? good morning. naga- _ about getting out this weekend? (emf. morning, naga. yeah, the weather is good, quite cold this morning, but it looks sunny. i'm in the shade, so i'm looking forward to warming up and being in the sun later on today. so what can you do today, what is the plan? so what can you do today, what is the lan? ., , , ., ., the plan? from yesterday, we are now allowed to travel _ the plan? from yesterday, we are now allowed to travel outside _ the plan? from yesterday, we are now allowed to travel outside our— the plan? from yesterday, we are now allowed to travel outside our local - allowed to travel outside our local areas so for the last few months, we have been only able to travel within the council area we live in. so now in a group of up to six people, we are allowed to travel anywhere in scotland as long as we come home at
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night and don't stay over. so it's really exciting. i night and don't stay over. so it's really exciting.— really exciting. i know you are a very keen _ really exciting. i know you are a very keen walker, _ really exciting. i know you are a very keen walker, tell— really exciting. i know you are a very keen walker, tell me - really exciting. i know you are aj very keen walker, tell me about really exciting. i know you are a - very keen walker, tell me about some of the views you will be taking in and some of the people you will be walking with. i’m and some of the people you will be walking with-— walking with. i'm really keen walker, particularly - walking with. i'm really keen walker, particularly a - walking with. i'm really keen walker, particularly a hill- walking with. i'm really keen - walker, particularly a hill walker, so i have been bagging the munro rose, 282 mountains 3000 feet and overin rose, 282 mountains 3000 feet and over in scotland. today i will be walking with a friend i haven't seen for months on a local hill about a0 miles away. it's the furthest i have travelled in months. tomorrow i shall be bagging my first monroes of the year so i am so excited. d0 shall be bagging my first monroes of the year so i am so excited.- the year so i am so excited. do you think it will — the year so i am so excited. do you think it will be — the year so i am so excited. do you think it will be busy? _ the year so i am so excited. do you think it will be busy? i _ the year so i am so excited. do you think it will be busy? ithink- the year so i am so excited. do you think it will be busy? i think it - think it will be busy? i think it will be, think it will be busy? i think it will be. so — think it will be busy? i think it will be, so will _ think it will be busy? i think it will be, so will we _ think it will be busy? i think it will be, so will we be - think it will be busy? i think it will be, so will we be going i think it will be busy? i think it will be, so will we be going atj will be, so will we be going at unusual times. this evening i am going for a walk hopefully once the crowds have gone and tomorrow i have a very early and set up sol crowds have gone and tomorrow i have a very early and set up so i can get to where i am supposed to be going to where i am supposed to be going to say we are expecting it to be
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very busy, especially if you are going on a group as big as six. it going on a group as big as six. it is going to change because you will have to come home today but from the 26th of april you will be able to go further afield when the rules change? further afield when the rules chan . e? , further afield when the rules chance? , . ., , ., change? yes, it changes into weight on the 26th. — change? yes, it changes into weight on the 26th. at _ change? yes, it changes into weight on the 26th, at the _ change? yes, it changes into weight on the 26th, at the moment - change? yes, it changes into weight on the 26th, at the moment we - change? yes, it changes into weight on the 26th, at the moment we can | on the 26th, at the moment we can only travel in a group of six of family and friends. my walking group, i am the chair of glasgow young walkers, we are only allowed to walk in our local area only in a slightly bigger group. but after the 26th we will be able to travel with our walking group as well. people will be able to travel and stay overnight with family and friends but also be able to walk farther away, so it is very exciting. the acceleration of the restrictions on easing earlier was a real blessing. you, like so many people, beka, have not been able to see family if they live further afield. how important has it been to have that contact
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with your walking friends, even they have not been able to get out in groups? it have not been able to get out in arou s? . , have not been able to get out in l mu es? ., , , have not been able to get out in u-rous? , have not been able to get out in ”rous? , ., have not been able to get out in ”rous? .,, , ., ., groups? it has been so important to me. all groups? it has been so important to me- all my — groups? it has been so important to me. all my family _ groups? it has been so important to me. all my family live _ groups? it has been so important to me. all my family live in _ groups? it has been so important to me. all my family live in england i groups? it has been so important to me. all my family live in england or| me. all my family live in england or abroad, so i'm on my own up here. so walking with my group and staying in touch with my group even when we were not allowed to walk as a group has been so important to me. my walking group friends, family appear so it has been so important. i'm so looking forward to seeing the ones that don't live in glasgow. i’m that don't live in glasgow. i'm feelin: that don't live in glasgow. i'm feeling the — that don't live in glasgow. i'm feeling the joy _ that don't live in glasgow. i'm feeling the joy radiating for you and your excitement, so please, do enjoy your walk today and enjoy the catch up. enjoy your walk today and en'oy the catch u -. . ~ enjoy your walk today and en'oy the catch u. ., ~ ,, enjoy your walk today and en'oy the catch u. . ~ ,, enjoy your walk today and en'oy the catch u. . ~' ,, . enjoy your walk today and en'oy the catchu. ., . ., ., catch up. thank you so much, naga! take catch up. thank you so much, naga! teke care- — catch up. thank you so much, naga! teke care- 50 _ catch up. thank you so much, naga! take care. so that _ catch up. thank you so much, naga! take care. so that was _ catch up. thank you so much, naga! take care. so that was beka - catch up. thank you so much, naga! take care. so that was beka getting| take care. so that was beka getting out and about in the sunshine. let's show you a view across london because we are being indulged with these shots this morning. that is buckingham palace. today the duke of
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edinburgh's funeral will take place at st george's chapel at threepea. there will be a national minute's silence at 3pm as well. members of the royalfamily will silence at 3pm as well. members of the royal family will be attending, just 30, in line with covert restrictions at the moment. a spokesperson from buckingham palace has said that the funeral plans have been modified to take into account the current covid public health guidelines. the ceremonial aspects of the service will remain in line with the duke of edinburgh's wishes. we will have coverage across the whole day on the bbc head of the funeral which takes place and the one minute's silence. charlie is at windsor castle today with coverage and a look ahead and a remembrance of the duke of edinburgh who died at the age of 99. there is more coming up.
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good morning. you're watching bbc breakfast here at windsor castle, where the funeral procession for the duke of edinburgh will begin at 2.a5 this afternoon.
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it isa it is a magnificent setting. one of those walking in front of the coffin will be general sir patrick sanders, commander of strategic command. earlier this week i sat down with the general to ask for his thoughts on this occasion — and his memories of the duke. general sir patrick sanders, welcome. the first thing i would like to say, for you, obviously, the event will be a very personal honour for you? it will. both in my position as one of the chiefs of staff, of the heads of the armed forces in the uk, and also as colonel commandant of the rifles, which has had an association with his royal highness for 68 years. and being able to stand and march in front of the coffin as part of the funeral procession feels like a huge honour and a significant responsibility. he had always said he wanted
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a "no fuss" funeral. that's something we've heard quite a lot. tell us what that's meant in practice, and what you understand by what he meant? there's a lot in there that is very him, you know? we've got a land rover that has been designed by him, that has been maintained byjaguar land rover, scrupulously, i understand. there's a back—up in case it goes wrong, we were talking about that yesterday, what happens if it breaks down, do we stop and start again? the answer's no. painted in particular colours. and then of course he has been, you know, he has taken a personal interest in every aspect of it, but in particular, the selection of which units, which bands, which music, which medals will be there. so it is very much his funeral, designed by him. there are hymns that will be sung, but it's just by four members of a choir. the programme of music that will be played, from the moment the soldiers form up in the quadrangle at st george's,
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the hymns that are played before he comes out, so, i vow to thee my country, jerusalem, for those in peril on the sea, and then of course nimrod. i was standing at the rehearsal yesterday, and you hear those first notes of nimrod and the hairs go up on the back of your neck. you get a lump in your throat. it's difficult to stifle a tear as you think about the duke and the impact on the royal family and the whole nation, and you stand there, a little stiffer, a little straighter, and determined to do right by him. i can't imagine what it must be like to have to bury your husband, you know, you spent a lifetime together, and to be sitting in a pew on your own, that really feels desperately sad. you know, i lost my own father a year ago. there's not a day that goes by when i don't think of him. there's a hole in my life. i imagine it's exactly the same for the royal family, and our heart goes out to them. this is a royalfuneral that is like no other.
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i mean, it is first and foremost a family funeral. and we're all very conscious of that and don't want to intrude. i mean, i would claim that we feel part of that family, that extended family in the armed forces, the connection that we have with the duke of edinburgh was very personal, it was very deep, it went back a very long time. but there's a moment when his coffin will be borne into st george's chapel and the doors will close, that it becomes very much a personal or private family affair. and we will very quietly and discreetly fall out and allow the family to grieve. a lot of people have been sharing their personal recollections of him. you two had met a number of times over the years. tell us a little bit about that? i think the first time i met the duke, i didn't really get it right. so, i fall into that category of people who'd said something banal or stupid, and you find yourself
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subjected to a look that makes you realise you said something pretty stupid. so, i asked him what he had thought of a picture that had just been unveiled of him, and he pointed out to me, in no uncertain terms, that it didn't really matter what he thought of it, it was what everybody else thought of it that counted. i think it's so lovely, as we have been talking about what is a very solemn and very personal, as you say, funeral for a family, you have been able to smile. and you've been able to... i think that is something we have seen quite a bit, isn't it? when people have been talking about him, those who knew him, even members of his own family, when you hear the tributes, there is always that element to it. you couldn't have a conversation with the duke without seeing a twinkle in his eye, i mean, every interaction. and the thing that always struck me about him was that he was focused entirely on the person in front of him and he was able to engage with people as individuals. it didn't matter what your rank was, it didn't matter what your station in life was, it didn't matter what your experience was,
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he was interested in you. i mean really interested. and he treated everybody the same. and each of those exchanges invariably involved some kind of banter, some kind of personal anecdote, some kind of quip. and you could always hear laughter wherever the duke was. really interesting healing from the general yesterday. we can hear now from someone who came to know the duke of edinburgh well. robert woodsjoins us from pembrokeshire. robert, before we hear your memories of the duke, tell us about the connection between your family and his. it goes back to when you were 15 years old. it goes back to when you were 15 ears old. . , .., . it goes back to when you were 15 years old-— it goes back to when you were 15 ears old. . , . , years old. that is correct, when my father was — years old. that is correct, when my father was appointed _ years old. that is correct, when my father was appointed dean - years old. that is correct, when my father was appointed dean of- father was appointed dean of
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windsor, i was 15 then. please carry on. tell us more about that connection. we got to know prince charles and princess and pretty well. —— princess and pretty well. —— princess anne. my father's connection with the queen and prince philip. as, connection with the queen and prince phili -. �* ., connection with the queen and prince phili. �* ., ., connection with the queen and prince phili.�* ., ., , connection with the queen and prince phili. ., ., , , philip. a lot of people listening will. . . philip. a lot of people listening will- -- up _ philip. a lot of people listening will... up when _ philip. a lot of people listening will... up when my _ philip. a lot of people listening will... up when my father - philip. a lot of people listening will... up when my father was | will... up when my father was appointed the dean he felt that more could be done. they were having a reorganisation of
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the accommodation. my father thought they should turn it into a centre for consultation for people to think about wider and global issues. he put this plan to prince philip, who was a great enthusiast for doing it. he was very enthusiastic about setting up a consultation centre in st georges we the great and the good could talk about wider issues of ethics, interface, and the role of the clergy. that is why it is important today to think about st george's house because that reflects on a side of prince philip that i feel probable has not had enough publicity. he was interested in spiritual and religious aspects and this came through in his
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chairmanship of st george's house very clearly. for a lot of people they will have seen some of that relationship via television, which must have been strange for you as a family, knowing it first hand as you did. the strange for you as a family, knowing it first hand as you did.— it first hand as you did. the crown programme _ it first hand as you did. the crown programme was — it first hand as you did. the crown programme was interesting. - it first hand as you did. the crown programme was interesting. it - it first hand as you did. the crown | programme was interesting. it was not particularly correct. it did not get through clearly enough until the very end, there was a footnote at the end of the programme that said how important st george's house was to the duke and all his thinking about spiritual and religious and ethical matters. relating to the duke today, a follow on from st george's house, which was extremely important and still is, to comments i would like to make. the council ran out which filled up —— accounts
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about which prince philip chipped. —— a council ran it which prince philip cheered. in my father's letters, there weren't many letters from prince philip to my father debating spiritual and religious issues. one of the last letters he wrote was about a talkie was going to give on business ethics —— a talk he was going to give. that shows that he cares about these wider issues. q; , , that he cares about these wider issues. , ., that he cares about these wider issues. 5: , , ., ., ., ., issues. 3pm this afternoon, at the funeral itself. _ issues. 3pm this afternoon, at the funeral itself. i _ issues. 3pm this afternoon, at the funeral itself. i know _ issues. 3pm this afternoon, at the funeral itself. i know you - issues. 3pm this afternoon, at the funeral itself. i know you are - issues. 3pm this afternoon, at the funeral itself. i know you are still| funeral itself. i know you are still close friends with prince charles and princess anne. many people making the point that so many
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thoughts will be with her majesty the queen and the immediate family. and existence this is a family funeral. , , . ., , ., funeral. -- in essence. that is what it is. it funeral. -- in essence. that is what it is- it is — funeral. -- in essence. that is what it is- it is in — funeral. -- in essence. that is what it is. it is in its — funeral. -- in essence. that is what it is. it is in its rightful— funeral. -- in essence. that is what it is. it is in its rightful place, - it is. it is in its rightful place, the quire in st georges. that is the importance of today. many people have reflected on, because of the necessity of covid restrictions, numbers plummeted to 30 people attending within the chapel itself, it will possibly have a more personalfeel than might otherwise have been the case. izieri; otherwise have been the case. very much so. otherwise have been the case. very much so- i — otherwise have been the case. very much so. ithink— otherwise have been the case. very much so. i think that _ otherwise have been the case. very much so. i think that is _ otherwise have been the case. - much so. i think that is probably a good thing. cutting it down to 30
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people will give it that personal flavour, that is probably a good thing. thank you so much forjoining as today. i am sure that you, like millions of people in the uk, will be following events as they unfold on tv. . ~ be following events as they unfold on tv. ., ,, , ., be following events as they unfold ontv. ., ,, ., be following events as they unfold ontv. ., ., .,, on tv. thank you. i hope all goes well with the _ on tv. thank you. i hope all goes well with the funeral. _ well with the funeral. we have a spectacular setting today. you will have seen behind me the blue skies and their bright sunshine over windsor castle. we are just in the grounds of the castle itself. the events themselves, the procession, will take place within the walls of the castle itself. the weather could not be more fitting for what will be a remarkable occasion. we will review with those images and i will hand you back to
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the studio. we saw that sunshine there are over st george's chapel. it is pretty much the picture across the uk this morning. but a cold start. yes, it is a cold start. temperatures fail below freezing but there is a lot of blue sky and sunshine. you can see how extensive that sunshine is. there are some cloud further north and west. rain bearing clouds in the atlantic, an indication of what is to come, but it will take its time to arrive. high pressure keeping things fine and dry. fear whether cloud is developing across england and wales through today. that rain arrives through today. that rain arrives through the night tonight, into northern ireland and western
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scotland. more of a breeze. that will prevent those temperatures from falling below freezing. a light frost still not out of the question. more sunshine for the second half of the weekend. light patchy rain moving through scotland and northern ireland. to the east of the pennines is where we will see the base of the sunshine tomorrow afternoon. sunday into monday, that where the front has not moved very far at all. we might continue to see more in the way of cloud, particularly farther west. the base of the drier and sunnier moments in eastern areas. temperatures back to really should be for this time of year. high
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pressure removing it from the atlantic in the middle part of this week, with winds in a clockwise direction, a return to a northerly component, coolair direction, a return to a northerly component, cool air being drawn in once again. but not for all. through the middle part of the week there is potential for the slight drop in the temperature but then they hopefully bounce back as we move towards next weekend. a quiet story. it is chilly at the moment but there is a good deal of dry weather and a good deal of sunshine. we have seen the report in leeds where people can drink in pubs outside. sport has taken it a step further, going inside. snooker come up with the return of
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the world championship in sheffield, one of those events being used to taste the safe return to sport. a lot of other events will have a close eye on how things play out in the coming days. it is notjust snooker. a number of other sporting events being used as well. but the focus on the crucible theatre in sheffield as spectators are reckoned back for the world championship. the success of this part will determine the speed at which indoor events begin to open out. a huge difference new car. and for life sport in general. it is a big logistical operation. all of those fans in attendance half to pass a covid test, that would take some organising? yes. the first few fans are just starting to gather outside the
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crucible. they will have had to fill out a checklist of things if they are going to get inside the crucible this morning to watch ronnie o'sullivan begin his world championship title defence. first and for most on that checklist, they will have had to have passed a negative lateral flow covid test. that cannot be one of the ones you do at home, it has to have been done at an official testing centre, because they will have to provide photographic evidence of that negative covered —— negative covid taste. there will also have to sign a consent form to agree to be part of a government programme, of which two pilot is the first event. it has also been requested that a pcr test is taken before and after the event to help gather data on any impact on transmission of covid in the local community and we are ticket holders live. it is a huge logistical operation going into to the's event.
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that is a compound behind me were the queues will move through to get inside the venue. this is about trying to get large strides back at live events this summer. although there are only 300 people here today, that is around one third capacity. by the final in two weekends time the hope is that they crucible will be at full capacity. that'll be the first time an event in the uk has been held in front of a full house before covid. that big logistical operation is unable to ramp up. is there most wicket has over the coming days. how will this powers be deemed a success? the government has been said that the research programme is a science led. it will all be about the data thatis led. it will all be about the data that is gathered from all of the pilots. smalland that is gathered from all of the pilots. small and large venues, indoors and outdoors. today's setting is taking place in a
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theatre. it will be testing for safety of an indoor sports cried but it will also help inform audiences in the west end. i spoke to the world snooker cheer earlier, he said he had had andrew lloyd webber on the phone earlier, seeing please help me get people back into the theatre. this is notjust about sport, it is about the entire live eventin sport, it is about the entire live event in 3—foot stop tomorrow well —— tomorrow fa cup semifinal is set to have 3000 fans. this is a cross industry. it will have a pivotal effect of what this will look like for life events. thank you. one of the other pilots will see football taking part in that as well. fans will return, around a000 at wembley tomorrow, for the fa cup semifinal between
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southampton and leicester. a000 fans expected that wembley for that second semifinal tomorrow. yes, we will be live at wembley today having a look at today's semifinal, chelsea against manchester city, also looking towards leicester and southampton. football focus is on bbc two.
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he has got all sorts of shirts, there race when he has got is a shirt they wore in 1989, a yellowing against arsenal. it is solely. we have got the goals from last night.
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he has spent the day with ian wright, here is a snippet of that interview. did you used to play here? interview. did ou used to -la here? . interview. did ou usedto -la here? . did you used to play here? this was a mushroom — did you used to play here? this was a mushroom farm _ did you used to play here? this was a mushroom farm years _ did you used to play here? this was a mushroom farm years ago. - did you used to play here? this was a mushroom farm years ago. this . did you used to play here? this was a mushroom farm years ago. this is where _ a mushroom farm years ago. this is where we _ a mushroom farm years ago. this is where we used to play. for hours on end _ where we used to play. for hours on end when _ where we used to play. for hours on end when i — where we used to play. for hours on end. when i signed my contract at leeds _ leeds. when i was at leeds. — when i was at crystal palace, i would still go to the park and play. plenty more of that on the programme. we have got a piece on
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northern ireland's women who have qualified for the first ever major tournament. bedford take on millwall. we have got a nice piece on them. —— brentford. fa cup semifinals, we are speaking to a leicester fan semifinals, we are speaking to a leicesterfan who semifinals, we are speaking to a leicester fan who was at two of the three fa cup final is that leicester played in the 1960s. they lost all three of them. and from a southampton point of view, we can relive their most famous moment in 1976 when they beat manchester united in the final. lawrie mcmenemy is taking a look back at that famous final. that is from midday on bbc two. some great memories there. and the snookerfollows.
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some great memories there. and the snooker follows. interesting to hear if the logistical operation going on at the crucible. they have got to put on the event itself. interesting that barry hearn has been speaking to andrew lloyd webber. it will make a massive difference is way out of the atmosphere stop. from james bond to harry potter, peaky blinders and doctor who, the actor helen mccrory lit up some of the biggest films and tv series of the last 20 years — as well as having a highly acclaimed stage career. yesterday, she died at the age ofjust 52. our arts correspondent david sillito looks back at her life. never as prime minister.
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it is as if you insist you still love — it is as if you insist you still love any— it is as if you insist you still love any golden age of espionage. through— love any golden age of espionage. through others we saw silence. and the end of all things. are you ardent?-
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very sad news that we heard yesterday. such a shock. so few people knew she was ill. she had been on tv doing interviews. the real shock yesterday when her husband put this tweet out seeing that he was heartbroken to announce that after an heroic battle with cancer helen mccrory had died. they met when they did a play together. the director said they had such amazing chemistry on stage that it was like trying to direct a fire.
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helen mccrory has often spoken about her marriage. she said she had a trick, when she was at a party and she could not find damian lewis, she would get the dj to put on grace jones, he would always find her, that was the song. it was a very moving tribute from damian lewis. i mentioned a few of the films and television programmes she mentioned in. she had such a number of rules. she was in all five series of peaky blinders. in the 1990s she made her name on the stage in london. she came straight out of drama school and the national theatre she did the seagal and another five rules.
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and the national theatre she did the seagal and anotherfive rules. then she diversified into films. then there was harry potter. she was originally cast in that series that fell pregnant, and had to withdraw. then she finally got her moment, she was given the role of narcissa malfoy in that series. the fact she had two huge hits last year during lockdown. roadkill, with hugh laurie. earlier, quiz. about the
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coughing major, the who wants to be a millionaire scandal. when she arrived in that series it was the energy and ferocity she brought to those courtroom scenes, one of the crucial part in making that show a hit that was seen by almost 10 million people per night during lockdown. she worked with martin scorsese on hugo. and she was in sky fall. she completed the holy british trilogy. drwho. harry potter. james bond. it trilogy. dr who. harry potter. james bond. . . . trilogy. dr who. harry potter. james bond. , ,, ., bond. it is as if you insist on pretending _ bond. it is as if you insist on pretending we _ bond. it is as if you insist on pretending we are _ bond. it is as if you insist on pretending we are still- bond. it is as if you insist on l pretending we are still earning bond. it is as if you insist on - pretending we are still earning a golden age of espionage. i find this old—fashioned belief demonstrates a reckless disregard... i do old-fashioned belief demonstrates a reckless disregard. . .— reckless disregard... i do not mean to interact — reckless disregard... i do not mean to interact but _ reckless disregard... i do not mean to interact but for _ reckless disregard... i do not mean to interact but for the _ reckless disregard... i do not mean to interact but for the sake - reckless disregard... i do not mean to interact but for the sake of - to interact but for the sake of variety — to interact but for the sake of variety might be actually here from
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the witness? we - the witness? we saw helen mccrory there in sky fall. she had such a large breadth of kenya, different roles, made many friends in the industry. —— breadth of career.
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again an example of the kind of think she would do on the side. helen mccrory said, i am a positive person. my grandmother told me that happiness is both a skill and a decision and you are responsible for the outcome. very wise words.
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the outcome. ve wise words. ., ., very wise words. more from charlie ahead of the _ very wise words. more from charlie ahead of the duke _ very wise words. more from charlie ahead of the duke of _ very wise words. more from charlie ahead of the duke of edinburgh's i ahead of the duke of edinburgh's funeral coming up. charlie stayt, inside the grounds of windsor castle, where today the queen will lead the royal family and the nation in mourning, at the funeral of prince philip, the duke of edinburgh.
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the service will pay tribute to prince philip's "unwavering loyalty" to the queen. new pictures show how many aspects of the ceremony were planned by the duke himself, with military precision. his funeral, designed by him. a cherished moment during 73 years of marriage. her majesty shares one of her favourite photos of herself and her husband, relaxing in the scottish highlands. this is st george's chapel in windsor. a small group of family members will walk through the castle grounds this afternoon in procession behind the duke's coffin. we're looking ahead to the service on the programme this morning. and also on breakfast. a first friday night out in months. we'll have a report from leeds where many enjoyed the easing of england's lockdown restrictions. the world snooker championship
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gets under way in sheffield this morning. and fans will be in attendance at the crucible theatre, the first indoor sporting event to admit spectators as part of the government's pilot scheme. good morning. a quiet weekend of weather ahead. a chilly start once again, but there should be some decent spells of sunshine for most of us throughout the day. all of the details shortly. it's saturday the 17th of april. good morning from windsor castle, where the funeral of the duke of edinburgh will take place this afternoon, watched by millions of people around the world. it'll be a small family affair, because in line with covid restricitons, only 30 people will be allowed into st george's chapel. the queen will sit alone as she says goodbye to her husband of 73 years. buckingham palace said the service
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will celebrate and reflect the duke's life, but they have asked members of the public to stay away. the palace said it will focus on his association and love of the sea. on breakfast this morning we've been hearing from those who knew the duke, and those who've been involved in planning today's events. here's our royal correspondent nicholas witchell. a husband and wife, a photograph from the queen's private collection, an image from a strong marriage. and a reminder that today there is a wife saying farewell to a beloved partner of 73 years. inside windsor castle, st george's chapel has been made ready. the duke of edinburgh's many decorations have been placed on the altar. close by, the seat he used to occupy, the enamelled stall plate is in place. but his insignia as a knight of the garter has been removed. it will be in this section of the chapel, known as the quire, where the 30 members of the congregation will be seated around the catafalque
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bearing the duke's coffin. the funeral procession will have made its way to the chapel from the castle's quadrangle. just after 2:a0pm, his coffin will be borne from the state entrance to be placed on the land rover hearse the duke helped to design. at 2:a5pm, a small procession will step off for the eight minute journey through the castle. some members of the royalfamily will walk behind the coffin. the queen will follow in a limousine. at 2:53pm, the coffin will arrive at the west steps of st george's chapel. it will be borne to the top of the steps where it will pause. at three o'clock, a one—minute silence will be observed, before the coffin enters the chapel for the funeral service, which will be presided over by the archbishop of canterbury. as with all funerals, there is a huge sense of privilege that you're with the family, any family, at this remarkable point in their lives.
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where they are grieving someone they loved profoundly. and then with this funeral, there is also that extra sense of huge privilege, but also pride in his life. the pride is not that i'm there, the pride is, here we are, celebrating such a wonderful life. within the chapel, the order of service will proceed precisely as the duke had prescribed. he chose the music and the readings. there's a lot in there that is very him. we've got a land rover that has been designed by him. he's taken a personal interest in every aspect of it, but in particular, the selection of which units, which bands, which music, which medals will be there. so it will be very much his funeral, designed by him. the service will end with the lowering of his coffin to the royal vault below the chapel. royal marine buglers
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will sound the last post, and then action stations, a reminder of the duke's years of service in the royal navy. a reminder, too, that he was a royal consort with a difference. distinctive to the end. nicholas witchell, bbc news. a reminder that the service will begin at three o'clock this afternoon, following a nationwide minute's silence. the order of service has been released by buckingham palace and we can take a look at that now. inside it has a message from the dean of windsor, who will lead the service, paying tribute to prince philip's "kindness, humour and humanity". joining me now is our royal correspondent sarah campbell. we are blessed with beautiful sunshine this morning. tell us a little bit more about what we know of the service itself. the little bit more about what we know of the service itself.— of the service itself. the order of service was _ of the service itself. the order of service was released _ of the service itself. the order of service was released late - of the service itself. the order of service was released late last i service was released late last night. and i think as with all the
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details to do with today which had been made public over the last week, the sense is very much that this was the sense is very much that this was the duke's plan. he very much had a hand in what television viewers will see today and it is worth reiterating again, the message to not come to windsor. all of this will be behind castle walls. the best place to watch it really is on television. the order of service, perhaps people might be surprised but it is pretty common for royal funerals, no members of the royal family will be giving readings and there will be no eulogy. there is a sense of the duke's love of the sea, his naval past, throughout the music that has been music chosen and readings, the him eternal father strong to save that is usually associated with seafarers. as the coffin is lowered into the royal vault, buglers will play action
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stations, this is the call on warships for people to man the battle stations. that is a nod to the duke's military past. he saw active service during the second world war. active service during the second world war-— active service during the second world war. ., , .,, world war. one of the things those involved in the _ world war. one of the things those involved in the military _ world war. one of the things those involved in the military planning i involved in the military planning but also the royal household have said themselves is, there will be in a way two different tones. there will be the procession with the military accompaniment and there is a moment when it becomes very much a private family funeral. yes. a moment when it becomes very much a private family funeral.— private family funeral. yes, you are riiht, it is private family funeral. yes, you are right. it is in _ private family funeral. yes, you are right, it is in separate _ private family funeral. yes, you are right, it is in separate stages i right, it is in separate stages people will see. the procession is when the coffin will be borne through the grounds of windsor castle. there will be detachments from the armed services, particular regiments that he had a close connection with who will line the procession route. there will be members of the royal family, procession route. there will be members of the royalfamily, his children, and prince william and harry will walk behind the coffin as it goes to the ground and the
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criminals follow in —— and the queen will follow in the state bentley. if you think of the images, when it comes to the chapel itself after the minute's silence, rather than 800 mourners, there will be 30, socially distanced and wearing masks. the queen will be sitting on her own as in so many families have been experiencing, a socially distance funeral. that will be the two elements and i think in such a vast space that is st george's chapel, that is when the starkness of the reduced numbers will be most obvious. i think throughout all of this the palace have been very keen to say that this will still be a fitting tribute to a man who gave much of his adult life in service of the country.— in service of the country. thank you very much- — the archbishop of canterbury, justin welby, will play a key
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part in today's service. he's been speaking to the bbc ahead of the ceremony and started by reflecting on the duke's personality. he was someone who had lots of... you were never bored with him. you couldn't, he couldn't bore someone if he set out to do it. if he spoke, it was one of his talents, he saw into things. because he studied so hard and spoke so, and read so widely. and so when you preached, you heard that he would give his opinion, and he expected you to be able to answer him back. i think one of the things is, we really have to avoid judging from anything external. she's the queen. she will behave with the extraordinary dignity and extraordinary courage that she always does. and at the same time, she is saying farewell to someone
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to whom she was married for 73 years. i think that must be a very, very profound thing in anybody�*s life. and i hope that the whole nation and around the world, as they look at this, when the cameras are focused on her, as it will be from time to time, that they, if they believe in that that they pray for her, and if they don't, that they sympathise and in their hearts, offer their condolences to her and the hope for her to find strength in what must be an anguished moment. over the last year, there's literally millions of people around the world, and in this country, hundreds of thousands, who have been in her position. i think it will resonate very deeply for a lot of people. i think there will be tears in many
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homes because other names will be on their mind. faces they have lost, that they won't see again. funeral that they couldn't go to, as many haven't been able to go to this one because it is limited to 30 in the congregation. that will break many a heart. and i hope that we will see this moment as something we share in, in the grief of this very, very hard year that we have all gone through. and we will say, the best thing that we can do is do what he did in all his life, just get on with it. the archbishop of canterbury, reflecting, some of the crossover with those who have lost loved ones in the past years. the restrictions that will be in place for this event as well.
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for a senior royal of the duke of edinburgh's standing, the streets here in windsor would usually be lined with thousands of people wanting to pay their respects. however, because of covid restrictions, the public has been asked to stay away and the media presence is strictly limited. we can show you an image of the henry viii gate, which is slightly down from the castle walls from where i am standing. you can see in the foreground, that would normally be a place where many people would gather. yesterday there were some people here. mostly people from windsor itself. and of course people here in windsor very much saw the royalfamily as part here in windsor very much saw the royal family as part of the community here because they would be seen routinely. one of the very few journalists who'll be reporting from inside st george's chapel is the bbc�*s eleanor oldroyd. she will have a unique position in the events today. good morning, you arejust the events today. good morning, you are just outside the gate from me here but a little bit later on, you
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will annual tell me exactly it is the case, case, you will be the only reporter inside the chapel at the funeral takes place.— funeral takes place. yes, good morning- _ funeral takes place. yes, good morning- we _ funeral takes place. yes, good morning. we have _ funeral takes place. yes, good morning. we have the - funeral takes place. yes, good morning. we have the most i morning. we have the most extraordinary commentary position for bbc radio. we have a number of commentators inside the walls of the castle today including clare balding and allan little but i will be positioned actually inside the chapel itself. directly over the high altar, and the catherine of aragon wooden balcony. people who have visited the chapel might know it, it is high above the quire, it was erected originally for catherine of aragon by henry viii so that she could watch services. we have a soundproof box inside that. from there, i will get the most intimate of view, really, of the royal family, as they gather to mourn the duke. but also of the coffin itself, on its high platform, the
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catafalque, before it is lowered very slowly into the royal vault where kings and queens and princes and princesses have lain in the many hundreds of years. it will be quite a spine tingling moment of theatre in the service itself.— in the service itself. eleanor, we have been _ in the service itself. eleanor, we have been speaking _ in the service itself. eleanor, we have been speaking to _ in the service itself. eleanor, we have been speaking to members in the service itself. eleanor, we i have been speaking to members of the military and the royal household. they have been explaining anyway the change in tone of the event today. inside the walls there will be a procession and then there will be a moment in time where the doors of the chapel close, you will be inside, and this becomes very much a family funeral. a time for people to grieve. family funeral. a time for people to irieve. . . family funeral. a time for people to irieve. , , , grieve. yes, this contrast struck me the other day- _ grieve. yes, this contrast struck me the other day- i _ grieve. yes, this contrast struck me the other day. i watched _ grieve. yes, this contrast struck me the other day. i watched the - the other day. i watched the military procession as it came down the hill led by the band of the grenadier guards and the magnificence of the 700 plus personnel who will be lining the route from the state department to
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the chapel itself. then the west store will close and the focus will be on a very small space. —— the west door. the quire willjust have the 30 people sitting in the stalls, including the queen who will be socially distanced from the rest of her family. socially distanced from the rest of herfamily. but then socially distanced from the rest of her family. but then the singers, the performers who normally, you would get a big choir, the choir of st george's chapel, this will be four members of that choir, three male members of the choir, the three lay clerks who have been chosen to sing and a soprano who is a member of the st george's community here and she lives in the horseshoe cloisters. the music has been adapted for the service as well. you heard that there will be eternal father strong to save, the navy him, and also other —— the navy hymn, and there will be other aspects reflecting his amorality in
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so so many mentions of the sea —— his admiral status in the navy. there are so many mentions of the sea. hymns are often a great outlet in funerals, the chance to sing the hymns, but they will not be allowed to either because these are the covid restrictions are people who have had funerals this year have had to deal with. have had funerals this year have had to deal with-— you can follow live coverage of the funeral at a special programme at half past midday here on bbc one. there will be further coverage on bbc two from ten past eight this evening. and it will also be broadcast on bbc radio a and radio five live, coverage starting at 2pm. you will have seen by now, we are
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blessed this morning with a very, very beautiful weather. we have bright blue skies, and warm sunshine this morning. the image you can see there is inside the castle walls. as eleanor was describing a moment ago, thatis eleanor was describing a moment ago, that is where you will see the procession in advance of the service itself at 3pm. you can have a look at the flag as well. the royal standard. not a breath of wind here. and you can see a magnificent setting. as has been said all the way along, the royal household very keen to share this moment via the television and the radio coverage, and people are being asked to stay away. i can confirm from our position just in the grounds here of the castle, very few people here at the castle, very few people here at the moment. in other circumstances
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there may well have been a very different atmosphere. it is a beautiful day. the funeral itself is at 3p and this afternoon. i will hand you back to the studio now and two naga. thank you very much. a beautiful day in windsor, but it has been a cold start for many of us. but i think lots of us, louise, good morning, we'll see some sunshine today. yes, good morning. it is very quiet out there, very atmospheric picture here from a weather watcher, some messed around and you can see the blue sky across the country. —— there is some list around. the satellite pictures are coming in and you can see how extensive the sunshine is. cloud in the far north—west and this mass of cloud behind me is a weatherfront north—west and this mass of cloud behind me is a weather front that will arrive later on today. it will bring some rain eventually but it
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will take its time. that will push gradually eastwards through the course of the afternoon. the best of the sunshine through the afternoon looks likely to be across most of the country, temperature is peaking at 11 to 15 degrees. as you go to the evening and overnight, the weather front will be bringing more breeze, cloud and some rain. that will hold the temperatures up above freezing. with low single figures in the south and east where we have the clear skies. showering tomorrow morning in northern ireland and scotland, best of the sunshine to my to the east of the pennines with highs of 15 degrees. thank you very much. we had more positive covid news yesterday with infections in the uk
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at their lowest rates since september, according to the office for national statistics. however, there's also a new variant at large and plenty of questions to consider with our regular pair of experts, doctor chris smith and professor linda bauld. good morning. morning! morning. let's talk about _ good morning. morning! morning. let's talk about this _ good morning. morning! morning. let's talk about this new _ good morning. morning! morning. let's talk about this new variant, i let's talk about this new variant, this strain from india and how it affects us. linda, how consent is public health about this? definitely concerned and _ public health about this? definitely concerned and watching _ public health about this? definitely concerned and watching carefully. l concerned and watching carefully. this is not yet classified as a variant of concern, it is a variant of interest, and the distinction is about how much information we have about how much information we have about this variant, the b1617. it has emerged in india over the last few months, there are 77 cases in the uk. there are two changes to the spike protein, which means it might attach to the a two receptor and
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there could be a better immune response. india has seen a lot of infections, about 216,000 cases yesterday and i think this new variant contributes to that. but we don't know enough about it, how much more transmissible it is, could it contribute to disease severity? we just need to do the sequencing and search testing where we pick it up in the uk. —— the search —— the surge testing. when we look at variance like this, how do they differ? what about the population of the country that these are emerging from? . . . the country that these are emerging from? , ,y ,., ., the country that these are emerging from? , ., from? this is a symptom of the fact that india has _ from? this is a symptom of the fact that india has a _ from? this is a symptom of the fact that india has a large _ from? this is a symptom of the fact that india has a large population, i that india has a large population, and it_ that india has a large population, and it has— that india has a large population, and it has a — that india has a large population, and it has a large population of people — and it has a large population of people with coronavirus. as we were hearing. _ people with coronavirus. as we were hearing. the — people with coronavirus. as we were hearing, the numbers are pretty eye watering _ hearing, the numbers are pretty eye watering in— hearing, the numbers are pretty eye watering in terms of new cases. it is no _ watering in terms of new cases. it is no coincidence that when you look at places— is no coincidence that when you look at places that are densely populated with lots _ at places that are densely populated with lots of cases of infection, you
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.et with lots of cases of infection, you get the _ with lots of cases of infection, you get the opportunity for these new variants _ get the opportunity for these new variants to pop up. that's because there _ variants to pop up. that's because there are — variants to pop up. that's because there are many roles of the genetic dice _ there are many roles of the genetic dice that's— there are many roles of the genetic dice. that's why india has is going on, dice. that's why india has is going on. brazil— dice. that's why india has is going on, brazil has had this, south africa — on, brazil has had this, south africa has— on, brazil has had this, south africa has had this going on and we spawned, _ africa has had this going on and we spawned, apparently, the kent variant, — spawned, apparently, the kent variant, just before christmas last yeah _ variant, just before christmas last yeah it _ variant, just before christmas last yeah it is— variant, just before christmas last yeah it is a — variant, just before christmas last year. it is a fact that where you .et year. it is a fact that where you get a _ year. it is a fact that where you get a lot— year. it is a fact that where you get a lot of— year. it is a fact that where you get a lot of virus turnover, you roll the — get a lot of virus turnover, you roll the genetic dice for the virus and give — roll the genetic dice for the virus and give it— roll the genetic dice for the virus and give it the opportunity to evolve — and give it the opportunity to evolve and mutate and it will move towards. _ evolve and mutate and it will move towards. i— evolve and mutate and it will move towards, i suppose, evolve and mutate and it will move towards, isuppose, islands evolve and mutate and it will move towards, i suppose, islands of stability. — towards, i suppose, islands of stability, genetic stability, that .ive stability, genetic stability, that give the — stability, genetic stability, that give the virus are some additional advantage. at the moment it is still early— advantage. at the moment it is still early days— advantage. at the moment it is still early days and people are still investigating. but if the virus changes— investigating. but if the virus changes in a way that means it can transmit— changes in a way that means it can transmit more efficiently, or grow more _ transmit more efficiently, or grow more efficiently, or sidestep pre—existing immunity, which is what is happening in brazil, the new variant— is happening in brazil, the new variant which has popped up there has the _ variant which has popped up there has the ability to sidestep the immunity conferred either by vaccination in some cases all previous— vaccination in some cases all previous infection. this means you
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.et previous infection. this means you get a _ previous infection. this means you get a whole — previous infection. this means you get a whole new rash of cases again. it is get a whole new rash of cases again. it is early— get a whole new rash of cases again. it is early days. we are still getting _ it is early days. we are still getting to grips with many of these mutations and what they mean and that includes the indian variant. we would _ that includes the indian variant. we would say— that includes the indian variant. we would say this is part of the course and it— would say this is part of the course and it is— would say this is part of the course and it is a — would say this is part of the course and it is a somewhat reassuring that it has— and it is a somewhat reassuring that it has been— and it is a somewhat reassuring that it has been detected. it's much better— it has been detected. it's much better the _ it has been detected. it's much better the deal will the devil that you better the deal will the devil that vou do— better the deal will the devil that you do know rather than the one that you do know rather than the one that you don't _ you do know rather than the one that you don't it — you do know rather than the one that you don't. it shows that our surveillance and scrutiny is working and we _ surveillance and scrutiny is working and we can — surveillance and scrutiny is working and we can pick this up.| surveillance and scrutiny is working and we can pick this up.— and we can pick this up. i have a iuestion and we can pick this up. i have a question here, _ and we can pick this up. i have a question here, this _ and we can pick this up. i have a question here, this one - and we can pick this up. i have a question here, this one says, i. and we can pick this up. i have a l question here, this one says, i am about to get my second vaccination, do i still need to test twice a week? bearing in mind that we are seeing surge testing in various parts of london.— seeing surge testing in various parts of london. yes, this might chance parts of london. yes, this might change in _ parts of london. yes, this might change in the — parts of london. yes, this might change in the future _ parts of london. yes, this might change in the future but - parts of london. yes, this might change in the future but at i parts of london. yes, this might change in the future but at the l change in the future but at the moment people who have had both doses of the vaccine, and remember, the protection is not instantly after a second dose, we have discussed this, it is a week or two after that, you get better protection. they are still being advised to take up testing. there is some very interesting data released yesterday from the centre for
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disease control in the us. they were looking at what they call, when people are vaccinated but still cases that test positive and they found quite a small number. it amounted to 0.008% of the people who had been vaccinated in the us. but sadly about 7a of those group died. they developed an infection after the second dose. it isn't impossible to get an infection, these vaccines are not 100% effective but it is extremely rare. to help our surveillance and also for people to be able to get treatment and support if they do in very rare circumstances pick up the virus again, do continue to take up testing. here, for example, at the university where we are rolling out routine testing, we are noting if someone has had a vaccine but we are still offering them the test. that is the guidance at the moment, might change in future.— change in future. sticking with the theme of vaccinations, _ change in future. sticking with the theme of vaccinations, ian - change in future. sticking with the theme of vaccinations, ian wants l change in future. sticking with the l theme of vaccinations, ian wants to know if he should expect to have a
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covid vaccination once a year for the rest of his life? we are still in the first stage, so many people have not had the first vaccination but will this become a part of life? what do we know in terms of levels of immunity that are offered by the vaccine and how long they last? 50 vaccine and how long they last? so far, we anticipate that this virus is not _ far, we anticipate that this virus is not going to go away. it's very likely— is not going to go away. it's very likely to — is not going to go away. it's very likely to become what we call endemic, _ likely to become what we call endemic, it will continue to circulate _ endemic, it will continue to circulate given the chance in the human— circulate given the chance in the human population for at least a long timei _ human population for at least a long time, possibly indefinitely. that being _ time, possibly indefinitely. that being the case, there will also raise _ being the case, there will also raise therefore be people in the preparation who are susceptible and vulnerable. in the best way in the same _ vulnerable. in the best way in the same way— vulnerable. in the best way in the same way that we tackle flu, there are people — same way that we tackle flu, there are people who are susceptible and vulnerable in the population and protect— vulnerable in the population and protect them, to have a seasonal vaccination — protect them, to have a seasonal vaccination. we do it seasonal for two reasons. flu is virus that changes— two reasons. flu is virus that changes the only and we update our immunity— changes the only and we update our
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immunity by updating the vaccine. coronavirus — immunity by updating the vaccine. coronavirus update but more slowly but we _ coronavirus update but more slowly but we will — coronavirus update but more slowly but we will still need to update the vaccine _ but we will still need to update the vaccine for— but we will still need to update the vaccine for the virus. the immunity you get— vaccine for the virus. the immunity you get doesn't appear to be lifelong _ you get doesn't appear to be lifelong from vaccine or from getting — lifelong from vaccine or from getting the virus, it is short—term. with— getting the virus, it is short—term. with both — getting the virus, it is short—term. with both of— getting the virus, it is short—term. with both of those factors in mind, there _ with both of those factors in mind, there will— with both of those factors in mind, there will probably be some kind of strategy. _ there will probably be some kind of strategy, possibly piggybacking on what we _ strategy, possibly piggybacking on what we already do to flu, to update and boost _ what we already do to flu, to update and boost the immunity of people in society— and boost the immunity of people in society to _ and boost the immunity of people in society to make sure that we can keep _ society to make sure that we can keep the — society to make sure that we can keep the levels of herd immunity in the population as high as we can. that's_ the population as high as we can. that's the — the population as high as we can. that's the reason why nadeem is vaccines minister, —— nadhim zahawi, said they— vaccines minister, —— nadhim zahawi, said they will — vaccines minister, —— nadhim zahawi, said they will return to other vulnerable groups and care workers to make _ vulnerable groups and care workers to make sure that they are vaccinated again in october and september, so that they can be as protected — september, so that they can be as protected as they can be.-
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september, so that they can be as protected as they can be. picking up on that. protected as they can be. picking up on that- we — protected as they can be. picking up on that. we have _ protected as they can be. picking up on that. we have seen _ protected as they can be. picking up on that. we have seen that - protected as they can be. picking up on that. we have seen that with i protected as they can be. picking up on that. we have seen that with the | on that. we have seen that with the flu booster vaccines as well, the most vulnerable in society are the ones who are given those.- ones who are given those. that's correct. ones who are given those. that's correct- and _ ones who are given those. that's correct. and asked _ ones who are given those. that's correct. and asked to _ ones who are given those. that's correct. and asked to come i ones who are given those. that's i correct. and asked to come forward annually. we really don't know, as chris says, how long the duration of protection from these vaccines will last. all around the world we have been vaccinating people since december. the people in the original trials have been followed up but there are big questions about this. i think it is unusual or unlikely to have repeat booster campaigns for everyone in the appellation, including we will probably start vaccinating children, their trials are under way. it's likely the us could be the first country to approve a vaccine that can be used certainly for teenagers and then into the younger age groups. i think it is something that will probably be focused on the older and more vulnerable groups as a vaccine minister has said. it means that it is something we need to get used to. and recognise it is an ongoing challenge for the nhs and we have to
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continue to invest in that vital public health response. i continue to invest in that vital public health response. i suppose is the vaccination _ public health response. i suppose is the vaccination roll-out _ public health response. i suppose is the vaccination roll-out continues, i the vaccination roll—out continues, people are looking ahead now. this one asks, will we always have to self—isolate, if we come in contact with someone who has covid? i with someone who has covid? i definitely hope that will change in the future. that is the guidance at the future. that is the guidance at the moment and continues to be the case. if you look around the world, the centre for disease control in the centre for disease control in the us has provided different guidance to people who had both doses of the vaccine a couple of weeks after the second dose, they do not necessarily have to self—isolate if they come into contact with the positive case and when they travel around the country, they don't necessarily have to take up testing. that is quite specific to the us, thatis that is quite specific to the us, that is not the case here. at the moment we absolutely need to follow that guidance. it's one of the best ways that we can make sure the infection does not spread to other people. as we progress with addressing this pandemic and the virus becomes endemic, and we live
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alongside it as chris and i have discussed several times before, they could not be that need. crucially as more people are vaccinated and we know more about the durability and duration of protection, that response might not be needed. the key thing for the moment including doing this surge testing at all the other type of testing, if you find a positive result even with a lateral flow test, isolate immediately and you'll be offered a compliment —— confirmation test. mas you'll be offered a compliment -- confirmation test.— you'll be offered a compliment -- confirmation test. was good to talk to ou, confirmation test. was good to talk to you. linda _ confirmation test. was good to talk to you, linda and _ confirmation test. was good to talk to you, linda and chris, _ confirmation test. was good to talk to you, linda and chris, i _ confirmation test. was good to talk to you, linda and chris, i am i to you, linda and chris, i am enjoying pairing! saturday kitchen is on bbc two — not bbc one — this morning, but it starts at ten o'clock as always. matt tebbutt can tell us what's in store. morning, matt. we are live as usual. our special guest is shane ritchie.— guest is shane ritchie. good
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morning- — guest is shane ritchie. good morning- is _ guest is shane ritchie. good morning. is it _ guest is shane ritchie. good morning. is it nice _ guest is shane ritchie. good morning. is it nice to - guest is shane ritchie. good morning. is it nice to be i guest is shane ritchie. good morning. is it nice to be out| guest is shane ritchie. good i morning. is it nice to be out and about? just _ morning. is it nice to be out and about? just to — morning. is it nice to be out and about? just to be _ morning. is it nice to be out and about? just to be out _ morning. is it nice to be out and about? just to be out and i morning. is it nice to be out and | about? just to be out and about. morning. is it nice to be out and i about? just to be out and about. i am sure you _ about? just to be out and about. i am sure you have _ about? just to be out and about. i am sure you have booked - about? just to be out and about. i am sure you have booked lionel. am sure you have booked lionel richie and you have got it wrong. food heaven, food tail? food hail. i food hail. lam not a food hail. lam nota fan food hail. i am not a fan of pork. i am done with boiled vegetables. tiara am done with boiled vegetables. two ireat am done with boiled vegetables. two great chefs- — am done with boiled vegetables. two great chefs- a _ am done with boiled vegetables. two great chefs. a celebration _ am done with boiled vegetables. two great chefs. a celebration of - great chefs. a celebration of s - rini. great chefs. a celebration of spring. minestrone - great chefs. a celebration of spring. minestrone with i great chefs. a celebration of l spring. minestrone with spring vegetables- — spring. minestrone with spring vegetables. what _ spring. minestrone with spring vegetables. what is _ spring. minestrone with spring vegetables. what is cooking? l spring. minestrone with spring i vegetables. what is cooking? korean s - i vegetables. what is cooking? korean spicy fermented _ vegetables. what is cooking? korean spicy fermented cabbage. _
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vegetables. what is cooking? korean spicy fermented cabbage. it - vegetables. what is cooking? korean spicy fermented cabbage. it is i spicy fermented cabbage. it is delicious- _ spicy fermented cabbage. it is delicious. i— spicy fermented cabbage. it is delicious. i love _ spicy fermented cabbage. it is delicious. i love these - spicy fermented cabbage. it is delicious. i love these dishes. j spicy fermented cabbage. it is i delicious. i love these dishes. they are tremendous. _ delicious. i love these dishes. they are tremendous. a _ delicious. i love these dishes. they are tremendous. a springtime i delicious. i love these dishes. theyj are tremendous. a springtime wine from _ are tremendous. a springtime wine from italv — are tremendous. a springtime wine from italy. add a beautiful british been _ from italy. add a beautiful british beer. ~ . from italy. add a beautiful british beer. ~ , , ., from italy. add a beautiful british beer. ~ , ., from italy. add a beautiful british beer. , ., beer. we will see you at ten o'clock on bbc two- _ on bbc two. and of course the reason that is on bbc two is because we will have coverage of the funeral of the duke of edinburgh. stay with us, more from charlie at windsor castle coming up.
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good morning. you're watching bbc breakfast with me — charlie stayt — here at windsor castle, where the funeral of the duke of edinburgh will take place this afternoon. there has not been a breath of wind this morning. just as you came to be a moment ago, a little wind came up. the royal standard they are, high above windsor castle against those blue skies. just 30 guests will attend — in line with covid restrictions — and the public has been asked to stay away.
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but the people of windsor are preparing to mark the occasion in their own way — as graham satchell has been finding out. at their barracks in windsor, state trumpeters from the band of the household cavalry are having their final rehearsal for this afternoon's ceremony. trumpeters play the reveille. these trumpeters have played at royal weddings, state banquets, the opening of parliament. but there is a real pride being involved in today's service. it is a huge national event, you kind of build up to these events throughout your whole career. so i am exceptionally privileged to be part of it. it is a little bit nerve—wracking. but you hear so much,
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and hear so many stories, especially now, of what he did for the duke of edinburgh awards, what he did for the military, and such a very, very inspirational man. the trumpeters have met prince philip over and over again, and remember his playful sense of humour. he would often walk through and while we were playing he would go, "what's on the flip side?" referring to the old lps, and would turn your music over while you were playing, to see what was on the flip side, and then walk off mischievously grinning. he was always a real pleasure to be around, and work in the presence of. from the roof terrace of castleview retirement home, they have quite a view of windsor castle. the residents here have all been vaccinated and are in one large bubble, so can watch today's funeral without social distancing. they have fond memories here of a man who made windsor his home. living in windsor for almost 50 years, you actually feel very close to the royal family here.
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you know, we sort of feel as though they're part, sort of part of our family. i always thought he was a man's man. i loved his attitude. chuckles. he was part of our lives. everyday life, not just those special occasions. all the time, it was, "there's the duke!" and the duke would wave at you. he was such a charismatic, charming, with such a great sense of humour, that you just want to be here, you want to be here for the queen and her family as well, you want to try and do your bit. obviously, living in windsor, you feel that that's right, don't you? at the duke of edinburgh pub, landlady annie andrews is putting the final touches in place. she is hoping to send the duke off in style.
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we are inviting all the regulars, as many as we can safely get in the tent, and we will be raising a glass to toast him. when you lose family you always have a wake, etc, and he has been like part of our family. it'll be watched worldwide. and, you know, it's a mark of respect and he deserves it. he didn't want the fuss and the pageantry, so he did get what he wanted. it's a moment of history. it's the passing of an era, almost. he was a part of my history, and i think i shall miss him. there will be quite a bit of piping, bugling and trumpeting at today's funeral to reflect the duke's military past. after the royal marines play the last post, the state trumpeters will play this, the reveille. it signifies the start of a new day, as one chapter of history comes to a close. graham satchell, bbc news, windsor.
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good morning. the duke of edinburgh's signature is clearly and obviously all over the events that people will see today. that obviously all over the events that people will see today.— people will see today. that is ri . ht. right. it is scaled down because of coronavirus. but we can expect a huge military presence in keeping with him having served with distinction during the second world war and always kept up those military and nautical ties. and a piping party is going to play some music that will be familiar to any
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able seaman. we will see a funeral that has been planned in advance by the duke. and attention will be on that customised land rover hearse. he said he wanted to be carried off in a land rover. ihe he said he wanted to be carried off in a land rover.— in a land rover. he has got that wish. in a land rover. he has got that wish- there _ in a land rover. he has got that wish. there are _ in a land rover. he has got that wish. there are those _ in a land rover. he has got that wish. there are those elements| in a land rover. he has got that l wish. there are those elements to events today that will make people smile. members of the royal household and the military involved in that, you very much taking on that kind of sentiment, alongside the thoughts about the duke of edinburgh himself. you talked about social distancing regulations which have been common to so many families as they have said goodbye to loved ones during the pandemic. so many people will be thinking about the queen today because right at the heart of this, this is a family grieving for a loved one.
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absolutely. we used the last week to reflect on the duke's past. but now sympathies lie squarely with the queen. her husband of 73 years has been such a key feature of her rain. to be without him is going to be hugely difficult. it is also the stabilising —— key feature of her rain. it will be a reflection of a difficult 12 months for the country, many people are losing loved ones and wanting to take time out today to remember them.
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normally they would be hundreds and thousands of people in attendance. that would give it a very different feel. the royal household, the police, saying, please stay away. that is such a big difference from events we have seen in the past. i have been here for the golden jubilee. for recent weddings. happy scenes. it does feel strange. it feels unique not to have people lining the streets here, waving flags stop it was obviously never going to be a celebrated eat mood but it is very toned down. having said that, we will still get the p°mp said that, we will still get the pomp and pageantry we would expect. that will be helped by that military presence. but it is because of covid going to be extraordinary to see the queen following the procession with a facemask on, and members of the royal family having to sit
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separately, the idea of the queen being alone in the pews, and not be able to be next to her nearest and dearest, will make us seem like quite an isolated figure later. on a final note, have you got a particular memory from the time you spent on royal tours, of the duke of edinburgh to mac talking about his kindness, humourand edinburgh to mac talking about his kindness, humour and humanity. edinburgh to mac talking about his kindness, humourand humanity. i kindness, humourand humanity. i have been on manyjobs were effectively he would be playing the queen's warm up man and making people feel at ease. several years ago, he said, should you have shaved before you meet the queen? and the duke burst out laughing.
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that is all from our coverage this morning. you can't follow live coverage of the funeral. the special programme starts at half past midday. —— you can follow. blue skies all over windsor castle. at the moment, very if you planes flying because of covid. during the minutes silence we know heathrow will have no planes flight. it will be even more tranquil than it is now. many people within the grounds
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covering the funeral, and the staff. but the streets in and around windsor very quiet this morning. that image, i think we will leave you with this morning, inside the castle walls. this isjust you with this morning, inside the castle walls. this is just outside the gates. it will be a very serene scene. that will be where the procession is led inside the castle walls just before three o'clock this afternoon. very apt to seal is rather tranquil scenes ahead of the funeral of the duke of edinburgh this afternoon. lots of sunshine around. very peaceful. yet, you are going to take as inside, more noise, more
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spectators, indoors, all as part of a trial to watch a sport again. exactly, yes. the world snooker championship today which is one of those pilot events to safely return fans to watch those events that they enjoy. we will also be seeing fans of the second fa cup semifinal tomorrow at wembley. the league cup final to come. potentially more fans again at the fa cup final and if you more weeks' time. exciting times. plenty of excitement at the crucible as fans are welcomes back end, the world championship one of four big sports event is being used to pilot the safe return of fans. its success will determine the speed at which other events can begin to open up. a lot of excitement, but so many talking points as we begin the
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championship, not least, returning fans. but the competition itself, as ronnie o'sullivan goes for another slice of snooker history. absolutely right. ifeel slice of snooker history. absolutely right. i feel so fortunate to be here. fans are entering the crucible, positively looming over us here. we are delighted it is back you. i am joined byjason ferguson. its, i am joined byjason ferguson. very special day. it is great to be backin very special day. it is great to be back in sheffield. the crucible is open. we are seeing friendly faces, ourfans are returning open. we are seeing friendly faces, our fans are returning for the first time. ~ ., ., , , ., ., our fans are returning for the first time. . ., ., , , ., ., time. what does this mean for them? eve ear time. what does this mean for them? every year these _ time. what does this mean for them? every year these fans _ time. what does this mean for them? every year these fans come _ time. what does this mean for them? every year these fans come back. i every year these fans come back. they are loyal fans. yes, they are. a lot of friendly faces that come back. this is a global event. television pictures reaching 1.6 billion homes around the world.
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difficult with travel this year. any fans who are potentially thinking about coming who are reticent, what would you say? we are doini reticent, what would you say? we are doing everything _ reticent, what would you say? we are doing everything we _ reticent, what would you say? we are doing everything we can _ reticent, what would you say? we are doing everything we can to _ reticent, what would you say? we are doing everything we can to create i reticent, what would you say? we are doing everything we can to create a i doing everything we can to create a safe environment. to give some comfort, we have run 18 successful safe events this year which have been shown on global television, albeit much of that has been done behind closed doors. we are using those same procedures, increasing the capacity of course, testing is taking place. every person on that building will have had to have a lateral flow test, that will have be very close to the event itself. i mitigating risk and this is important that we see two people that do attend they must do their own risk assessment and understand this is a test programme. it is not full capacity. we are starting small and building threat the tenant.
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how much of a chance has it been to make it happen? it how much of a chance has it been to make it happen?— make it happen? it has been an enormous _ make it happen? it has been an enormous challenge. _ make it happen? it has been an enormous challenge. i - make it happen? it has been an enormous challenge. i must i make it happen? it has been an i enormous challenge. i must thank the government that has provided the protocol first to operate throughout the year, notjust this week. but our teams on the ground, i am very proud. very proud of the teams that have done the operations. the logistics are complicated in a normal year of delivery. to do that and these difficult times has taken it to another level. i and these difficult times has taken it to another level.— it to another level. i am pleased that we are _ it to another level. i am pleased that we are today. _ that we are today. late us talk logistics. who would you predict to win the title for 2021? , ' . ., you predict to win the title for 2021? w . ., . you predict to win the title for 2021? , ' . ., . ., ., 2021? difficult to call. we have got their rocket — 2021? difficult to call. we have got their rocket today. _ 2021? difficult to call. we have got their rocket today. there _ 2021? difficult to call. we have got their rocket today. there will i 2021? difficult to call. we have got their rocket today. there will be i their rocket today. there will be fans with him today. neil robertson is shining at the moment. there are
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a few surprises in there. it'll be interesting to see how the players react that crowd. isine interesting to see how the players react that crowd.— react that crowd. one thing is for sure, the snooker _ react that crowd. one thing is for sure, the snooker will _ react that crowd. one thing is for sure, the snooker will be - react that crowd. one thing is for sure, the snooker will be top i sure, the snooker will be top drawer. if ronnie o'sullivan makes it to the final, amazing to think that would be a full house, the first event to be a full house, the first event to be in front of a full house since the start of the pandemic. here is the weather. there was a frost as temperatures across wales, england and scotland got down to minus a,—5 c. the latest
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picture, you can see how extensive that sunshine is. eventually this where front will bring rain, after it tonight. cloud thickening waste and northern ireland. fear where cloud bubbling up. this evening and overnight, that where the front pushing in from the north—west will bring some rain. it will also bring a blanket of cloud. temperatures holding up above freezing but it will be a chilly start to sunday morning. lots of sunshine expected for most. the rain light and patchy in the east. last night saw the long—awaited return — in england — of a time—honoured pastime — a friday
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evening in the pub. or at least outside the pub because indoor areas remain off—limits for now. danjohnson was in the centre of leeds to see how it went. it has been awhile since leeds saw celebration like this. restrictions have been lifted. everything is going back to normal. we are getting our lives back. we have _ we are getting our lives back. we have waited a year. it is we are getting our lives back. we have waited a year.— have waited a year. it is different to what they _ have waited a year. it is different to what they are _ have waited a year. it is different to what they are used _ have waited a year. it is different to what they are used to. - have waited a year. it is different to what they are used to. but i have waited a year. it is different to what they are used to. but it | have waited a year. it is different| to what they are used to. but it is nice to _ to what they are used to. but it is nice to be — to what they are used to. but it is nice to be back— to what they are used to. but it is nice to be back out _ to what they are used to. but it is nice to be back out and _ to what they are used to. but it is nice to be back out and about. it. nice to be back out and about. [it has nice to be back out and about. has felt quite safe and nice to be back out and about.- has felt quite safe and controlled. we are not worried as such. there are still restrictions. it is alfresco dining table service, under the watch of the police and council
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covid marshals. in the watch of the police and council covid marshals.— covid marshals. in my role as city manauer covid marshals. in my role as city manager this _ covid marshals. in my role as city manager this is _ covid marshals. in my role as city manager this is what _ covid marshals. in my role as city manager this is what i _ covid marshals. in my role as city manager this is what i live - covid marshals. in my role as city manager this is what i live for. i manager this is what i live for. this is what we want, a relaxed city centre, people coming back to enjoy a city. centre, people coming back to en'oy a ci . ~ ., centre, people coming back to en'oy aci .~ . . . a city. what about at closing time, when discipline _ a city. what about at closing time, when discipline starts _ a city. what about at closing time, when discipline starts to _ a city. what about at closing time, when discipline starts to drop? - when discipline starts to drop? people are generally responsible. we would not be doing this unless you are certain it was the right thing to do. down by the canal it was a lovely sunny afternoon. how long such a room to do this? quite some time. it is how long such a room to do this? quite some time.— how long such a room to do this? quite some time. it is amazing. we have been placed _ quite some time. it is amazing. we have been placed with _ quite some time. it is amazing. we have been placed with the - quite some time. it is amazing. we have been placed with the weather. it is really _ have been placed with the weather. it is really busy~ _ have been placed with the weather. it is really busy. we _ have been placed with the weather. it is really busy. we had _ have been placed with the weather. it is really busy. we had over- have been placed with the weather. it is really busy. we had over 2000| it is really busy. we had over 2000 bookings— it is really busy. we had over 2000 bookings for— it is really busy. we had over 2000 bookings for this _ it is really busy. we had over 2000 bookings for this week. _ it is really busy. we had over 2000 bookings for this week. as - it is really busy. we had over 2000 bookings for this week. as soon - it is really busy. we had over 2000 bookings for this week. as soon as| bookings for this week. as soon as we opened — bookings for this week. as soon as we opened the _ bookings for this week. as soon as we opened the bookings— bookings for this week. as soon as we opened the bookings the - bookings for this week. as soon as i we opened the bookings the response was overwhelming. _
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we opened the bookings the response was overwhelming. it _ we opened the bookings the response was overwhelming. it is _ we opened the bookings the response was overwhelming. it is great - we opened the bookings the response was overwhelming. it is great to - we opened the bookings the response was overwhelming. it is great to be i was overwhelming. it is great to be back _ was overwhelming. it is great to be back. we _ was overwhelming. it is great to be back. ~ ~ ., was overwhelming. it is great to be back. ~ ~ . ., . ., back. we like having our food and to . ro . back. we like having our food and to -ro- two back. we like having our food and to prep two hours _ back. we like having our food and to prop two hours. when _ back. we like having our food and to prop two hours. when the _ back. we like having our food and to prop two hours. when the sun - back. we like having our food and to prop two hours. when the sun was l prop two hours. when the sun was down, so prop two hours. when the sun was down. so does _ prop two hours. when the sun was down, so does the _ prop two hours. when the sun was down, so does the temperature. l prop two hours. when the sun was i down, so does the temperature. we have down, so does the temperature. - have been out since one o'clock. it was lovely when it was sunny. but it is now getting very cold. so, is now getting very cold. a really aood is now getting very cold. a really good time. _ is now getting very cold. a really good time. but _ is now getting very cold. a really good time, but extremely - is now getting very cold. a really good time, but extremely cold. l is now getting very cold. a really good time, but extremely cold. i is now getting very cold. a really - good time, but extremely cold. i am not regretting it. it is good time, but extremely cold. i am not regretting it.— not regretting it. it is not exactly heavin: , not regretting it. it is not exactly heaving. not _ not regretting it. it is not exactly heaving, not as _ not regretting it. it is not exactly heaving, not as busy _ not regretting it. it is not exactly heaving, not as busy as - not regretting it. it is not exactly heaving, not as busy as it - not regretting it. it is not exactly heaving, not as busy as it would | heaving, not as busy as it would have been when i was a student here, but that is a now. you get the sense that people are testing the water a bit, just to see what it is like. on the whole, it is really calm. people are being sensible, sticking by the rules. now it is a question of how late you stay out and how you choose to get home.
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stuart swann is from the howard town brewery and joins us now. it went smoothly. we had a great crowd in. everybody followed the rules and behave themselves impeccably to stop it was a great night. it went really well. it was superb to welcome people back. how much work did you put into making sure it was safe and that we do not take a step back? we have been preparing for this throughout all of the lockdown is. each set of lock downs has seen a slight change in the rules and regulations for us. we put in a solid five weeks of prep to get relatively open last night. we have spaced tables very well. we have got a booking system. everybody scans in and that everything else they need
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to do. we and that everything else they need to do. ~ ., , ., and that everything else they need to do. ~ . , . ., ., and that everything else they need todo. . , . ., .,,, and that everything else they need todo. . , . ., .,, to do. we have put a lot of prep on. how excited — to do. we have put a lot of prep on. how excited were _ to do. we have put a lot of prep on. how excited were you _ to do. we have put a lot of prep on. how excited were you and _ to do. we have put a lot of prep on. how excited were you and staff? - to do. we have put a lot of prep on. | how excited were you and staff? the team, how excited were you and staff? the team. there — how excited were you and staff? tie: team, there was how excited were you and staff? tts: team, there was a how excited were you and staff? "tt2 team, there was a positive how excited were you and staff? tt2 team, there was a positive buzz yesterday. it was superb to see people back as the crew and the team. it was superb to see people back behind the bar, doing what they do best, and welcoming guys. it was fantastic. there was a real vibe. it fantastic. there was a real vibe. it was great. we saw pictures in a report earlier, people wrapped up in blankets. it is still chilly in the evening. blankets. it is still chilly in the evenina. , . . , ., evening. yes. there are a couple of cu s evening. yes. there are a couple of au s that evening. yes. there are a couple of guys that love _ evening. yes. there are a couple of guys that love local, _ evening. yes. there are a couple of guys that love local, they _ evening. yes. there are a couple of guys that love local, they have - guys that love local, they have christened our beer garden everest base camp, they turned up with full outdoor mountain gear and cushions which you probably do not get in everest base camp. but we have a
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hardy bunch. we have got our toes in the peak district. we attract an outdoor scene, which is great. aha, outdoor scene, which is great. a hardy bunch. good luck. that's just about all from breakfast today. we're back tomorrow morning from six. here on bbc one you can follow live coverage of the duke of edinburgh's funeral from half—past midday — and there'll be a special programme at 8.10. the proceedings will also be broadcast on bbc radio 4 and radio 5 live from 2pm. before we go, we'll leave you with a look on the remarkable life of his royal highness, the duke of edinburgh — and just some of the reaction
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to his death over the past week. from all of us — goodbye. music: nimrod by elgar
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you're watching bbc news. i'm jane hill in windsor. as the nation prepares to remember the life of the duke of edinburgh, his funeral takes place here in st george's chapel this afternoon. the funeral will mark prince philip's unwavering loyalty to the queen, and his service to the nation. prince philip's association with the royal navy and love
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of the sea will be a focus of the ceremony.

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