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tv   BBC News Special  BBC News  April 17, 2021 10:00am-12:01pm BST

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you're watching bbc news. i'm jane hill in windsor. as the nation prepares to remember the life of the duke of edinburgh, his funeral takes place here in st george's chapel this afternoon. the funeral will mark prince philip's unwavering loyalty to the queen, and his service to the nation. prince philip's association with the royal navy and love
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of the sea will be a focus of the ceremony. many aspects of today's ceremony were planned by the duke himself. his many medals and decorations have been placed in the chapel, and more than 730 members of the armed forces will take part in a procession. the selection of which units, which bands, which music, which medals will be there. so it is very much his funeral, designed by him. there is a limit of 30 mourners in st george's chapel, because of covid rules. the queen and the duke's four children and their eight grandchildren will be present. and before the funeral, the queen has shared one of her favourite photos of her and her husband, relaxing in the scottish highlands. the service itself will begin after a national minute's silence at three o'clock this afternoon.
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buckingham palace has urged the public not to travel to windsor and asks people to follow the service on radio and television instead. good morning from windsor castle, where the funeral of the duke of edinburgh will take place this afternoon — watched by millions of people around the world. it'll be a small family affair, because, in line with covid restrictions, only 30 people will be allowed into st george's chapel. the queen will sit alone as she says goodbye to her husband of 73 years. buckingham palace said the service will celebrate and reflect the duke's life and mark his unwavering loyalty to the queen. this morning we'll be hearing from those who knew the duke, and those involved in the planning of today's events,
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but first here's our royal correspondent nicholas witchell. a husband and wife, a photograph from the queen's private collection, an image from a strong marriage. and a reminder that today there is a wife saying farewell to a beloved partner of 73 years. inside windsor castle, st george's chapel has been made ready. the duke of edinburgh's many decorations have been placed on the altar. close by, the seat he used to occupy, the enamelled stall plate is in place. but his insignia as a knight of the garter has been removed. it will be in this section of the chapel, known as the quire, where the 30 members of the congregation will be seated around the catafalque bearing the duke's coffin. the funeral procession will have made its way to the chapel from the castle�*s quadrangle. just after 2:40pm, his coffin will
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be borne from the state entrance to be placed on the land rover hearse the duke helped to design. at 2:45pm, a small procession will step off for the eight minute journey through the castle. some members of the royalfamily will walk behind the coffin. the queen will follow in a limousine. at 2:53pm, the coffin will arrive at the west steps of st george's chapel. it will be borne to the top of the steps where it will pause. at three o'clock, a one—minute silence will be observed, before the coffin enters the chapel for the funeral service, which will be presided over by the archbishop of canterbury. as with all funerals, there is a huge sense of privilege that you're with the family, any family, at this remarkable point in their lives. where they are grieving someone they loved profoundly. and then with this funeral, there is also that extra sense of huge privilege, but also pride in his life.
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the pride is not that i'm there, the pride is, here we are, celebrating such a wonderful life. within the chapel, the order of service will proceed precisely as the duke had prescribed. he chose the music and the readings. there's a lot in there that is very him. we've got a land rover that has been designed by him. he's taken a personal interest in every aspect of it, but in particular, the selection of which units, which bands, which music, which medals will be there. so it will be very much his funeral, designed by him. the service will end with the lowering of his coffin to the royal vault below the chapel. royal marine buglers will sound the last post, and then action stations, a reminder of the duke's years of service in the royal navy. a reminder, too, that he was a royal consort with a difference. distinctive to the end.
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nicholas witchell, bbc news. with me is our royal correspondent sarah campbell. let's talk about the order of the day, if you like, because there will be some elements of pomp and ceremony, the things we always hear the duke was less keen on, but important because it is about involving the military? absolutely, and we know _ involving the military? absolutely, and we know about _ involving the military? absolutely, and we know about the _ involving the military? absolutely, and we know about the duke's - involving the military? absolutely, | and we know about the duke's long history with the military, it would always have been important for them to be involved. limitations within covid is that everything is within castle walls, no public elements, but there will be a procession, the coffin will be borne to st george's chapel, it is due to last around eight minutes and involve regiments
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he was personally linked to. the land rover has, which we had seen so many pictures of, we know the duke was involved in the design, his coffin will be ball on that and senior members of the royal family will walk behind him —— his coffin will walk behind him —— his coffin will be borne on that. and behind them the queen will follow the procession in the bentley, it will be led by the badge of the grenadier guards, the king's royal horse or celery will fire guns and a bell will toll, so there will be that element of a day, military funeral —— royal horse artillery. then there will be a national minutes's silence and the coffin will be brought into the chapel. that would have been 800 mourners but there is a limit of 30, a limit that every family across the
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country has had to adhere to during the pandemic, so it is very close family members, every person will be wearing a mask, they will have to be socially distant so the queen will be sitting on her own, with a mask, with no family member able to put that supporting arm around her, so a bit of a contrast.— bit of a contrast. military outside, family inside. _ bit of a contrast. military outside, family inside. that _ bit of a contrast. military outside, family inside. that is _ bit of a contrast. military outside, family inside. that is so _ bit of a contrast. military outside, family inside. that is so hard - bit of a contrast. military outside, family inside. that is so hard to l family inside. that is so hard to think of as an image and reminds us what so many families have gone through over the course of the last year, when funerals have not been held to people would like them, and we will see that here today even though we are talking about the royal family. though we are talking about the royal family-— though we are talking about the r0 alfamil. , ., , , royal family. exactly, and yesterday the archbishop _ royal family. exactly, and yesterday the archbishop of _ royal family. exactly, and yesterday the archbishop of canterbury - royal family. exactly, and yesterday the archbishop of canterbury said . royal family. exactly, and yesterday the archbishop of canterbury said it. the archbishop of canterbury said it would be a very poignant moment and there would be tears in many households. sadness for the duke, sadness for the queen, but people will be thinking about their own
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family members they have lost and perhaps funerals that did not take place how they would have liked, so this is national mourning on different levels for different people. different levels for different eo le. different levels for different --eole. , , people. some people will be saying, how can you — people. some people will be saying, how can you call— people. some people will be saying, how can you call it _ people. some people will be saying, how can you call it a _ people. some people will be saying, how can you call it a small— people. some people will be saying, how can you call it a small family - how can you call it a small family funeral when so many hours of it are being televised, but that is a deliberate strategy in the middle of a pandemic, the palace has been clearfor more than a pandemic, the palace has been clear for more than a week that it is trying to discourage people from coming here to windsor? that is trying to discourage people from coming here to windsor?— coming here to windsor? that has been clear from _ coming here to windsor? that has been clear from the _ coming here to windsor? that has been clear from the beginning, i l coming here to windsor? that has i been clear from the beginning, i was at buckingham palace last friday but people still wanted to come, we had seen the floral tributes at the family have been very clear they have been very thankful for the tributes were studied has meant a lot for them to know how much the duke of edinburgh meant to other people as well as to them as the father, grandfather, great—grandfather, but the message is, please do not travel to windsor,
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there are messages on all the signs leading to windsor this morning saying please do not travel to the royal residences, watch it on television or listen on the radio, thatis television or listen on the radio, that is the way the royal family hopes they will still feel part of the proceedings.— hopes they will still feel part of the proceedings. thank you, sarah cambell. let's speak now to the royal biographer and historian robert lacey. we have already reflected that so much of what people will see today and here today on the radio is element that the duke himself wanted, that he planned. this is what he wanted?— wanted, that he planned. this is what he wanted? , ., .,. what he wanted? yes, and the fact we are doinu what he wanted? yes, and the fact we are doin: it what he wanted? yes, and the fact we are doing it the _ what he wanted? yes, and the fact we are doing it the television _ what he wanted? yes, and the fact we are doing it the television and - are doing it the television and although with all the regulations people are not here, it is not a grand state occasion, it still has power and intimacy and the whole nation is involved because of television. let's remember that the
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duke brought this element into national life and the royal life, when the queen came to the throne in 1952, the courtiers, the establishment, the politicians and winston churchill thought that the coronation of the queen should remain semiprivate, as it always had been, certainly not shared with everybody through cameras, and it was the duke who had to fight, he had difficulty in those early days establishing his new ideas inside the royal family, but he got his way. i can remember 1953, what a great occasion it was in our street to gather round one of the few televisions in the street and watch the coronation, that was thanks to him, although he never played a starring role in age. he never played a starring role, in many
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ways, in anything, except, perhaps, today. and it is appropriate that we remember him this way. we remember and we have — remember him this way. we remember and we have reflected _ remember him this way. we remember and we have reflected so _ remember him this way. we remember and we have reflected so much - remember him this way. we remember and we have reflected so much in - remember him this way. we remember and we have reflected so much in the i and we have reflected so much in the last week also about so much about the duke that has emerged. i am thinking particularly of conversations you and i had this week about younger people perhaps you have thought over the last we can discover things about the duke and his passions and interests that they say, i had no idea, i had no idea he was so passionate and interested in engineering, i had so idea —— so little idea that he was engaged with the national world and cared about climate protection long before it was in common parlance. for me, and i'm sure for many of my generation and others, the first thing i heard about the environment and threats to the planet from the way we were living actually came from the duke. in later years it
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came from charles and now from prince william, but it is very important, a larger dimension to our lives, certainly in my memory it was brought to public attention not by the politicians or the government but by the duke of edinburgh, this man with his incredible breadth of vision and interests, here in windsor he got dreadfully involved in something called st george's house, which was started by 18 of windsor as a hostel for what he called it burnt out clergymen, members of the church of england he needed refreshing, the duke came in, got terribly interested and said, let's have meetings here were men of god can meet with men of science, men of engineering, and he held many conferences here to do with the
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environment, challenges to the world, he wrote letters, he gave lectures, these were then turned into books. 13, 1a books, the duke published. not great, big, fat books, rather elegant, thin volumes of thoughts and lectures, reflecting his many intellectual interests. and if we are getting personal now, he must have kept his white stimulated and in touch with her well done to people in a totally novel way —— must have kept his wife stimulated. thank you for your reflections, robert lacey, the royal historian and author. you can follow live coverage of the funeral, all day on the bbc news channel. the procession we were talking about and the funeral itself. later on, we'll have a special programme from 12:30pm
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here on bbc one, with further coverage on bbc two from 8:10pm. it will also be broadcast on bbc radio 4 and radio 5 live. coverage starts from 2pm. as we reflect, the palace has said throughout they want people to watch on television, or they want people to listen on the radio because we are still in a pandemic. the palace is clear to remind people and they don't want people coming here to this beautiful town of windsor today. we have reflected on the fact that because of the pandemic it is a very, very small number of people allowed into st george's chapel. 0ur correspondence sarah campbell was explaining more of that. just 30
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people allowed inside the chapel for the actual service itself. 0n people allowed inside the chapel for the actual service itself. on that of 30 are a few members of prince philip's family who are coming from germany. we can speak to one member of that family, i'm pleased to say. joining me now from munich is princess xenia of hohenlohe—langenburg, the duke of edinburgh's great—niece. thank you so much for agreeing to talk to us on bbc news on what is a very, very sad and difficult day for yourfamily. but i know very, very sad and difficult day for your family. but i know it is your brother, one of the people who is here in windsor today, and i wonder what that means to your family. thank you, yes, thank you for having me on today. it is a huge honour, obviously, and having spoken to my brother yesterday he is just saying it is just a very special time for the cousins to be together and be representing what is a huge part of
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the duke of edinburgh's family. you just have to think there were some 16 direct cousins, direct descendants, cousins, a huge number of people, and that there is three of people, and that there is three of them that are able to be there to represent us which is obviously a huge honour and deeply felt. tell us, if ou huge honour and deeply felt. tell us. if you can. — huge honour and deeply felt. tell us, if you can, some of your remembrances. how do you think of the duke of edinburgh? how do you remember him? what sort of role did he play in your life? i remember him? what sort of role did he play in your life?— he play in your life? i think, to all of us. _ he play in your life? i think, to all of us. he — he play in your life? i think, to all of us, he was _ he play in your life? i think, to all of us, he was an _ he play in your life? i think, to all of us, he was an idol, - he play in your life? i think, to - all of us, he was an idol, somebody to look up to. we had enormous respect for him, it was always very exciting when he came to visit. this has become clear to me in the weeks since he has died, the way he lived his life, his motto, an unwritten motto for us, this sort of
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discipline, this selflessness, this lack of ego, but also his sense of humour always underlying all of that, but his hard work and the sort of philosophy that the duke of edinburgh's awards have given so many young people is something that is constantly underlying our lives and something i have always aspired to look up to. he has been like a glue for the family because sadly a lot of our grandmothers passed away far too early. but he was always there, he was the link, he brought all of us cousins, even though we are in germany, a lot of us but not all of us, he brought us together on all of us, he brought us together on a lot of family occasions, the last one having been his 90th birthday celebrations ten years ago at windsor. we were all there, that was a huge bunch of us and that was lovely. a huge bunch of us and that was lovel . , �* a huge bunch of us and that was lovel . , ~ , ., a huge bunch of us and that was lovel . , ~ i. ., ., lovely. yes. and your grandmother, we should perhaps _ lovely. yes. and your grandmother, we should perhaps explain, - lovely. yes. and your grandmother, we should perhaps explain, your. we should perhaps explain, your grandmother was the duke of edinburgh's system.- grandmother was the duke of edinburgh's system. yes, the eldest one. a edinburgh's system. yes, the eldest one- a very — edinburgh's system. yes, the eldest one- a very large — edinburgh's system. yes, the eldest one. a very large family. _
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edinburgh's system. yes, the eldest one. a very large family. yes. - edinburgh's system. yes, the eldest one. a very large family. yes. and l edinburgh's system. yes, the eldest one. a very large family. yes. and i | one. a very large family. yes. and i have been — one. a very large family. yes. and i have been so _ one. a very large family. yes. and i have been so struck... _ one. a very large family. yes. and i have been so struck... sorry - one. a very large family. yes. and i have been so struck... sorry to - have been so struck... sorry to interruot- _ have been so struck... sorry to interruot- i'm _ have been so struck... sorry to interrupt. i'm so _ have been so struck. .. sorry to interrupt. i'm so struck- have been so struck... sorry to interrupt. i'm so struck by - have been so struck... sorry to interrupt. i'm so struck by thel interrupt. i'm so struck by the number of people i have spoken to over the last week or so, and you mentioned it, who mentioned the sense of humour, that really sharp sense of humour, that really sharp sense of humour and the no—nonsense, the number of people who have, for example, worked with him in the charity sector, who have said he is fantastically passionate but as one charity member said to me you had to know your stuff, if you are going to be talking to him you really had to know what you were talking about otherwise he would no more than you. are those characteristics you recognise?— are those characteristics you recoanise? ~ , ., recognise? absolutely. you will most likel on recognise? absolutely. you will most likely on the — recognise? absolutely. you will most likely on the edge _ recognise? absolutely. you will most likely on the edge and _ recognise? absolutely. you will most likely on the edge and nervous - recognise? absolutely. you will most likely on the edge and nervous to - recognise? absolutely. you will most likely on the edge and nervous to be | likely on the edge and nervous to be asked questions that let you out of depth, he went very deep with those questions and they were very critical as well but that was good because you had to know what you were doing and you had to be at the forefront of it.
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princess senior, thank you so much. it's very kind of you to speak to us today. —— xena. —— xenia. we send good wishes to your family. you're watching bbc news. windsor is no stranger to royal events, but today only 30 guests will attend — in line with covid restrictions — and the public has been asked to stay away. but the people of windsor are preparing to mark the occasion in their own way — as graham satchell has been finding out. at their barracks in windsor, state trumpeters from the band of the household cavalry are having their final rehearsal for this afternoon's ceremony. trumpeters play the reveille.
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these trumpeters have played at royal weddings, state banquets, the opening of parliament. but there is a real pride being involved in today's service. it is a huge national event, you kind of build up to these events throughout your whole career. so i am exceptionally privileged to be part of it. it is a little bit nerve—wracking. but you hear so much, and hear so many stories, especially now, of what he did for the duke of edinburgh awards, what he did for the military, and such a very, very inspirational man _ the trumpeters have met prince philip over and over again, and remember his playful sense of humour. he would often walk through and whilst we were playing he would go, "what's on the flip side?" referring to the old lps, and would turn your music over while you were playing, to see what was on the flip
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side, and then walk off, mischievously grinning. he was always a real pleasure to be around, and work in the presence of. from the roof terrace of castle view retirement home, they have quite a view of windsor castle. the residents here have all been vaccinated and are in one large bubble, so can watch today's funeral without social distancing. they have fond memories here of a man who made windsor his home. living in windsor for almost 50 years, you actually feel very close to the royal family here. you know, we sort of feel as though they're part, sort of part of our family. i thought he was a man's man. i loved his attitude. he chuckles. he was part of our lives. everyday life, not just those special occasions. all the time, it was, "there's the duke!" and duke waves. "hi, duke!" yeah. he was such — a charismatic...charming, with such a great sense of humour,
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that you just want to be here, - you want to be here for the queen and her family as well, _ you want to try and do your bit. obviously, living in. windsor, you feel that that's right, don't you? at the duke of edinburgh pub, landlady annie andrews is putting the final touches in place. she's hoping to send the duke off in style. we are inviting all the regulars, as many as we can safely get in the tent, and we will be raising a glass to toast him. when you lose family you always have a wake, etc, and he has been like part of ourfamily. it'll be watched worldwide. and, you know, it's a mark of respect, and he deserves it. he didn't want the fuss and the pageantry, so he did get what he wanted. it's a moment of history. it's a passing of an era, almost. he was a part of my history, and i think i shall miss him. there will be quite a bit of piping,
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bugling and trumpeting at today's funeral to reflect the duke's military past. after the royal marines play the last post, the state trumpeters will play this, the reveille. it signifies the start of a new day, as one chapter of history comes to a close. graham satchell, bbc news, windsor. yesterday the chief of the defence staff general sir nick carter said the funeral had the duke's fingerprints all over it. let's talk about the significance of what we will see today. let's speak now to lieutenant colonel gary green, who's been
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in the royal marines for a0 years, and was the corps colonel at the duke of edinburgh's last official engagement in august 2017. thank you forjoining us. the role of the armed forces here in windsor today, just remind us how extremely important that is.— important that is. good morning, jane. important that is. good morning, jane- yes. _ important that is. good morning, jane. yes. very — important that is. good morning, jane. yes, very important - important that is. good morning, | jane. yes, very important indeed. the duke was a very wonderful man and an inspiration to so many within the armed forces, myself included. he held many very senior honorary ranks within the armed forces. he was the admiral of the fleet, he was a field marshal in the army and he was a chief air marshal in the raf, but for us in the royal marines he was our captain general and we loved him. he was an inspiration to us and we were very proud to have that association with him for 64 years of his life. we
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association with him for 64 years of his life. ~ . , association with him for 64 years of his life. ~ ., , , . , ., his life. we are seeing pictures of the duke now _ his life. we are seeing pictures of the duke now chatting _ his life. we are seeing pictures of the duke now chatting to - his life. we are seeing pictures of the duke now chatting to large i the duke now chatting to large groups of particularly young marines there, i think. groups of particularly young marines there, ithink. what groups of particularly young marines there, i think. what was that like when younger recruits would be told that the duke of edinburgh was coming to visit? what was the response and what were the sort of conversations and stories that went on? , ,., , ., , on? everybody was delighted when the duke visited- — on? everybody was delighted when the duke visited. but _ on? everybody was delighted when the duke visited. but there _ on? everybody was delighted when the duke visited. but there was _ on? everybody was delighted when the duke visited. but there was tension - duke visited. but there was tension and you could imagine there was tension, but the magic of his royal highness was his abilityjust to put those young personnel at ease with a word of support or a word of encouragement, and immediately with a smile they would relax and they would then talk about their experiences. for me and the royal marines on his final solo event on the 2nd of august in 2017 it was
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exactly that when i presented the royal marines who did the charity event to his royal highness, he immediately put them at ease. we would call it banter and he understood banter, he was a serviceman, he understood royal marines. he understood what royal marines. he understood what royal marines and service personnel had done on operations because he had been there himself and he was quite simply a wonderful inspiration to all those personnel. you simply a wonderful inspiration to all those personnel. you mention his final engagement _ all those personnel. you mention his final engagement in _ all those personnel. you mention his final engagement in 2017, _ all those personnel. you mention his final engagement in 2017, and - all those personnel. you mention his final engagement in 2017, and we . final engagement in 2017, and we have to remember that this was someone stepping back from public life in his 90s. that in itself is remarkable. tell us a little bit about the day, the emotion of that day. about the day, the emotion of that da . ~ ._ about the day, the emotion of that da . ~ , ., , about the day, the emotion of that da . ~ ._ ., , ., about the day, the emotion of that da. .,, about the day, the emotion of that da. ., , day. well, the day was a rainy day and the duke _ day. well, the day was a rainy day and the duke came _ day. well, the day was a rainy day and the duke came out, _ day. well, the day was a rainy day and the duke came out, as - day. well, the day was a rainy day and the duke came out, as he - and the duke came out, as he normally does, in high spirits, marching along with a stiff back,
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and he was, as i say, an inspiration. it was a very poignant day for everybody at the event because it was his final solo engagement with the royal marines andindeed engagement with the royal marines and indeed his final solo engagement as the duke and his royal highness prince philip. it was an event that we had planned for a long period of time over a number of months and i know he wanted to do that event as his last event and we had a huge honour guard there for him, we had the royal marines association, our veterans there, and we had our cadets there as well and he really enjoyed talking to the very younger members of our core family. he really enjoyed listening to the extraordinary thing is that the royal marines had achieved on this particular challenge, whether that
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was running 1664 miles, or swimming under waterfor ten miles, he really enjoyed listening to that, and as i say, he would sort of in terms of chatting with the lads he would relax them and give them words of encouragement and have that banter between the royal marines and himself, on a hugely historic occasion for all of us. very much a wonderfulfigurehead for occasion for all of us. very much a wonderful figurehead for all of our royal marines and royal marines family to look up to.— family to look up to. yes. and a final thought. — family to look up to. yes. and a final thought, if _ family to look up to. yes. and a finalthought, if i _ family to look up to. yes. and a finalthought, ifi may, - family to look up to. yes. and a finalthought, ifi may, about i family to look up to. yes. and a l finalthought, ifi may, about the final thought, if i may, about the procession here in windsor this afternoon. just on a personal note, for the men and women of the armed forces who are part of that procession, and we have seen the rehearsals over the course of the week, what does that mean for them to be part of this here today, albeit a sad occasion, i'm interested in what that means. indeed it is a very sad occasion, jane will stop but for everybody on parade today this is something that they will remember for the rest of
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their careers and indeed for the rest of their lives. whether they have been in the armed forces for just a couple of years, or they have beenin just a couple of years, or they have been in the armed forces for 22 years, it is a hugely sad but historic occasion. but they will never forget it. historic occasion. but they will neverforget it. i know historic occasion. but they will never forget it. i know they will be very proud to be there. and i know that they are very proud that his royal highness wanted them there as part of his funeral. and so they will remember it for the rest of their lives. lieutenant colonel gary green from the royal marines, very many thanks for your time. thank you forjoining us on bbc news. the archbishop of canterbury, justin welby, will play a key part in today's service. he's been speaking to the bbc ahead of the ceremony — and started by reflecting on the duke's personality. he was someone who had lots of... you were never bored with him. you couldn't, he couldn't bore someone if he set out to do it.
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if he spoke, it was one of his talents, he saw into things. because he studied so hard and spoke so, and read so widely. and so when you preached, you heard that he would give his opinion, and he expected you to be able to answer him back. i think one of the things is we really have to avoid judging from anything external. she's the queen. she will behave with the extraordinary dignity and extraordinary courage that she always does. and at the same time, she is saying farewell to someone to whom she was married for 73 years. i think that must be a very, very profound thing in anybody�*s life.
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and i hope that the whole nation and around the world, as they look at this, when the cameras are focused on her, as it will be from time to time, that they, if they believe in that that they pray for her, and if they don't, that they sympathise and in their hearts, offer their condolences to her and the hope for her to find strength in what must be an anguished moment. over the last year, there's literally millions of people around the world, and in this country, hundreds of thousands, who have been in her position. i think it will resonate very deeply for a lot of people. i think there will be tears in many homes because other names will be on their mind. faces they have lost, that they don't see again. funeral that they couldn't go to, as many haven't been able to go to this one because it is limited
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to 30 in the congregation. that will break many a heart. and i hope that we will see this moment as something we share in, in the grief of this very, very hard year that we have all gone through. and we will say, the best thing that we can do is do what he did in all his life, just get on with it. the archbishop of canterbury, justin welby, reflecting on the extremely difficult year that families up and down the uk have had, of course, in the light of the pandemic, and those struggles reflected in windsor here today. let's get the view from the commonwealth nations. we can speak now to our south asia correspondent, rajini vaidyanathan.
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give us a sense of the duke of edinburgh's legacy, really, that? for many older people in south asia, they wait —— they may remember some of prince philip's visit to the region. he made a solo tour in 1959 when he arrived here in india, i believe he went to pakistan and sri lanka. he came to india on four other occasions as well consort, the last visit he made with her majesty was in 1997. —— as royal consort. he leads an enduring legacy among younger south asians, one that perhaps has not been talked about often, that is the duke of edinburgh award scheme here, which is big south asia. it is called the international award here and more
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than 150,000 people had taken part since it was first introduced, not just here in india pakistan, angela ——, sri lanka and nepal. ispoke to one young woman in sri lanka who said the scheme gave her something beyond the formal education. 0ften beyond the formal education. often in south asia there is an emphasis on formal education but she said the duke of edinburgh scheme gave her the chance to go on those expeditions and do the volunteering and community service, she said it gave her confidence and options outside ofjust a traditional academic education. i spoke to the head teacher at a school for blind children in calcutta and he said the scheme really gave confidence to the students thereby allowing them to mingle with the local community when dealing with their community service, so that is the thing that perhaps will be a hidden legacy,
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somebody described it as his silent service in south asia.— service in south asia. richard divided nelson, _ service in south asia. richard divided nelson, thank - service in south asia. richard divided nelson, thank you. i it was at the treetops hotel in kenya that prince philip and princess elizabeth were when she became queen, on the night king george vi died. we know it was the duke of edinburgh who had to explain to his wife what happens at home. —— what happened. we can speak to our africa correspondent, catherine byaru hanga. how is the funeral being marked where you are?— how is the funeral being marked where ou are? ., ., where you are? good afternoon from nairobi, where you are? good afternoon from nairobi. and — where you are? good afternoon from nairobi, and just _ where you are? good afternoon from nairobi, and just behind _ where you are? good afternoon from nairobi, andjust behind me - where you are? good afternoon from nairobi, andjust behind me is- where you are? good afternoon from nairobi, and just behind me is a - nairobi, and just behind me is a park, just behind me is the parliament of kenya. the duke of edinburgh continue to play a part in kenya after the events of tree tops,
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one decade later the country gained independence and he opened the parliament of an independent kenya and he took part in the handover ceremony in 1963. this country is going through eight said weight of the coronavirus pandemic, meaning there is a partial knockdown in this city and others across the country —— going through and third wave of the coronavirus pandemic. people are being discovered from —— discouraged from gathering in crowd that we understand from the foreign office that will be no official events and people are being directed to the online book of condolence on the royal family website. this is also military funeral, not a state funeral, meaning there are limitations of the types of events that can be carried out. but the duke of edinburgh award is followed across this continent and lots of young people take part. we asked the
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sympathy commemoration events in countries like kenya, ghana and uganda next week. in the ratios at the moment the minister of youth has asked former awardees to wear their badges today in commemoration of the prince, whether it is gold, silver or bronze. prince, whether it is gold, silver or bronze-— we can speak now to doctor linda yueh, chair of the royal commonwealth society. you have met the duke of edinburgh on many occasions give it your role as can, can you tell me some of your reflections and experiences with the duke of edinburgh, because there is no doubt that the queen and the duke have always been hugely passionate about the commonwealth? certainly, ou can about the commonwealth? certainly, you can see — about the commonwealth? certainly, you can see that _ about the commonwealth? certainly, you can see that in _ about the commonwealth? certainly, you can see that in the _ about the commonwealth? certainly, you can see that in the number - about the commonwealth? certainly, you can see that in the number of. you can see that in the number of visits they have made, the duke has
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been to every commonwealth country, accompanying the queen, and solo visits. he has about 800 also charities, about a third of them are focused on the commonwealth. and a number of other projects such as the queen's commonwealth canopy which protects forests across the commonwealth, there was a reception at buckingham palace in late 2016 and he was there, it spoke to his long—standing interest in the environment under particular place the commonwealth has in furthering some of those shared goals we all have. i had seen him at major diplomatic events for the commonwealth, for instance one during commonwealth week, he accompanied the queen to celebrate the commonwealth not only at westminster abbey, where he arranged a commonwealth service, but also he
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arranged a massive reception ever in 2000 people, charity workers, diplomats and the business community. hejust evidenced diplomats and the business community. he just evidenced the personal touch, community. he just evidenced the personaltouch, he community. he just evidenced the personal touch, he was always very interested in asking me and others house our work was coming along and really showing that kind of engagement that makes the person to person connection in the commonwealth so memorable for us all, and certainly i think that will be a lasting impact on the commonwealth itself, it has such a post —— such a focus on it by the duke, and you can see that in the funeral arrangements. duke, and you can see that in the funeralarrangements. he duke, and you can see that in the funeral arrangements. he has numerous insignia, not all of which could be included, but a number of commonwealth insignia such as the order of new zealand, the order of canada, the ninth order of australia, these will be included today.
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australia, these will be included toda. ., australia, these will be included toda . ., ., australia, these will be included toda. ., , today. for him, it was about people, it was not a — today. for him, it was about people, it was not a big _ today. for him, it was about people, it was not a big governmental- it was not a big governmental organisation, the individuals were as important as the government. he visited almost every commonwealth country, i think? visited almost every commonwealth country. ithink?— country, i think? yes, and in fact the last overseas _ country, i think? yes, and in fact the last overseas visits, - country, i think? yes, and in fact the last overseas visits, to - country, i think? yes, and in fact| the last overseas visits, to accept the last overseas visits, to accept the cameroon and rwanda, he has visited 54 commonwealth countries, the last visit to officially by the queen and prince philip was too multi, and they opened a government meeting —— was to malta. the queen spoke to many of us, she said we debt the duke of edinburgh a debt for the commonwealth. we have the heads of government meeting but my organisation was there, the royal
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commonwealth society, and his ability to connect people is what makes the commonwealth... has endured for all these decades, because he and the queen was from the very beginning. in that speech, the very beginning. in that speech, the queen said in 1949 she and the prince left in malta, and that was the year of the founding of the commonwealth, and one of his projects was to continue to connect communities, known as the commonwealth study conference, the next one is in canada in 2023, every six years you bring people from the various communities, industry leaders, government leaders, and you visit for a couple of weeks a commonwealth country, learn about its people and values, and those connections actually makes a network like the commonwealth standouts, and
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a commitment that he shows to it is, i think, an embodiment of the values the royal family places on the commonwealth, which is this very... yeah, almost unique organisation network were personal connections bind us together so we can help achieve shared goals such as around the environment, which i previously mentioned. we the environment, which i previously mentioned-— the environment, which i previously mentioned. we have heard so many stories this — mentioned. we have heard so many stories this week _ mentioned. we have heard so many stories this week of _ mentioned. we have heard so many stories this week of the _ mentioned. we have heard so many stories this week of the duke's - stories this week of the duke's humour, when he went around the room, when he was introduced to people, chatting to people, we pick up people, chatting to people, we pick up on a time and time again, even if it was intense perhaps a sharp humour, it was there and it was used to put people at their reason sometimes, and i wonder whether you experienced that in your work with the commonwealth? i experienced that in your work with the commonwealth?— experienced that in your work with the commonwealth? i certainly have. i think it is the commonwealth? i certainly have. i think it is his _ the commonwealth? i certainly have. i think it is his ability _ the commonwealth? i certainly have. i think it is his ability to _ the commonwealth? i certainly have. i think it is his ability to put _ the commonwealth? i certainly have. i think it is his ability to put you - i think it is his ability to put you at ease with a twinkle in his eye,
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almost. when he asks you about how the royal commonwealth society is coming along, what is happening in the commonwealth, he does it with a degree of humour. i think he is a very entertaining presence in that he always has a quick, a response, asking yesterday to elaborate —— in that he always has a quip. it is his ability to engage you, whether you are the chair of a charity, a young volunteer or a diplomat, and i think that ability to speak across such a wide variety of people, but always in a personally engaging manner, and thatis in a personally engaging manner, and that is pretty special and if i think about the diversity of the commonwealth, such different backgrounds, i had seen him go from a massive room and just do this with people one after another and it is
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really something to remark. i think once you have met the duke of edinburgh, he stays with you because of that extremely personal connection and personal touch. you almost feel light, having met him, because he has such a manner about him that puts you at the. he is not formal, and i think that element of it, especially for young people, really stays with them. it certainly stayed with me and it stayed with one of my staff, who received the duke of edinburgh awards, about 40 countries of the commonwealth are included in that scheme, and then she decided to become a volunteer and work for the royal commonwealth society, committed to doing charity work for the commonwealth had two gates later she tells me, after receiving the award, she was it not —— she was organising events for as at saintjames's palace, so it really stays with you, that personal
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touch. . ~ really stays with you, that personal touch. ., ~' ,, , . really stays with you, that personal touch. ., ~ , . ., really stays with you, that personal touch. . ~ , . ., touch. thank you very much for your time, dr touch. thank you very much for your time. dr linda _ touch. thank you very much for your time, dr linda yueh, _ touch. thank you very much for your time, dr linda yueh, chair _ touch. thank you very much for your time, dr linda yueh, chair of - touch. thank you very much for your time, dr linda yueh, chair of the i time, dr linda yueh, chair of the royal commonwealth society. prince philip was born into the greek royal family in 1921 on the island of corfu, but after a coup d'etat the following year, the young prince and his family were forced to flee. 0ur correspondentjenny hill has been back to the island of the duke's birth. for this son of greece, no tranquil retreat. prince philip was born into a volatile country, torn by war. so this is the house where prince philip was born? yes, come inside. what was greece like when prince philip was born? it was a very difficult period for our history. after all of these wars with turkey. and for this reason the family of prince philip was obligated to leave the country. and he was taken away in a fruit box, an orange crate?
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the legend says. it was to be a turbulent childhood. the family moved around europe and then, as his mother's mental health worsened, broke up. prince philip isolated, left to the care of relatives. it is thought he never returned to the island of his birth, but he is remembered here, even as they prepare for an orthodox easter in the church where he was baptised. queen elizabeth will feel lonely, after 73 years of common life. i think it is a shock. it is something that happened suddenly and it is like a blackout. so i think they will need time. but the family connection lives on. during an official visit to greece last month, prince charles spoke of his deep
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affection for his father's native country. he is said to visit corfu often, in a private capacity. few tourists here now. the pandemic has all but closed the island's doors. like so many other places in europe, corfu is restricted by coronavirus measures. there will be no large, public events to commemorate the duke's passing. but as people in britain prepare for his funeral, many here will be quietly reflecting on the life of a man whose story, after all, began right here. a man who grew from the chaos of childhood into someone upon whom his family, his country, could depend. jenny hill, bbc news, corfu. prince philip carried out countless official engagements, creating lasting memories for many of those who attended. we have heard some of
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those stories this morning. in 2007 he accompanied the queen at the opening of a hindu temple in bradford. they were welcomed by hundreds of worshippers, including disha joshi, who was aged just nine at the time. shabnam mahmood reports. it was honestly very, very exciting. i spent the whole morning practising my curtsey. at the age of nine, disha joshi presented a bouquet of flowers to the queen and prince philip. now 23, she remembers the day well. normally i would absolutely dread getting out of bed. however, this morning i was absolutely thrilled to be meeting both the queen and prince philip. so i woke up about 6am, through my lengha on, that my mum and my dadima had picked out specially for me to wear. so it was a beautiful purple lengha, just so i thought i would represent a bit of my heritage, my culture. and it was absolutely brilliant. i got all dolled up, which was great, as you can imagine, a nine—year—old, i absolutely loved getting my hair done. i was allowed to wear a little
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bit of make—up for one. bit of make—up for once. it was may 2007 when prince philip accompanied his wife, the queen, to officially open the lakshmi narayan temple in bradford. the atmosphere was relatively split, i would say. just in a sense of, everyone quite young such as myself at the time, we were ecstatic, really excited to be there. whereas the elderly people there were probably a little bit more nervous, trying to make sure everything was done correctly and was prim and proper. the royal couple met hundreds of worshippers and dignitaries, as well as observing some of the hindu traditions. when she actually entered the mandir and took her shoes off, which i thought was a really, really nice touch. it showed how she was very culturally aware of what we as hindus and asians do as we enter the mandir or the temple. so the queen and prince philip were the first generation to bridge that gap between all of those british indians who are very patriotic about britain, but also very, very proud and heavily involved in our heritage and indian culture.
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disha says the memory will live with her forever. and her photograph? well, that takes pride of place at the family's home in bradford. shabnam mahmood, bbc news. we are reflecting a lot today on the duke of edinburgh's legacies. one of prince philip's key lasting legacies will be the youth awards programme set up in his name — the duke of edinburgh's award started in 1956, and since then more than six million people have completed the scheme. in more than 100 countries. let's talk to one man who has been very much enjoyed in —— involved in the scheme. i'm joined by ed hill—thompson, training and participation manager of blue sky fostering in bournemouth, which is the only foster agency in the uk to run its own duke of edinburgh award scheme. have i understood that correctly?
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explain how it works?— have i understood that correctly? explain how it works? yes, you have, thank ou explain how it works? yes, you have, thank you for— explain how it works? yes, you have, thank you for having _ explain how it works? yes, you have, thank you for having us _ explain how it works? yes, you have, thank you for having us on. _ explain how it works? yes, you have, thank you for having us on. we - explain how it works? yes, you have, thank you for having us on. we are i thank you for having us on. we are the only fostering agency that took on the award, we had a punt about five and a half years ago to see if we could work with it, to see if it would work with us, we didn't think it would be an attainable thing, probably like some young people who take part in the order, they see it as something that is too far away from them. the guy that started our company simon said let's look into it and here we are talking about it on a day like today with young people that thought they would never have the opportunity to potentially live with a family because they had been living in care, but also to take part in an award that, you know, it might sound cheesy, but it does have such a lasting impact on them and the rest of their life. it's a slightly strange one because normally it is delivered in schools or youth centres, and being a fostering agency we are slightly different. but every person that does it is from a disadvantaged background and they are amazing at
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it. so there you go. it is background and they are amazing at it. so there you go.— it. so there you go. it is really interesting — it. so there you go. it is really interesting that _ it. so there you go. it is really interesting that you _ it. so there you go. it is really interesting that you picked i it. so there you go. it is really interesting that you picked up| it. so there you go. it is really i interesting that you picked up on the fact that a lot of youngsters felt it wasn't for them. so i suppose it's about trying to diversify that and to say that anyone can get something out of this. what are the changes you have seenin this. what are the changes you have seen in some of those young people who have taken part, and what it difference it makes in the long run? a lot of people don't have a lot of control in their lives, they are told they will go to the school and do this and that, and children have another layer added to that but with the duke of edinburgh is what they are in control, we talk to them and so you can get this, this and this out of it and after the conversation today if you decide it is not for you then that's fine. we will not pressure you. it's the first time they have control in their lives. a good example, we have an amazing young person at the moment who was on radio berkshire the other day talking about her award. she has
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done her bronze award and one of the first young people with us to do her silver, and went again when we started this we never thought i would be possible, and is going on to do her level two gym instructor award to be a personal trainer, kind of starting that journey. award to be a personal trainer, kind of starting thatjourney. from her experience of when she first came into care with us and all the things we have done along the way of being scared of heights and are taking on challenges and overcoming stuff, it really encapsulates and represents the journey of coming into care, you live with a family you potentially don't know, away from your friends and your area and the duke of edinburgh's award, going out and learning a new skill, getting into your community. we have another young person down in devon who has been volunteering at a local charity and it has really helped her to integrate herself into the community that she's in. the duke of edinburgh's award provides a good structure for that. we use it for interventions. so if there is a young that is at risk of cse, or self harming, we look at how having a positive distraction for them can
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kind of divert them away from and take a different path in life and if we didn't have that structure you are coming out things from a different angle. it is quite touching. at the same time it levels the playing field. you know, you can have a young person that is in a private school, there has a, b and c and actually they are on the same level of qualification as a young person that is coming into care. it levels the playing field for everybody. levels the playing field for everybody-— levels the playing field for eve bod. ., .,., ,., . everybody. that alone is fantastic. i was so interested _ everybody. that alone is fantastic. i was so interested in _ everybody. that alone is fantastic. i was so interested in what - everybody. that alone is fantastic. i was so interested in what you - everybody. that alone is fantastic. i i was so interested in what you were describing and some of the opportunities the youngsters you work with have had. that tells me that the scheme is ever evolving. if i think of it back in my school days, obviously a very long time ago, it was all sort of outward bound and sleeping in tents in the middle of the field on a very cold night, which i won't lie, didn't really appeal to me. but i think what you're describing says that actually it's a lot bigger than
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that, it's notjust a physical scheme, for example, and there is a lot more about it now that you can take young people out into the community and that is a chance they wouldn't previously have had. i wouldn't previously have had. i would say, when i was at school i didn't do the award, and the reason for that was everybody who did it at the school i went to, i was too busy playing football and listening to slipknot. we have young people here from different cultures, we have translators so they understand what the award is about and the other good thing about the award is, which really sums it up, was how quickly they were to respond to the changes in lockdown. it wasn't possible to do an expedition for many people this year because of lockdown, but they have still had some structure while being stuck at home, not being able to see their friends. we have put people through online cooking courses, we have done volunteering
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opportunities online like mapping out disaster areas. the award has been very responsive. when we as blue sky fostering joined them they sort of looked at us and went, 0k, sort of looked at us and went, ok, this is quite a key turning point, how can we make this work for our young people? anything we do at blue sky fostering and the duke of edinburgh so what always comes back to what it means for that kid. what more can you ask for a legacy to be left behind like that as well? —— the duke of edinburgh's award. ed hill—thompson, thank you forjoining us, from blue sky fostering in bournemouth. lovely to hear that passionate enthusiasm, particularly about the duke of edinburgh is a word because that is one of the great legacy is that the duke of edinburgh has left this country, as we have been saying on bbc news throughout the week. it runs in many countries but lovely to hear that enthusiasm and passion, i think, even though we are here at windsor
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to reflect on a sad day, of course. let's close this hour with some more thoughts from our royal correspondent sarah campbell. what a beautiful day in windsor, and tinged with such sadness for one family, and a family funeral. even though it is a family funeral that is being televised around the world, it is a family that is grieving in the way that so many have in this country over the last year.— over the last year. you're absolutely _ over the last year. you're absolutely right - over the last year. you're absolutely right and - over the last year. you're absolutely right and it. over the last year. you're absolutely right and it is l over the last year. you're - absolutely right and it is lovely to be here at windsor castle, a beautiful backdrop for the funeral today. and of course it is worth remembering that this is where the duke and the queen were shielding the final year of his life together, having spent so long together, though 73 years of marriage. but i think in the last year they will have had more time than at any point because he didn't have any royal engagements to go to, she was confined to the castle walls, so they would have had more hours and
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days than ever before to just spend time together, to reflect on the extraordinary life that both of them had led together. and of course, the counter to that is for the rest of the family, as so many families will have experienced over the last year, they were deprived of the direct contact with this man who was the father, grandfather, great—grandfather absolutely at the heart of the family. those members of the family didn't have that direct contact. it was prince charles who said in interview before christmas you can call via the internet and do all these things but there is no replacement for the hug, there is no replacement for the hug, the personal physical contact. and so yes, family man. what we will see todayis so yes, family man. what we will see today is his two families, the military family, the procession which will bear the coffin from the state apartments down through windsor castle lined with all those regiments that he had such close connection with over the years, that
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is his military family, those 730 members of service personnel will be so honoured to be able to take part in the funeral service today. and then just 30 mourners, so the closest family members that the duke wanted to have at his funeral. despite being smaller it will be a fitting tribute and will reflect this extraordinary long life of service to the country.— extraordinary long life of service to the country. thank you, our rail correspondence _ to the country. thank you, our rail correspondence here _ to the country. thank you, our rail correspondence here in _ to the country. thank you, our rail correspondence here in the - to the country. thank you, our raill correspondence here in the grounds of windsor castle where here in the next few hours we will see that military procession coming through the grounds here, the procession that sarah has talked about and we
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have spoken to military personnel about and the honour it is for them to take part in this hugely significant day for the nation. the queen today mourning her husband of 73 years. we will have continuing coverage from windsor throughout the day here on bbc news.
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you're watching bbc news — i'mjane hill in windsor — as the nation prepares to remember the life of the duke of edinburgh — his funeral takes place here in st george's chapel this afternoon. the funeral will mark prince philip's �*unwavering loyalty�* to the queen, and his service to the nation. prince philip's association with the royal navy and love
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of the sea will be a focus of the ceremony. many aspects of today's ceremony were planned by the duke himself. his many medals and decorations have been placed in the chapel — and more than 730 members of the armed forces will take part in a procession. the selection of which units, which bands, which music, which medals will be there. it is very much his funeral designed by him. there is a limit of 30 mourners in st george's chapel because of covid rules. the queen and the duke's four children, and their eight grandchildren, will all be present. and before the funeral, the queen has shared one of her favourite photos of her and her husband, relaxing in the scottish highlands. the service itself will begin after a national minute's silence at 3pm this afternoon.
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buckingham palace has urged the public not to travel to windsor and asks people to follow the service on radio and television. good morning from windsor castle, where the funeral of the duke of edinburgh will take place this afternoon — watched by millions of people in this country and around the world. it will be a small family affair, because in line with covid restricitons, only 30 people will be allowed into st george's chapel. the queen will sit alone as she says goodbye to her husband of 73 years. buckingham palace said the service will celebrate and reflect the duke's life and mark his unwavering loyalty to the queen. this morning we'll be hearing from those who knew the duke, and those involved in the planning of today's events,
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but first here's our royal correspondent nicholas witchell. a husband and wife, a photograph from the queen's private collection, an image from a strong marriage. and a reminder that today there is a wife saying farewell to a beloved partner of 73 years. inside windsor castle, st george's chapel has been made ready. the duke of edinburgh's many decorations have been placed on the altar. close by, the seat he used to occupy, the enamelled stall plate is in place. but his insignia as a knight of the garter has been removed. it will be in this section of the chapel, known as the quire, where the 30 members of the congregation will be seated around the catafalque bearing the duke's coffin. the funeral procession will have made its way to the chapel from the castle's quadrangle. just after 2:40pm, his coffin
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will be borne from the state entrance to be placed on the land rover hearse the duke helped to design. at 2:45pm, a small procession will step off for the eight minute journey through the castle. some members of the royalfamily will walk behind the coffin. the queen will follow in a limousine. at 2:53pm, the coffin will arrive at the west steps of st george's chapel. it will be borne to the top of the steps where it will pause. at three o'clock, a one—minute silence will be observed, before the coffin enters the chapel for the funeral service, which will be presided over by the archbishop of canterbury. as with all funerals, there is a huge sense of privilege that you're with the family, any family, at this remarkable point in their lives. where they are grieving someone they loved profoundly. and then with this funeral, there is also that extra
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sense of huge privilege, but also pride in his life. the pride is not that i'm there, the pride is, here we are, celebrating such a wonderful life. within the chapel, the order of service will proceed precisely as the duke had prescribed. he chose the music and the readings. there's a lot in there that is very him. we've got a land rover that has been designed by him. he's taken a personal interest in every aspect of it, but in particular, the selection of which units, which bands, which music, which medals will be there. so it will be very much his funeral, designed by him. the service will end with the lowering of his coffin to the royal vault below the chapel. royal marine buglers will sound the last post, and then action stations, a reminder of the duke's years of service in the royal navy. a reminder, too, that he was a royal consort with a difference.
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distinctive to the end. nicholas witchell, bbc news. in preperation for the funeral... we arejust we are just hearing that the duke of edinburgh's offer will be covered with wreath and the sword. we talk about the armed services place and all of today's events, and that wreath has been removed by the grenadier guards, a regiment that the duke of edinburgh had a close association with. that is just one formal
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element of today's proceedings in the run—up to the funeral service itself which will take place a little later this afternoon here at windsor castle after the procession we have been speaking about as well. we have been talking to members of the military here as well. for now, let's speak again to the... ..royal biographer and historian, robert lacey. he has written extensively about the royal family. everything we see here this afternoon, as the head of the army said yesterday, it has the duke's fingerprints on it, this is something that he wished for. yes. something that he wished for. yes, ou talk something that he wished for. yes, you talk about _ something that he wished for. yes, you talk about the _ something that he wished for. yes, you talk about the two _ something that he wished for. ya: you talk about the two families by which i think you refer to the royal family and the military family is of course there is a third family and thatis course there is a third family and that is all of us who are
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participating today. the military element is very important but i was so interested to hear before the hour you were talking to someone involved in the doe scheme and i was interested to hear that you were involved in it yourself. we have talked about it before but i do think it is emblematic of so much that mattered about the duke and says something about the royal family as a whole. when you think of it, something like the duke of edinburgh's award scheme which you have said has now affected millions of people around the world, bringing all sorts of the outdoor life to people in urban situations, often deprived areas, giving a new dimension to their life. when you
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think about it, that is the sort of thing that a government ought to do all the ministry of education or to do but actually it is the idea of this member of the royalfamily, prince philip. way back in the 1950s when that sort of thing wasn't thought of. this is a man who has really, one must avoid superlatives when talking about the royal family on an occasion like this, but this is a man who has changed the character of britain in a positive way, both international terms, getting row ceremony staged in televised, but also touching everybody�*s life and making our life better so there is something for everybody, notjust a family, not just a military family to remember and reflect on this afternoon. yes.
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and reflect on this afternoon. yes, and reflect on this afternoon. yes, and i and reflect on this afternoon. yes, and i don't — and reflect on this afternoon. yes, and i don't wish _ and reflect on this afternoon. yes, and i don't wish to _ and reflect on this afternoon. yes, and i don't wish to claim _ and reflect on this afternoon. yes, and i don't wish to claim anything that i didn't do, roberts but anything will tell you i do nothing that involves standing out in the cold! ., ., , ., ., cold! you are standing out in the cold! you are standing out in the cold at the _ cold! you are standing out in the cold at the moment, _ cold! you are standing out in the cold at the moment, jane. - cold! you are standing out in the cold at the moment, jane. in - cold! you are standing out in the i cold at the moment, jane. in terms ofthe cold at the moment, jane. in terms of the success _ cold at the moment, jane. in terms of the success of _ cold at the moment, jane. in terms of the success of the _ cold at the moment, jane. in terms of the success of the scheme, - cold at the moment, jane. in terms of the success of the scheme, we i of the success of the scheme, we heard from a wonderful, passionate young man a little earlier talking about the benefits he had seen in his local community in bournemouth. 0f his local community in bournemouth. of course, i want to ask someone who spoke and wrote about the duke, was he really delighted about what it achieved. i know he is someone that didn't engage in that emotion but i'm interested to know from you about what you got from him about the scheme and that he was delighted with it. i the scheme and that he was delighted
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with it. , ,., ~ ., ., ,., with it. i spoke to him about it in 1976, just— with it. i spoke to him about it in 1976, just before _ with it. i spoke to him about it in 1976, just before the _ with it. i spoke to him about it in 1976, just before the silver - 1976, just before the silver jubilee, i interviewed him about the previous 25 years. and when i got onto the subject of the doe scheme, he didn't shy away from it, he talked fairly happily and reflexively about all the young people he had met and a difference it had made to their life and the general idea that kids cooped up in towns could get out in the countryside, the idea that at any age young people need challenges, an old—fashioned term perhaps but that he felt was very important. and he was eloquent on it until we got to question of he got the idea from and was it something to do with having
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gone to gordonstoun, the school in the highland with the outdoor ethic. in that point he slowed down and didn't want to get involved in his own particular role, he didn't want to take credit for it, and transferring that modesty appears to the role he played beside the queen, he was always one step behind the queen, that was a physical thing, a symbolic thing but a very real thing that we are seeing these last few days, week, he transformed so many aspects of the monarchy and what he did and kept it relevant to national life but never did he want to put his own imprint upon it. he stood back from it. i suppose the fact that today ceremony will be in many ways quiet and modest and not a
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grand event is notjust because of covid but basically that is because how he wanted it to be.— covid but basically that is because how he wanted it to be. roberts, for now, how he wanted it to be. roberts, for now. thank — how he wanted it to be. roberts, for now. thank you _ how he wanted it to be. roberts, for now, thank you very _ how he wanted it to be. roberts, for now, thank you very much. - how he wanted it to be. roberts, for now, thank you very much. robert l now, thank you very much. robert lacey, the royal author and historian. a lot of what robert mentioned there, i think we can pick up mentioned there, i think we can pick up on with charles anson, who was the queen's press secretary from 1990 to 1997. thank you forjoining us. you must have worked very closely with the duke of edinburgh. can i ask you for your personal reflections here today on this sad day? flit reflections here today on this sad da ? . ., , , ., reflections here today on this sad da? , day? of course it is a sad day but it is also an _ day? of course it is a sad day but it is also an opportunity - day? of course it is a sad day but it is also an opportunity to - day? of course it is a sad day but it is also an opportunity to pay i it is also an opportunity to pay tribute to a remarkable man and consort of the queen with such a wide range of interests. i was press secretary between 1990 and 1997, one of the more difficult periods in the
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queen's rain and prince philip was a steady presence of always with the queen through those quite difficult years. he was also someone interested in ideas and interested interested in ideas and interested in talking about how to make things better weather for young people in the award scheme or the environment or scientist, the award scheme or the environment orscientist, he the award scheme or the environment or scientist, he had interesting ideas as well as doing things. it was always very modest about it. he was always very modest about it. he was driven by public duty to the queen and that was his foundation of their marriage, to promote public service and enjoyment of public service. we see it on state visits. they were a pleasure to work for and prince philip was away is open for
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discussions, he always had good ideas in a better understanding of the right way of moving forward. he was a moderniser as well as a polymath who wanted to get things done but it was also tremendously interested in ideas. i’m done but it was also tremendously interested in ideas.— interested in ideas. i'm interested ou sa interested in ideas. i'm interested you say he — interested in ideas. i'm interested you say he was — interested in ideas. i'm interested you say he was a _ interested in ideas. i'm interested you say he was a practical- interested in ideas. i'm interested you say he was a practical person | interested in ideas. i'm interested i you say he was a practical person as well as an ideas person will stop to see someone that would come to you and your team and say, "i've got an idea to do x, but he would also have to stand how that idea would be executed. would he see something through to its natural conclusion? he definitely would see things through and also conceptualise. he had a strategic mind but also a great eye for detail. partly that came from his naval career, running a ship you need to be meticulous about how it runs and how you treat
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people. that breeds camaraderie and i think one of the joys of working for the queen and prince philip is that they were such a good team together and so different, the queen more reserved and very neutral in her approach, fair and neutral in her approach, fair and neutral in her approach. her approach, fair and neutral in herapproach. but her approach, fair and neutral in her approach. but philip had little extra room for manoeuvre with his naval background and camaraderie which made it very easy around people and he broke the ice well on formal occasions. he took an interest in everybody, whatever age they were, whatever their background and he was curious about people and really interested in their ideas. he had a huge faith in the queen but he also had an interest in faith, not
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just religion, notjust his own but others as well and that has been inherited by the prince of wales. everyone who was involved in his charities, 800 charities he was patron of throughout his lifetime, his ideas rubbed off on other people so he enabled them to change and a big way but he also gave to the children and grandchildren his love of public service and love of the armed services and the contribution of the armed services. as well as that this interesting other ideas. he was a polymath and his interests were eclectic. such a wide range of things he devoted his energy to as well as always being there to the
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queen, through happy times but also through difficult times for the monarchy and the rain, 70 years, it is an astonishing thing to be at her side throughout all those years. i'm sure the queen will reflect that today, it is a sad day but also a rather marvellous sing that the whole world will pay tribute to him. thank you for your time. windsor is no stranger to royal events , but today — just 30 guests will attend — in line with covid restrictions — and the public has been asked to stay away. but the people of windsor are preparing to mark the occasion in their own way — as graham satchell has been finding out.
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at their barracks in windsor, state trumpeters from the band of the household cavalry are having their final rehearsal for this afternoon's ceremony. trumpeters play the reveille. these trumpeters have played at royal weddings, state banquets, the opening of parliament. but there is a real pride being involved in today's service. it is a huge national event, you kind of build up to these events throughout your whole career. so i am exceptionally privileged to be part of it. it is a little bit nerve—wracking. but you hear so much, and hear so many stories, especially now, of what he did for the duke of edinburgh awards, what he did for the military, and such a very, very inspirational man. the trumpeters have met
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prince philip over and over again, and remember his playful sense of humour. he would often walk through and while we were playing he would go, "what's on the flip side?" referring to the old lps, and would turn your music over while you were playing, to see what was on the flip side, and then walk off, mischievously grinning. he was always a real pleasure to be around, and work in the presence of. from the roof terrace of castleview retirement home, they have quite a view of windsor castle. the residents here have all been vaccinated and are in one large bubble, so can watch today's funeral without social distancing. they have fond memories here of a man who made windsor his home. living in windsor for almost 50 years, you actually feel very close to the royal family here. you know, we sort of feel as though they're part, sort of part of our family. i thought he was a man's man. i loved his attitude. he chuckles.
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he was part of our lives. everyday life, not just those special occasions. all the time, it was, "there's the duke!" and duke waves. "hi, duke!" yeah. he was such a charismatic... charming, with such i a great sense of humour, that you just want to be here, i you want to be here for the queen and her family as well, - you want to try and do your bit. obviously, living in. windsor, you feel that that's right, don't you? at the duke of edinburgh pub, landlady annie andrews is putting the final touches in place. she's hoping to send the duke off in style. we are inviting all the regulars, as many as we can safely get in the tent, and we will be raising a glass to toast him. when you lose family you always have a wake, etc, and he has been like part of ourfamily. it'll be watched worldwide. and, you know, it's a mark
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of respect, and he deserves it. he didn't want the fuss and the pageantry, so he did get what he wanted. it's a moment of history. it's the passing of an era, almost. he was a part of my history, and i think i shall miss him. there will be quite a bit of piping, bugling and trumpeting at today's funeral to reflect the duke's military past. after the royal marines play the last post, the state trumpeters will play this, the reveille. it signifies the start of a new day, as one chapter of history comes to a close. graham satchell, bbc news, windsor.
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as we have been reflecting, the plea from the palace is to not to come to windsor and follow today's ceremony from the radio or television. i can see a few members of the public who have gathered at the barriers that have gathered at the barriers that have been set up through the town here. i can see several dozen people, may be more than that but largely the crowds, it appears from what i can see from my vantage point, have stayed away, even though it is turning into a beautiful sunny day here in windsor, quite unexpectedly. so people largely, it would appear, abiding by the royal family's wish to follow the duke of edinburgh's funeral on television and radio. just to explain you can see full coverage on bbc news, the bbc news channel throughout the day and a special programme on bbc one that starts at 12:30pm on midday. it
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will also be another programme on bbc two tonight beginning at eight to 10pm. ——beginning at 8:10pm it will also be broadcast on bbc radio 4 and radio 5 live. coverage starts from 2pm. the death of prince philip is of course a loss deeply felt by his family. earlier i spoke to his great—niece, princess xenia of hohenlohe—langenburg. her brother — also called philip — will be walking in the procession today. he is one of a handful of family guests being allowed in here today, just 30 in saint george's chapel because of covid rules. i spoke to
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princess xenia of hohenlohe—langenburg in munich earlier today. ita huge honour, obviously, and having, you know, spoken to my brother yesterday, he's just saying it's just a very specialtime forthem, cousins, to be together and to be representing what is a huge part of the duke of edinburgh's family. i mean, you just have to think that there were 16 direct cousins, you known, descendances of his sisters, descendants of the prince of wales. that's a huge, you know, number of people, and that there's three of them, descendants, that are able to be there to represent us is obviously a huge honour and is deeply felt. and tell us, if you can, some of your remembrances. how do you think of the duke of edinburgh? how do you remember him? what sort of role did he play in your life? well, i think to all of us he was a huge... he was an idol, he was somebody to look up to. you know, we had enormous respect for him. it was always very exciting when he came to visit, and he came often. i think his — and this
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has come clear to me in the weeks since he's died — the way he lived his life, his motto of, you know, it's an unwritten motto for us, the sort of discipline, the selflessness, this lack of ego, but also his sense of humour always underlying all of that. but his hard work and his, sort of, you know, the philosophy that the duke of edinburgh awards have given so many young people is something that is constantly underlying our lives and it's certainly something that i've always aspired to live up to. and he's been like a glue for the family because, sadly, a lot of our grandmothers passed away much too early, but he was always there. he was the link, so he brought all of us cousins, even though we're in germany — a lot of us, but not all of us — he brought us together on a lot of family occasions. i mean, the last one having been his 90th birthday celebrations ten years ago at windsor — we were all there. there was a huge bunch of us and it was lovely.
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that was the duke of edinburgh's great—niece speaking to me earlier from munich, her grandmother was prince philip's eldest sister. prince philip was born into the greek royal family in 1921 on the island of corfu, but after a coup d'etat the following year, the young prince and his family were forced to flee the country. 0ur correspondentjenny hill has been back to the island of his birth. for this son of greece, no tranquil retreat. prince philip was born into a volatile country, torn by war. so this is the house where prince philip was born? what was greece like when prince philip was born? it was a very difficult period for our history. after all of these wars with turkey. and for this reason the family of prince philip was obligated to leave the country. and he was taken away in a fruit box, an orange crate? the legend says.
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it was to be a turbulent childhood. the family moved around europe and then, as his mother's mental health worsened, broke up. prince philip isolated, left to the care of relatives. it is thought he never returned to the island of his birth, but he is remembered here, even as they prepare for an orthodox easter in the church where he was baptised. queen elizabeth will feel lonely, after 73 years of common life. i think it is a shock. it is something that happened suddenly and it is like a blackout. so i think they will need time. but the family connection lives on. during an official visit to greece last month, prince charles spoke of his deep affection for his father's native country. he is said to visit corfu often,
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in a private capacity. few tourists here now. the pandemic has all but closed the island's doors. like so many other places in europe, corfu is restricted by coronavirus measures. there will be no large, public events to commemorate the duke's passing. but as people in britain prepare for his funeral, many here will be quietly reflecting on the life of a man whose story, after all, began right here. a man who grew from the chaos of childhood into someone upon whom his family, his country, could depend. jenny hill, bbc news, corfu. well, we've been talking a lot today about some of prince philip's passions and endeavours and among many other things he was very keen sportsman. 0ne many other things he was very keen sportsman. one of the things he had
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a passion for was carriage driving and he is actually credited with bringing and boosting the spot here in this country and so it is entirely appropriate that we take a few minutes to talk about that sport. i am joined few minutes to talk about that sport. iamjoined by few minutes to talk about that sport. i am joined by dick laine who was a cabbage driving instructor and, laine who was a cabbage driving instructorand, in laine who was a cabbage driving instructor and, in fact, laine who was a cabbage driving instructorand, infact, is laine who was a cabbage driving instructor and, in fact, is from british cabbage diving governing council. —— carriage driving. not many people know about the sport but am i not many people know about the sport butam i insane part not many people know about the sport but am i insane part of the point was the duke of edinburgh wanted to publicise as it and let more people know more about it? —— am i right in saying. know more about it? -- am i right in sa inc. , . , ., saying. yes, prince philip vote tools in the —
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saying. yes, prince philip vote tools in the early _ saying. yes, prince philip vote tools in the early 70s, - saying. yes, prince philip vote tools in the early 70s, many i saying. yes, prince philip vote| tools in the early 70s, many of which we still use today, and he was instrumental in getting it on the road and have now started. horse driving trials we have a dressage on day one, marathon and aged two and a day one, marathon and aged two and a day three we do cone driving where we drive the cabbages pairs of cones with bells on. find we drive the cabbages pairs of cones with bells on— with bells on. and was he very good at it? she won _ with bells on. and was he very good at it? she won gold _ with bells on. and was he very good at it? she won gold medal- with bells on. and was he very good at it? she won gold medal in - with bells on. and was he very goodj at it? she won gold medal in bronze medal at world _ at it? she won gold medal in bronze medal at world and _ at it? she won gold medal in bronze medal at world and european i medal at world and european championships with the holstein which he drove which was the queen's, because the great thing was that he had all of the horses and carriages in the royal mews at his disposal and it fitted in very well for him and then in later years he competed with the queen's home reared fell ponies which were slightly easier to drive and easier to manage and, again he was very successful and represented britain at the europeans and, yes, he was very good. in later years obviously
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he slowed down a lot and enjoy driving on a daily basis, exercising the pleasure and for fun. find driving on a daily basis, exercising the pleasure and for fun.— the pleasure and for fun. and it is a team endeavour _ the pleasure and for fun. and it is a team endeavour and _ the pleasure and for fun. and it is a team endeavour and is - the pleasure and for fun. and it is a team endeavour and is one i the pleasure and for fun. and it is a team endeavour and is one of. the pleasure and for fun. and it is i a team endeavour and is one of the things he liked about it that, do you? that he enjoyed the team aspect of it? you? that he en'oyed the team aspect of it? , , .,, you? that he en'oyed the team aspect ofit?, , . ., , of it? definitely. he most certainly liuht of it? definitely. he most certainly light getting _ of it? definitely. he most certainly light getting away _ of it? definitely. he most certainly light getting away from _ of it? definitely. he most certainly light getting away from the - of it? definitely. he most certainly light getting away from the royal i light getting away from the royal spotlight, come and wait till competitions, would have been part of the crew, had dreams that helped him and hejust of the crew, had dreams that helped him and he just enjoyed of the crew, had dreams that helped him and hejust enjoyed getting of the crew, had dreams that helped him and he just enjoyed getting away from it and having a bacon butty after he had walked the marathon course and in a way been one of the lads are not wanting any special treatment and he really enjoyed just being away at the events and being away the competition and he also had time to talk to fellow competitors and would ask how the dressage went and would ask how the dressage went and how you had viewed the marathon course and he was very knowledgeable and obviously when he was away on royal duties he would keep
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up—to—date on everything that was going on in the sport. aha, up-to-date on everything that was going on in the sport.— up-to-date on everything that was going on in the sport. a few pranks alon: the going on in the sport. a few pranks along the way. _ going on in the sport. a few pranks along the way, whether? _ going on in the sport. a few pranks along the way, whether? i - going on in the sport. a few pranks along the way, whether? i suppose going on in the sport. a few pranks i along the way, whether? i suppose we have all encountered _ along the way, whether? i suppose we have all encountered a _ along the way, whether? i suppose we have all encountered a few _ along the way, whether? i suppose we have all encountered a few of - along the way, whether? i suppose we have all encountered a few of those i have all encountered a few of those but there were various stories of him being pulled out of ditches but i am happy to say that there was nothing too serious and at competitions, actually, he had a very good record and i think it is well documented, you know, in later years he just wanted to get around safely and finish the course. hand. safely and finish the course. and, in fact, he — safely and finish the course. and, in fact, he wanted _ safely and finish the course. and, in fact, he wanted it _ safely and finish the course. and, in fact, he wanted it to _ safely and finish the course. and, in fact, he wanted it to be - safely and finish the course. and, in fact, he wanted it to be an i in fact, he wanted it to be an olympic sport, didn't he? iie in fact, he wanted it to be an olympic sport, didn't he? he did. one of the _ olympic sport, didn't he? he did. one of the things _ olympic sport, didn't he? he did. one of the things he _ olympic sport, didn't he? he did. one of the things he tried, i olympic sport, didn't he? he did. i one of the things he tried, because he was on the olympic committee and he was on the olympic committee and he wanted to get it made an olympic sport. that would have opened a lot of funding up for us, lottery funding and funding for training, and, unfortunately, he was never able to get it made an olympic discipline. i think the olympic
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committee view is that the idea of the olympic sport is on the athlete and where we are driving for horses, then there was an imbalance there, for whatever reason, anyway, so, unfortunately, we still remain an amateur self funding sport. find amateur self funding sport. and before i amateur self funding sport. and before i let _ amateur self funding sport. and before i let you _ amateur self funding sport. and before i let you go, can ijust ask for your personal reflections, have you will remember the duke of edinburgh?— edinburgh? well, i will always remember _ edinburgh? well, i will always remember him _ edinburgh? well, i will always remember him for _ edinburgh? well, i will always remember him for his - edinburgh? well, i will always remember him for his great i edinburgh? well, i will always- remember him for his great sense of humour, the way that he always called a spade a spade, he didn't beat around the bush, you knew exactly where you were with him and really, i suppose, exactly where you were with him and really, isuppose, his exactly where you were with him and really, i suppose, his great service to the queen in the country and for everything that he has done for british carriage driving. dick lane, thank ou british carriage driving. dick lane, thank you so _ british carriage driving. dick lane, thank you so much _ british carriage driving. dick lane, thank you so much for— british carriage driving. dick lane, thank you so much for talking i british carriage driving. dick lane, thank you so much for talking to i british carriage driving. dick lane, i thank you so much for talking to us. fascinating to hear your stories. he
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is from the british carriage driving governing council and thank you very much for your time on the day of june whenever�*s you know which will take place here in windsor in the afternoon. we're talking loss of course about prince philip's passions in his endeavours and we have a reflected loss already that one of his key legacies, i think it is fair to say, —— reflected a lot already. it will be awards programme which has now won so many programmes. let's talk to the ceo of the duke of edinburgh scheme. cani can i ask, in fact, feel reflections today given what's an enormous legacies left here. your reflections on the duke of edinburgh and what he achieved with the organisation that you are now in charge of?- achieved with the organisation that you are now in charge of? thank you. it is a you are now in charge of? thank you. it is a pleasure _ you are now in charge of? thank you. it is a pleasure to _ you are now in charge of? thank you. it is a pleasure to be _ you are now in charge of? thank you. it is a pleasure to be here _ you are now in charge of? thank you. it is a pleasure to be here and - you are now in charge of? thank you. it is a pleasure to be here and i i it is a pleasure to be here and i think it is obviously a very sad day for the award, remembering our founder and patron who, over way
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backin founder and patron who, over way back in 1956, had the vision to set “p back in 1956, had the vision to set up the duke of edinburgh's awards but it is also, i think, a day of thanks and gratitude and optimism. we have seen over the past week such an outpouring of love and emotion associated with the duke of edinburgh's awards. thousands of people have been sharing their memories of the awards, both current participants and people who did it many, many years ago and i think it has been really... cemented that sense of the duke's legacy and his vision for young people, his belief and passion for young people and giving them all of the opportunities that they need to be able to develop and grow and succeed in adult life so a bittersweet moment, i think, for the award. very sad day but we are delighted to be able to thank
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the duke and pay our respects and thinks really positively, i think, about the future and wanting to build on his incredible legacy to be able to reach many, many more young people with these life changing opportunities. people with these life changing opportunities-— people with these life changing opportunities. yes, and it's been runnina opportunities. yes, and it's been running for _ opportunities. yes, and it's been running for decades _ opportunities. yes, and it's been running for decades now. - opportunities. yes, and it's been running for decades now. i i opportunities. yes, and it's been | running for decades now. i mean, what sense when you are ever able to get from him of, perhaps, what he thought about the fact that it had just grown and grown runs are so many countries? i just grown and grown runs are so many countries?— many countries? i think it is something _ many countries? i think it is something that _ many countries? i think it is something that he - many countries? i think it is something that he was i many countries? i think it is i something that he was incredibly proud of. he was very, very involved in the award for many years. as a trustee, he attended over 500 presentations for gold award achievers and only when he stepped back from public life in 2017 was less involved so i think the award is certainly one of his proudest achievements and legacies. we've had
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6.7 million young people take part in the awards after they were founded back in 1956 and we have great ambitions to want to reach many, many more young people, a million more over the next five years, because we know how impactful and how extraordinary these experiences can be for young people. i know that you are talking to ed a little while ago about his experience of running tv programmes with the young people that he works with the young people that he works with who are fostered and just the extraordinary impact that the awards can have on young people's confidence, their sense of self and self belief, the skills that they're going to need for later life so i think, i hope the duke will be very pleased with the outpouring of affection both for him and his vision and for the achievement and impact that the award has had over the last 65 years and that he would support our efforts to want to build
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on his fantastic legacy and reach many many your stomach to smack many, many more young people in years to come. —— many, many more young people in years to come. the duke of edinburgh was a proud conservationist — martin palmer worked with the duke for over 30 years and is chief executive of faithinvest, a charitable foundation. as we know, the duke of edinburgh was very passionate about the environment and wildlife. am i right to say that your professional relationship with the duke was as an adviser in religious matters? explain the role that you had with him. , . ,., explain the role that you had with him. , . . ., , explain the role that you had with him. , . , , him. very much so, jane. yes, my role was really, _ him. very much so, jane. yes, my role was really, he _ him. very much so, jane. yes, my role was really, he came _ him. very much so, jane. yes, my role was really, he came up i him. very much so, jane. yes, my role was really, he came up with i him. very much so, jane. yes, my| role was really, he came up with an idea in 1985 and filled it would be vitalfor idea in 1985 and filled it would be vital for the environmental movement, conservation movement, that it move beyond just, sort of,
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scientists and environmentalists and actually began to touch people's hearts and minds and he read a book that i had written for wwf on how different religions you do place within nature and our stories and having read this he meant to a meeting of wwf international who are planning their fifth anniversary and he basically scrapped the plans based pad and said, look, i think we should just meet with the fates and when kind of went, you know what, he said, look, the only things that have actually change peoples minds are the arts and religion. —— meet with the faiths. he said i have just read this book about and religion. —— meet with the faiths. he said i have just read this book about an environment in amongst our strongest allies. and that is what we basically beamed up the whole programme of working with initially five face, buddhism, christianity, islam, hinduism, judaism, and then
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we had 12 fates and now the other literally 3.5 million faith —based environmental projects on the world, a wonderful testimony to his ability to have a vision and to get the vision to happen. 50. to have a vision and to get the vision to happen.— vision to happen. so, that is interesting _ vision to happen. so, that is interesting because - vision to happen. so, that is interesting because we i vision to happen. so, that is interesting because we have vision to happen. so, that is i interesting because we have heard early in the day from someone who worked with him making the point that he was a practical person as well as an ideas person, as far as they felt, so it sounds to me as if that was your experience as well. oh, totally. the guy when he was, 0h, totally. the guy when he was, jane, i was sent for a meeting with him at sandringham just after christmas in 1985 to tell him it wasn't a good idea, which is disastrous, you never do that with him, and i didn't want to say that wwf was very scared about this idea of religion so i went to see him and said you have been told i'm going to come and tell you it is a very good idea. and he said yes. and i said well, i don't think it is a good idea because i don't think you are
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thinking big enough and that is exactly what you need to say to prince philip and he loved never wanting to take the limelight but always saying i supported something that was good but was able to help it be bigger because there are people who are passionate about it anyway, that was his great gift, he enabled those of us who are passionate to go further than then we could possibly have done if it hadn't been for his support. bud we could possibly have done if it hadn't been for his support. and was he also a hard _ hadn't been for his support. and was he also a hard task— hadn't been for his support. and was he also a hard task master— hadn't been for his support. and was he also a hard task master as - hadn't been for his support. and was he also a hard task master as well i he also a hard task master as well as having all these ideas? yes. he also a hard task master as well as having all these ideas? yes, he was. i as having all these ideas? yes, he was- i mean. _ as having all these ideas? yes, he was- i mean. i— as having all these ideas? yes, he was. i mean, i got— as having all these ideas? yes, he was. i mean, i got to _ as having all these ideas? yes, he was. i mean, i got to know- as having all these ideas? yes, he was. i mean, i got to know him i as having all these ideas? yes, he i was. i mean, i got to know him very well indeed and we would meet often just the job was to talk and he didn't like a good argument and he would provoke you if you said something that he didn't agree with he would go oh, rubbish, don't agree with that, how can you justify that? and then had to justify it. if you made a statement you had to follow it up and we did once very famously clear the entire deck of a greek ferry shipped after we had been on this extraordinary peninsula in northern greece which is only
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0rthodox monastery and only women had been allowed there for 1000 years and we had been on a walk there and it is an astonishing ecosystem that had been preserved there and became a very early in the morning from the ferry and he was all good first thing in the morning, i have to say, and we had this monumental row about the role of monasticism. he monumental row about the role of monasticism— monasticism. he was like, it's all ve well monasticism. he was like, it's all very well about _ monasticism. he was like, it's all very well about these _ monasticism. he was like, it's all very well about these monks i monasticism. he was like, it's all. very well about these monks having monasticism. he was like, it's all- very well about these monks having a simple lifestyle but how is it going to change the planet? bud simple lifestyle but how is it going to change the planet? find i simple lifestyle but how is it going to change the planet?— to change the planet? and i was like, to change the planet? and i was like. because — to change the planet? and i was like, because of— to change the planet? and i was like, because of the _ to change the planet? and i was like, because of the people i to change the planet? and i was like, because of the people are| like, because of the people are going to be a spider it. i was light enough, enough, buta going to be a spider it. i was light enough, enough, but a cup of coffee, went downstairs and all of the clicks of the weather said i going to be put in the tower? i said, no, i'm not going to be put in the tower? i said, i'm not going to be put in the tower? isaid, no, i'm not these reporters in the tower for arguing with him —— all the colleagues who were with us said are you going to be put on the tower? 50. were with us said are you going to be put on the tower?— were with us said are you going to be put on the tower? so, you were allowed to — be put on the tower? so, you were allowed to win _ be put on the tower? so, you were allowed to win the _ be put on the tower? so, you were allowed to win the argument? i be put on the tower? so, you were| allowed to win the argument? yes, but ou allowed to win the argument? yes, but you had — allowed to win the argument? yes, but you had to _ allowed to win the argument? yes, but you had to prove _ allowed to win the argument? yes but you had to prove your case and he was immensely well read and when he was immensely well read and when he retired i went to see him and
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said look, this is a disaster. ice he said, what you mean? i said, well, because now you will have even more time to read all these books and articles and tell me i ought to be them and i'm not going to have time because i'm very all these out, and organisations. and he really was and organisations. and he really was a voracious reader and love to say and throw the stuff he thought about at you and say what you think about that, then? and he had to be quick on yourfeet or say that, then? and he had to be quick on your feet or say something like oh, that is a fascinating idea, can you tell me which book it is and i will try to get hold of it? it is lovely to _ will try to get hold of it? it is lovely to hear _ will try to get hold of it? it is lovely to hear those - will try to get hold of it? it is lovely to hear those very warm and very frank stories from you and it gives us a real flavour of the man, i think. gives us a real flavour of the man, ithink. i gives us a real flavour of the man, i think. i would, just before i let you go, i would be interested on just more your reflections more broadly in what today means because it comes at the end of such a difficult yearfor so many it comes at the end of such a difficult year for so many families up difficult year for so many families up and down the country, an extraordinary year, a very difficult ceremony here today because of that
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and just your thoughts about what today means. i and just your thoughts about what today means-— today means. i think the thing he will feel is possibly _ today means. i think the thing he will feel is possibly the _ today means. i think the thing he will feel is possibly the most i will feel is possibly the most significant thing of what happened today. we know that there are 6-8,000,000 today. we know that there are 6—8,000,000 people who are not able to attend funerals in the last year, not just to attend funerals in the last year, notjust because of covid but because of accidents and other forms of death that have taken place. this, i think, of death that have taken place. this, ithink, is of death that have taken place. this, i think, is going to be an opportunity for those people, those families, those vents, too, yes, pay their respects to the duke but also, perhaps, in theirfirst their respects to the duke but also, perhaps, in their first mention names of those they loved in his feels they could not attend. —— perhaps in their praise. i think this is a cathartic moment for those of the nation to actually recognise that and morning are normal and what we have been through is abnormal and i think the many people this will be, at last, at last, an opportunity to, as it were, attend a funeral and to, as it were, attend a funeral and to name the ones that they have lost and loved. a
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to name the ones that they have lost and loved. n, ., ., ~ , ., and loved. martin palmer, thank you so much for— and loved. martin palmer, thank you so much for your _ and loved. martin palmer, thank you so much for your time _ and loved. martin palmer, thank you so much for your time here - and loved. martin palmer, thank you so much for your time here this i so much for your time here this morning. martin palmer, it was a religious adviser to the duke of edinburgh for very many years and clearly, as you can tell, knew him very well indeed. let's just bring you some pictures that have just come on in the last little while from elgin in scotland, and it is a tribute from gordonstoun, the school, of course, that prince philip went to, sent his son prince charles two, and this is how gordonstoun has been paying tribute. staff and students today paying tribute to their distinguished former pupil. this is, i am told an 80 foot vessel, 0cean spirit, which has been sailing and then from there a wreath was cast in memory of prince philip. and the music that we
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hear on the harbour—side is a student piper playing as a wreath is thrown into the water and that is gordonstoun's tribute to the duke of edinburgh. well, prince philip carried out numerous official engagements, creating lasting memories for those who attended and we have been talking to some of those people over the course of the morning here. in 2007 he accompanied the queen to the opening of a hindu temple in bradford and they were welcomed by hundreds of worshippers. including disha joshi, who was aged just nine at the time. shabnam mahmood reports it was honestly very, very exciting. it was honestly very, very exciting. i spent the whole morning practising my curtsy! that
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i spent the whole morning practising m curts ! �* ., ., , my curtsy! at the age of nine, she resented my curtsy! at the age of nine, she presented a _ my curtsy! at the age of nine, she presented a bouquet _ my curtsy! at the age of nine, she presented a bouquet of— my curtsy! at the age of nine, she presented a bouquet of flowers i my curtsy! at the age of nine, she presented a bouquet of flowers to | presented a bouquet of flowers to the queen and prince philip. now 23, she remembers the day well. normally i would absolutely _ she remembers the day well. normally i would absolutely get _ she remembers the day well. normally i would absolutely get down _ she remembers the day well. normally i would absolutely get down might i i would absolutely get down might dread getting out of bed but i was absolutely thrilled to be meeting with the queen and prince philip, so i woke up around 6am, through my lenga on that my mum and dad had picked out specially for me to wear, a beautiful lenga which i thought would represent a bit of my heritage and culture, absolutely brilliant, got all dolled up which was great as you can imagine for a nine—year—old, loves getting a head on and wearing a little bit of make up for once. it is 2007 when prince philip accompanied his wife the queen to officially open a temple in bradford. officially open a temple in izaradford-_ officially open a temple in bradford. ., .,, , ., , bradford. the atmosphere was relatively split _ bradford. the atmosphere was relatively split i _ bradford. the atmosphere was relatively split i would - bradford. the atmosphere was relatively split i would say i bradford. the atmosphere was i relatively split i would say because everyone quite young was really ecstatic and excited to be their well as the elderly people there probably a little bit more nervous and trying to make sure everything was done correctly implement proper.
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the royal couple met hundreds of worshippers and dignitaries as well as observing some of the hindu traditions. ~ as observing some of the hindu traditions-— traditions. when she actually entered the _ traditions. when she actually entered the mandir - traditions. when she actually entered the mandir she i traditions. when she actually entered the mandir she took| traditions. when she actually i entered the mandir she took her shoes off which i thought was a nice touch and showed she was actually aware of what we as hindus and asians do as we enter the the mandir, the temple, and all of those british hindus will payjust about this input powder and involved in a heritage in indian culture. she says the memory will live with her forever and her photograph takes pride of place at the family's home in bradford. bbc news. countries in the commonwealth have also been commemorating and reflecting today. 0ur correspondent in delhi, rajini vaidyanathan, and our correspondent in nairobi, catherine byaruhanga, said many young people in africa and south asia will remember
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the prince because of the duke of edinburgh award he started. well, for many older people in south asia they may remember some of prince philip's visits to the region. he made a solo tour in 1959 where he arrived here in india. he also went to pakistan during that the visit and also, i believe, sri lanka. he also came in several other occasions to india as a royal consort. last visit he made with a majesty was in 1987 but he actually also enjoys an enduring legacy amongst younger south asians that perhaps hasn't really been talked about that often that is his duke of edinburgh award scheme here it is a big thing in south asia, called the
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international award here are more than 150,000 people have taken part in that scheme since it was first introduced in the region. notjust here in india but pakistan, bangladesh, sri lanka and nepaland is vaginally was mentioning that the duke of edinburgh award is followed across this continent and lots of people —— as rajni was mentioning. we are seeing some of the commemoration events were in uganda next week. the minister has asked former awardees whether they had a gold, silver or bronze badge to wear today incomprehension of the pinch. 0ur correspondence and again reflections on how people will remember the duke of edinburgh and reference time and again as we see to the remarkable legacy of the duke of edinburgh's award scheme. the smack gold. _ of edinburgh's award scheme. tue: smack gold, silver of edinburgh's award scheme. tie: smack gold, silver or bronze badge
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to wear in remembrance of the pinch. —— in remembrance of the prince. he was someone who had lots of... you were never bored with him. you couldn't, he couldn't bore someone if he set out to do it. if he spoke, it was one of his talents, he saw into things. because he studied so hard and spoke so, and read so widely. and so when you preached, you heard that he would give his opinion, and he expected you to be able to answer him back. i think one of the things is, we really have to avoid judging from anything external. she's the queen. she will behave with the extraordinary dignity and extraordinary courage that she always does.
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and at the same time, she is saying farewell to someone to whom she was married for 73 years. i think that must be a very, very profound thing in anybody�*s life. and i hope that the whole nation and around the world, as they look at this, when the cameras are focused on her, as it will be from time to time, that they, if they believe in that that they pray for her, and if they don't, that they sympathise and in their hearts, offer their condolences to her and the hope for her to find strength in what must be an anguished moment. over the last year, there's literally millions of people around the world, and in this country, hundreds of thousands, who have been in her position. i think it will resonate very deeply for a lot of people. i think there will be tears in many
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homes because other names will be on their mind. faces they have lost, that they don't see again. funeral that they couldn't go to, as many haven't been able to go to this one because it is limited to 30 in the congregation. that will break many a heart. and i hope that we will see this moment as something we share in, in the grief of this very, very hard year that we have all gone through. and we will say, the best thing that we can do is do what he did in all his life, just get on with it. hello there, high pressure still dominating the weather
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story at the moment. that means a quiet weekend of weather ahead. yes, it was a chilly start this morning with some frost around, as you can see from this weather watcher picture sent in from london. but further the north and west we have some thickening cloud here and that means the arrival of a weather front but it is going to take its time in pushing in, the rain bearing cloud not really arriving until the end of the day. ahead of it there will be cloud developing into scotland and northern ireland. for many of us so the emphasis is dry, settled for the remainder of the day and with just a light breeze. you could see a little bit of fair weather cloud developing as we go through the afternoon but temperatures are likely to peak at highs widely between 11 and 1a degrees. one or two areas may see highs of 15. through the night tonight that cloud and rain will arrive, pushing into northern ireland and western scotland. bit more of a breeze here as well so that is going to prevent those temperatures from falling too far. we might see overnight minimums of around 6 to 8 degrees but under clearing skies, once again, out to the east we will see low single figures first thing on sunday morning
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but there will be some sunshine around on sunday for many. outbreaks of light patchy rain push their way steadily eastwards into scotland, thickening cloud across the borders into wales and south—west england but to the east of the pennines we keep some clearer skies and we keep some sunshine and some warmth with highs of 15 celsius. now, not that much in the way of changes as we go in to monday, still that weather front sitting out to the west. again you could see a little more cloud just pushing across parts of england and wales but it is still going to be largely dry and it will still be quite warm with it with those temperatures back to where they should be for this time of year, highs of 15 or 16 degrees. but we are looking at a change to come as high pressure starts to push on from the atlantic through the middle part of the week and with wind circling in a clockwise direction around that high that means a return to more of a northerly. that is going to push that cold air
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back across the country for most of us, perhaps not the far south, but it does mean through the middle part of the week we might see a bit of a dip in the feel of the weather before some warm starts to build once again from the south. that's it. take care.
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good afternoon from windsor, as the nation prepares to remember the life of the duke of edinburgh. his funeral takes place here at st george's chapel inside the castle grounds this afternoon. only 30 mourners will attend. the archbishop of canterbury will lead the service.

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