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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 17, 2021 12:00pm-12:31pm BST

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good afternoon from windsor, as the nation prepares to remember the life of the duke of edinburgh. his funeral takes place here at st george's chapel inside the castle grounds this afternoon. only 30 mourners will attend. the archbishop of canterbury
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will lead the service. as with all funerals there is a huge sense of privilege that you are with the family, any family, at this remarkable point in their lives. the queen will sit alone as she says goodbye to her husband of 73 years. crowds have been asked to stay away from windsor this afternoon. welcome to windsor castle, where the funeral of the duke of edinburgh will take place later this afternoon — watched by millions of people around the world. it'll be a small family service, because in line with covid restrictions, only 30 mourners will be allowed into st george's chapel.
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the queen will sit alone as she says goodbye to her husband of 73 years. buckingham palace said the ceremony will celebrate and reflect the duke's life and mark his �*unwavering loyalty�* to the queen. our first report this lunchtime is from our royal correspondent, nicholas witchell. a husband and wife, a photograph from the queen's private collection, an image from a strong marriage. and a reminder that today there is a wife saying farewell to a beloved partner of 73 years. inside windsor castle, st george's chapel has been made ready. the duke of edinburgh's many decorations have been placed on the altar. close by, the seat he used to occupy, the enamelled stall plate is in place. but his insignia as a knight of the garter has been removed. it will be in this section of the chapel, known as the quire, where the 30 members
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of the congregation will be seated around the catafalque bearing the duke's coffin. the funeral procession will have made its way to the chapel from the castle�*s quadrangle. just after 2:40pm, his coffin will be borne from the state entrance to be placed on the land rover hearse the duke helped to design. at 2:45pm, the small procession will step off for the eight—minute journey through the castle. some members of the royalfamily will walk behind the coffin. the queen will follow in a limousine. at 2:53pm, the coffin will arrive at the west steps of st george's chapel. it will be borne to the top of the steps where it will pause. at three o'clock, a one—minute silence will be observed, before the coffin enters the chapel for the funeral service, which will be presided over by the archbishop of canterbury. as with all funerals, there is a huge sense of privilege that you're with the family,
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any family, at this remarkable point in their lives where they are grieving someone they loved profoundly. and then with this funeral, there is also that extra sense of huge privilege, but also pride in his life. the pride is not that i'm there, the pride is, here we are, celebrating such a wonderful life. as the queen and her family prepare for the service, from buckingham palace a montage of images and a poem, the patriarchs, by the poet laureate, simon armitage. to presume to eulogise one man is to pipe up. for a whole generation. that crew whose survival was always the stuff of minor miracle. _ who came ashore in orange crate |coracles, fought ingenious wars, | finagled triumphs at sea i with flaming decoy boats, and sidestepped torpedoes.
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major oaks in the woods start tuning up and skies to come _ will deliver their tributes. but for now, a cold april's closing| moments parachute slowly home. so, by mid afternoon, snow is recast - as seed heads and thistledown. this afternoon's funeral service will end with the lowering of the duke's coffin into the royal vault below st george's chapel. royal marine buglers will sound the last post, and then action stations, a reminder of the duke's years of service in the royal navy. a reminder, too, that he was a royal consort with a difference. distinctive to the end. nicholas witchell, bbc news. 0ur royal correspondent, sarah campbell is with me now. we have reflected of course so much on the life of the duke and his
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achievements but actually this afternoon thoughts perhaps really should be with the queen. absolutely. here we are at a royal residence which for so long was the home of the duke and the queen. this is where he spent his final months, of course, shielding alongside the queen. what a stunning backdrop to a funeral which the palace has said consistently will reflect and celebrate his life of service. when the queen leaves the state entrance just before 3pm it will be the first time that we will have seen her since the announcement was made last friday that her husband of 73 years had died. she will follow the procession in a state bentley and then she will follow social distancing in the quire at st george's chapel, she will wear a mask and will be separated from family members as the memory families have experienced funerals. so many moments of great happiness and sorrow over so many years, you
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and sorrow over so many years, you can and sorrow over so many years, you can only imagine how difficult this day will be for her. figs can only imagine how difficult this day will be for her.— can only imagine how difficult this day will be for her. as for so many families, changes _ day will be for her. as for so many families, changes to _ day will be for her. as for so many families, changes to what - day will be for her. as for so many families, changes to what might i day will be for her. as for so many i families, changes to what might have been this afternoon precisely because of the pandemic. there is no ublic because of the pandemic. there is no public element. _ because of the pandemic. there is no public element. the _ because of the pandemic. there is no public element. the public _ because of the pandemic. there is no public element. the public will - because of the pandemic. there is no public element. the public will be - public element. the public will be able to do so but only watching on television or listening on radio. instead of 800 mourners inside the chapel there will be just 30, surly family and close relatives. the quire will numberjust four people. the plans mean that it will be a fitting farewell. it will involve members of the armed forces, and they, of course, so important to the duke, and reflection and remembrance of his life of service and his service during the second world war. here in windsor as final preparations for the funeral are made — there is a large police presence to deter any large crowds gathering.
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beautiful sunshine here at windsor. despite the sunshine most people have kept away as the entire event will be held within the walls of the castle. 0ur royal correspondent daniela relph reports now on how the people and the town are getting ready to remember the duke. there was a quiet calm to windsor this morning. picture perfect for a day of solemnity and remembrance. windsor knows how to prepare for a major royal occasions. today, the normal rules do not apply. there are normal rules do not apply. there are no crowds lining the streets. no royal supporters securing the best spot. covid regulations have changed how this town will honour the duke
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of edinburgh. the how this town will honour the duke of edinburgh-— how this town will honour the duke of edinbur: h. ,,., ., , , of edinburgh. the message to members of edinburgh. the message to members ofthe of edinburgh. the message to members of the ublic of edinburgh. the message to members of the public is — of edinburgh. the message to members of the public is please _ of edinburgh. the message to members of the public is please stay _ of edinburgh. the message to members of the public is please stay at _ of the public is please stay at home, don't make specialjourneys to windsor. there will not be anything to see in the town. the ceremonies and events are happening inside the castle. the best place to see it, if you want to see it is on tv. despite the clear warnings, _ you want to see it is on tv. despite the clear warnings, the _ you want to see it is on tv. despite the clear warnings, the pleas - you want to see it is on tv. despite the clear warnings, the pleas from | the clear warnings, the pleas from the clear warnings, the pleas from the authorities, there are those who feel that they need to be here in person, to be present in this most royal of towns, on a day of enormous significance. at windsor train station, passengers were arriving to honour the duke. i station, passengers were arriving to honour the duke.— honour the duke. i was quite overwhelmed _ honour the duke. i was quite overwhelmed with _ honour the duke. i was quite overwhelmed with the - honour the duke. i was quite overwhelmed with the whole j honour the duke. i was quite - overwhelmed with the whole thing, the prince passing. something ifelt i had to do today is to be here. it is wonderful to come out and feel part of— is wonderful to come out and feel part of the — is wonderful to come out and feel part of the celebration of his life fundamentally and for the queen to have her_ fundamentally and for the queen to have her close friends and family around _ have her close friends and family around her. a have her close friends and family around her-— have her close friends and family around her. . , ., ., ., around her. a little bit emotional. it is a beautiful _ around her. a little bit emotional. it is a beautiful day _ around her. a little bit emotional. it is a beautiful day and _ around her. a little bit emotional. it is a beautiful day and what - it is a beautiful day and what better— it is a beautiful day and what
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better day, _ it is a beautiful day and what better day, with _ it is a beautiful day and what better day, with the - it is a beautiful day and what better day, with the sun - it is a beautiful day and what - better day, with the sun shining? the military— better day, with the sun shining? the military associations - better day, with the sun shining? the military associations with - the military associations with windsor are obvious and long lasting. this week the preparations and rehearsals have seen that on show. many individual servicemen and women, taking part in the funeral session for the duke of edinburgh. he would have visited their units, and a great many would have personal meet memories of meeting the duke of edinburgh so i think for them it means a huge amount to be able to be out there today paying their respects. in out there today paying their resects. . ~ out there today paying their resume— out there today paying their resects. . ~' ., , respects. in a week where many lockdown restrictions _ respects. in a week where many lockdown restrictions are - respects. in a week where many lockdown restrictions are lifted, | lockdown restrictions are lifted, several businesses around the castle would be closed until after the funeral. 0ne would be closed until after the funeral. one of the few ways the windsor community can publicly pay tribute today. we windsor community can publicly pay tribute today-— tribute today. we have a lot of his staff that come _ tribute today. we have a lot of his staff that come down _ tribute today. we have a lot of his staff that come down from - tribute today. we have a lot of his staff that come down from the - staff that come down from the castle, especially the grooms, whom i know personally, so my thoughts and prayers are with them as well. unlike many celebratory events in recent years, windsor�*s tribute today will be restrained, and like
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the rest of the country at 3pm, the town will fall silent in memory of a man so strongly connected with this royal county. there are commemorations happening around the country — to celebrate the life of prince philip — including in edinburgh, although the scottish government has told the public not to go to any royal location to pay respects, due to the risk of spreading coronavirus. 0ur scotland correspondent alexandra mackenzie joins me now from edinburgh castle. what is happening there? i'm at edinbur: h what is happening there? i'm at edinburgh castle _ what is happening there? i'm at edinburgh castle at _ what is happening there? i'm at edinburgh castle at the - what is happening there? i'm at edinburgh castle at the top - what is happening there? i'm at edinburgh castle at the top of i what is happening there? i'm at. edinburgh castle at the top of the royal mile. it is a lovely day. a few people have gathered. the scottish government has advised people to stay at home, but there will be a gun salute at three o'clock that will mark the beginning and the end of that one—minute's silence. the duke of edinburgh spent
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a lot of time here. he was chancellor of the university for nearly 60 years. people across the country are remembering him. people in gordonstoun, where he was at school in the 1930s, and got his love of the sea, which led to that naval career, and students and pupils and teachers have been out on the waters around the moray coast and they passed a wreath into the water to remember the duke, who was at the school so many decades ago, and a lone piper was on the shore, playing a tribute for the duke, and at three o'clock, pupils and staff also there will remember the duke of edinburgh in that minute's silence, and back here in the city of edinburgh, scotland's first minister, she is at her official residence, bute house, and at three o'clock she will come out and, like many others, will remember the duke of edinburgh, who spent so much time in scotland, also people in royal
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deeside, the family spent so many summers in aberdeenshire, people there got to know the family well and will be remembering them this afternoon. �* . and will be remembering them this afternoon. . ., a, . ~ afternoon. alexander mackenzie, thank you- _ prince philip was born into the greek royal family in 1921 on the island of corfu, but after a coup d'etat the following year, the young prince and his family were forced to flee. 0ur correspondent, jenny hill, has been to the island of his birth and talked to people there. for this son of greece, no tranquil retreat. prince philip was born into a volatile country, torn by war. so this is the house where prince philip was born? what was greece like when prince philip was born? it was a very difficult period for our history. after all of these wars with turkey. and for this reason the family of prince philip was obligated to leave the country.
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and he was taken away in a fruit box, an orange crate? the legend says. it was to be a turbulent childhood. the family moved around europe and then, as his mother's mental health worsened, broke up. prince philip isolated, left to the care of relatives. it is thought he never returned to the island of his birth, but he is remembered here, even as they prepare for an orthodox easter in the church where he was baptised. queen elizabeth will feel lonely, after 73 years of common life. i think it is a shock. it is something that happened suddenly and it is like a blackout. so i think they will need time. but the family connection lives on. during an official visit
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to greece last month, prince charles spoke of his deep affection for his father's native country. he is said to visit corfu often, in a private capacity. few tourists here now. the pandemic has all but closed the island's doors. like so many other places in europe, corfu is restricted by coronavirus measures. there will be no large, public events to commemorate the duke's passing. but as people in britain prepare for his funeral, many here will be quietly reflecting on the life of a man whose story, after all, began right here. a man who grew from the chaos of childhood into someone upon whom his family, his country, could depend. jenny hill, bbc news, corfu. the queen has described the death of prince philip as "having left a huge void" in her life.
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they first met in 193a and got married after the war in 1947 — a relationship spanning nine decades. mark easton reports from liverpool on how the queen and duke of edinburgh have been a remarkable team in the of the monarchy. | liverpool gives a true lancashirej welcome to princess elizabeth... in spring 1949, a young couple went to liverpool's anglican cathedral at the end of hope street, and drew a lovers' knot on the third pier of the nave. the entwined e and p remains carved into the fabric of the building to this day, the physical embodiment of a marriage that was to last more than 73 years. the princess and the duke move into... . among the choirboys attending that day was geoff holliday, now in his 80s. he recently lost his wife, helen, after almost 50 years of marriage, and feels for the queen as she bids a final farewell to her husband. i would say that the queen is feeling this tremendously at the moment.
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even though you are prepared in a way for such an event, and ifeel for her, actually, and i have a lot of respect for the duke as well. i thought he was a great guy. ijust can't imagine what it would be like after 72 years of having somebody that you can have a moan to or you can go home to and express your disappointments or problems or the things that are worrying you, and now there just to be an empty void. elizabeth and her husband waved to the cheering crowd... - their wedding in 1947 was a distraction from post—war austerity — "a flash of colour on the hard road we travel", as churchill put it. you are now husband and wife together. this weekend, victoria and kevin got married in liverpool town hall. a moment ofjoy in a land struggling to recoverfrom the pandemic. the best feeling ever. yeah. yeah, so happy.
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in liverpool, as across the commonwealth, the queen and prince philip came to represent constancy and commitment, a partnership that endured the pressures of family turbulence and public scrutiny. i think that the main lesson that we've learnt is that tolerance is the one essential ingredient of any happy marriage. and you can take it from me that the queen has the quality of tolerance in abundance. laughter and i thinkjack always thought i was his best friend as well. pat and jack will celebrate their 67th wedding anniversary tomorrow. still together in their merseyside home, they respect the example set by the queen and prince philip. she must be devastated, losing her husband after all this time. i mean, he's been there, steadfast, standing... not beside her but, you know... just behind her. it's very difficult, that, isn't it? what strikes me about your generation is that real sense of duty and of
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resilience and determination. it'sjust being tolerant, i think. and enjoying each other's company is the most... and being lucky. being lucky? - being lucky. yeah, we were lucky, finding each other. he has quite simply been my strength and stay all these years, and i and his whole family owe him a debt greater than he would ever claim or we shall ever know. the queen made her wedding vows before god, to love, to cherish, and — by tradition — to obey, till death us do part. mark easton, bbc news, liverpool. let's take a look at some of today's other news. the number of people who've died with coronavirus worldwide has passed three million. cases of the virus continue to surge in large parts of the world, including india and brazil. the figures — compiled byjohns hopkins university —
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are thought unlikely to represent a full tally of people who've lost their lives. president biden has reversed a decision to retain a trump—era cap on the number of refugees allowed into the us. mr biden had said he would keep the figure to 15,000, but faced with a build—up of migrants on the country's border with mexico, the cap will now be raised next month. nasa has chosen elon musk�*s spacex company to build a lander to return humans to the moon this decade. this vehicle will carry the next man and the first woman to the lunar surface under the space agency's artemis programme. spacex was competing against a group part—financed by amazon founderjeff bezos. the first fans to return to a sporting event have arrived at the crucible in sheffield for the world snooker championship. it marks the start of the government's events research programme, with a third of the venue's capacity being allowed in at first before
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being gradually increased. 0ur sports correspondent laura scott reports. an laura scott reports. iconic venue for a significant moment. an iconic venue for a significant moment. 0pening its doors to 300 snookerfans, the moment. 0pening its doors to 300 snooker fans, the crucible was tasked with kick—starting a science led programme of crowd pilots that could have a pivotal bearing on what this summer's live events look like across the country. those in charge feel a responsibility to get it right. feel a responsibility to get it riuht. , ., ., ., ., right. there is a huge amount of ressure right. there is a huge amount of pressure on _ right. there is a huge amount of pressure on the _ right. there is a huge amount of pressure on the team _ right. there is a huge amount of pressure on the team here. - right. there is a huge amount of pressure on the team here. it i right. there is a huge amount of pressure on the team here. it is| pressure on the team here. it is about the wider picture, the government test is about can be produce protocols which will allow other venues to open? that as cinemas, theatres. it is everything that would be a public gathering in an indoor space. so there is a lot at stake here, and certainly these first few days are very challenging for us. in first few days are very challenging for us. ., ., . ,, for us. in order to get in, ticket holders had _ for us. in order to get in, ticket holders had to _ for us. in order to get in, ticket holders had to show _ for us. in order to get in, ticket holders had to show proof - for us. in order to get in, ticket holders had to show proof of i for us. in order to get in, ticket holders had to show proof of a | holders had to show proof of a negative lateral flow test and sign a consent form to take part in the
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government's events research programme. they have been asked to have pcr tests before and after the event to help provide data on any transmission risk. those who were extremely vulnerable, underrated or pregnant were advised not to attend. having spent so many months away from life support, there is said to be some reticence among fans to attend events like these again, and no session has yet sold out. but, for some fans we spoke to, the opportunity to be back watching the action live is one to savour. defending world champion ronnie 0'sullivan said in advance of the tournament, you wanted protection from overexuberant fans, but the lucky few to be inside stayed calm, as did he, as he held out a tight opening frame. if he makes it to the finalfull opening frame. if he makes it to the final full house will be permitted, marking the first time a capacity crowd has been allowed since before covid. 0ther pilots are taking place at wembley, with 4000 fans attending
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tomorrow's's fa cup semifinal. the site of packed crowds is one that notjust site of packed crowds is one that not just sport has site of packed crowds is one that notjust sport has missed, but music and art, too. depending on how the next few weeks go, it might not be long before they are back. laura scott, bbc news, sheffield. let's return now to our main story. windsor is no stranger to royal events, but today — as we've been hearing — just 30 guests will attend the duke of edinburgh's funeral. 0ur correspondent graham satchell has been speaking to some of those involved with the preparations. at their barracks in windsor, state trumpeters from the band of the household cavalry are having their final rehearsal for this afternoon's ceremony. trumpeters play the reveille these trumpeters have played at royal weddings, state banquets, the opening of parliament. but there is a real pride
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being involved in today's service. it is a little bit nerve—wracking. but you hear so much, and hear so many stories, especially now, of what he did for the duke of edinburgh awards, what he did for the military, and such— a very, very inspirational man. the trumpeters have met prince philip over and over again, and remember his playful sense of humour. he would often walk through and while we were playing he would go, "what's on the flip side?" referring to the old lps, and would turn your music over while you were playing, to see what was on the flip side, and then walk off, mischievously grinning. he was always a real pleasure to be around, and work in the presence of. from the roof terrace of castleview retirement home, they have quite a view of windsor castle. the residents here have all been vaccinated and are in one large bubble, so can watch today's funeral without social distancing. they have fond memories here of a man who made windsor his home.
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living in windsor for almost 50 years, you actually feel very close to the royal family here. you know, we sort of feel as though they're part, sort of part of our family. he was such — a charismatic...charming, with such a great sense of humour, that you just want to be here, - you want to be here for the queen and her family as well, _ there will be quite a bit of piping, bugling and trumpeting at today's funeral to reflect the duke's military past. after the royal marines play the last post, the state trumpeters will play this, the reveille. it signifies the start of a new day, as one chapter of history comes to a close. graham satchell, bbc news, windsor.
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let's join our royal correspondent, sarah campbell, again. just remind us how the afternoon will progress. the just remind us how the afternoon will progress-— will progress. the service will reflect the — will progress. the service will reflect the duke _ will progress. the service will reflect the duke was - will progress. the service will reflect the duke was my - will progress. the service will| reflect the duke was my great passions, he was a family man and a military man. at a quarter to three, his coffin, draped in his personal standard, and the sword and naval cap will be placed on the land rover hearse that he designed. some 730 service personnel will line the route, his children and some of his grandchildren will be there, some walking behind the land rover, the queen following in the state bentley. there will be a minute's silence at three o'clock when the coffin which are the steps of st george's chapel. it will be limited to just 30 mourners, george's chapel. it will be limited tojust 30 mourners, and it will feel different to previous royal
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funerals, but it is clear that this will be a very fitting farewell. sarah campbell, thank you very much. there is coverage of the afternoon ceremony and that family funeral service here at windsor castle throughout the day, here on bbc news. i will leave you with a look at the weather. here is susan powell. a very quiet weather picture across the uk at the moment. widespread blue skies and sunshine as reflected from the satellite picture. look closely, you can see some puffs of cloud developing here and there. that will be a story through this afternoon stop may be a bit of passing cloud, but staying dry with light winds. temperatures getting up into the south, but typically 12—14. heading through the evening and overnight, it stays rather quiet
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with some evening sunshine. into the small hours, a weather front were to sway into northern ireland and western scotland, bearing some rain here, and with the presence of the cloud it will be milder of a night for scotland and northern ireland. elsewhere, frost developing once again with rural lows of —3. for sunday, high pressure from scandinavia, meaning more dry and fine weather but this front tries to eke into the north—west. at the front is on a hiding to nothing because it is pushing into the high pressure and the front is fizzling out. so on sunday so thick cloud and light, patchy rain in scotland and northern ireland, not as bright as it has today, with temperatures not struggling too much, still getting to much, still getting 210—12, 15, further south where we keep the widespread sunshine. the story for the week ahead is the dry weather. we have seen precious little rain across many parts of england and wales this april. and looking onto the week ahead, there is not much to
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come. the high pressure from scandinavia pulls away through the week but high pressure builds from the west, so we will see the continuation of fairweather, moving on into the end of the week and even further afield than that. but on the plus side, the knights should become a little milder. —— the nights. brute a little milder. -- the nights. we a- roach a little milder. —— the nights. we approach now the beginning of our special programme to mark the funeral of the duke of edinburgh, which gets under way in windsor later this afternoon. you can follow that of course throughout the day on bbc news. goodbye.
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