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tv   The Funeral of HRH The Prince...  BBC News  April 17, 2021 12:30pm-4:20pm BST

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for more than a thousand years — in good times and in bad — the town of windsor has taken pride in its enduring bond with the monarchy. today, under blue skies, the royal borough provides the setting for a funeral. a ceremonial funeral as the longest—serving consort in the history of the royal family is laid to rest. a long and productive lifetime, a history of achievement, a peaceful death at the age of 99. these are all things to celebrate and to mark with gratitude. today's funeral for his royal highness, the prince philip, duke of edinburgh, will certainly celebrate a life well lived.
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but it will also be a time of grief and loss for her majesty the queen, who for over 70 years, counted on the strength and advice of a dutiful husband and consort. it's a time of loss, too, for the children, the grandchildren, and the wider family. it was here at windsor castle — eight days ago — that prince philip passed away. and it is here in the private chapel that his body has been lying at rest in readiness for today's funeral, which will take place within the castle precincts in the splendour of st george's chapel — the burial place of some of britain's greatest monarchs. the congregation won't fill the chapel in the manner of previous great events. the current covid restrictions mean that numbers will be very limited. there will be glorious music, much of it restrained
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but powerful in keeping with the occasion. and flowers and other tributes are vivid reminders of a vast congregation watching throughout the world, especially in the countries of the commonwealth, wanting to pay tribute to prince philip and to convey sympathy for the queen at this time. i think it is fair to say that events moved quickly since the announcement of the death on friday. family members have paid their own tributes, led by the prince of wales. while palace officials have finalised the plans for the funeral — the plans approved by prince philip himself in recent months. we are interrupting our normal programmes to bring you an important announcement. programmes to bring you an important announcement-— programmes to bring you an important announcement. buckingham palace has announced the — announcement. buckingham palace has announced the death _ announcement. buckingham palace has announced the death of _ announcement. buckingham palace has announced the death of his _ announcement. buckingham palace has announced the death of his royal- announced the death of his royal highness, prince philip, the duke of edinburgh — highness, prince philip, the duke of edinburgh. the palace said it is with_ edinburgh. the palace said it is with deep— edinburgh. the palace said it is with deep sorrow her majesty the
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queen— with deep sorrow her majesty the queen announces the death of her husband — queen announces the death of her husband. his royal highness passed away peacefully this morning at windsor— away peacefully this morning at windsor castle. i particularly wanted to say that my father, i suppose the last 70 years, has given the most remarkable, devoted service to the queen, to my family, and to the country. as you can imagine, my family and i miss my
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father enormously. he was a much loved and appreciated figure. we are so deeply touched by the number of other people here and elsewhere around the world who also i think share our loss and our sorrow. my my dear papa was a special person who i think above all else would have been amazed by the reaction and the touching things that have been said about him. and from that point of view, we are, my family, deeply gratefulfor of view, we are, my family, deeply grateful for all that, which will sustain us in this particular loss and at this particularly sad time. thank you. thank you.
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a sense of the rapid course of the past week. one of the important things to do today, ahead of the service, is to talk about prince philip, his character and his causes. so we've invited some rather special guests to share their knowledge with us. we start with two with a wealth of knowledge and experience, distinguished individuals. with me are the broadcaster and natural historian sir david attenborough. and baroness scotland, secretary—general of the commonwealth. welcome to you both. given the fact that you shared certainly a core of interests around conservation and the environment and you had quite a few dealings with the duke over the years, can we talk about the man first of all and the
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impression he made on you during exchanges together? he impression he made on you during exchanges together?— exchanges together? he was an extraordinary — exchanges together? he was an extraordinary combination - exchanges together? he was an extraordinary combination of. exchanges together? he was an i extraordinary combination of being formidable and actually being cheerful, friendly. rather than cheerful. you knew he was there in an extraordinary way. we had an amazing presence, which at the same time, an extraordinary balancing act between formality and informality. that put you at your ease, but also made you aware you were on parade, as it were. the fact he was a serving officer in the british navy, that was with him all the time. at
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least it was in my view. i was in the navy, a long time after the war, but i know when the commanding officer comes on board. and you knew that when he arrived. it is an extraordinary ambience which is difficult to describe, you just have to sense it. we difficult to describe, you “ust have to it.— to sense it. we will talk about the causes in a _ to sense it. we will talk about the causes in a moment. _ to sense it. we will talk about the causes in a moment. i _ to sense it. we will talk about the causes in a moment. i want - to sense it. we will talk about the causes in a moment. i want to - to sense it. we will talk about the l causes in a moment. i want to stay on the man and impression he made. i think it was extraordinary. i had the privilege of meeting him off and on about_ the privilege of meeting him off and on about 40 years, first as a young barrister_ on about 40 years, first as a young barrister coming to windsor great park, _ barrister coming to windsor great park. and — barrister coming to windsor great park, and then in all the different manifestations up to being secretary general, _ manifestations up to being secretary general, and he was always the same. he had _ general, and he was always the same. he had acuity, sharpness, wit, and he could _ he had acuity, sharpness, wit, and he could make you really stand on your metal, — he could make you really stand on your metal, but he was charming and kind and _ your metal, but he was charming and kind and warm. he really cared. so
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that the _ kind and warm. he really cared. so that the things that absorbed him, whether— that the things that absorbed him, whether climate change, the ex service — whether climate change, the ex service league, the commonwealth, a study— service league, the commonwealth, a study conference, the duke of edinburgh awards, these were passionate things for him, and he was a _ passionate things for him, and he was a great — passionate things for him, and he was a great conveyor and purveyor of those _ was a great conveyor and purveyor of those passions and i think we will miss— those passions and i think we will miss him — those passions and i think we will miss him terribly. the commonwealth is heartbroken, 2.5 billion people, one third — is heartbroken, 2.5 billion people, one third of— is heartbroken, 2.5 billion people, one third of the world, 60% of them under— one third of the world, 60% of them under the _ one third of the world, 60% of them under the age of 30. the}r one third of the world, 6096 of them under the age of 30.— under the age of 30. they will all miss him- _ under the age of 30. they will all miss him- we — under the age of 30. they will all miss him. we talk _ under the age of 30. they will all miss him. we talk a _ under the age of 30. they will all miss him. we talk a lot _ under the age of 30. they will all miss him. we talk a lot about. under the age of 30. they will all| miss him. we talk a lot about the fact he was a pioneer in some fields and embraced causes such as conservation and the environment when people did not give it a lot of thought. what has that contribution in that area, giving you have made a contribution, how did you measure his? he contribution, how did you measure his? . , .,
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his? he was in there at the beginning- _ his? he was in there at the beginning. when _ his? he was in there at the beginning. when you - his? he was in there at the beginning. when you say i his? he was in there at the - beginning. when you say correctly at a time when conservation did not mean much to many people, he, back at the end of the 50s, towards the 60s, when in fact the world of conservation had hardly opened up, he saw it here but also saw it universally. the world wildlife fund as it was then called, owed a huge amount to him and his presence and the fact he made it a real issue, important issue. not something to be brushed aside, a past time, but something centrally important. when he spoke about it, he spoke with the passion of a man who cared about it and also knew about it and knew about it a lot. he and also knew about it and knew about it a lot.— and also knew about it and knew about it a lot. he campaigned, he was a man _ about it a lot. he campaigned, he was a man who _ about it a lot. he campaigned, he was a man who wanted _ about it a lot. he campaigned, he was a man who wanted results. . about it a lot. he campaigned, he| was a man who wanted results. he about it a lot. he campaigned, he - was a man who wanted results. he was known as a bit of an action man. what would you point to today as
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some of the things he achieved in this area, let's say a younger generation not familiar with prince philip would be able to recognise? the fact that conservation now is a worldwide sensitivity. people know worldwide, notjust in this country. people used to think, oh well, looking after rare birds is interesting but not central. we know perhaps it is more central than we realised in the 50s and 60s. the future of the world now depends upon our solving these problems. if people are aware there are problems, a great deal of that awareness is due to the fact he made it clear and apparent. it due to the fact he made it clear and a- arent. , ., , due to the fact he made it clear and a- arent. , . , , ., apparent. it is a big tribute, to ut it in apparent. it is a big tribute, to put it in that — apparent. it is a big tribute, to put it in that context. - apparent. it is a big tribute, to put it in that context. there i apparent. it is a big tribute, tol put it in that context. there has been debate about britain's place in the world, not least in the past years with the political debate around that. will this lead to a
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kind of revisiting of the importance of the commonwealth, and may be the kind of realigning, the vision that prince philip had for the commonwealth, in the years to come? he made a tremendous contribution. if he made a tremendous contribution. if you _ he made a tremendous contribution. if you think— he made a tremendous contribution. if you think about 1956, when he created — if you think about 1956, when he created the studies conference, studies — created the studies conference, studies leadership conference and the awards. he saw there was huge common— the awards. he saw there was huge common good and commitment that could _ common good and commitment that could come — common good and commitment that could come from the commonwealth and he said _ could come from the commonwealth and he said the _ could come from the commonwealth and he said the commonwealth was worth a -reat he said the commonwealth was worth a great deal— he said the commonwealth was worth a great deal of personal sacrifice because — great deal of personal sacrifice because of the incredible opportunity to do good and that has been passed on to the next generation. if you think about what david _ generation. if you think about what david talked about in terms of climate — david talked about in terms of climate change, he passed that absolutely on to prince charles, who has been _ absolutely on to prince charles, who has been passionate about this issue for 50 _ has been passionate about this issue for 50 years — has been passionate about this issue for 50 years and this week,
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notwithstanding the bereavement, he held a _ notwithstanding the bereavement, he held a roundtable with african leaders — held a roundtable with african leaders talking about sustainability. this is a new commonwealth. the duke of edinburgh said the _ commonwealth. the duke of edinburgh said the new commonwealth was a new construct _ said the new commonwealth was a new construct built on the highest ideais — construct built on the highest ideals of— construct built on the highest ideals of man. we have 54 countries now, _ ideals of man. we have 54 countries now. the _ ideals of man. we have 54 countries now, the largest number, more countries — now, the largest number, more countries wanting to join. that now, the largest number, more countries wanting tojoin. that is part of— countries wanting tojoin. that is part of his — countries wanting tojoin. that is part of his legacy, part of her majesty's legacy. they were modernisers in the 505 and maje5ty'5 legacy. they were moderni5er5 in the 505 and what is extraordinary, they have remained moderni5er5 for 70 years and the commitment to the commonwealth famiiy— commitment to the commonwealth family has— commitment to the commonwealth family has been felt so deeply by all the _ family has been felt so deeply by all the leaders around the commonwealth today. a5 we honour him, commonwealth today. a5 we honour him. he _ commonwealth today. a5 we honour him. he is _ commonwealth today. a5 we honour him, he is being honoured bya third of humanity— him, he is being honoured bya third of humanity in 54 countries. the commonwealth ha5 of humanity in 54 countries. the commonwealth has a great future but he has _ commonwealth has a great future but he has it— commonwealth has a great future but he has it -- _ commonwealth has a great future but he has it -- it— commonwealth has a great future but he has it —— it has it because of her_ he has it —— it has it because of her majesty_ he has it —— it has it because of her majesty the queen and prince philip _ her majesty the queen and prince philip and — her majesty the queen and prince philip and the total commitment from prince _ philip and the total commitment from
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prince charles and the rest of the family— prince charles and the rest of the family and — prince charles and the rest of the family and the 54 leaders working together— family and the 54 leaders working together for humanity. | family and the 54 leaders working together for humanity.— family and the 54 leaders working together for humanity. i think it is a treat together for humanity. i think it is a great opportunity. _ together for humanity. i think it is a great opportunity. important - a great opportunity. important themes to set out at the start of this coverage today. thank you. today's events have been planned to the last second, as you would expect when british ceremonial events take place. a short while ago, as an example, the king's troop, royal horse artillery, approached windsor castle along the long walk. a site on a glorious saturday. it is their duty to fired the gun is, the gun is fired on the day of the wedding between princess elizabeth and the dukein between princess elizabeth and the duke in 1947, but this time to fire for the funeral procession on the east lawn of windsor castle. let's
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look ahead to events this afternoon. by 14:15, all the elements in place in the quadrangle. when all the participants are in place, the procession will step off from the quadrangle of windsor castle, and senior members of the royal family will walk behind the hearse as it makes its way down the hill to st george's chapel. a minute's silence will be observed across the united kingdom at 3pm, after which the funeral service will begin. our understanding is that her majesty the queen has taken the decision to follow the funeral procession in her car, instead of taking the lead as the sovereign would normally do. it's a very special occasion. a moment of history without question. smaller in scale than the funeral originally intended, but no less poignant for that.
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we will have full coverage of the day's events with our special guests. but if you'd like unaccompanied coverage, you can use the service on the red button. let's join sophie raworth. she is on the long walk., and she has a great view of the countryside around windsor great park leading up to the castle. i around windsor great park leading up to the castle-— to the castle. i am here on the long walk. , to the castle. i am here on the long walk., this — to the castle. i am here on the long walk., this two _ to the castle. i am here on the long walk. , this two and _ to the castle. i am here on the long walk. , this two and a _ to the castle. i am here on the long walk. , this two and a half— to the castle. i am here on the long walk. , this two and a half miles - walk., this two and a half miles route stretching from the statue of king george iii up to the gates of windsor castle. normally, during non—covid times, the long walk. would have been packed with thousands of people, who would have come here to play their last respects to the duke of edinburgh but instead, today, everything is taken place within the castle walls. there really are very few people out here this afternoon. people seem to have heeded the wishes of buckingham
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palace to stay away. later this afternoon, i will be talking to people who knew the duke, to representatives from some of the almost 1000 charities that he lent his support to for more than 70 years, and i will be talking to the explorer sir david templeman adams, who described the duke is like a surrogate father, and says he first discovered his own spirit of adventure when he did duke of edinburgh's award scheme the age of 13. late edinburgh's award scheme the age of 13. . ., ., 4' edinburgh's award scheme the age of 13. ~ ., ., ~ ., ., edinburgh's award scheme the age of 13. we look forward to that. sophie raworth on — 13. we look forward to that. sophie raworth on the _ 13. we look forward to that. sophie raworth on the long _ 13. we look forward to that. sophie raworth on the long walk.. - 13. we look forward to that. sophie raworth on the long walk.. also . raworth on the long walk.. also there in the park with the military, hundreds of them, members of the armed forces who are forming up, they will be taking their places within the next hour or so, all of them. there we have the famous blues and royals of the household cavalry. in that park we have my colleague, himself a former armed forces
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veteran, jj chalmers. himself a former armed forces veteran, jj chalmers.— himself a former armed forces veteran, jj chalmers. yes, i'm in home park. _ veteran, jj chalmers. yes, i'm in home park. 300 _ veteran, jj chalmers. yes, i'm in home park, 300 metres - veteran, jj chalmers. yes, i'm in home park, 300 metres from . veteran, jj chalmers. yes, i'm in| home park, 300 metres from the veteran, jj chalmers. yes, i'm in - home park, 300 metres from the front gates of windsor castle. it will take the trip for a few minutes to possess interposition. a lot of area round here is a public park, gifted to the residents of windsor in 1851 by the queen victoria, but today it is the forming up point for the over 700 military personnel that will be on parade. you can see them over my shoulderfalling in in position. they have been rehearsing all week for this event, since the passing of the duke. the duke himself was involved in the planning and preparation of this event. he was a humble man who knew when and when not to use pomp and ceremony, but for the military, and i can say this myself as an armed forces veteran, this is the military spectacular that we feel he deserves. there is a real sense of pride in the air, a sense of sorrow and a sense of anticipation about what is to come. many thanks. we will be back shortly to see what is
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going on. there is plenty to seek in terms of the various units and detachments coming together put up we will see them a bit later. what we call those residents and detachments at units with special relationships with the duke. they have been invited to form up duke. they have been invited to form up in the quadrangle in windsor castle. they will be very much part of today's event. we look forward to seeing the various groups forming, and we will explain a little about the nature of the special relationship between the duke and, let's say, the grenadier guards or, of course, the royal navy and royal air force and others, too. much of the past week has featured tributes to prince philip's many achievements, his support for many good causes but, at the heart of today's service, as we all remember, is family mourning the loss of a much loved figure. her majesty the queen has lost her husband and consort of 73 years, and charles,
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anne, andrew and edward have lost a father. lim and harry will also be walking the procession stop they have lost a grandfather. —— william and harry put up here are some of the tributes of the past eight days. we were always aware there was a time set aside, particularly in the evenings, and if he was around he would always come up, and you knew he would be there. that was for reading, story time. i he would be there. that was for reading, story time. i remember him as a man who — reading, story time. i remember him as a man who loved _ reading, story time. i remember him as a man who loved the _ reading, story time. i remember him as a man who loved the family, - reading, story time. i remember him| as a man who loved the family, loved a5 a man who loved the family, loved being _ a5 a man who loved the family, loved being around in scotland. it was 'u5t being around in scotland. it was just extraordinary in those ju5t extraordinary in those circumstances. my just extraordinary in those circumstances.— just extraordinary in those circumstances. g . ., circumstances. my father was was a treat circumstances. my father was was a great source — circumstances. my father was was a great source of _ circumstances. my father was was a great source of support _ circumstances. my father was was a great source of support and - great source of support and encouragement. and guidance, all the way through. and never trying to curtail any of the activities that we wanted to try and do. i
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personally wouldn't have been involved with the duke of edinburgh's award if it wasn't for him encouraging me to get involved in all sorts of other aspects that he would after that.— he would after that. when i was ounter, he would after that. when i was younger. l _ he would after that. when i was younger, i talked _ he would after that. when i was younger, i talked to _ he would after that. when i was younger, i talked to him - he would after that. when i was younger, i talked to him a - he would after that. when i was younger, i talked to him a lot i he would after that. when i was - younger, i talked to him a lot about his efforts. — younger, i talked to him a lot about his efforts, you know, the world wildlife — his efforts, you know, the world wildlife fund, and we did talk quite a lot about those sorts of things. i suspect— a lot about those sorts of things. i suspect i— a lot about those sorts of things. i suspect i was probably quite interested by that. as suspect i was probably quite interested by that.— suspect i was probably quite interested by that. as you grow older, interested by that. as you grow older. you _ interested by that. as you grow older, you were _ interested by that. as you grow older, you were expected - interested by that. as you grow older, you were expected to . interested by that. as you grow l older, you were expected to have interested by that. as you grow - older, you were expected to have a degree of discipline and manners in your life. if you didn't do that, your life. if you didn't do that, you would know about it, but there was a huge amount of encouragement to do things, and quite a lot of leeway in terms of pushing your own boundaries. he leeway in terms of pushing your own boundaries. . . leeway in terms of pushing your own boundaries-— boundaries. he was inspirational in nettina
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boundaries. he was inspirational in taettin me boundaries. he was inspirational in getting me to _ boundaries. he was inspirational in getting me to join _ boundaries. he was inspirational in getting me to join the _ boundaries. he was inspirational in getting me to join the navy, - boundaries. he was inspirational in getting me to join the navy, but i boundaries. he was inspirational in | getting me to join the navy, but not getting me tojoin the navy, but not for the _ getting me tojoin the navy, but not for the reasons that you might think — for the reasons that you might think he _ for the reasons that you might think. he took me flying in a helicopter when i was very, very small _ helicopter when i was very, very small it — helicopter when i was very, very small. it always 5tuck helicopter when i was very, very small. it always stuck with me that 5mall. it always stuck with me that that's— small. it always stuck with me that that's what — small. it always stuck with me that that's what i wanted to do. and we that'5 what i wanted to do. and we never_ that's what i wanted to do. and we never really — that's what i wanted to do. and we never really di5cu55ed that's what i wanted to do. and we never really discussed it as to whether — never really discussed it as to whether or not i should go in the navy. _ whether or not i should go in the navy. hut— whether or not i should go in the navy, but it was a logical conclusion, because that's the best place _ conclu5ion, because that's the best place to— conclu5ion, because that's the best place to go— conclusion, because that's the best place to go and fly helicopters. he. showed place to go and fly helicopters. showed me place to go and fly helicopters. he: showed me how to place to go and fly helicopters. he showed me how to do things, he taught me how to play polo and that sort of thing. he tried to teach me how to drive a carriage but i wasn't very good at that. i how to drive a carriage but i wasn't very good at that.— very good at that. i will certainly remember _ very good at that. i will certainly remember him _ very good at that. i will certainly remember him as _ very good at that. i will certainly remember him as somebody - very good at that. i will certainly| remember him as somebody you very good at that. i will certainly - remember him as somebody you could always— remember him as somebody you could always turn— remember him as somebody you could always turn to, in good times and in bad. always turn to, in good times and in bad and _ always turn to, in good times and in bad. and that he would always manage to find _ bad. and that he would always manage to find something that you could turn into— to find something that you could turn into a — to find something that you could turn into a positive, and help you to look— turn into a positive, and help you to look forward. i
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turn into a positive, and help you to look forward.— to look forward. i think he is somebody — to look forward. i think he is somebody who _ to look forward. i think he is somebody who did - to look forward. i think he is somebody who did his - to look forward. i think he is somebody who did his duty, | to look forward. i think he is - somebody who did his duty, you to look forward. i think he is _ somebody who did his duty, you know, by this country, and obviously by my mother. ., .,, by this country, and obviously by my mother. ., ., , mother. some of those lovely tributes we — mother. some of those lovely tributes we have _ mother. some of those lovely tributes we have heard - mother. some of those lovely tributes we have heard this i mother. some of those lovely - tributes we have heard this week. standing by, knowing that they are playing such an important part in today's events, the grenadier guards. they really have such an important relationship with the royal family, especially with the duke of edinburgh. he took over as their colonel in 1975, and served for 40 years as their colonel fed he was very proud of the association. the duke was a big naval man who had served in the navy, so a bit of a country of transition for to become colonel of the welsh guards up to 1975, or handing her over to the prince of wales, then taking over as colonel of the grenadier guards, something he delighted in.
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he was keen to maintain a close relationship with the grenadiers, and he attended lots of their events. they will be leading the funeral procession today. that is the burden that they are bearing. they will lead the procession down chapel hill to st george's chapel with the hearse behind them, the specially converted land rover, designed by the duke himself, and we are looking forward to seeing that a little bit later. a very special feature of today's events. the grenadiers will lead that procession, with members of the royal family, the prince of wales and, of course, her majesty the queen a bit later. just a word about the importance of those very smartly turned out footguards today. there will, of course, be other regiments here, too, including the scots guards and the welsh guards, but we will give them their credit when they are seen. but the grenadiers certainly pride of place when it comes to that funeral procession.
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sir david is still with us. and we'rejoined by richard griffin, a former personal protection officerfor the duke of edinburgh. so he knows that you could very from a different perspective. good to have you here. we have talked a lot already in this programme about the character of the duke of edinburgh, because people have a general sense of a robust man, somebody with a pretty sense of humour, somebody who could be rather outspoken, sometimes too outspoken for some people. what was he like to work for? was he as daunting and forbidding as all of that seems to suggest?- that seems to suggest? when i started working _ that seems to suggest? when i started working for _ that seems to suggest? when i started working for him, - that seems to suggest? when i started working for him, yes, i | that seems to suggest? when i - started working for him, yes, i must admit, his reputation terrified me, but i quickly realised he was a very kind and considerate man. the first time i was introduced to him, i was with prince edward, and he introduced me to her majesty and prince philip, and i had just been
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transferred to buckingham palace after the michael fagan incident, breaking into buckingham palace, and i remember the queen saying to me, mr griffin, what did you do before you came to buckingham palace, which was probably a question i'd have preferred not to be asked, because i'd spent five years dealing with vice. i said, i'd spent five years dealing with vice. isaid, i've been i'd spent five years dealing with vice. i said, i've been in the west end dealing with sex shops and pornographic cinemas and brothels and prostitution and gambling. good gracious me, she said, why on earth does edward need a protection officer with your qualifications? quick as a flash, prince philip said, i don't know, we are going to have some wonderful parties at cambridge. that was my first experience. and then i was with him in china when he made the famous slitty eyed comments, and he was always coming out with these inappropriate one—liners. i remember one day in the press they were saying that prince philip had made another gaffe, and i was in the car within the following day and said, i
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was with you all day yesterday, when did you say that? he said, i didn't, it was the sort of thing i would say so i may as well take the credit. when you work with someone like that, and he was so, so kind. 0ccasionally he would ring up my houseif 0ccasionally he would ring up my house if there was a change of plans and he wouldn't bother going through the switchboard, he knew my phone number and he would ring the switchboard, he knew my phone numberand he would ring up, and it was brilliant because, if my wife answered, she would stand up and curtsy, and i used to say, he can't see you, but the wonderful story prince philip used to dine out on was that he rang up one day and my five—year—old son answered, and he used to call me dick, could i speak to dick, please? he said, is in the garden. who should i say is colin? he said, the duke of edinburgh for top —— is calling for top and he said all he heard was, dad, somebody from the pub wants to speak to you. that's very sweet. i think viewers will be invested in this, and i will
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ask david as well, because the image over the years, as some people portrayed it, was not terribly flattering, in terms of the way he dealt with people. you are offering us a different picture, of somebody with a gentle sense of humour at times, great with children, a good rapport with young people, and as you say a sense of being kind to people, especially those who worked with him and for him, and that's perhaps something is important to point out. his perhaps something is important to oint out. . . perhaps something is important to ointout. , , , point out. his staff absolutely adored him. _ point out. his staff absolutely adored him. none _ point out. his staff absolutely adored him. none of- point out. his staff absolutely adored him. none of the - point out. his staff absolutely adored him. none of the lady point out. his staff absolutely - adored him. none of the lady cloaks in the office would ever leave. he has one valet with him who has been with him over 35 years. he had a private secretary who has passed away, sir brian mcgrath, but brian had been with him over 20 years, and had been with him over 20 years, and had a retirement party at buckingham palace, and he still came back to work on the monday. he had retired. i said, what are you doing? he said, i'm not leaving the step he took over his office and the new private secretary had to find somewhere else to work from, and brian stayed for
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another three or four years because he loved being a red prince philip. david, we mentioned earlier the big projects and missions and passions to do with conservation and the environment, but again, with you, when you dealt with him, when you discuss things with him, did you get this sense of a man who had a very different public persona to the one behind—the—scenes? he different public persona to the one behind-the-scenes?_ different public persona to the one behind-the-scenes? he was a most extraordinary _ behind-the-scenes? he was a most extraordinary amalgam _ behind-the-scenes? he was a most extraordinary amalgam of— behind-the-scenes? he was a most extraordinary amalgam of two - behind-the-scenes? he was a most i extraordinary amalgam of two things. he was— extraordinary amalgam of two things. he was that considerate, charming, witty human being that you have just spoken _ witty human being that you have just spoken of. _ witty human being that you have just spoken of, but he was also actually very formidable. he was a real presence _ very formidable. he was a real presence. it was extraordinary balancing _ presence. it was extraordinary balancing act in which he combined informality — balancing act in which he combined informality with something that you knew that _ informality with something that you knew that he was not as other men. when _ knew that he was not as other men. when he _ knew that he was not as other men. when he came into the room, you knew
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about— when he came into the room, you knew about it _ when he came into the room, you knew about it it's_ when he came into the room, you knew about it. it's something indescribable. human beings want people _ indescribable. human beings want people who are special. human societies— people who are special. human societies want to be led by people who are _ societies want to be led by people who are special. 400 years ago, we thought— who are special. 400 years ago, we thought about whether or not kings and queens at a divine right —— had and queens at a divine right —— had a divine— and queens at a divine right —— had a divine right. _ and queens at a divine right —— had a divine right, and of course we don't _ a divine right, and of course we don't believe in gods in that sense, but there _ don't believe in gods in that sense, but there was something very palpable. when he came in the room, he knew— palpable. when he came in the room, he knew how— palpable. when he came in the room, he knew how to handle it. he knew how to _ he knew how to handle it. he knew how to put — he knew how to handle it. he knew how to put you at your ease. but, when — how to put you at your ease. but, when it — how to put you at your ease. but, when it was — how to put you at your ease. but, when it was required, it was there. ithink— when it was required, it was there. i think that's — when it was required, it was there. i think that's a good point at which to pause. thank you, sir david and richard. thank you for bringing those anecdotes. it helps us understand the man that is being laid to rest today.
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0ver his lifetime, the duke was associated with almost a thousand organisations as president, patron, or honorary member — and many of those were charities. sophie is with someone who was a member of the first charity he supported. it was originally called the london federation of boys club and in 1947, the duke of edinburgh became its patron and it was something his dash he stayed with. i am joined by a former member, victoria azubuike, who showed him around his own back garden, buckingham palace, only three years ago and it was an event for london youth. it three years ago and it was an event for london youth.— three years ago and it was an event for london youth. it was a great day and to celebrate _ for london youth. it was a great day and to celebrate his _ for london youth. it was a great day and to celebrate his anniversary - for london youth. it was a great day and to celebrate his anniversary of. and to celebrate his anniversary of london youth and it was a great day for young people to understand a man
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from another generation wanted to hear the voices of young people. we had a rock climbing, tennis, football, and recreated a youth club in buckingham palace grounds. he had already stepped _ in buckingham palace grounds. he had already stepped back _ in buckingham palace grounds. he had already stepped back from _ in buckingham palace grounds. he had already stepped back from public - already stepped back from public duties but he showed a great interest. i duties but he showed a great interest. . duties but he showed a great interest. , ., , ., ., interest. i remember there was a lot ha -~enin interest. i remember there was a lot happening on _ interest. i remember there was a lot happening on the — interest. i remember there was a lot happening on the day _ interest. i remember there was a lot happening on the day but _ interest. i remember there was a lot happening on the day but he - interest. i remember there was a lot happening on the day but he was - happening on the day but he was determined to understand viewpoints of the young people and listen to their stories, which was a great experience. filtrate their stories, which was a great experience-_ experience. we heard david attenborough _ experience. we heard david attenborough saying - experience. we heard david attenborough saying what l experience. we heard david attenborough saying what a experience. we heard david - attenborough saying what a great presence he was when he arrive somewhere which you recognise. that is the same — somewhere which you recognise. trust is the same with the work of london youth and he was passionate about visiting youth clubs and beating young people to understand their stories. it was a great experience then, and his service to london youth over those years.- then, and his service to london youth over those years. thank you.
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sohie, youth over those years. thank you. sophie. thanks- _ youth over those years. thank you. sophie, thanks. i _ youth over those years. thank you. sophie, thanks. i really _ youth over those years. thank you. sophie, thanks. i really would - youth over those years. thank you. sophie, thanks. i really would like l sophie, thanks. i really would like to keep outside. we can go into windsor great park and celebrate because it is such a great view. i told you about the grenadiers. because they play such an important role, we can underline that. for those joining role, we can underline that. for thosejoining us, i want to underline the important part of the grenadier guards will play. and the footguards are the queen's personal troops who have a special bond with the royalfamily, and the household division very much part of that. the grenadier guards today are missing the fact that this special man, colonel for 42 years, is being laid to rest and they want to mark that properly and they want to market with dignity and they want to play
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their own solemn part in this procession. you will see the instruments. the drums, in black, and we will see those emblems of grief as we go through the day. but let's celebrate with the grenadier guards as we look at the long association between the duke and grenadiers. association between the duke and grenadiers-— association between the duke and grenadiers. : ., , ., , grenadiers. although the news was not unexpected. — grenadiers. although the news was not unexpected, when _ grenadiers. although the news was not unexpected, when it _ grenadiers. although the news was not unexpected, when it came - not unexpected, when it came through, it was shocking. i not unexpected, when it came through, it was shocking. i was very u set. through, it was shocking. i was very upset. regardless _ through, it was shocking. i was very upset. regardless of _ through, it was shocking. i was very upset. regardless of the _ through, it was shocking. i was very upset. regardless of the age, - through, it was shocking. i was very upset. regardless of the age, you l upset. regardless of the age, you think— upset. regardless of the age, you think somebody will live for ever. that sense — think somebody will live for ever. that sense of loss and sadness i5 that sense of loss and sadness is very much— that sense of loss and sadness is very much apparent. _ that sense of loss and sadness is very much apparent. he - that sense of loss and sadness is very much apparent. he was - that sense of loss and sadness is very much apparent. he was notl that sense of loss and sadness i5 - very much apparent. he was not only an amazing _ very much apparent. he was not only an amazing figure _ very much apparent. he was not only an amazing figure to _ very much apparent. he was not only an amazing figure to look _ very much apparent. he was not only an amazing figure to look back- very much apparent. he was not only an amazing figure to look back on - an amazing figure to look back on and what — an amazing figure to look back on and what he — an amazing figure to look back on and what he achieved _ an amazing figure to look back on and what he achieved but - an amazing figure to look back on and what he achieved but also - an amazing figure to look back on and what he achieved but also toi and what he achieved but also to look up — and what he achieved but also to look up to — and what he achieved but also to look up to he—
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and what he achieved but also to look up to— and what he achieved but also to look up to. he was patron of 800 organisations _ look up to. he was patron of 800 organisations and _ look up to. he was patron of 800 organisations and they _ look up to. he was patron of 800 organisations and they all - look up to. he was patron of 800 i organisations and they all competed for his time and amongst those was the grenadier guards. he was colonel for 42 years. he would always find time to visit the grenadiers. he wanted to get to know the soldiers, their families and to wanted to get to know the soldiers, theirfamilies and to be more than wanted to get to know the soldiers, their families and to be more than a figurehead. he wanted to provide that practical support and i think it was for that reason he was keen to create the colonel�*s fund. it followed the deployment to afghanistan in 2007 where it provides financial support to bereaved families and soldiers who have been injured, and it thrives today. i have been in'ured, and it thrives toda . , have been in'ured, and it thrives toda. _. have been in'ured, and it thrives toda. ~ ., today. i lost my son in afghanistan. the 13th of — today. i lost my son in afghanistan. the 13th of february, _ today. i lost my son in afghanistan. the 13th of february, 2010. - today. i lost my son in afghanistan. the 13th of february, 2010. david. | the 13th of february, 2010. david. he loved _ the 13th of february, 2010. david. he loved being a soldier and he loved _ he loved being a soldier and he loved his— he loved being a soldier and he loved hisjob and he was proud to be a grenadier~ —
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loved hisjob and he was proud to be a grenadier. i have met the duke of edinburgh _ a grenadier. i have met the duke of edinburgh when he came to pass on his condolences. he did want you to know— his condolences. he did want you to know he _ his condolences. he did want you to know he really did care. it was as if he _ know he really did care. it was as if he could — know he really did care. it was as if he could feel your pain. and i actually— if he could feel your pain. and i actually said to him, if it wasn't for the — actually said to him, if it wasn't for the colonel's fund we would not be here _ for the colonel's fund we would not be here. his for the colonel's fund we would not be here. . for the colonel's fund we would not be here. , , ., , be here. his entire persona 'ust screams everything i be here. his entire persona 'ust screams everything you i be here. his entire personajust screams everything you should | be here. his entire personajust - screams everything you should look up screams everything you should look up to _ screams everything you should look up to as _ screams everything you should look up to as a _ screams everything you should look up to as a person _ screams everything you should look up to as a person. something - screams everything you should look up to as a person. something you l up to as a person. something you want _ up to as a person. something you want to— up to as a person. something you want to aspire _ up to as a person. something you want to aspire to _ up to as a person. something you want to aspire to achieve, - up to as a person. something you want to aspire to achieve, to - up to as a person. something you | want to aspire to achieve, to wear the uniform — want to aspire to achieve, to wear the uniform. we _ want to aspire to achieve, to wear the uniform. we have _ want to aspire to achieve, to wear the uniform. we have lost- want to aspire to achieve, to wear the uniform. we have lost a - want to aspire to achieve, to wear the uniform. we have lost a great| the uniform. we have lost a great man _ the uniform. we have lost a great man he — the uniform. we have lost a great man he did — the uniform. we have lost a great man he did so— the uniform. we have lost a great man. he did so much _ the uniform. we have lost a great man. he did so much for- the uniform. we have lost a great man. he did so much for all- the uniform. we have lost a great man. he did so much for all of. the uniform. we have lost a great man. he did so much for all of u5| the uniform. we have lost a great. man. he did so much for all of us as a nation _ man. he did so much for all of us as a nation and — man. he did so much for all of us as a nation and for— man. he did so much for all of us as a nation and for the _ man. he did so much for all of us as a nation and for the grenadiers- man. he did so much for all of us as a nation and for the grenadiers andl a nation and for the grenadiers and it is something _ a nation and for the grenadiers and it is something we _ a nation and for the grenadiers and it is something we will— a nation and for the grenadiers and it is something we will feel- a nation and for the grenadiers and it is something we will feel the - it is something we will feel the effect — it is something we will feel the effect of — it is something we will feel the effect of. , ., , ., , effect of. very eloquent testimony
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from one of— effect of. very eloquent testimony from one of the _ effect of. very eloquent testimony from one of the young _ effect of. very eloquent testimony from one of the young soldiers. i effect of. very eloquent testimony i from one of the young soldiers. what we are looking at now is the rifles, and the rifles themselves will be positioned near st george's chapel. they will provide a guard of honour in what will be the horseshoe cloister, just by the western door of the chapel. it is their duty to play the national anthem, the royal salute, when the hearse approaches the cloister, a few moments before we arrive at the chapel itself. there will be a representative number of members of the royal navy as part of the event of the day. the duke of edinburgh was the lord high admiral, highest rank in the royal navy, awarded by the queen to recognise his astonishing length of service there. we were talking about
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the footguards. principally about the footguards. principally about the grenadier guards, given the tributes we heard. it gives me great pleasure to introduce my next guess. —— guests. lieutenant general roland walker, regimental lieutenant colonel of the grenadier guards. and major chris ghika, who's in charge of the household division troops on parade today. it is good to have you with us. i would like to ask your relatively personal question and that is to do with the sense of responsibility you have taking part in today's events and not least because of link with the grenadiers told the audience about. and the long period is colonel the duke is served. tell us about the sense of the regiment�*s
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loss, and what is important to mark today. in loss, and what is important to mark toda . . loss, and what is important to mark toda . , ., ., ,, , today. in terms of marking, it is clear to us _ today. in terms of marking, it is clear to us that _ today. in terms of marking, it is clear to us that this _ today. in terms of marking, it is clear to us that this is _ today. in terms of marking, it is clear to us that this is a - today. in terms of marking, it is clear to us that this is a family l clear to us that this is a family thatis clear to us that this is a family that is grieving. and so, in a small way, if we can help mark the passing of a man of substantial stature, by any measure, i think, given the span of his life and what he was witness to and a participant of, i think we are doing our duty. i think it is more than a duty, it is a privilege, because my understanding is he planned this. we are here because he wanted us to be here. that i think is down to the junior guardsman is a known fact. i is down to the 'unior guardsman is a known fact.— is down to the 'unior guardsman is a known foot.— known fact. i will talk about the nalannin known fact. i will talk about the planning aspect _ known fact. i will talk about the planning aspect in _ known fact. i will talk about the
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planning aspect in a _ known fact. i will talk about the planning aspect in a second. i known fact. i will talk about the planning aspect in a second. asj known fact. i will talk about the i planning aspect in a second. as we understand it, of course, the original largerscale event that would have occurred has been changed because of the circumstances we find ourselves in, but he still wanted a big say, down to the last detail, about how this would take place. of course, we do not need to say about the prominence of the grenadier guards, that speaks for itself. what was his relationship with the grenadiers, because we talk about a close bond, but how does it manifest itself, what did he do that was so special? i itself, what did he do that was so s-ecial? ~ ., , itself, what did he do that was so s-ecial? ~' ., , ., itself, what did he do that was so s-ecial? ~' . , ., ., special? i knew him as a grenadier. because he — special? i knew him as a grenadier. because he was _ special? i knew him as a grenadier. because he was so _ special? i knew him as a grenadier. because he was so interested i special? i knew him as a grenadier. because he was so interested in i special? i knew him as a grenadier. | because he was so interested in the men and their families, because he was so interested in the men and theirfamilies, i think he was amused by some of our idiosyncrasies in the regiment, but it was personal. i could be forgiven
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for thinking that is all that mattered to him. evidently, by who is here today that is not the case. i think for him, the relationship with the regiment and with the armed forces reflected i hope a deep appreciation of the relationship with the armed forces and the country's fortunes. he witnessed at first hand. i also think it is a reflection for the regiment of the close association we have as household troops with the queen. he was that link. he was the living proof of that link, which is why grenadiers will stand a bit taller when that association is clear. major general, there will be millions around the world focusing on the events in windsor. it is your responsibility to make sure all of the household division is doing what
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it normally does, which is to really be pin sharp and in a position where they express pride in the things britain does so well, but, behind that, we have a bond between the household division and the sovereign and with the duke of edinburgh. how does the nature of that bond manifest itself? it does the nature of that bond manifest itself?— does the nature of that bond manifest itself? . , , , manifest itself? it manifests itself in the annual— manifest itself? it manifests itself in the annual round _ manifest itself? it manifests itself in the annual round of— manifest itself? it manifests itself in the annual round of state i in the annual round of state ceremonial events when we are around the royal— ceremonial events when we are around the royal family, trooping the colour. — the royal family, trooping the colour, state opening of parliament. we conduct _ colour, state opening of parliament. we conduct those duties for the queen — we conduct those duties for the queen in— we conduct those duties for the queen. in this case it has been a case _ queen. in this case it has been a case of— queen. in this case it has been a case of refining a plan which has been _ case of refining a plan which has been many— case of refining a plan which has been many years in the making of his own making. — been many years in the making of his own making, and adapting it to reduced — own making, and adapting it to reduced numbers to windsor. obviously making sure it is covid
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compliant — obviously making sure it is covid compliant while doing the duty and making _ compliant while doing the duty and making a _ compliant while doing the duty and making a tribute to a much loved national— making a tribute to a much loved national figure and that has been the essence of the past week. would ou be at the essence of the past week. would you be at one — the essence of the past week. would you be at one when _ the essence of the past week. would you be at one when we _ the essence of the past week. would you be at one when we talk - the essence of the past week. would you be at one when we talk about i you be at one when we talk about duty, it is duty overlaid with the highest privilege? i duty, it is duty overlaid with the highest privilege?— highest privilege? i think for everybody — highest privilege? i think for everybody here _ highest privilege? i think for everybody here today, i highest privilege? i think for everybody here today, a i highest privilege? i think for i everybody here today, a slightly reduced — everybody here today, a slightly reduced number, are here because they had _ reduced number, are here because they had a — reduced number, are here because they had a connection with the duke of edinburgh. for those of us fortunate _ of edinburgh. for those of us fortunate enough to take part, it is an historic— fortunate enough to take part, it is an historic privilege and we hope we can pay— an historic privilege and we hope we can pay tribute to this remarkable man~ _ can pay tribute to this remarkable man it— can pay tribute to this remarkable man. ., , ., , ., man. it would be an understatement to sa ou man. it would be an understatement to say you have _ man. it would be an understatement to say you have a — man. it would be an understatement to say you have a lot _ man. it would be an understatement to say you have a lot to _ man. it would be an understatement to say you have a lot to deal- man. it would be an understatement to say you have a lot to deal with i to say you have a lot to deal with today and we are grateful to you for coming along to explain to viewers what is going on. we wish you well in the events to come. we were talking earlier about st
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george's chapel, a place of worship for the royalfamily. a place for christenings, marriages, funerals and burials for centuries. among those buried here, henry viii, george iii, edward vii, and the queen's parents, king george vi and queen elizabeth the queen mother. the vast emptiness of the nave, in this time of restrictions, stands in marked contrast to the overflowing congregation at the wedding of harry and meghan just three years ago. the dean of windsor and the archbishop of canterbury will lead prince philip's coffin through the nave and into the quire beyond, into the spiritual home of the order of the garter. philip's garter banner has already been taken down but his enamelled stall—plate is still there with a wreath of laurel, a symbol
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of victory and honour. the famous choir of st george's chapel has been reduced to four singers for the funeral service, but having heard them in the past days, it is a magnificent sound. which will feature the hymns and music selected by the duke of edinburgh in recent years. at the end of the service, the dean of windsor will speak the words of the commendation, as prince philip is laid to rest in the royal vault in the chapel. that will be at the conclusion of the funeral service. talking of that service, it will be very true to the traditions of the church of england. the duke's religious faith has been a source of great interest over the years.
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there was a time when prince philip questioned his faith — indeed, the archbishop of canterbury has said that faith has to be tested — but the funeral service today will confirm the central part of the christian faith in the duke's life. to discuss this further, i'm joined by the former bishop of york, the most reverend drjohn sentamu. it's very good to have you with us. thank you so much forjoining us. thank you so much forjoining us. thank you, huw. thank you so much for 'oining us. thank you, huw.i thank you so much for 'oining us. thank you, huw. prince philip being related to rest _ thank you, huw. prince philip being related to rest and _ thank you, huw. prince philip being related to rest and there _ thank you, huw. prince philip being related to rest and there is - thank you, huw. prince philip being related to rest and there is a - thank you, huw. prince philip being related to rest and there is a sense | related to rest and there is a sense of grief for lots of people, a sense of grief for lots of people, a sense of loss, notjust in the armed forces but, of course, the family, it goes without saying, but also others who had never met the duke, because he has been such a prominent part of british public life for decades. they also feel a sense of loss. what is your message to them,
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as a prominent churchman, a faith leader, on a day like this? i as a prominent churchman, a faith leader, on a day like this?- leader, on a day like this? i think my message _ leader, on a day like this? i think my message is — leader, on a day like this? i think my message is really _ leader, on a day like this? i think my message is really somethingl leader, on a day like this? i think- my message is really something that the duke said to me after 1992, that terrible year, you know, annus horribilis. shadows are passed, and he says to me, at the end, very, very short message, but it was very powerful. you know, the thunders of many waters, mightierthan powerful. you know, the thunders of many waters, mightier than the waves of the sea, the load on high is mightier, some 94 plus three. that actually encapsulated, and i told him, by the way, this is inscribed on a bit of stone on holy island, and simply put that response below, you know, god is greater then all our troubles. there was a smile on his face. i want to say to them, whatever you are going through,
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actually, prince philip had this very, very deep faith, which allowed him to question, and faith which is in question is not worth living, and because he questioned his faith, actually, it grew deeper and deeper in christ, and it was free therefore to work on anybody, whether they believe it or not. for him, because he was safe in his own faith. so i want to say to people today who are watching, it's probably also a prayer he loved, john newman, support us, the lord, all this daylong of this traveller's life, until the shadows lengthen, the evening comes and the busy world is hushed and our work is done. then, lord in our mercy, grant us peace at the end. that's what people today should focus. it seems to me that he would have focused on the god he
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loved and the people he cared for, not on himself or his worry and his miseries. a, not on himself or his worry and his miseries. : . . not on himself or his worry and his miseries. : , . , ., ~ miseries. a beautiful message, thank ou. i miseries. a beautiful message, thank you- i know— miseries. a beautiful message, thank you- i know you _ miseries. a beautiful message, thank you. i know you met _ miseries. a beautiful message, thank you. i know you met many _ miseries. a beautiful message, thank you. i know you met many times i miseries. a beautiful message, thank you. i know you met many times over the years. we have heard lots already about his character and his interest in people. the fact that he had a bit of a dual personality, if you like, public persona, the private man. what impression did he make new? you private man. what impression did he make new? ., ., . ., make new? you watch him at sandringham, _ make new? you watch him at sandringham, because i i make new? you watch him at sandringham, because i go . make new? you watch him at| sandringham, because i go to make new? you watch him at - sandringham, because i go to preach there at the weekend, and he is doing a barbecue and you see he is very down to earth, really down to earth, and he wasn't actually given to all kinds of pomposity. he didn't like it. that's why he always loved what he called short service, not long church. he was a real lover of the common prayer, because he said it actually says it very simply and with beauty, and there is no need to
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have more words. he oversaw the communion service particularly that the sherman delete on a sermon should be short, because it leads to the crescendo of the celebration of communion, shouldn't take over. the other thing he is is he knew the bible. if people misquoted, he would immediately tell them afterwards, you got the wrong verse in the wrong book. it was supposed to be this. he knew it and, because he knew the scriptures, he was able to have what i call a life that was stable, life is always looking for change. it was not opposed to change because, again, he was very stable. i loved when he said to me, have you seen those birds, the way they fly? you know what is important about birds? when they take off, they go so high that, all the time, theirfeet when they take off, they go so high that, all the time, their feet are pointing to the ground, and that's why they are able to land very safely. tampa a nice message. there are so many things to look forward
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to today are so many things to look forward to toda j . �* are so many things to look forward to todaj . �* ~ are so many things to look forward to todaj . �* ,, ., ., ,, are so many things to look forward to todaj . �* ,, ., . ~' ,. to today and i'd like to thank you for setting _ to today and i'd like to thank you for setting a _ to today and i'd like to thank you for setting a beautiful— to today and i'd like to thank you for setting a beautiful message | to today and i'd like to thank you i for setting a beautiful message for us and to give us something to think about when the service takes place. thank you very much. what about when the service takes place. thank you very much.— thank you very much. what i also want to say _ thank you very much. what i also want to say to — thank you very much. what i also want to say to people, _ thank you very much. what i also want to say to people, the i thank you very much. what i also | want to say to people, the queen thank you very much. what i also i want to say to people, the queen on wednesday, she is going to be 95 and, for 73 wednesday, she is going to be 95 and, for73 years, wednesday, she is going to be 95 and, for 73 years, both of them have celebrated each other�*s birthday, and this is the first time that isn't going to happen, that her majesty, like the duke, will simply look to christ and god.— look to christ and god. former archbishop _ look to christ and god. former archbishop of _ look to christ and god. former archbishop of york, _ look to christ and god. former archbishop of york, dr - look to christ and god. former archbishop of york, dr john i look to christ and god. former - archbishop of york, dr john sentamu. archbishop of york, drjohn sentamu. military are still assembling ahead of the procession from top lets join jj- of the procession from top lets 'oin jj. , ~ ., ., ., , of the procession from top lets 'oin jj. ,~ ., ., , jj. the duke held honorary titles across all three _ jj. the duke held honorary titles across all three services, - jj. the duke held honorary titles across all three services, but i jj. the duke held honorary titlesj across all three services, but his military career started in the royal navy. i'mjoined by military career started in the royal navy. i'm joined by warrant officer eddie waring. i've heard him described as a sailor's sailor this week. that's true, isn't it? 10096.
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it's week. that's true, isn't it? 10096. it's almost _ week. that's true, isn't it? 10096. it's almost down _ week. that's true, isn't it? 10096. it's almost down to _ week. that's true, isn't it? 10096. it's almost down to his _ week. that's true, isn't it? 10096. it's almost down to his sense i week. that's true, isn't it? 10096. it's almost down to his sense of. it's almost down to his sense of humour~ — it'5 almost down to his sense of humour~ i— it's almost down to his sense of humour. i think everyone may be put he didn't— humour. i think everyone may be put he didn't have one, but he certainly did, he didn't have one, but he certainly did. and _ he didn't have one, but he certainly did. and i_ he didn't have one, but he certainly did, and i think that's the same set of all— did, and i think that's the same set of all sailors — did, and i think that's the same set of all sailors in the royal navy. i think— of all sailors in the royal navy. i think he — of all sailors in the royal navy. i think he was humorous, but definitely he had his standards and wouldn't _ definitely he had his standards and wouldn't relent on those. speaking of standards. _ wouldn't relent on those. speaking of standards, what _ wouldn't relent on those. speaking of standards, what is _ wouldn't relent on those. speaking of standards, what is your - wouldn't relent on those. speaking of standards, what is yourjob i of standards, what is yourjob today? i of standards, what is your 'ob toda ? . : ., ., of standards, what is your 'ob toda ? . . ., ., , . of standards, what is your 'ob toda ? ., . ., ., ' . ., today? i am the warrant officer of the r0 al today? i am the warrant officer of the royal navy — today? i am the warrant officer of the royal navy within _ today? i am the warrant officer of the royal navy within the - today? i am the warrant officer of the royal navy within the special. the royal navy within the special relationships quadrangle god, a massive — relationships quadrangle god, a massive honour and privilege to take charge _ massive honour and privilege to take charge of— massive honour and privilege to take charge of that. —— massive honour and privilege to take charge of that. -- quadrangle god. the sailors — charge of that. -- quadrangle god. the sailors and real marine commandos are already to do their duty _ commandos are already to do their duty -- _ commandos are already to do their duty. -- quadrangle guard. and you met the duke? _ duty. -- quadrangle guard. and you met the duke? been _ duty. -- quadrangle guard. and you met the duke? been privileged i duty. -- quadrangle guard. and you met the duke? been privileged over| met the duke? been privileged over the ears, met the duke? been privileged over the years. now _ met the duke? been privileged over the years, now the _ met the duke? been privileged over the years, now the warrant - met the duke? been privileged over the years, now the warrant officer | the years, now the warrant officer of the _ the years, now the warrant officer of the section put up i've been fortunate _ of the section put up i've been fortunate enough to meet his royal highness— fortunate enough to meet his royal highness and a number of occasions and had _ highness and a number of occasions and had quite a lot of interaction with him. — and had quite a lot of interaction with him, which was really
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fantastic.— with him, which was really fantastic. ., ., ., ., ' with him, which was really fantastic. ., . ., ., 'y ., fantastic. you have had a 29 year career. fantastic. you have had a 29 year career- how _ fantastic. you have had a 29 year career. how does _ fantastic. you have had a 29 year career. how does this _ fantastic. you have had a 29 year career. how does this day - fantastic. you have had a 29 year career. how does this day stack l fantastic. you have had a 29 year. career. how does this day stack up to the rest? i career. how does this day stack up to the rest?— career. how does this day stack up to the rest? i think, in terms of my military career. _ to the rest? i think, in terms of my military career, i— to the rest? i think, in terms of my military career, i don't _ to the rest? i think, in terms of my military career, i don't think - military career, i don't think anything _ military career, i don't think anything will be as important of this at— anything will be as important of this at this stage. a5 anything will be as important of this at this stage. as i said, it's a massive — this at this stage. as i said, it's a massive honour and privilege to be part of— a massive honour and privilege to be part of this _ a massive honour and privilege to be part of this event. it's huge. lots of pressure. _ part of this event. it's huge. lots of pressure, but as i keep saying it's a _ of pressure, but as i keep saying it's a massive privilege to be here, to it'5 a massive privilege to be here, to represent— it's a massive privilege to be here, to represent the royal navy. they all looked poised _ to represent the royal navy. iie all looked poised and to represent the royal navy. tie all looked poised and ready to represent the royal navy. “iie1: all looked poised and ready and to represent the royal navy. i“ie1: all looked poised and ready and i will let you put in full in. thanks, and thanks _ will let you put in full in. thanks, and thanks to _ will let you put in full in. thanks, and thanks to your— will let you put in full in. thanks, and thanks to your guests. i will let you put in full in. thanks, and thanks to your guests. we i will let you put in full in. thanks, | and thanks to your guests. we will talk a bit more that one of the biggest achievements for the duke of edinburgh of his lifetime, the creation of the duke of edinburgh's award scheme. join sophie. millions of young people have done it in more than 140 countries around the world. the duke's greatest
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legacy, how the explorer david hempleman—adams describes it. you did the scheme when you were 13, and look at you now. i did the scheme when you were 13, and look at you now— look at you now. i started at 13 and i've often said, _ look at you now. i started at 13 and i've often said, notwithstanding i i've often said, notwithstanding everest. — i've often said, notwithstanding everest, even on the north face of everest. _ everest, even on the north face of everest. the — everest, even on the north face of everest, the north and south poles, the brains _ everest, the north and south poles, the brains of— everest, the north and south poles, the brains of what the hardest thing i've the brains of what the hardest thing i've ever— the brains of what the hardest thing i've ever done. the first time i'd ever— i've ever done. the first time i'd ever left— i've ever done. the first time i'd ever left home, the first time i'd left my— ever left home, the first time i'd left myjob — ever left home, the first time i'd left myjob as a teddy bear. —— the bronze _ left myjob as a teddy bear. —— the bronze award was the hardest thing i'd bronze award was the hardest thing i'd ever— bronze award was the hardest thing i'd ever done. bronze award was the hardest thing l'd ever done-— i'd ever done. because of that you not to to i'd ever done. because of that you got to to know _ i'd ever done. because of that you got to to know the _ i'd ever done. because of that you got to to know the duke _ i'd ever done. because of that you got to to know the duke of - i'd ever done. because of that you i got to to know the duke of edinburgh in later life. you describe him as a surrogate father. i in later life. you describe him as a surrogate father.— surrogate father. i got into adventure _ surrogate father. i got into adventure in _ surrogate father. i got into adventure in quite - surrogate father. i got into adventure in quite a i surrogate father. i got into adventure in quite a big i surrogate father. i got into l adventure in quite a big way. surrogate father. i got into i adventure in quite a big way. he surrogate father. i got into - adventure in quite a big way. he was adventure in quite a big way. he was a patron— adventure in quite a big way. he was a patron to _ adventure in quite a big way. he was a patron to a — adventure in quite a big way. he was a patron to a lot of my expeditions, and he _ a patron to a lot of my expeditions, and he was — a patron to a lot of my expeditions, and he was extraordinarily kind. he would _ and he was extraordinarily kind. he would ask— and he was extraordinarily kind. he would ask really intelligent, knowledgeable questions. he didn't really— knowledgeable questions. he didn't really want to know about pulling sledges _ really want to know about pulling sledges or climbing, he wanted the bigger— sledges or climbing, he wanted the bigger picture, and he would want to know about — bigger picture, and he would want to know about the climate, he would want _ know about the climate, he would want to _ know about the climate, he would want to know about the glaziers and
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things— want to know about the glaziers and things like _ want to know about the glaziers and things like that. and then he asked me if— things like that. and then he asked me if i_ things like that. and then he asked me if i would be the chairman of his 50th _ me if i would be the chairman of his 50th i_ me if i would be the chairman of his 50th i got— me if i would be the chairman of his 50th. i got to know him very well in those _ 50th. i got to know him very well in those couple of years. and then he asked _ those couple of years. and then he asked me — those couple of years. and then he asked me if— those couple of years. and then he asked me if i would be a trustee of the awards— asked me if i would be a trustee of the awards scheme, and i said, sir, thank— the awards scheme, and i said, sir, thank you _ the awards scheme, and i said, sir, thank you very much, it's a great honour— thank you very much, it's a great honour and — thank you very much, it's a great honour and a _ thank you very much, it's a great honour and a privilege. he said, thank you very much, it's a great honourand a privilege. he said, no, it's not— honourand a privilege. he said, no, it's not an _ honourand a privilege. he said, no, it's not an honour and privilege, it's not an honour and privilege, it's a _ it's not an honour and privilege, it's a duty. _ it's not an honour and privilege, it's a duty, remember the difference. is it's a duty, remember the difference.— it's a duty, remember the difference. , ., ., difference. is part of that, you have wonderful _ difference. is part of that, you have wonderful stories - difference. is part of that, you have wonderful stories to - difference. is part of that, you have wonderful stories to tell| difference. is part of that, you i have wonderful stories to tell put up have wonderful stories to tell put up you were picked up many times in his black cab. up you were picked up many times in his black cab-— his black cab. there was one day when that _ his black cab. there was one day when that morning _ his black cab. there was one day when that morning i _ his black cab. there was one day when that morning i was - his black cab. there was one dayl when that morning i was working his black cab. there was one day - when that morning i was working with him and _ when that morning i was working with him and i_ when that morning i was working with him and i said, i have to go because i'm him and i said, i have to go because l'm helping — him and i said, i have to go because i'm helping you going to present lold i'm helping you going to present gold awards at saint james is put up he said. _ gold awards at saint james is put up he said, how are you getting there? i he said, how are you getting there? i said. _ he said, how are you getting there? i said. we _ he said, how are you getting there? i said, i've got to run because you may— i said, i've got to run because you may be _ i said, i've got to run because you nray be late _ i said, i've got to run because you may be late. he gave me a lift. i was expecting a great big daimler, and it— was expecting a great big daimler, and it was— was expecting a great big daimler, and it was a taxi. we got into the taxi and — and it was a taxi. we got into the taxi and this _ and it was a taxi. we got into the taxi and this is where he was years and years— taxi and this is where he was years and years ahead of his time, this was a _ and years ahead of his time, this was a gas — and years ahead of his time, this was a gas converted taxi, and we go
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out and _ was a gas converted taxi, and we go out and all— was a gas converted taxi, and we go out and all the policemen stand to attention, — out and all the policemen stand to attention, but as soon as we got out of the _ attention, but as soon as we got out of the gates— attention, but as soon as we got out of the gates of buckingham palace, every _ of the gates of buckingham palace, every single taxi flashed their lights — every single taxi flashed their lights and waved, everything will taxi driver— lights and waved, everything will taxi driver in the whole of london knew _ taxi driver in the whole of london knew he — taxi driver in the whole of london knew he was out there in his taxi, and the _ knew he was out there in his taxi, and the taxi — knew he was out there in his taxi, and the taxi drivers loved him. you wrote to each _ and the taxi drivers loved him. gm. wrote to each other even until recently. a, wrote to each other even until recentl . �* ., , ., ., wrote to each other even until| recently-— lf wrote to each other even until i recently-— if it recently. a few months ago. if it hadn't been _ recently. a few months ago. if it hadn't been for _ recently. a few months ago. if it hadn't been for covid _ recently. a few months ago. if it hadn't been for covid you - recently. a few months ago. if it hadn't been for covid you would | recently. a few months ago. if it - hadn't been for covid you would have been at the funeral. edd hadn't been for covid you would have been at the funeral.— been at the funeral. sad day for millions of— been at the funeral. sad day for millions of people _ been at the funeral. sad day for millions of people are _ been at the funeral. sad day for millions of people are but - been at the funeral. sad day for millions of people are but in - been at the funeral. sad day for millions of people are but in a l been at the funeral. sad day for. millions of people are but in a way ithink— millions of people are but in a way i think he — millions of people are but in a way i think he would have enjoyed it, lreautiful— i think he would have enjoyed it, beautiful blue skies, people out. i hope _ beautiful blue skies, people out. i hope everybody will stand for one minute, _ hope everybody will stand for one minute, two minute silence at 3p, but i _ minute, two minute silence at 3p, but i think— minute, two minute silence at 3p, but i think it's really that that the royal family are there, rather than 800 — the royal family are there, rather than 800 other people. —— a two—minute silence at 3pm. a very sad day— two—minute silence at 3pm. a very sad day and — two—minute silence at 3pm. a very sad day and i will miss him enormously.— sad day and i will miss him enormously. sad day and i will miss him enormousl . ., ,, enormously. indeed, and sir david the are enormously. indeed, and sir david they are rightly — enormously. indeed, and sir david they are rightly pointing _ enormously. indeed, and sir david they are rightly pointing to - enormously. indeed, and sir david they are rightly pointing to the - they are rightly pointing to the lovely circumstances, in terms of
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weather, and such beautiful countryside around windsor itself. it's such a lovely setting for an event of this kind, a funeral, when people want to reflect on the good things that were achieved, even in sad times. so it's a nice thing for us to be talking in those terms. with me now are baroness tanni grey—thompson and baroness floella benjamin. —— gyles brandreth. tanni grey—thompson, you are the -— gyles brandreth. tanni grey—thompson, you are the chair —— gyles brandreth. tanni grey—thompson, you are the chair of trustees, you know all about the scheme. we all know people who benefit from the scheme for the many, many of them. what does the scheme do to take on the values that the duke was so keen to underline over decades? he the duke was so keen to underline over decades?— the duke was so keen to underline over decades? he was very keen in terms of building _ over decades? he was very keen in terms of building resilience - over decades? he was very keen in terms of building resilience in - terms of building resilience in young people, and he said many years ago, if you can get at a young person to excel in one part of their
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life, it will go into other parts. if you are starting with a blank piece of paper, you would end up with the scheme too much how it is in terms of volunteering, community. 6.7 million young people have benefited from top at any one point, 400,000 young people are doing it. it's been wonderful to see in this past week how many people that we didn't know at benefited from being part of the award. l didn't know at benefited from being part of the award. i am didn't know at benefited from being part of the award.— part of the award. i am interested in the reach- _ part of the award. i am interested in the reach. does _ part of the award. i am interested in the reach. does the _ part of the award. i am interested in the reach. does the reach - part of the award. i am interested in the reach. does the reach tell l part of the award. i am interested l in the reach. does the reach tell us something about the kinds of people who are interested in this kind of scheme, or does the reach actually tell us something about the fact that different elements of society, different kinds of schools, by the way, are prepared to embrace it? absolutely, it goes across every walk of life in the uk, and what has been incredible during covid is how many young people still see the value in it, and it's more relevant than ever, while gcses and a—levels are cancelled. you want something that young people can really relate
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to, that they go to college, university, work, it's there. irate to, that they go to college, university, work, it's there. we are addressing — university, work, it's there. we are addressing the _ university, work, it's there. we are addressing the dismounted - university, work, it's there. we are - addressing the dismounted attachment of the household cavalry marching down chapel hill toward st george's chapel. it is their duty today to line the steps approaching the great west door of st george's chapel. they will be there, ready for when the coffin arrives, and that will be just before a few minutes before 3pm. when we see the horseshoe cloister, as we call it, a little later, we will see these troops, we very smartly turned out troops of the household cavalry, the blues and royals on the right and the life guards on the left, ready on the steps of the chapel. while we look at those images, itjust reminds us really of the duke's attention to detail, his smartness, the way he was away is turned out smartly come rain orshine, and was away is turned out smartly come rain or shine, and those actually were the kinds of values that he tried to instill in young people who took part in the scheme. the
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importance of taking things seriously. it isa it is a privilege to be here on this historic day, remembering this extraordinary figure who was so varied in his interests and personality. varied in his interests and personality-— varied in his interests and ersonali . ., , personality. one day he would be with ou personality. one day he would be with you ioshing _ personality. one day he would be with you joshing and _ personality. one day he would be with you joshing and the - personality. one day he would be with you joshing and the next - personality. one day he would be with you joshing and the next day you have to be turned out and impeccable and he made sure everybody was impeccable. the great thing about him was he lived in the present. if you are doing something, you will do that to the best of your ability. i think he would have been impressed with this marching. absolutely, and you get a sense as they pass the chapel with this glorious architecture, towards the archway, that leads us into the horseshoe cloister where the coffin will arrive a little later and there be the household cavalry and a piping party because they will pipe
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the still, a lovely touch, when the coffin arrives.— coffin arrives. this castle meant everything _ coffin arrives. this castle meant everything to — coffin arrives. this castle meant everything to him _ coffin arrives. this castle meant everything to him and _ coffin arrives. this castle meant everything to him and he - coffin arrives. this castle meant. everything to him and he remarked coffin arrives. this castle meant - everything to him and he remarked on how his mother was born here in 1885 and that is where it began and this is where it ends and in between, the variety of his life and energy was extraordinary. the last time i saw him at a gold award event and he met every single young person who became a gold winner, he met them all. it was 3—4 years ago, in his mid to late 90s and he ran towards the desk and jumped up late 90s and he ran towards the desk andjumped up onto late 90s and he ran towards the desk and jumped up onto it in his mid—90s. he was formidable. he could be huge fun. i got to know him through the national playing fields association. what does it mean? this is part of his legacy, thousands of acres of recreational space, playing fields, sport fields, playgrounds, playgrounds for disabled people will
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exist for ever because they were put into trust thanks to him. he did concrete things that will stand the test of time. concrete things that will stand the test of time-— test of time. far-sighted and thinkin: test of time. far-sighted and thinking about _ test of time. far-sighted and thinking about the _ test of time. far-sighted and thinking about the welfare i test of time. far-sighted and thinking about the welfare of| test of time. far-sighted and i thinking about the welfare of young people. it is a good thing to mark. thank you. we will see more of the armed forces build—up because it will look as splendid as the household cavalry there. for 73 years, after the second world war, through social and economic change, to the 21st—century. prince philip stood at the queen's side, her strength and stay as she famously said, offering advice and support and comfort. he shaped a role as royal consort and it was not an easy task, and their marriage was built on a foundation of mutual love and respect. by any standards, you would have to say it was a hugely successful partnership.
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it is with the greatest pleasure the king and queen announced the betrothal of their dearly beloved daughter the princess elizabeth to lieutenant philip mountbatten. than lieutenant philip mountbatten. an announcement in 1947 to brighten up britain's slow recovery from the second world war. l britain's slow recovery from the second world war.— britain's slow recovery from the second world war. i am so happy that on this visit my _ second world war. i am so happy that on this visit my future _ second world war. i am so happy that on this visit my future husband - second world war. i am so happy that on this visit my future husband is i on this visit my future husband is by my side. on this visit my future husband is by my side-— on this visit my future husband is by my side. on this visit my future husband is b m side. . ., , , by my side. the wedding date was set for november. _ by my side. the wedding date was set for november, four _ by my side. the wedding date was set for november, four months _ by my side. the wedding date was set for november, four months to - by my side. the wedding date was set for november, four months to enjoy l for november, four months to enjoy the celebration and plan a party on the celebration and plan a party on the big day. l, the celebration and plan a party on the big day-— the big day. i, philip, take elizabeth _ the big day. i, philip, take elizabeth alexandra i the big day. i, philip, take elizabeth alexandra maryl the big day. i, philip, take i elizabeth alexandra mary to my wedded wife.
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in a letter to his mother—in—law written on his honeymoon, the new husband wrote to lilibet is the only thing in the world absolutely real to me and my ambition is to weld the two of us into a new combined existence. two of us into a new combined existence-— two of us into a new combined existence. ~ ., ., ., existence. we were fortunate to en'o five existence. we were fortunate to enjoy five happy _ existence. we were fortunate to enjoy five happy years _ existence. we were fortunate to enjoy five happy years of - existence. we were fortunate to enjoy five happy years of fairly l enjoy five happy years of fairly conventional married life and that included two years with a home of our own in malta when i was in the navy. this period came to an abrupt end when the queen had the melancholy duty of succeeding her father after his premature death. she was 25 and i was 30. we had two small children. life as you can imagine changed dramatically in many ways, but it had much less effect on our married life than i anticipated.
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the new combined existence, her majesty the queen, prince philip, by her side. majesty the queen, prince philip, by herside. her companion for 65 majesty the queen, prince philip, by her side. her companion for 65 years until his retirement in 2017 at the age of 96. together in marriage for over 70 years. perhaps the duke should have the final say on what made them special. tolerance is the one essential ingredient of any happy marriage. it may not be quite so important when things are going well but it is absolutely vital when things get difficult. you can take it from me the queen has the quality of tolerance in abundance. laughter. he does rrot — tolerance in abundance. laughter. he does not take _ tolerance in abundance. laughter. he does not take easily _ tolerance in abundance. laughter. he does not take easily to _ he does not take easily to compliments but he has quite simply been my— compliments but he has quite simply been my strength and stay all these
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years— been my strength and stay all these years and _ been my strength and stay all these years and i— been my strength and stay all these years and i and his whole family and this and _ years and i and his whole family and this and many other countries owe him a _ this and many other countries owe him a debt— this and many other countries owe him a debt greater than he would ever claim — him a debt greater than he would ever claim orwe him a debt greater than he would ever claim or we shall ever know. ijust think you i just think you get a sense there of the hugely successful partnership and the magic, really that made that work. with me are people who can offer their own perspectives on them. i'm joined by gardener and broadcaster alan titchmarsh. that is a huge shared interests with the duke, gardening. and from a different perspective but deep knowledge of how the institution works and individuals work. former director of royal communications at buckingham palace, sally osman. sally, can i ask you about the way
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the family will be dealing with today? viewers want to know how they cope with an event like this. they are grieving, they are having to do it publicly. are grieving, they are having to do it ublicl . ., , , it publicly. how will they be coin: ? it publicly. how will they be coping? they _ it publicly. how will they be coping? they will _ it publicly. how will they be coping? they will be - it publicly. how will they be coping? they will be doing l it publicly. how will they be | coping? they will be doing it it publicly. how will they be i coping? they will be doing it in it publicly. how will they be - coping? they will be doing it in the way they cope with so many events in many respects. this is unique, very special, and they will be supporting each other. many of them have spoken about supporting the queen over the coming days and years and that is what they will be doing, united in grief and mourning. they will be aware of the public interest. they are mindful of public interest. but this is essentially a family funeral. we should respect that. and let the family have their moment. there was a moving comment on one of the news websites this morning
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saying, i hope her majesty is getting the support that she needs. it was a moving comment because this was someone clearly concerned for the queen, but also wondering about how the family and institution functions when you have the queen who has lost her husband. can viewers be assured that support will be there in the form she would like? i am sure. whether from the family, orfrom close friends. those professionals, who have been with the queen many years, many were with the queen many years, many were with the duke many years, let's not forget. they will be there ensuring the queen is supported in the way she needs to be. just the queen is supported in the way she needs to be.— she needs to be. just there the highlanders — she needs to be. just there the highlanders. they _ she needs to be. just there the highlanders. they look - she needs to be. just there the highlanders. they look really l she needs to be. just there the i highlanders. they look really smart. stepping off. and then the royal air
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force, the queens colours squadron making their way to the castle. and then we have the footguards. band of then we have the footguards. band of the grenadier guards and the drum major scott fitzgerald in that famous, smart gold tunic. leading them away towards the quadrangle and then the chapel hill. we caught a glimpse before this section of the armed forces of markers who will be marking the way for the armed forces who will follow them. sally told us about support for the queen. alan titchmarsh, i am about support for the queen. alan titchmarsh, lam bound about support for the queen. alan titchmarsh, i am bound to ask you, because of shared interests, and i and wondering what your interaction with the duke was in terms of the natural world, with the duke was in terms of the naturalworld, gardening, with the duke was in terms of the natural world, gardening, which he took an interest in and experimented with, especially at windsor. what with, especially at windsor. what are our with, especially at windsor. what are your recollections? _ with, especially at windsor. what are your recollections? of- with, especially at windsor. what are your recollections? of being
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kept _ are your recollections? of being kept on — are your recollections? of being kept on my toes. there were two kinds _ kept on my toes. there were two kinds of— kept on my toes. there were two kinds of eye from the duke, one was twinkly— kinds of eye from the duke, one was twinkly and — kinds of eye from the duke, one was twinkly and one was beady and when he came _ twinkly and one was beady and when he came to _ twinkly and one was beady and when he came to you with the bd eye you were on— he came to you with the bd eye you were on your mettle. what came to the fore _ were on your mettle. what came to the fore with him was his sense of being _ the fore with him was his sense of being a _ the fore with him was his sense of being a custodian of 5000 acres that are windsor great park and making sure he _ are windsor great park and making sure he was— are windsor great park and making sure he was fulfilling his role as ranger— sure he was fulfilling his role as ranger in — sure he was fulfilling his role as ranger in the way george v, george vi ranger in the way george v, george vi had _ ranger in the way george v, george vi had done — ranger in the way george v, george vi had done before. the queen had given— vi had done before. the queen had given it _ vi had done before. the queen had given it to— vi had done before. the queen had given it to him to look after and he relished _ given it to him to look after and he relished it~ — given it to him to look after and he relished it. ., , given it to him to look after and he relished it— relished it. there was a line that amused me _ relished it. there was a line that amused me from _ relished it. there was a line that amused me from the _ relished it. there was a line that amused me from the queen i relished it. there was a line that i amused me from the queen mother relished it. there was a line that - amused me from the queen mother that basically said, yes, he has taken over. she clearly thought he was doing the job too seriously, but thatis doing the job too seriously, but that is a reflection of how committed he was. did that is a reflection of how committed he was. , ., ., committed he was. did he ever do a 'ob committed he was. did he ever do a job half-heartedly? _ committed he was. did he ever do a job half-heartedly? he _ committed he was. did he ever do a job half-heartedly? he did - committed he was. did he ever do a job half-heartedly? he did it - committed he was. did he ever do a job half-heartedly? he did it with i committed he was. did he ever do a job half-heartedly? he did it with al job half—heartedly? he did it with a eye to _ job half—heartedly? he did it with a eye to detail and made sure it was
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right _ eye to detail and made sure it was right it _ eye to detail and made sure it was right it was — eye to detail and made sure it was right. it was a role, an important job. _ right. it was a role, an important job, as _ right. it was a role, an important job, as a — right. it was a role, an important job, as a custodian and steward of everything — job, as a custodian and steward of everything around us here and sandringham. do i have time to read from a _ sandringham. do i have time to read from a letter. i wrote a book on royal _ from a letter. i wrote a book on royal gardeners and sent it to the queen— royal gardeners and sent it to the queen because you feel you ought. i had a _ queen because you feel you ought. i had a letter— queen because you feel you ought. i had a letter back from the duke, closely _ had a letter back from the duke, closely typed. apparently he typed his own _ closely typed. apparently he typed his own letters. he said, he missed the series— his own letters. he said, he missed the series on— his own letters. he said, he missed the series on television but he enjoyed — the series on television but he enjoyed the book and he said on the chapter— enjoyed the book and he said on the chapter devoted to elizabeth ii you say outdoor activities were much more _ say outdoor activities were much more their— say outdoor activities were much more their scene, riding and horse racing. _ more their scene, riding and horse racing. for— more their scene, riding and horse racing, for the queen, more their scene, riding and horse racing, forthe queen, shooting more their scene, riding and horse racing, for the queen, shooting and carriage _ racing, for the queen, shooting and carriage driving for the duke. you will appreciate shooting does not go on all— will appreciate shooting does not go on all year— will appreciate shooting does not go on all year round and i only took up carriage _ on all year round and i only took up carriage driving in 1973. and then he listed — carriage driving in 1973. and then he listed everything he has done in the park— he listed everything he has done in the park such as planting eggs. i thought— the park such as planting eggs. i thought it — the park such as planting eggs. i thought it might interest you to
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know— thought it might interest you to know active gardening still goes on in the _ know active gardening still goes on in the royal gardens. that know active gardening still goes on in the royal gardens.— in the royal gardens. that was you ut in in the royal gardens. that was you put in your— in the royal gardens. that was you put in your place! _ in the royal gardens. that was you put in your place! i _ in the royal gardens. that was you put in your place! i cherish - in the royal gardens. that was you put in your place! i cherish it. i put in your place! i cherish it. does it surprise you? not at all. the duke, we know the many interests he had. to build on that point of stewardship of the park, he was a great custodian and steward of the other states such as sandringham, bell —— balmoral. he planted trees here and hedgerows which was important in terms of biodiversity and conservation.— terms of biodiversity and conservation. . ,, , ., ' :: :: :: conservation. oak trees are 1000 ears old conservation. oak trees are 1000 years old in _ conservation. oak trees are 1000 years old in windsor— conservation. oak trees are 1000 years old in windsor great - conservation. oak trees are 1000 years old in windsor great park. conservation. oak trees are 1000 l years old in windsor great park and there _ years old in windsor great park and there are _ years old in windsor great park and there are some that are ten years old which — there are some that are ten years old which the duke would have created — old which the duke would have created that continuity. we old which the duke would have created that continuity. we have a lot of movement _ created that continuity. we have a lot of movement and _ created that continuity. we have a lot of movement and as _ created that continuity. we have a lot of movement and as you i created that continuity. we have a lot of movement and as you can . lot of movement and as you can imagine, the timetable is strict.
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thank you so much. we saw the markers making their way to the castle and we will talk about their duties in a moment. they will be lining the quadrangle where the first gathering will be seen in a short while. before that, we can join sophie. the duke of edinburgh supported hundreds of charities. he was a particular fond supported hundreds of charities. he was a particularfond of supported hundreds of charities. he was a particular fond of the supported hundreds of charities. he was a particularfond of the royal commonwealth egg services league and i am joined by dr erica myers—davis. what is the charity motto? anyone who has ever served the crown in their time of need, we are there for them. , ,, ., , ., , them. the duke of edinburgh was rand them. the duke of edinburgh was grand president _ them. the duke of edinburgh was grand president for _ them. the duke of edinburgh was grand president for 41 _ them. the duke of edinburgh was grand president for 41 years i them. the duke of edinburgh was grand president for 41 years and l grand president for 41 years and took it really seriously? he chaired the beatings _ took it really seriously? he chaired the beatings and _ took it really seriously? he chaired the beatings and would _ took it really seriously? he chaired the beatings and would be - took it really seriously? he chaired the beatings and would be there i took it really seriously? he chaired i the beatings and would be there with the beatings and would be there with the agendas, minutes, everything. he would go through things we had discussed and keep you on your toes.
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we would need to make sure you got your reports done. if i can say three things about him, he was diligent, paying careful attention. he was incredibly passionate about supporting widows and veterans. and he was also very punctual so you needed to be on time. you he was also very punctual so you needed to be on time. you spent a lot of time — needed to be on time. you spent a lot of time with _ needed to be on time. you spent a lot of time with him _ needed to be on time. you spent a lot of time with him over— needed to be on time. you spent a lot of time with him over a - needed to be on time. you spent a | lot of time with him over a decade, 2007-2017 and lot of time with him over a decade, 2007—2017 and became very fond of him? he 2007-2017 and became very fond of him? ., , 2007-2017 and became very fond of him? . , ., ., , 2007-2017 and became very fond of him? ., ., ., , ., ., 2007-2017 and became very fond of him? ., ., , ., ., ., ~' him? he was a lovely man to work with. incredibly _ him? he was a lovely man to work with. incredibly passionate. i him? he was a lovely man to work with. incredibly passionate. he i with. incredibly passionate. he really cared. at our meetings, we would often have food and drink served to make sure we were on time. he would just wander around the room and talk to everybody. he knew everyone. just observing him particularly with older councilmembers who were it was like just a bunch of old boys getting
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together for a just a bunch of old boys getting togetherfor a beer. for just a bunch of old boys getting together for a beer.— just a bunch of old boys getting together for a beer. for you today, if it had rrot — together for a beer. for you today, if it had not been _ together for a beer. for you today, if it had not been for— together for a beer. for you today, if it had not been for covid - together for a beer. for you today, if it had not been for covid you i if it had not been for covid you would have been part of procession and here with other members. it is and here with other members. it is bittersweet _ and here with other members. it is bittersweet. of _ and here with other members. it 3 bittersweet. of course, we and here with other members. it 1 bittersweet. of course, we would have been part of the procession today. on behalf of lord richards, general sir david, current grand president, on behalf of him and council members, we are so sad today that he has passed and we could not be part of the procession as he would have liked. however, our deepest condolences to her majesty the queen and the family. the fact we can at least have this conversation today, so close, is meaningful. i know there are many people from the commonwealth with us today in spirit. dr people from the commonwealth with us today in spirit-— today in spirit. dr erica myers-davis, - today in spirit. dr erica myers- davis, thank i today in spirit. dr erica l myers- davis, thank you.
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this gives you a sense of the grandeur, the colour, glinting uniforms, all of it part of a scene that we have seen in different contexts, for the queen's birthday parade, the state opening of parliament, a very different event today, with the armed forces wanting today, with the armed forces wanting to pay tribute to somebody they respected, someone they loved, indeed, and with whom they shared such a close association over many decades. let's go back to windsor great pop and joint” chalmers. mil great pop and joint jj chalmers. fill three services will be on parade today, and i'm joined by a flight lieutenant from the raf. we were in the army before that and you represent the commonwealth as well. what did the duke mean to our airmen and soldiers and sailors? his what did the duke mean to our airmen and soldiers and sailors?— and soldiers and sailors? his royal hiuhness's and soldiers and sailors? his royal highness's previous _ and soldiers and sailors? his royal highness's previous military - highness's previous military experience was an inspiration for every— experience was an inspiration for every airmen or armed forces personneh _ every airmen or armed forces personnel. as a second world war
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veteran, _ personnel. as a second world war veteran, he — personnel. as a second world war veteran, he was one of our biggest surlporters — veteran, he was one of our biggest supporters. it was our honorary air commodore — supporters. it was our honorary air commodore and took part in our interest— commodore and took part in our interest in— commodore and took part in our interest in the station by taking numerous — interest in the station by taking numerous special ceremonies over the years _ numerous special ceremonies over the ears. , . , , years. things are slightly scaled down today _ years. things are slightly scaled down today but _ years. things are slightly scaled down today but everyone - years. things are slightly scaled down today but everyone on - years. things are slightly scaled . down today but everyone on parade has some special connection to the duke. who are you representing? the raf special relationship contingent, made _ raf special relationship contingent, made up _ raf special relationship contingent, made up of three or four officers, and we _ made up of three or four officers, and we are — made up of three or four officers, and we are pleased to be representing the raf. what is it like to be part — representing the raf. what is it like to be part of _ representing the raf. what is it like to be part of this _ representing the raf. what is it like to be part of this piece - representing the raf. what is it like to be part of this piece of. like to be part of this piece of history? like to be part of this piece of histo ? �* , . ., like to be part of this piece of histo ? �*, . ., , ., history? it's a great privilege to be able to _ history? it's a great privilege to be able to represent _ history? it's a great privilege to be able to represent the - history? it's a great privilege to be able to represent the raf i history? it's a great privilege toj be able to represent the raf as history? it's a great privilege to l be able to represent the raf as a nation _ be able to represent the raf as a nation foot— be able to represent the raf as a nation foot of the commonwealth and the rest _ nation foot of the commonwealth and the rest of— nation foot of the commonwealth and the rest of world comes together to paper— the rest of world comes together to paper wealth to his royal highness, the duke _ paper wealth to his royal highness, the duke of edinburgh. —— to say farewetl — the duke of edinburgh. -- to say farewell. ., ~ the duke of edinburgh. -- to say farewell. ., ,, , ., the duke of edinburgh. -- to say farewell. ., ~' , ., ., the duke of edinburgh. -- to say farewell. ., ,, , ., ., , , ., ,, ., farewell. thank you for speaking to me. did farewell. thank you for speaking to me- did your _ farewell. thank you for speaking to me- did your as — farewell. thank you for speaking to me. did your as it's _ farewell. thank you for speaking to me. did your as it's known, - farewell. thank you for speaking to me. did your as it's known, the - me. did your as it's known, the approach _ me. did your as it's known, the approach from _ me. did your as it's known, the
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approach from the _ me. did your as it's known, the approach from the george - me. did your as it's known, the approach from the george iv i me. did your as it's known, the i approach from the george iv gate into windsor castle. just beyond, we can see the east lawn in the far distance. that is where the king's trip will be firing their gun salutes during the funeral procession, one gun fired every minute, hence the minute gun salute during the procession. there we have the armed forces, different parts of the armed forces, different parts of the forces, making their way into windsor castle. here we are in the quadrangle itself. we have pipes and drums making their way in, the big drums making their way in, the big drums assuaged in black, and lots of the instruments you will see, lots of the insignia we will see today, including the queen's truncheon of the gurkhas, all of these things draped in black. the forces coming in now will be those who are preparing to line the quadrangle. very, very important task which will be to provide a backdrop certainly and a framework, if you like, for
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the event to take place there later, when the royal family will gather, her majesty the queen will be joining the procession just before it makes its way down the hill to the chapel for the funeral service itself. so, from the quadrangle in the castle, let me join sophie again. the castle, let me 'oin sophie aaain. ~ , ,, ., the castle, let me 'oin sophie aaain. ~ , ~' ., , again. well, the duke of edinburgh had deep connections _ again. well, the duke of edinburgh had deep connections with - again. well, the duke of edinburgh had deep connections with windsor castle throughout his life. it is also where his mother was born back in 1885. i am also where his mother was born back in 1885. iamjoint also where his mother was born back in 1885. i am joint by the author and journalist philip eade, who has written extensively about young prince philip. his connections really do go back a long way. thea;r really do go back a long way. they do. it really do go back a long way. they do- it wasn't _ really do go back a long way. they do. it wasn't just _ really do go back a long way. they do. it wasn'tjust his _ really do go back a long way. they do. it wasn'tjust his mother who was bom— do. it wasn'tjust his mother who was born here. it was her mother, and he _ was born here. it was her mother, and he was — was born here. it was her mother, and he was descended from queen victoria _ and he was descended from queen victoria. when he first began to get to know _
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victoria. when he first began to get to know princess elizabeth, and they met famously when she was 13 and he was a _ met famously when she was 13 and he was a cadet _ met famously when she was 13 and he was a cadet at dartmouth, but the most _ was a cadet at dartmouth, but the most significant meetings really were _ most significant meetings really were a _ most significant meetings really were a little bit later on during his ieaves— were a little bit later on during his leaves from the navy, in the second — his leaves from the navy, in the second world war, when he would be invited _ second world war, when he would be invited by— second world war, when he would be invited by king george vi to come and stay— invited by king george vi to come and stay at — invited by king george vi to come and stay at windsor, because king george _ and stay at windsor, because king george vi — and stay at windsor, because king george vi was his second cousin, and at christmas — george vi was his second cousin, and at christmas 1943 he came and he watched _ at christmas 1943 he came and he watched the princesses in the pantomime aladdin. it was observed to laugh _ pantomime aladdin. it was observed to laugh loudly at all the loud jokes. — to laugh loudly at all the loud jokes, and afterwards he wrote to the queen— jokes, and afterwards he wrote to the queen to thank her for this time that he _ the queen to thank her for this time that he had — the queen to thank her for this time that he had had, and it was really a very moving — that he had had, and it was really a very moving letter, because it basically— very moving letter, because it basically said, he thanked her for, as he _ basically said, he thanked her for, as he put— basically said, he thanked her for, as he put it. — basically said, he thanked her for, as he put it, the opportunity to enjoy— as he put it, the opportunity to enjoy the — as he put it, the opportunity to enjoy the simple family pleasures and amusements, and the feeling that he was _ and amusements, and the feeling that
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he was able _ and amusements, and the feeling that he was able to share them. it was really— he was able to share them. it was really a _ he was able to share them. it was really a sense in that letter that you got — really a sense in that letter that you got that he was at last, he was beginning — you got that he was at last, he was beginning to fall in love with princess _ beginning to fall in love with princess elizabeth. he saw a way of regaining _ princess elizabeth. he saw a way of regaining this family life that he had lost — regaining this family life that he had lost as a boy, aged nine, when his own _ had lost as a boy, aged nine, when his own family disintegrated. throughout his life, the queen and the duke of enver spent a lot of here, and he will enjoy it been here. —— the duke of edinburgh. he loved it here. in 1952, it became their— loved it here. in 1952, it became their weekend home, loved it here. in 1952, it became theirweekend home, so it loved it here. in 1952, it became their weekend home, so it would be here whenever they were not elsewhere for the weekend. it was where _ elsewhere for the weekend. it was where he — elsewhere for the weekend. it was where he started the polo here. his ureat where he started the polo here. h 1 great passion. where he started the polo here. his great passion. the _ where he started the polo here. his great passion. the guards - where he started the polo here. his great passion. the guards polo - where he started the polo here. his| great passion. the guards polo club. now really the _ great passion. the guards polo club. now really the wimbledon _ great passion. the guards polo club. now really the wimbledon of - great passion. the guards polo club. now really the wimbledon of polo. l now really the wimbledon of polo. later— now really the wimbledon of polo. later on. _ now really the wimbledon of polo. later on, when he gave up polo, he started _ later on, when he gave up polo, he started carriage driving here, so it was the _ started carriage driving here, so it was the place where he lived at his
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passions — was the place where he lived at his assions. ~ , ., ., ,, ., was the place where he lived at his assions. ~ i. ., ,, ., ., passions. when you talk to local eo - le, passions. when you talk to local people. a _ passions. when you talk to local people, a familiar _ passions. when you talk to local people, a familiar figure, - passions. when you talk to local people, a familiar figure, often l people, a familiarfigure, often seenin people, a familiarfigure, often seen in the grounds outside windsor castle. thank you. is seen in the grounds outside windsor castle. thank you.— castle. thank you. is so fit, thank ou and castle. thank you. is so fit, thank you and to — castle. thank you. is so fit, thank you and to your— castle. thank you. is so fit, thank you and to your guest. _ castle. thank you. is so fit, thank you and to your guest. -- - castle. thank you. is so fit, thankj you and to your guest. -- sophie, you and to your guest. —— sophie, thank you and to your guest. the corps of drums, led by the drum majors, in this lovely sunshine on this day, the day of the funeral of his royal highness, the duke of edinburgh. all of these participants today are preparing to line the route and to prepare for the procession itself a little later on. with me is brigadier greville bibby, a very experienced household division individual, former commanding officer of the 1st battalion was in guards, and we have the royal editor of the sunday
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times, roya nikkhah. wonderfulto have you with us. why don't we start by helping viewers understand this part of the ceremonial. what is going on? we part of the ceremonial. what is going on?— part of the ceremonial. what is hoin on? . ., ., , going on? we have got the first troo -s going on? we have got the first troops moving _ going on? we have got the first troops moving down _ going on? we have got the first troops moving down towards i going on? we have got the first troops moving down towards stj troops moving down towards st george's chapel, and on the screen at the moment we have what they pull the mass corps of drums, which are actually the coldstream guards and the grenadier guards working together. as you know from trooping the colour, these guys are real soldiers, in that they are part of their battalions, and their duty is to be musicians within the battalions. machine gun, to be precise. and cole people see this wonderful ceremonial and often they don't make the link wonderful ceremonial and often they don't make the [in— don't make the link between the operational _ don't make the link between the operational and _ don't make the link between the operational and ceremonial- don't make the link between the i operational and ceremonial duties. exactly, nice to remind people that we do our bit for the country above and beyond this sort of stuff.
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talking about the health subdivision, let's be clear that we have the army, air force and navy, all of them playing prominent roles today. all of them playing prominent roles toda . , ., all of them playing prominent roles toda . , . ., , ~ all of them playing prominent roles toda . , . .,, ~ ., today. yes, and i was thinking about this on the way _ today. yes, and i was thinking about this on the way here _ today. yes, and i was thinking about this on the way here today. - today. yes, and i was thinking about this on the way here today. it's i this on the way here today. it's utterly remarkable that you can have so many people with a special relationship to one person. i've likened it to when we had our third child. i was wondering if there would be enough love in my heart for a third child, but this is what prince philip did. he was able to encourage and generate a special relationship with all his regiments, with all his charities and with the nation as a whole. a remarkable achievement. brute nation as a whole. a remarkable achievement.— achievement. we caught a quick ulim se achievement. we caught a quick glimpse of— achievement. we caught a quick glimpse of the _ achievement. we caught a quick glimpse of the dean _ achievement. we caught a quick glimpse of the dean of - achievement. we caught a quickj glimpse of the dean of windsor, david conner, who will be leading the ceremony. this is the guard of honour, this is the rifles, on their way to the chapel itself. they will be just outside the chapel in that horseshoe cloister. they are
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providing the guard of honour for the arrival of the hearse a bit later for the funeral procession, the conclusion of that procession. we have the band and bugles of the rifles and we have the serving officers as well, and the men. i am wondering, for the rifles, we need to explain again to people watching why these different branches of the armed forces have been selected. the duke wasn't a relationship the rifles is what? he duke wasn't a relationship the rifles is what?— duke wasn't a relationship the rifles is what? . , ., ., ., rifles is what? he was a colonel in chief of the — rifles is what? he was a colonel in chief of the regiment _ rifles is what? he was a colonel in chief of the regiment when - rifles is what? he was a colonel in chief of the regiment when it i rifles is what? he was a colonel in chief of the regiment when it was i chief of the regiment when it was formed in 2007, because the rifles were animal commission of four traditional regiments, including the royal green jackets and traditional regiments, including the royal greenjackets and the light infantry, and they were put together as part of the changes to the defence forces in 2007. his royal highness was made there colonel. i think the other thing that's worth pointing out, as we watch them come up, you can see they are much, much quicker than everybody else. they
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march at 150 paces per minute. the reason for that is because they used to be the original skirmishers. they were the ones that used to lead us into battle, and they are not wearing red. they wore sensible colours so the enemy couldn't see them, so they were allowed to get into battle before everybody else. i into battle before everybody else. i would like us to see at this point the important ceremony that took place a few years ago, because we had the duke of edinburgh handing over his position with the rifles to the duchess of cornwall. one of the last public engagement, really, that he engaged in, and there we have the images. that was a memorable day. very memorable, and very emotional, i think, for the nation as a whole, because i think it was one of the last times we saw his royal highness in the public eye. the last times we saw his royal highness in the public eye-— in the public eye. the duchess of cornwall very _ in the public eye. the duchess of cornwall very proud _ in the public eye. the duchess of cornwall very proud and - in the public eye. the duchess of cornwall very proud and happy i in the public eye. the duchess of cornwall very proud and happy to take over that role for the the royal marines band again so smart,
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and then we have others following up. different establishments represented within that contingent. while we watch these images, i'm going to bring in roya nikkhah. as we look at this, let's remember that there is a family watching all of this, no doubt, some of them, from the windows of windsor castle, preparing to take part in this procession today. they will, like all of us, be impressed with the ceremonial and they will think it is fitting and exactly as the duke would have wished. what are your thoughts on the family taking part? i think this is really important, this part. _ i think this is really important, this part, because, forthe i think this is really important, this part, because, for the family, we would — this part, because, for the family, we would have had a very different funeral. _ we would have had a very different funeral, had we not been in the middle — funeral, had we not been in the middle of— funeral, had we not been in the middle of a pandemic. there would have been— middle of a pandemic. there would have been a huge military procession in london _ have been a huge military procession in london at — have been a huge military procession in london at a public procession in
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windsor _ in london at a public procession in windsor so. — in london at a public procession in windsor. so, for the family, in london at a public procession in windsor. so, forthe family, it in london at a public procession in windsor. so, for the family, it will be really— windsor. so, for the family, it will be really important that the duke's strong _ be really important that the duke's strong military links to all parts the armed forces is being honoured today— the armed forces is being honoured today on— the armed forces is being honoured today on quite a large scale. i think— today on quite a large scale. i think that's important. there are huge _ think that's important. there are huge family links when it comes to the military. you just talk about their— the military. you just talk about their very— the military. you just talk about their very moving service where we saw the _ their very moving service where we saw the duke of edinburgh handing over the _ saw the duke of edinburgh handing over the rifles to the duchess of cornwall, — over the rifles to the duchess of cornwall, and some key parts, very key points, — cornwall, and some key parts, very key points, the royal marines. that's— key points, the royal marines. that's a — key points, the royal marines. that's a good prompt, because let's look at the band. i mentioned earlier that the fact that lots of the insignia, the instruments, the drums swathes in black but, if you see the maisonette is being carried, to lead the band, even the mace is really dressed in black cloth. that's something again that we are going to see with lots of the elements of the armed forces today, different important parts of the
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insignia draped in black to reflect the occasion. insignia draped in black to reflect the occasion-— insignia draped in black to reflect the occasion. ~ , , ., �* , ., the occasion. absolutely, and it's a sin of the occasion. absolutely, and it's a sign of respect _ the occasion. absolutely, and it's a sign of respect and _ the occasion. absolutely, and it's a sign of respect and a _ the occasion. absolutely, and it's a sign of respect and a sign - the occasion. absolutely, and it's a sign of respect and a sign of i sign of respect and a sign of mourning, and i think it's a lovely thing, very sombre, covering up all that gold and red and glitz. of course, i am advised that it also makes sense that the site runs, and the timekeeper on what they call the bass drum, it tones down the drum as well. the music is there, people can hear it but perhaps it's quite as loud as we are used to. it’s hear it but perhaps it's quite as loud as we are used to. it's more restrained. _ loud as we are used to. it's more restrained, muffled. _ loud as we are used to. it's more restrained, muffled. that's- loud as we are used to. it's more restrained, muffled. that's the i restrained, muffled. that's the word. restrained, muffled. that's the word- lets _ restrained, muffled. that's the word. lets take _ restrained, muffled. that's the word. lets take in _ restrained, muffled. that's the word. lets take in the - restrained, muffled. that's the word. lets take in the scene i restrained, muffled. that's the i word. lets take in the scene within the precincts _ word. lets take in the scene within the precincts of— word. lets take in the scene within the precincts of the _ word. lets take in the scene within the precincts of the castle - word. lets take in the scene within the precincts of the castle itself. i the precincts of the castle itself. that's a lovely site. there you have the scene. this is the root, the root of the funeral procession, as it leaves the quadrangle at the northern end of the picture here, the castle, passed a round tower,
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down chapel hill, turning around to our left and intricate archway into the horseshoe cloister. a very, very bright, sunny day under glorious blue skies, with the royal standard flying above the round tower. are very warm are very warm welcome are very warm welcome at 2pm. wherever you are welcome to our special coverage at windsor where the funeral for his royal highness prince philip, the duke of edinburgh is about to take place. it will start in on our�*s time but before that we will have coverage of events leading up to the funeral and talking more to special guests. if you would like unaccompanied coverage you can use the service on the red button. the service will take place in st
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george's chapel, one of the architectural treasures of the united kingdom. soon the liners will be in position, the dismounted detachments of the household cavalry and a royal navy piping party, something the duke wanted to pipe the still as the duke is brought to the still as the duke is brought to the chapel for the service and then interment. we will have representatives there of the commonwealth, who will be in horseshoe cloister, a symbol of the importance of the commonwealth, and the piping party of the royal navy ready and in place. impeccably smart, ready to take part in what will be for lots of people watching, especially those with naval connections, a moving tribute and a nice touch that the duke added to the ceremonial today. as the coffin
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comes through the archway, the piping party will be ready to accompany the coffin as it is taken by the royal marines up the steps to the great west door. back in the quadrangle and we have the band and bugles of the rifle making their way through to the horse —— horseshoe cloister. to provide a guard of honour, that means what? it is cloister. to provide a guard of honour, that means what? it is a hue honour, that means what? it is a huge honour- — honour, that means what? it is a huge honour. it _ honour, that means what? it is a huge honour. it does _ honour, that means what? it is a huge honour. it does what i honour, that means what? it is a huge honour. it does what it i honour, that means what? it is a| huge honour. it does what it says honour, that means what? it is a i huge honour. it does what it says on the tin, it is the guard of honour, the tin, it is the guard of honour, the regiment selected to provide that body of men and women who are providing an honour guard. funnily enough, if you do not mind, it reminds me of a funny story of prince philip when i commanded the guard of armourfor the president prince philip when i commanded the guard of armour for the president of russia boris yeltsin and i had to
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learn my lines in russian to present the queens company of the grenadiers to boris yeltsin outside buckingham palace and did my bit in russian about three lines. of course, the president started to talk to me in russian, at which point prince philip lent to his aide and said, i don't think major bibby speaks russian! he don't think ma'or bibby speaks russian! ., , don't think ma'or bibby speaks russian! . , ,., , ,., ., russian! he was disappointed. you were telling _ russian! he was disappointed. you were telling us _ russian! he was disappointed. you were telling us earlier, _ russian! he was disappointed. you were telling us earlier, roya i were telling us earlier, roya nikkhah, about the family. we are thinking notjust about nikkhah, about the family. we are thinking not just about the children, charles, anne, andrew and edward and their families, there will certainly be a focus on william and harry. harry is back from america and there has been focused on that also. when we drew up the plans, they drew up the plans for
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today, what do you think they will try to achieve in the way they put the procession together? what are people meant to read and how it will play out? people meant to read and how it will -la out? ., , , people meant to read and how it will -la out? , ,,. ., ., play out? there has been speculation around some — play out? there has been speculation around some of— play out? there has been speculation around some of the _ play out? there has been speculation around some of the so _ play out? there has been speculation around some of the so dramas i play out? there has been speculation around some of the so dramas we i play out? there has been speculation i around some of the so dramas we have seen with the royal family in the past months. the key thing the family want to focus on today, from her majesty to those attending today is unity at least for one day. the feeling is that is what the duke of edinburgh would have wanted and her majesty wants today. if we look at who is in the procession, we see the prince of wales, the princess royal, harry and william will be walking together, not shoulder to shoulder but pretty close. there will be a united show at least today. igate but pretty close. there will be a united show at least today. we are lookin: at united show at least today. we are looking at a — united show at least today. we are looking at a united _ united show at least today. we are looking at a united show— united show at least today. we are looking at a united show now i united show at least today. we are i looking at a united show now because we look at the combined bands of the royal air force, part of what we call the tri—service band. a
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relatively unusual thing, greville, that we have the bands from the three playing together. it is not unique but relatively unusual. it unique but relatively unusual. it comes back to that point i made earlier— comes back to that point i made earlier about how the duke has touched — earlier about how the duke has touched so many parts, every part of the services — touched so many parts, every part of the services in his life. it is a lovely— the services in his life. it is a lovely representation of that. what i do lovely representation of that. what i do not _ lovely representation of that. what i do not think you have mentioned but will— i do not think you have mentioned but will please you, we have the welsh _ but will please you, we have the welsh guards represented in the quadrangle, who are marking the route _ quadrangle, who are marking the route. before the duke was colonel of the _ route. before the duke was colonel of the grenadiers he was colonel of the welsh — of the grenadiers he was colonel of the welsh guards. it is of the grenadiers he was colonel of the welsh guards.— of the grenadiers he was colonel of the welsh guards. it is worth coming back to the studio _ the welsh guards. it is worth coming back to the studio for _ the welsh guards. it is worth coming back to the studio for a _ the welsh guards. it is worth coming back to the studio for a second. i the welsh guards. it is worth coming back to the studio for a second. you | back to the studio for a second. you will see we have a vantage point as well. the studio isjust will see we have a vantage point as well. the studio is just at the top of chapel hill and they are turning the corner and here we have the rifles passing us and we have a great view of them as they walk down chapel hill to provide the guard of
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honour when the procession starts later. to give you a sense of some of the geography here. there you have the magnificent green space of the quadrangle in windsor castle with the state entrance to the left. that is where we will see the procession starting later. we have the band of the royal marines making a very grand and impressive entrance. they are part of this tri—service band today. we saw the royal air force, the marines are taking their place. they will play a glorious selection of music which again, it is a list of tunes the duke wanted himself, very much his own choice. duke wanted himself, very much his own choice-— own choice. indeed and i spoke to the ma'or own choice. indeed and i spoke to the major general. _ own choice. indeed and i spoke to the major general. they _ own choice. indeed and i spoke to the major general. they were i own choice. indeed and i spoke to | the major general. they were very involved _ the major general. they were very involved in—
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the major general. they were very involved in working with the duke in choosing _ involved in working with the duke in choosing music with the senior director— choosing music with the senior director of music of the coldstream guards _ director of music of the coldstream guards. looking at the quadrangle, i reminded _ guards. looking at the quadrangle, i reminded myself it is extremely difficult — reminded myself it is extremely difficult to march on grass. it is not something you would think about but when _ not something you would think about but when you march on tarmac, you can hear— but when you march on tarmac, you can hear each— but when you march on tarmac, you can hear each other's feet and you can hear each other's feet and you can keep _ can hear each other's feet and you can keep in — can hear each other's feet and you can keep in step relatively easily, but on _ can keep in step relatively easily, but on grass, that goes. it will be interesting — but on grass, that goes. it will be interesting to watch them coming in. they have _ interesting to watch them coming in. they have rehearsed and they will be fine. we _ they have rehearsed and they will be fine. ~ ., ~ they have rehearsed and they will be fine. ~ . ,, ., fine. we were talking about connections _ fine. we were talking about connections with _ fine. we were talking about connections with the - fine. we were talking about connections with the army. fine. we were talking about i connections with the army and fine. we were talking about - connections with the army and with the navy. the royal air force, given the navy. the royal air force, given the strong connections with raf northolt and other bases. what can we tell viewers about the air force connection? he we tell viewers about the air force connection?— we tell viewers about the air force connection? he was marshal of the r0 al air connection? he was marshal of the royal air force. _ connection? he was marshal of the royal air force. most _ connection? he was marshal of the royal air force. most important, i connection? he was marshal of the | royalair force. most important, he royal air force. most important, he was described as a talented pilot himself~ — was described as a talented pilot himself. it is amazing to think he
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gualified — himself. it is amazing to think he qualified on 59 different aircraft. i do qualified on 59 different aircraft. i do not — qualified on 59 different aircraft. i do not know whether you know that fact. i do not know whether you know that fact it _ i do not know whether you know that fact it is _ i do not know whether you know that fact. it is worth underlining. as we have _ fact. it is worth underlining. as we have seen— fact. it is worth underlining. as we have seen from the coverage, it was difficult _ have seen from the coverage, it was difficult to _ have seen from the coverage, it was difficult to keep him out of the cockpit— difficult to keep him out of the cockpit and the raf are extremely proud _ cockpit and the raf are extremely proud of— cockpit and the raf are extremely proud of that. that - proud of that. that is a lovely sight. i do not think anybody had foreseen the procession that was planned for today would take place in this kind of weather and that of course, a funeral that everybody has been talking about in terms of being down scaled and on a smaller scale, is still immensely impressive as we see today. it still immensely impressive as we see toda . , ., , still immensely impressive as we see toda. , ., ,~ today. it is. that is something duke of edinburgh. _ today. it is. that is something duke of edinburgh, we _ today. it is. that is something duke of edinburgh, we know— today. it is. that is something duke of edinburgh, we know every i today. it is. that is something duke of edinburgh, we know every bit i today. it is. that is something duke of edinburgh, we know every bit ofl of edinburgh, we know every bit of this funeral was done with his wishes, planning it down to the last detail, things like his commitment to service with a raf. the insignia
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inside st george's chapel, chosen by him and his raf wings will be there. a magnificent sight. it does not feel like a small, scaled—down funeral. and to go back to how the family are preparing, that is something they will feel happy about. �* ., ., something they will feel happy about. ., ., , something they will feel happy about. ., , , ., , about. the band of the scots guards and the tri-service _ about. the band of the scots guards and the tri-service band _ about. the band of the scots guards and the tri-service band will - about. the band of the scots guards and the tri-service band will be i and the tri—service band will be directed by lieutenant colonel simon haw. the footguards in the background, against this wall, and coldstream guards and welsh guards present as part of those lining the quadrangle. on the other end of the quadrangle, just in the far distance, in the sunshine, you have the household cavalry, blues and royals and life guards, who are lining the quadrangle. here we have a special group, greville, the truncheon parties, some of the rich
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banners that are the emblems of regiments and other units and for the gurkhas, the queen's truncheon, again, ithink the gurkhas, the queen's truncheon, again, i think it was a gift that was part of the important symbols regiments have. i was part of the important symbols regiments have.— was part of the important symbols regiments have. i would go further than symbols- _ regiments have. i would go further than symbols. they _ regiments have. i would go further than symbols. they are _ regiments have. i would go further than symbols. they are the - regiments have. i would go further than symbols. they are the soul. regiments have. i would go further than symbols. they are the soul ofj than symbols. they are the soul of the regiment, representing the heart of the _ the regiment, representing the heart of the regiment. each of these flags for want _ of the regiment. each of these flags for want of— of the regiment. each of these flags for want of a better term, these colours — for want of a better term, these colours. the regimental colour and queens— colours. the regimental colour and queen's colour there, the union flag _ queen's colour there, the union flag. these are the colours we see trooped _ flag. these are the colours we see trooped every year on the birthday parade _ trooped every year on the birthday parade to— trooped every year on the birthday parade to commemorate her majesty's birthday _ parade to commemorate her majesty's birthday. each of these regiments with special relationships with his royal— with special relationships with his royal highness represented. a huge honour— royal highness represented. a huge honour for— royal highness represented. a huge honour for young soldiers and officers — honour for young soldiers and officers carrying these colours. the
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highlanders — officers carrying these colours. tie: highlanders look magnificent. officers carrying these colours. the highlanders look magnificent. they look absolutely _ highlanders look magnificent. they look absolutely magnificent. the 4th battalion _ look absolutely magnificent. the 4th battalion royal regiment of scotland. like the rifles, when they were merged, but nice they could keep— were merged, but nice they could keep their— were merged, but nice they could keep their antecedent. prince were merged, but nice they could keep theirantecedent. prince philip was extremely fond of his connections with scotland and the regiment — connections with scotland and the regiment. a connections with scotland and the reuiment. �* .., ., connections with scotland and the reuiment. ~ _, ., ., regiment. a colonel of the 4th battalion royal— regiment. a colonel of the 4th battalion royal regiment, i regiment. a colonel of the 4th battalion royal regiment, thej battalion royal regiment, the highlanders. you are getting a sense now of this presentation on the quadrangle. just think about the position involved. the garrison sergeant major andrew stokes has been hard at work, as has the brigade major, who we will see later, very hard at work trying to get all these arrangements ready in just over a week, because it is a revised plan and has involved last—minute changes. the work that has gone into it has been immense.
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and look at that standard. the biggest version, if you like, of the royal standard, the state standard above the round tower. the best possible conditions for flying the flag. possible conditions for flying the flat. , ., , ., flag. interesting what you were sa in: flag. interesting what you were saying about — flag. interesting what you were saying about the _ flag. interesting what you were saying about the architects i flag. interesting what you were saying about the architects of l flag. interesting what you were i saying about the architects of this parade _ saying about the architects of this parade. they are the ones who had to rethink— parade. they are the ones who had to rethink the _ parade. they are the ones who had to rethink the plan, due to the coronavirus. there he is, garrison sergeant— coronavirus. there he is, garrison sergeant major, putting finishing touches— sergeant major, putting finishing touches to the parade and making sure the _ touches to the parade and making sure the ensigns are lined up. the ro alair sure the ensigns are lined up. the royal air force _ sure the ensigns are lined up. tte: royal air force band sure the ensigns are lined up. t'te: royal air force band approaching sure the ensigns are lined up. tte: royal air force band approaching the george iv gate. musicians from the combined bands of the royal air force. selected for this event and again a matter of deep pride for those taking part.
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looking right down the long walk, over two miles of it, through the gateway. it is a vista to be very proud of and to take great delight in seeing, especially on such a clear day. in seeing, especially on such a clear day-— in seeing, especially on such a clear da . ., ., ., clear day. you mentioned the weather earlier. i remember _ clear day. you mentioned the weather earlier. i remember when _ clear day. you mentioned the weather earlier. i remember when the - earlier. i rememberwhen the coldstream guards were presented with their— coldstream guards were presented with their new colours in 2012 in this very— with their new colours in 2012 in this very spot. it was a miserable day~ _ this very spot. it was a miserable day i_ this very spot. it was a miserable day~ ithink— this very spot. it was a miserable day. i think you saw earlier the drum _ day. i think you saw earlier the drum major scott fitzgerald who will lead to _ drum major scott fitzgerald who will lead to the grenadiers down to the chapel~ _ lead to the grenadiers down to the chapel~ i_ lead to the grenadiers down to the chapel. i rememberthe duke lead to the grenadiers down to the chapel. i remember the duke looking at him _ chapel. i remember the duke looking at him with— chapel. i remember the duke looking at him with his gold braid and medals— at him with his gold braid and medals and maize, looking resplendent, but there was drizzle and wet. _ resplendent, but there was drizzle and wet, and prince philip said would — and wet, and prince philip said would he — and wet, and prince philip said would he rust? and scott reassured him he _ would he rust? and scott reassured him he would not rust.— him he would not rust. there they are. the grenadier _ him he would not rust. there they are. the grenadier guards - him he would not rust. there they are. the grenadier guards making their way in. let's take in this
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scene. it is one of the most poignant moments. that in the bottom of the shot we have seen and now we have a great view, is the carriage, the duke's carriage, he was an expert carriage driver, with the ponies. expert carriage driver, with the onies. , , ., ., ponies. this is a moment when the alace ponies. this is a moment when the palace announced _ ponies. this is a moment when the palace announced yesterday, i palace announced yesterday, everybody found poignant. these are his royal highness's fell ponies. balmoral nevus and another called storm. both born in 2008. they will stand in the quadrangle as the land rover bearing his body drives around. the duke of edinburgh took up around. the duke of edinburgh took up carriage driving at the age of 50 and it was a pastime that gave him enormous joy. and it was a pastime that gave him enormousjoy. it and it was a pastime that gave him enormous joy. it was and it was a pastime that gave him enormousjoy. it was his personal wish he wanted the ponies to see him on his finaljourney.—
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on his final 'ourney. remarkable that he on his finaljourney. remarkable that he was _ on his finaljourney. remarkable that he was still— on his finaljourney. remarkable that he was still engaged - on his finaljourney. remarkable that he was still engaged in i on his finaljourney. remarkable| that he was still engaged in that. such an energetic sport to engage in, well into his 905. ftithe such an energetic sport to engage in, well into his 90s.— in, well into his 90s. one of the lovely things — in, well into his 90s. one of the lovely things we _ in, well into his 90s. one of the lovely things we heard - in, well into his 90s. one of the lovely things we heard from i in, well into his 90s. one of the lovely things we heard from the | lovely things we heard from the royal family was on sunday, the earl of wessex and countess of wessex, a nd of wessex and countess of wessex, and her daughter, a keen carriage driver, they talked about how he ended up in ditches here and there when he started out and even very recently, it was a pastime that gave him the mostjoy and i think showed his hair raising love for live. however dangerous it was, it was never too late to pick up a new hobby. on the seat of the carriage, to underline how poignant this is, we have the cap and the whip. all of this planned for people to take in the interests, the commitment, the diligence in the best possible sense
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of the duke in all areas of life, this is just a lovely element, of the duke in all areas of life, this isjust a lovely element, i think, the courage, which willjust stand there as a reminder of something that he took on, as you say, at age 50, and went on to do for over 40 years. as we saw on the little clip, this isn't some little casual ride in a carriage, it's a very physical, energetic activity. it's a lovely reminder. t very physical, energetic activity. it's a lovely reminder.— it's a lovely reminder. i think nobody cannot _ it's a lovely reminder. i think nobody cannot be _ it's a lovely reminder. i think nobody cannot be moved i it's a lovely reminder. i think nobody cannot be moved by| it's a lovely reminder. i think- nobody cannot be moved by saying that cap _ nobody cannot be moved by saying that cap and that worked on that seat, _ that cap and that worked on that seat. and — that cap and that worked on that seat. and a _ that cap and that worked on that seat, and a lot has been made about the land _ seat, and a lot has been made about the land rover, hearse designed by his royal— the land rover, hearse designed by his royal highness. this courage was also designed by prince philip. —— this carriage. | also designed by prince philip. -- this carriage-— this carriage. i was talking about oiunant this carriage. i was talking about poignant images. _ this carriage. i was talking about poignant images. look - this carriage. i was talking about poignant images. look at - this carriage. i was talking about poignant images. look at this. i this carriage. i was talking about i poignant images. look at this. this is a land rover, clearly, but it's a land rover that's been converted, in effect, into a hearse. it's been
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designed over the course of many years, actually, modified from the years, actually, modified from the year 2003, years, actually, modified from the year2003, initially, by the years, actually, modified from the year 2003, initially, by the duke himself. i think it's worth taking that in. a specially adapted land rover, which will be the hearse in this funeral procession. it's ready and it will be driven by some of the royal engineers. it will be ready for the procession shortly. we are back at st george's chapel and, as we predicted earlier, we have the dismounted detachments of the household cavalry, the blues and royals on the left, the life guards on the right. we often see them at great state events, the state opening of parliament, for example, and other great events, and the household cavalry, which plays a big part in the queen's birthday parade. here they are today, very prominently, very smartly, and standing to attention on the steps
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of st george's chapel at windsor. the horseshoe cloister, you can now see the shape i was referring to, and looking at the steps on the western end of the chapel itself. this is where the land rover hearse will arrive. this is where the royal navy piping party will greet the hearse. this is where the commonwealth defence advisers are in place, just to remind everyone of the close bond with the commonwealth. this is where the badge of honour at the band of pupils with the rifles are standing by, and here we have a quick glimpse of the defence advisers of the commonwealth, canada, new zealand, australia, trinidad and tobago. let's stay on these wonderful images and with me as robert hardman, the distinguished royal writer, writer for the daily mail, and author. i am pleased to say that katie nicholl, also a distinguished commentator and
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journalist, an expert in these matters, is also with us. so nice to have you with us. you join us at a very solemn, poignant moment. we are taking in the beauty of the scene, because it is beautiful. we are taking in the colour and the pageantry of this element of the day, but we are preparing ourselves for what is, without doubt, the most solemn part of the day, which will be the funeral procession. we haven't seen her majesty the queen orany haven't seen her majesty the queen or any members of the royal family yet. clearly, when that happens, and when the band of the grenadier guards sounds the great drumbeat for the funeral procession to start, we will be remaining silent at that point to take in the scene as it happens. so, katie and robert, as we look at windsor castle and as we look at windsor castle and as we look at windsor castle and as we look at the quadrangle, just your
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thoughts, robert, on what viewers should now be focusing on in the next 15 or 20 minutes. t should now be focusing on in the next 15 or 20 minutes.— next 15 or 20 minutes. i think everyone _ next 15 or 20 minutes. i think everyone should _ next 15 or 20 minutes. i think everyone should know- next 15 or 20 minutes. i think everyone should know that i next 15 or 20 minutes. i think i everyone should know that every single element of what you are seeing there, that magnificent site, every aspect of this has been thought through by the duke himself. he has given immense care to ensure that every aspect, with the carriage we have heard about, that's a lovely touch, but that also reflects on a whole life devoted to horses. a former president of the international equestrian federation. every single one of those soldiers, sailors, airmen and women are from a unit he was closely attached to, and if ever they were in action, in trouble of any sort, they could always rely and, in fact, would always rely and, in fact, would always receive letters and enquiries from a man who was more than a figurehead, he was very much part of the unit. .,
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figurehead, he was very much part of the unit. . ., ~ figurehead, he was very much part of the unit. . ., ,, ., the unit. katie, we talked earlier about the family _ the unit. katie, we talked earlier about the family watching i the unit. katie, we talked earlier about the family watching all- the unit. katie, we talked earlier about the family watching all of. about the family watching all of this, hearing it, certainly, from inside the castle. the cars are just pulling up. these are really for the first of the royal attendees, so we are talking about zara and mike tindall, princess beatrice and her husband and princess eugenie and her husband, daughters of the duke of york, and the countess of wessex and lady louise mountbatten—windsor. that's the first group we have of the family. just a thought, katie, a small congregation, it's a family funeral, nothing like a royal funeral, nothing like a royal funeral as we have seen on previous occasions. what are your thoughts on what the family will be occasions. what are your thoughts on what the family will he think at this stage, as they prepare to join the procession? it’s this stage, as they prepare to 'oin the procession?i this stage, as they prepare to 'oin the procession? it's been a long and sad week for — the procession? it's been a long and sad week for the _ the procession? it's been a long and sad week for the royal _ the procession? it's been a long and sad week for the royal family i the procession? it's been a long and sad week for the royal family and, l sad week for the royal family and, as robert_ sad week for the royal family and, as robert was saying, everything has been planned in meticulous detail. the duke _ been planned in meticulous detail. the duke himself oversaw to the
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letter _ the duke himself oversaw to the letter what was going to happen today, _ letter what was going to happen today, but still this is a family, a grieving — today, but still this is a family, a grieving family in mourning, and a family— grieving family in mourning, and a family reunited in brief. they haven't— family reunited in brief. they haven't been together for over a yeah _ haven't been together for over a yeah a — haven't been together for over a year. a very sorry case and that this is— year. a very sorry case and that this is what— year. a very sorry case and that this is what is bringing them together, but this will be for them also to— together, but this will be for them also to reflect and to appreciate that the — also to reflect and to appreciate that the duke's wishes are being recognised in this fitting final farewell, and the colours are beautiful, it's a beautiful day here in winter. — beautiful, it's a beautiful day here in winter, it's a very fitting tribute _ in winter, it's a very fitting tribute. ~ ~ . ., , tribute. when we think about who is here and who _ tribute. when we think about who is here and who is _ tribute. when we think about who is here and who is not _ tribute. when we think about who is here and who is not here, _ tribute. when we think about who is here and who is not here, we - tribute. when we think about who is here and who is not here, we are i here and who is not here, we are told that the duchess of sussex is certainly watching from home in the united states. she was hopeful to attend and we are being told that sadly she wasn't cleared for travel by her position at this stage. that's a notable absence. but, of course, the duke of sussex certainly will be here, and it will be
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interesting, as well, to see how that procession forms up at what the various movements are, as they get ready to process. various movements are, as they get ready to process— ready to process. that's right, and the duchess _ ready to process. that's right, and the duchess of _ ready to process. that's right, and the duchess of sussex _ ready to process. that's right, and the duchess of sussex will - ready to process. that's right, and the duchess of sussex will be - the duchess of sussex will be watching from her home in california. there is a wreath that is going — california. there is a wreath that is going to — california. there is a wreath that is going to be late from the couple with a _ is going to be late from the couple with a handwritten tribute from the duchess _ with a handwritten tribute from the duchess of sussex. this is very's homecoming and the first time he has been back— homecoming and the first time he has been back irr— homecoming and the first time he has been back in the uk since he stood down _ been back in the uk since he stood down from — been back in the uk since he stood down from official royal duties. —— this is— down from official royal duties. —— this is harry's homecoming. not home. _ this is harry's homecoming. not home, he — this is harry's homecoming. not home, he would have wanted but will he need _ home, he would have wanted but will he need to— home, he would have wanted but will he need to be here for nonetheless. we are _ he need to be here for nonetheless. we are back— he need to be here for nonetheless. we are back at the quadrangle, and we have had the duke of kent, cousin of the queen, who hasjust we have had the duke of kent, cousin of the queen, who has just left, we have had the duke of kent, cousin of the queen, who hasjust left, and the duke of gloucester, and now we have more of the royal family making their way. have more of the royal family making theirway. really, have more of the royal family making their way. really, we are waiting for the final kind of construction
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of this procession, which involves the band of the grenadier guards, it involves very senior members of the military, and we spoke earlier to the major general. we have mentioned the major general. we have mentioned the brigade major. we will have the chiefs of the armed forces first up we will have the prince of wales and senior members of the royal family, and then some members of the duke of edinburgh's staff, and finallyjust before the procession sets off, the queen willjoin the procession, and that will be the moment where i think the nation draws breath. absolutely. this, for her, her former private secretary, lord charteris, once said the three most important thing is for the queen of good health, strong faith and prince philip, here we see members of the family, immediate family, starting to head off. irate family, immediate family, starting to head off-— to head off. we have 'ust seen the duchess of — to head off. we have just seen the duchess of cambridge _ to head off. we have just seen the duchess of cambridge get - to head off. we have just seen the duchess of cambridge get into - to head off. we have just seen the j duchess of cambridge get into one to head off. we have just seen the i duchess of cambridge get into one of those _ duchess of cambridge get into one of those cars _ duchess of cambridge get into one of those cars. we won't be seeing the
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cambridge — those cars. we won't be seeing the cambridge children. they are too little _ cambridge children. they are too little to— cambridge children. they are too little to be here. two great—grandchildren. i think i am correct _ great—grandchildren. i think i am correct in — great—grandchildren. i think i am correct in saying this the duchess of cambridge's first royal funeral she has— of cambridge's first royal funeral she has attended, so this will be a thirst— she has attended, so this will be a thirst for— she has attended, so this will be a thirst for her. —— a first. in a thirst for her. -- a first. in a short while, _ thirst for her. -- a first. in a short while, we _ thirst for her. -- a first. in a short while, we will- thirst for her. -- a first. in a short while, we will have - thirst for her. —— a first. in — short while, we will have music playing in the quadrangle. that is a magnificent selection of music. this is what is known as the galilee entrance, the galilee porch, the entrance, the galilee porch, the entrance into st george's chapel, into the deanery for tip that is princess beatrice and her husband, and we just saw princess eugenie going on, being greeted by the dean of windsor, david conner, who is of this service. a word of explanation, because we will see the archbishop of canterbury, gives the blessing at the end of the service, but st george's chapel is part of a certain category, a special category of royal places of worship, what is
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known as part of a royal peculiar. these places of worship are the sovereign's own place of worship, not part of the formal structure in terms of authority of the church of england. to put it another way, the dean of windsor is the boss here. it is not the archbishop of canterbury, and some people watching might want to why the archbishop is taken, frankly, a bit of a back seat, in effect. he will be giving a reading and he will be giving the blessing, but the dean is very much in charge. absolutely, the dean has been here more than 20 years. this is the spiritual home of the monarchy. all over this castle, you see the cross of st george, and that's what it's called st george's chapel, it's my saint george is the patron saint of england, it all goes back to this great building we see before us, and the dean, as you say, in charge of the dean, as you say, in charge of the royal peculiar, and deans of windsor become very close to the family. windsor become very close to the
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famil . . windsor become very close to the famil . , . , ., family. lets get ready for the music. this _ family. lets get ready for the music. this is _ family. lets get ready for the music. this is going - family. lets get ready for the music. this is going to - family. lets get ready for the music. this is going to be - family. lets get ready for the - music. this is going to be moving from top music, selected by the duke himself, and he had very particular tastes. we are going to enjoy music and to think about duke himself, as he selected this. music: i vow to thee my country
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the pallbearers, all senior officers
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associated with those regiments and services who have been selected to be here today, the special relationships, as they are being grouped, those selected by the duke because they reflect his close associations. so the pallbearers here representing those who have been invited today. everyone taking part with their heads bowed, as we will see throughout this procession. everyone will have their heads bout as a mark of respect, affection and admiration and in memory of the duke himself.
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music: jerusalem
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present arms.
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music: god save the queen
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about turn!
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and the lastjourney begins. after a lifetime of carefully keeping two steps behind the queen, today on his finaljourney keeping two steps behind the queen, today on his final journey the keeping two steps behind the queen, today on his finaljourney the duke takes precedence for the first and the last time.
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bell tolls music: the still
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cannon fires bell tolls
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minute gun fires
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the wreath of white roses and lilies selected by her majesty the queen, the duke of�*s naval cap and sword given to him all those years ago by his father—in—law, king george vi. funeral procession approaches cloister. guard of honour provided by the rifles. funeral service will begin after the national silence at three o'clock.
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music: god save the queen
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music: the side
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king's troop fire
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the end of the national silence and the beginning of the funeral service, with music, readings,
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selected by the duke of edinburgh in recent years before he is laid to rest in the royal vault, beneath st george's chapel.
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# i am the resurrection and the life, saith the lord # he that believeth in me though he were dead # yet shall he live # and whosoever liveth and believeth in me # shall never die # shall never die
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# i know that my redeemer liveth, and that he shall stand # at the latter day up on the earth # and though after my skin, worms destroy this body, # yet in my flesh shall i see god # whom i shall see for myself # and mine eye shall behold and not another
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# we brought nothing into this world, # and it is certain we can carry nothing out # the lord gave, and the lord hath taken away # blessed be the name of the lord #.
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we are here today in st george's chapel to commit into the hands of god the soul of his servant prince philip, duke of edinburgh. with grateful hearts, we remember the many ways in which his long life has been a blessing to us. we have been inspired by his unwavering loyalty to our queen, by his service to the nation and the commonwealth, by his courage, fortitude and faith.
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0ur lives have been enriched through the challenges that he has set us, the encouragement that he has given us, his kindness, humour and humanity. we therefore pray that god will give us grace to follow his example, and that, with our brother philip, at the last, we shall know the joys of life eternal. # eternal father strong to save # whose arm doth bind the restless wave, # who bidd'st the mighty ocean deep
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# its own appointed limits keep # 0 hear us when we cry to thee # for those in peril on the sea # 0 saviour, whose almighty word # the winds and waves sub—missive heard # who walkedst on the foaming deep, # and calm amid its rage didst sleep
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# 0 hear us when we cry to thee # for those in peril on the sea # 0 sacred spirit, who didst brood # upon the chaos dark and rude # who bad'st its angry tumult cease # and gavest light and life and peace # 0 hear us when we cry to thee # for those in peril on the sea
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# 0 trinity of love and power # 0ur brethren shield in danger�*s hour # from rock and tempest, fire and foe # protect them where—so—e'er they go # and ever let there rise to thee # glad hymns of praise from land and sea #.
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a reading from the book look at the rainbow and praise its maker; it shines with a supreme beauty, rounding the sky with its gleaming arc, a bow bent by the hands of the most high. his command speeds the snow storm and sends the swift lightning to execute his sentence. to that end the storehouses are opened, and the clouds fly out like birds. by his mighty power, the clouds are piled up and the hailstones broken small.
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the crash of his thunder makes the earth writhe, and, when he appears, an earthquake shakes the hills. at his will the south wind blows, the squall from the north and the hurricane. he scatters the snow—flakes like birds alighting; they settle like a swarm of locusts. the eye is dazzled by their beautiful whiteness, and as they fall, the mind is entranced. he spreads frost on the earth like salt, and icicles form like pointed stakes. a cold blast from the north,
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and ice grows hard on the water, settling on every pool, as though the water were putting on a breastplate. he consumes the hills, scorches the wilderness, and withers the grass like fire. cloudy weather quickly puts all to rights, and dew brings welcome relief after heat. by the power of his thought, he tamed the deep and planted it with islands. those who sail the sea tell stories of its dangers, which astonish all who hear them; in it are strange and wonderful creatures, all kinds of living
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things and huge sea—monsters. by his own action he achieves his end, and by his word all things are held together. amen. # 0 bejoyful in the lord, all ye lands # serve the lord with gladness # and come before his presence with a song # be ye sure that the lord he is god # it is he that hath made us, and not we ourselves # we are his people # and the sheep of his pasture # 0 go your way
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# go your way into his gates with thanksgiving # and into his courts with praise # be thankful unto him, and speak good of his name # for the lord is gracious, his mercy, # his mercy is everlasting # and his truth # aand his truth endureth # truth endureth # from generation to generation # glory be to the father,
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and to the son # and to the holy ghost # as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be # world without end # amen, amen
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# amen #. a reading from saintjohn's gospel. martha said tojesus, "lord, if you had been here, my brother would not have died. and even now i know that whatever you ask from god, god will give you." jesus said to her, "your brother will rise again." martha said to him, "i know that he will rise again in the resurrection at the last day." jesus said to her, "i am the resurrection and the life;
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he who believes in me, though he die, yet shall he live, and whoever lives and believes in me shall never die. do you believe this?" she said to him, "yes, lord; i believe that you are the christ, the son of god, he who is coming into the world."
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# my soul give praise unto the lord of heaven, # in majesty and honour clothed; # the earth he made will not be moved, # the seas he made to be its robe # give praise # praise, praise, praise # give praise # the waters rise above the highest mountain,
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# and flow down to the vales and teas; # at springs, wild as is quench their thirst # and birds make nest amid the trees # the trees the lord has made are full of vigour # the fir tree is a home for storks # wild goats find refuge in the hills # from foes
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# the conies shelter in the rocks # my soul give praise unto the lord of heaven, # in majesty and honour clothed; # the soul give praise unto the not be moved, # the seas he made to be its robe # give praise! # 0 lord, how manifold is your creation # all things in wisdom you provide # you give your riches to the earth
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# and to the sea so great and wide # you take your creatures breath and life is ended, # your breath goes forth and life begins # your hand renews the face of the earth, # your praise! # my whole life i will sing
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# my soul give praise unto the lord of heaven, # in majesty and honour clothed; # the earth he made will not be moved, # the seas he made to be its robe # give praise # praise, praise, praise # give praise. #
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# let as pray. # lord, have mercy upon us, # christ, have mercy upon us, # lord, have mercy upon us. # # 0ur father, which art in heaven, # hallowed be thy name; # thy kingdom come; # thy will be done in earth
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# as it is in heaven. # give us this day our daily bread # and forgive us our trespasses # as we forgive them # that trespass against us # and lead us not into temptation # but deliver us from evil # amen # enter not intojudgment with thy servant, 0 lord
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# for in thy sight shall no man living bejustified # grant unto him eternal rest # and let light perpetual shine upon him # we believe verily to see the goodness of the lord # in the land of the living # 0 lord, hear our prayer # and let our cry come unto thee. #
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0 merciful god, the father of our lord jesus christ, who is the resurrection and the life; in whom whosoever believeth shall live, though he die; and whosoever liveth and believeth in him shall not die eternally; who also have taught us by his holy apostle saint paul, not to be sorry, as men without hope, for them that sleep in him; we meekly beseech thee, 0 father that, when we shall depart this life, we may rest in him, as our hope is this our brother doth; and that, at the general resurrection in the last day, we may be found acceptable in thy sight; and receive that blessing,
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which thy well—beloved son shall then pronounce to all that love and fear thee, saying, come ye blessed children of my father; receive the kingdom prepared for you from the beginning of the world. grant this we beseech thee, 0 merciful father through jesus christ, our mediator and redeemer. amen. 0 eternal god, before whose face the generations rise and pass away, thyself unchanged, abiding, we bless thy holy name for all who have now completed their earthly course in thy faith and following and are now at rest; we remember before thee this day philip, duke of edinburgh,
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rendering thanks unto thee — for his resolute faith and loyalty, for his high sense of duty and integrity, for his life of service to the nation and commonwealth, and for the courage and inspiration of his leadership. to him, with all the faithful departed grant thy peace; let light perpetual shine upon them; and in thy loving wisdom and almighty power work in them the good purpose of thy perfect will; throuthesus christ our lord. amen. 0 lord, who didst give to thy servant saint george grace to lay aside the fear of man, and to be faithful even unto death: grant that we,
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unmindful of worldly honour, may fight the wrong, unhold thy rule, and serve thee to our lives' end; throuthesus christ our lord. amen. god save our gracious sovereign and all the companions, living and departed, of the most honourable and noble order of the garter. amen. 0 god of the spirits of all flesh, we praise thy holy name for thy servant philip, duke of edinburgh, who has left us a fair pattern of valiant and true knighthood; grant unto him the assurance of thine ancient promise that thou wilt ever be with those who go down to the sea in ships and occupy their business in great waters.
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and we beseech thee that, following his good example and strengthened by his fellowship, we may at the last, together with him, be partakers of thy heavenly kingdom; throuthesus christ our lord. amen. 0 lord god, when thou givest to thy servants to endeavour any great matter, grant us also to know that it is not the beginning, but the continuing of the same unto the end, until it be thoroughly finished, which yieldeth the true glory; through him who for the finishing of thy work laid down his life, our redeemer, jesus christ. amen. almighty god, father of all mercies
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and giver of all comfort, deal graciously, we pray thee, with those who mourn; that casting every care on thee they may know the consolation of thy love; throuthesus christ our lord. amen. # give rest, 0 christ # to thy servant with thy saints # where sorrow and pain are no more
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# neither sighing, but life everlasting # thou only art immortal # the creator and maker of man # and we are mortal,
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formed of the earth # and unto earth shall we return # for so thou didst ordain # when thou creaest me saying # "dust thou art, and unto dust shalt return" # all we go down to the dust
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# and, weeping, o'er thy grave # we make our song # alleluya, alleluya, alleluya # give rest, 0 christ # to thy servant with they saints
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# where sorrow and pain are no more # neither sighing # but life everlasting #.
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go forth upon thyjourney from this world, 0 christian soul. in the name of god the father almighty who created thee; in the name ofjesus christ who suffered for thee; in the name of the holy spirit who strengtheneth thee; may thy portion this day be in peace, and thy dwelling in the heavenlyjerusalem. amen. thus it hath pleased almighty god
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to take out of this transitory life unto his divine mercy the late most illustrious and most exalted prince philip, duke of edinburgh, earl of merioneth and baron greenwich, knight of the most noble 0rder of the garter, knight of the most ancient and most noble order of the thistle, member of the order of merit, knight grand cross of the royal victorian 0rder upon whom had been conferred the royal victorian chain, grand master and knight grand cross of the most excellent 0rder of the british empire, lord high admiral of the united kingdom, one of her majesty's most honourable privy council, husband of her most excellent majesty elizabeth the second by the grace of god of the united kingdom of great britain and northern
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ireland and of her other realms and territories queen, head of the commonwealth, defender of the faith, sovereign of the most noble order of the garter, whom may god preserve and bless with long life, health and honour and all worldly happiness. music: flowers of the forest
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music: the last post
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royal marines sound action stations
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god grant to the living grace, to the departed rest, to the church, the queen, the commonwealth and all people, unity, peace and concord, and to us and all god's servants, life everlasting. and the blessing of god almighty, father, son and holy spirit be with you all and remain with you always. amen. music: god save the queen # god save our gracious queen # long live our noble queen
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# god save the queen # send her victorious # happy and glorious # long to reign over us # god save the queen. # prince philip, the duke of edinburgh, being taken to his resting place in the royal vault
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beneath st george's chapel, windsor. her majesty the queen will be 95 in a few days' time. being accompanied by the dean of windsor and the archbishop of canterbury. followed by prince charles, prince andrew, princess anne, prince edward, their families from the chapel at the end of this funeral service. a funeral service so powerful in its simplicity and its elements reflecting the long life and the unshakeable christian faith of the duke of edinburgh.
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the family will return to the state apartments, windsor castle, where the queen and duke have spent so much of the past year during the pandemic. glory of the order of the garter, the banners, the eykens of its knights and the insignia of the duke of edinburgh placed on the —— placed on the altar.
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here at st george's chapel, the queen's state bentley ready to take her majesty back to her home, her main home at windsor. the dean of windsor will be comforting the queen, as will other members of the family, reflecting on the service. she will leave the chapel via the galilee porch as she and the duke entered and left so many times over the years during their long life together. the route where earlier there were hundreds of members of there were hundreds of members of the armed forces lining the route all the way down chapel hill to that horseshoe cloister and that guard of
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honour. empty now, tranquil in the spring sunshine. the royal car's pulling up, waiting for the royal guests to emerge. there will be some talk inevitably about the elements of the service itself, what they said about the duke, the fact he had selected them and the order in which he'd selected them and the pieces of outstandingly beautiful music that we heard, the setting of psalm 104, the great
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reading from the book of the preacher, ecclesiastes, with its dramatic language about the forces of nature and the beauty of nature and the terror of nature, reflecting the duke of�*s love of nature and of the duke of�*s love of nature and of the environment, a reading which summed up his attitude to life and the causes that he championed. the dean of windsor david connor who presided over the service and officiated with dignity and calm accompanying the queen to the car. —— david conner.
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the route where earlier the land rover hearse descended towards the
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chapel, the route now reversed as her majesty returns via the round tower, the state standard flying, turning to the royal family's private apartments. the duke of cambridge and his wife, the duke of sussex, prince harry here without his wife, the duchess of sussex who was advised not to travel to this funeral because of medical reasons. and all other senior members of the royal family. and all other senior members of the royalfamily. harry and his brother exchanging a few words as they walked back up the hill, the chapel hill which they know so well. the duke of york in a relatively
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rare public appearance at his father's funeral. they too will have been marked by the simple dignity of the funeral that they have attended. the second reading read by the archbishop, a short reading, but a reading that delivered one message, and that was to be of firm faith, of robust christian faith, and to confront the doubts of faith head on, very much in keeping with the duke's own
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philosophy. the royal town of windsor in the royal borough, which has seen so many great royal occasions over the years. bathed in sunshine today. the great river there in the background. and the car is taking the last remaining elements of the congregation from the chapel back to the castle above. i'm sure that you are at home will have been reflecting as we did in the studio.
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robert and katie here with me. on the beauty of that service and its simplicity, and really the fact that the service was nothing like the original plans developed over decades for the funeral of a prominent member of the royal family such as the duke of edinburgh. more low key, far fewer people attending. yes, there were hundreds of members of the armed forces, but not on the scale really of what had been intended originally. and yet, it delivered a very powerful effect and it certainly affected everyone here. i'm sure that you are at home too were impressed and were really affected by the elegance of what we heard and what we saw. robert and katie, i think it is good to reflect
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having gone through that kind of service, just to imagine what it would have been like in the chapel itself for those attending and certainly for her majesty the queen. one imagines what might possibly have been going through her mind as the coffin was lowered, the words were spoken by the dean of windsor. absolutely, for everyone here and those watching at home it was deeply moving and a funeral like no other. the queen cut such a solitary figure. and to see her there in a facemask, which may have been a blessing in many ways because it did shield her. obviously the cameras are very respectful of the queen, but at points to see her head bowed in prayer, bowed in grief, it was very difficult to see. there is no
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humanity in covid. this is a funeral that many families will have gone through this, many people watching at home will recognise what the queen has gone through. i think everybody�*s sympathies will be with her. she was stoic but she was very much solo and i think it was quite heartbreaking to see her sitting there all alone, it is a very sombre image. and one i think everyone will be reflecting on today. i image. and one i think everyone will be reflecting on today.— be reflecting on today. i think it is the image — be reflecting on today. i think it is the image people _ be reflecting on today. i think it is the image people will - be reflecting on today. i think it is the image people will have i be reflecting on today. i think it is the image people will have in j is the image people will have in mind, robert. i is the image people will have in mind, robert.— is the image people will have in mind, robert. ,, ., mind, robert. i think so. one of the most personal— mind, robert. i think so. one of the most personal and _ mind, robert. i think so. one of the most personal and poignant - mind, robert. i think so. one of the i most personal and poignant moments. that was— most personal and poignant moments. that was i_ most personal and poignant moments. that was i think the most intensely boighaht _ that was i think the most intensely poignant state occasion any of us will have — poignant state occasion any of us will have ever seen. but there was that one _ will have ever seen. but there was that one moment as garter king of arms _ that one moment as garter king of arms was — that one moment as garter king of arms was reading out the style and titles— arms was reading out the style and titles of— arms was reading out the style and titles of the duke of edinburgh and in all that— titles of the duke of edinburgh and in all that grandeur and all those titles— in all that grandeur and all those tittes ohe — in all that grandeur and all those titles one word stood out in the middle. — titles one word stood out in the middle, husband. it's the only reference _ middle, husband. it's the only reference to family in the whole service — reference to family in the whole service it — reference to family in the whole service. it was a fantastically royat — service. it was a fantastically royal service, it was exact to what the duke — royal service, it was exact to what the duke wanted, there was no eulogy, — the duke wanted, there was no
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eulogy, there was nothing personal about— eulogy, there was nothing personal about him. — eulogy, there was nothing personal about him, but that one word husband. _ about him, but that one word husband, and i think everyone at home _ husband, and i think everyone at home witi— husband, and i think everyone at home will have felt watching the queen— home will have felt watching the queen will have felt for her. this is such— queen will have felt for her. this is such a — queen will have felt for her. this is such a poignant moment, particularly because of covid, and as a result — particularly because of covid, and as a result of that i think everyone will have _ as a result of that i think everyone will have felt almost invested in that _ will have felt almost invested in that i_ will have felt almost invested in that. i think will have felt almost invested in that. ithink if will have felt almost invested in that. i think if you have lost a loved — that. i think if you have lost a loved one _ that. i think if you have lost a loved one during this pandemic, if you had _ loved one during this pandemic, if you had a — loved one during this pandemic, if you had a loved one who served in the armed — you had a loved one who served in the armed forces, if you had family who had _ the armed forces, if you had family who had been in the second world war watching _ who had been in the second world war watching that greatest generation, i think everyone will have felt, at that moment, everyone would have wanted _ that moment, everyone would have wanted to— that moment, everyone would have wanted to say in the time—honoured tradition— wanted to say in the time—honoured tradition of— wanted to say in the time—honoured tradition of waving off a great saitor. — tradition of waving off a great sailor, "godspeed, sir." i tradition of waving off a great sailor, "godspeed, sir." i think we owe it to lots _ sailor, "godspeed, sir." i think we owe it to lots of _ sailor, "godspeed, sir." i think we owe it to lots of people _ sailor, "godspeed, sir." i think we owe it to lots of people watching l sailor, "godspeed, sir." i think we. owe it to lots of people watching as well that there are many families out there that have not been able to
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attend a funeral, have not been able to grieve in a way that they would have wished to have done over the past year. the hope is of course that they will have derived some comfort from seeing a funeral like this. you said, robert, that the personal elements were not overtly stated. there was the word husband. and yet, in all of their selections, and maybe we can discuss some of them, in all of the selections, you could detect the reasons and the factors behind the choices. i mentioned that astonishingly strong reading about the forces of nature, the beauty of nature and the sheer terror of nature. that for me really did some up the duke's embracing of the outside world really and the fact he wanted to conserve it at all costs. , . fact he wanted to conserve it at all costs. , , ., .,, , .,
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costs. yes, for those in peril on the sea and _ costs. yes, for those in peril on the sea and conservation, i costs. yes, for those in peril on the sea and conservation, as i costs. yes, for those in peril on | the sea and conservation, as you say _ the sea and conservation, as you say it— the sea and conservation, as you say it was— the sea and conservation, as you say. it was so subtly done. everything about him was there and did what— everything about him was there and did what was not said, it said so much _ did what was not said, it said so much and _ did what was not said, it said so much. and there, all the insignia on the altar— much. and there, all the insignia on the altar and — much. and there, all the insignia on the altar and at the centre, the order— the altar and at the centre, the order of— the altar and at the centre, the order of the garter. the oldest knight — order of the garter. the oldest knight of— order of the garter. the oldest knight of the garter in its history we have — knight of the garter in its history we have laid to rest. no one has made _ we have laid to rest. no one has made that— we have laid to rest. no one has made that procession down the hill as we _ made that procession down the hill as we saw, — made that procession down the hill as we saw, the land rover, no one has done _ as we saw, the land rover, no one has done that procession more often than he _ has done that procession more often than he and — has done that procession more often than he and her majesty. there could be no _ than he and her majesty. there could be no finer— than he and her majesty. there could be no finer procession, really than the one _ be no finer procession, really than the one we — be no finer procession, really than the one we saw today. i be no finer procession, really than the one we saw today.— the one we saw today. i think it is a nice thing _ the one we saw today. i think it is a nice thing at _ the one we saw today. i think it is a nice thing at times _ the one we saw today. i think it is a nice thing at times like - the one we saw today. i think it is a nice thing at times like this i the one we saw today. i think it is a nice thing at times like this to l a nice thing at times like this to think back to earlier days. we think of the queen now, who is, as you say, alone. she is hopefully getting all of the support she needs but she is a loan in a different sense. to
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think back to them as a young couple, we have some lovely images we can share with you. look at these. they are from another time, i know that, but they just remind these. they are from another time, i know that, but theyjust remind us of the fact they were very much in love and they were not a couple who came together for any strategic reasons in that sense. it came together for any strategic reasons in that sense.- came together for any strategic reasons in that sense. it was a very endurina reasons in that sense. it was a very enduring love _ reasons in that sense. it was a very enduring love story, _ reasons in that sense. it was a very enduring love story, a _ reasons in that sense. it was a very enduring love story, a 73-year-old| enduring love story, a 73—year—old marriage, really quite remarkable. they celebrated their diamond wedding anniversary. i think the duke does represent a generation which is passed now and one that does continue to live on in the queen but theirs was a wonderful love story. this is one of the final images that we saw of the duke. as you said, i think the queen does take great comfort in these times they had together at windsor in this past year, for all the hardship. it is a year that has brought them together when they might otherwise not have been. i think that must be
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of great comfort, that they were able to share so much time together here at windsor, where i think we will see more of in the future. i think we are. windsor has re—emerged, really, as somewhere which is far more closely associated with the family for millions around the world. lots of people in the uk of course know about windsor and its significance but now it's been much more strongly associated because of the events of the past year and because of today, with the family in the life of the family.— the life of the family. absolutely, the life of the family. absolutely, the seat of _ the life of the family. absolutely, the seat of the _ the life of the family. absolutely, the seat of the house _ the life of the family. absolutely, the seat of the house of- the life of the family. absolutely, the seat of the house of windsor| the life of the family. absolutely, i the seat of the house of windsor has never _ the seat of the house of windsor has never been _ the seat of the house of windsor has never been quite as central and as personal— never been quite as central and as personal as — never been quite as central and as personal as it has today. it was mentioned earlier in your programme how it _ mentioned earlier in your programme how it was _ mentioned earlier in your programme how it wasjust mentioned earlier in your programme how it was just up the hill, mentioned earlier in your programme how it wasjust up the hill, the waterloo — how it wasjust up the hill, the waterloo chamber, in the war when prince _ waterloo chamber, in the war when prince philip was a young naval officer— prince philip was a young naval officer and came here to stay. had no home _ officer and came here to stay. had no home but came here because he was invited _ no home but came here because he was invited by— no home but came here because he was invited by the _ no home but came here because he was invited by the royal family. that was when — invited by the royal family. that was when he saw a young princess
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elizabeth _ was when he saw a young princess elizabeth taking part in the christmas pantomime is. there is so much, _ christmas pantomime is. there is so much, everything about this great partnership, this extraordinary partnership. i do think today underlines the fact, in the same way as history— underlines the fact, in the same way as history talks about victoria and albert. _ as history talks about victoria and albert. i_ as history talks about victoria and albert, i really do think history is going _ albert, i really do think history is going to — albert, i really do think history is going to talk for ever more about elizabeth— going to talk for ever more about elizabeth and philip. i going to talk for ever more about elizabeth and philip.— elizabeth and philip. i love this imaae, elizabeth and philip. i love this image. look — elizabeth and philip. i love this image, look at _ elizabeth and philip. i love this image, look at this. _ elizabeth and philip. i love this image, look at this. this i elizabeth and philip. i love this image, look at this. this was l image, look at this. this was released yesterday, a photo of sophie wessex?— released yesterday, a photo of sohie wessex? . ,, ., , sophie wessex? taken in the scottish hiahlands b sophie wessex? taken in the scottish highlands by the _ sophie wessex? taken in the scottish highlands by the countess _ sophie wessex? taken in the scottish highlands by the countess of - sophie wessex? taken in the scottish j highlands by the countess of wessex. the smiles tell you all you need to know about this couple. you talked about nature earlier but they were a way their happiest at balmoral. you can see from the relaxed informality of this picture, we have never seen it before but it is so special. this was a partnership at the heart of the royal family, that has been the most successful partnership. i the royal family, that has been the most successful partnership.- most successful partnership. i think there is a warmth _ most successful partnership. i think there is a warmth to _ most successful partnership. i think there is a warmth to that, _ most successful partnership. i think there is a warmth to that, that i most successful partnership. i think there is a warmth to that, that to i there is a warmth to that, that to be honest, you rarely see in these photos of the royal couple, the
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queen and the duke because over the years they have been photographed in rather more formal circumstances. which is why that image has created such a wave of affection overnight, literally overnight, to see it in the last 204i was. everyone who has seen it, all the team here with my colleagues in the bbc and everyone else, everyone loved the image because it spoke volumes about a natural warmth between them which is not always evident because of the roles they fulfil. that is the nice thing about it, really. the other thing about it, really. the other thing i wanted to mention at this of the roles they fulfil. that is the to do with the future, which is a difficult thing for us to talk about, in terms of her majesty, who is 95 very soon, in a few days' time. to contemplate the future of the royal family because philip had very strong views about the way the crown and monarchy fitted into modern society had to time when people are having a very vigorous debate about whether it fitted at
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all. so where does that leave us, where is that debate today? he was the treat where is that debate today? he was the great innovator. _ where is that debate today? he was the great innovator. he _ where is that debate today? he was the great innovator. he really i where is that debate today? he was the great innovator. he really did i the great innovator. he really did help the great innovator. he really did helb steer— the great innovator. he really did help steer this institution, keep it abreast— help steer this institution, keep it abreast of— help steer this institution, keep it abreast of the times, not ahead of the times— abreast of the times, not ahead of the times but he was conscious it had to— the times but he was conscious it had to move with the times. that has rubbed _ had to move with the times. that has rubbed off— had to move with the times. that has rubbed off on all members of the family _ rubbed off on all members of the family i— rubbed off on all members of the family. i think what we have seen from _ family. i think what we have seen from her— family. i think what we have seen from her majesty in the last few days. _ from her majesty in the last few days, the — from her majesty in the last few days, the way she has still gone about— days, the way she has still gone about taking her calls from prime ministers — about taking her calls from prime ministers around the commonwealth, has very— ministers around the commonwealth, has very much had a hands—on role in all of— has very much had a hands—on role in all of the _ has very much had a hands—on role in all of the arrangements for this, i think— all of the arrangements for this, i think the — all of the arrangements for this, i think the signals are very clear that duty— think the signals are very clear that duty before self. i think her birthday— that duty before self. i think her birthday will be a very personal affair, — birthday will be a very personal affair, as — birthday will be a very personal affair, as it usually is, but next it is— affair, as it usually is, but next it is her— affair, as it usually is, but next it is her platinum jubilee. we have never— it is her platinum jubilee. we have never had — it is her platinum jubilee. we have never had one of those. that will clearly _ never had one of those. that will clearly be — never had one of those. that will clearly be another key moment. i do think— clearly be another key moment. i do think duty. _ clearly be another key moment. i do think duty, we will see it next month — think duty, we will see it next month. the state opening of parliament beckons. i think our sovereign — parliament beckons. i think our sovereign will be at the heart of
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that, _ sovereign will be at the heart of that, as — sovereign will be at the heart of that, as she always has been, because — that, as she always has been, because that, fundamentally, is what comes— because that, fundamentally, is what comes first _ because that, fundamentally, is what comes first for her.— comes first for her. let's pause for a second because _ comes first for her. let's pause for a second because we _ comes first for her. let's pause for a second because we will - comes first for her. let's pause for a second because we will talk i comes first for her. let's pause for a second because we will talk a i a second because we will talk a little more before the end today on the service and what it means and perhaps what might happen in the next year or two, given the responsibilities and the prince of wales and the way his role has been evolving. what i would like to do is maybe pop outside and joined sophie, who is on the long walk earlier but you look as if you are a little closer to the castle now? just outside the — closer to the castle now? just outside the castle _ closer to the castle now? just outside the castle walls, indeed. there has been a strange stillness that has descended on the town of windsor today. you can imagine, if it hadn't been for covid the scenes to —— today in the warm sunshine would have been incredible. thousands would have packed the streets around the castle and lined the long walk but as it was, most did stay away. they respected the wishes of buckingham palace not to come here. you couldn't see anything
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from outside windsor castle, everything has taken place inside those walls but that did not stop hundreds of people turning up and gathering around in the streets here at about 2pm this afternoon. most of them were watching what was going on on their mobile phones, wanting to be as close as possible here to the castle, to pay their respects to the duke of edinburgh. you have to remember, people here knew him pretty well. he spent a lot of time here with the queen over the years. i spoke to one man who said he was often seen riding his carriage up and down the long walk, four times a week he would go and greet the locals as he went. say hello to the man who ran the pub. another woman said how he always acknowledged them and he would be greatly missed. you have to think, on a day like this, we have seen such beautiful, intimate family service and you can only imagine that is exactly what the duke would have wanted. sophie thank ou the duke would have wanted. sophie thank you very _ the duke would have wanted. sophie thank you very much. _ the duke would have wanted. sophie
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thank you very much. here _ the duke would have wanted. sophie thank you very much. here we i the duke would have wanted. sophie thank you very much. here we are, l thank you very much. here we are, back inside the precinct of the castle. if we popped back to the studio, we will see more proof of the events are coming to a close. just behind robert we have the defence advisers from the commonwealth because we mentioned them a little earlier. again, another element of two—day's events which just underlined the duke of�*s belief in big power of the commonwealth. that is an interesting factor for us as well because as we discussed earlier, there has been a lot of talk about britain's place in the world, a lot of heated debate about britain's place in the world over the last few years. baroness scotland was earlier telling us it is quite possibly a good opportunity for people to revisit the concept of the commonwealth as a healthy framework for britain to be reaching out, may be in a more assertive or certainly a more constructive way than some people have perceived it. is that a fair summary?—
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is that a fair summary? absolutely no one did — is that a fair summary? absolutely no one did more _ is that a fair summary? absolutely no one did more to _ is that a fair summary? absolutely no one did more to help _ is that a fair summary? absolutely no one did more to help the i is that a fair summary? absolutely | no one did more to help the queen is that a fair summary? absolutely i no one did more to help the queen to serve _ no one did more to help the queen to serve the _ no one did more to help the queen to serve the commonwealth and the duke. more than— serve the commonwealth and the duke. more than 200 visits. it is very nice _ more than 200 visits. it is very nice to — more than 200 visits. it is very nice to see _ more than 200 visits. it is very nice to see the attached as here today _ nice to see the attached as here today we — nice to see the attached as here today. we saw the order of canada and australia on the insignia. he was someone who knew it intimately, often in _ was someone who knew it intimately, often in the _ was someone who knew it intimately, often in the 60s and 70s, when parts often in the 60s and 70s, when parts of the _ often in the 60s and 70s, when parts of the commonwealth were gaining their independence, the queen would send prince _ their independence, the queen would send prince philip to be her representative. he knew all these leaders. _ representative. he knew all these leaders, both of them, the queen and he grew— leaders, both of them, the queen and he grew up— leaders, both of them, the queen and he grew up with the commonwealth. it only came _ he grew up with the commonwealth. it only came into his existence in modern — only came into his existence in modern form two years after their marriage — modern form two years after their marriage. so they have been central to holding _ marriage. so they have been central to holding these things together. there _ to holding these things together. there are — to holding these things together. there are only eight members at the coronation _ there are only eight members at the coronation and now there are 64, i think— coronation and now there are 64, i think that — coronation and now there are 64, i think that speaks for itself. catching a glimpse that you were speaking of the unmistakable figure of the major general, who was in earlier, and of course maybe even more commanding andrew stokes who
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was there to deliver such a big part in making sure that work so precisely and ijust in making sure that work so precisely and i just didn't spot anything going wrong. i precisely and i just didn't spot anything going wrong.- precisely and i just didn't spot anything going wrong. i don't think there was anything _ anything going wrong. i don't think there was anything to _ anything going wrong. i don't think there was anything to spot - anything going wrong. i don't think there was anything to spot that i anything going wrong. i don't think. there was anything to spot that went wrong. it was absolutely step perfect. i think the duke was incredibly proud of his attachments to the military and they did him proud today. abs. to the military and they did him proud today-— to the military and they did him roud toda . �* ., , ., proud today. a little thought before we say goodbye _ proud today. a little thought before we say goodbye to _ proud today. a little thought before we say goodbye to viewers. - proud today. a little thought before we say goodbye to viewers. from . proud today. a little thought before i we say goodbye to viewers. from you, katie first of all, to come back to this notion of where we go now and the way that duties clearly have started to be devolved, have started to be shared in a slightly different way. how will we see members of the family, notjust the prince of wales but the duke of cambridge, for example and the duchess of cambridge, how will we see those roles beginning to evolve further? well, i think roles beginning to evolve further? well, ithink it roles beginning to evolve further? well, i think it will be a continuation of what we have seen over the past year, actually. i think covid has forced the royal
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family, we have is have all seen that, to seen them take to zoom, it has change the way they work. i think is the queen approaches her 95th birthday, now she is a widow, they are going to step up and support her. they have always supported her. the prince of wales for a long time has carried out the lion's share of overseas travel, laying a wreath at the cenotaph, will be the head of the commonwealth. we are seeing a gradual handing over. i think the queen is not going anywhere. she is going to rain —— reign over us for many years, hopefully. i think certainly, you mention the duke and duchess of cambridge, who are now is carrying out full—time royal duties. the count and countess of wessex are doing a brilliantjob and the queen is really going to need their support and she has it. fine is really going to need their support and she has it. one of the
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more sensitive _ support and she has it. one of the more sensitive issues, _ support and she has it. one of the more sensitive issues, i _ support and she has it. one of the more sensitive issues, i don't i support and she has it. one of the| more sensitive issues, i don't want to dwell on it much but it has certainly been a factor of interest is the relationship between william and harry. we saw them walking past us here earlier.— us here earlier. together, together and talking- _ us here earlier. together, together and talking. what _ us here earlier. together, together and talking. what did _ us here earlier. together, together and talking. what did you - us here earlier. together, together and talking. what did you make i us here earlier. together, together and talking. what did you make of| us here earlier. together, together| and talking. what did you make of it toda ? it and talking. what did you make of it today? it was _ and talking. what did you make of it today? it was always _ and talking. what did you make of it today? it was always going - and talking. what did you make of it today? it was always going to i and talking. what did you make of it today? it was always going to be i today? it was always going to be scrutinised. _ today? it was always going to be scrutinised, everyone _ today? it was always going to be scrutinised, everyone was i today? it was always going to be scrutinised, everyone was going | today? it was always going to be l scrutinised, everyone was going to be watching. it was important not to be watching. it was important not to be a focal point of today but it was prince harry's homecoming. he has not been here for a year. this was a day when the brothers were going to put an did put their differences aside. clearly, there are things that need to be sorted out. if there is one thing we have seen today, this is a family with real emotions and feelings and rifts all being part of it. as i said to you yesterday, we all hope that they will move on, that this can be healed. but to see them together, i'm sure it brought back many memories for them and it would have been emotionalfor
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memories for them and it would have been emotional for prince harry, reunited with his family under difficult circumstances but lovely to see them talking. also i must say, i noticed peter phillips, i know they were walking as a trio, but the way he stood back, whether that was something to do with hierarchy orjust to enable that image of the two brothers i think will be incredibly touching too many people. will be incredibly touching too many --eole. ., will be incredibly touching too many eo le, ., ., will be incredibly touching too many --eole. ., ., , . people. how do you see that relationship _ people. how do you see that relationship in _ people. how do you see that relationship in the _ people. how do you see that relationship in the future? . people. how do you see that relationship in the future? i | people. how do you see that i relationship in the future? i think toda we relationship in the future? i think today we saw _ relationship in the future? i think today we saw the _ relationship in the future? i think today we saw the start _ relationship in the future? i think today we saw the start of - relationship in the future? i think today we saw the start of them i today we saw the start of them coming — today we saw the start of them coming back together. i thought it was wonderful. at the end of the service, — was wonderful. at the end of the service, as — was wonderful. at the end of the service, as all these state cars pulled — service, as all these state cars pulled up _ service, as all these state cars pulled up and there was a very strict _ pulled up and there was a very strict rule _ pulled up and there was a very strict rule of presidents and we were _ strict rule of presidents and we were expecting everyone to go in their— were expecting everyone to go in their official car and up the hill. the prince _ their official car and up the hill. the prince of wales led the way and said i_ the prince of wales led the way and said i am _ the prince of wales led the way and said i am not getting in the car, i'm said i am not getting in the car, l'm walking _ said i am not getting in the car, i'm walking on everyone else walked. at that _ i'm walking on everyone else walked. at that moment it ceased to be a state _ at that moment it ceased to be a state occasion but became a family event _ state occasion but became a family event i_ state occasion but became a family event. i expect now, subject to covid _ event. i expect now, subject to covid rules, they are like any other family _ covid rules, they are like any other family. they— covid rules, they are like any other family. they are catching up, reminiscing. i think today will have been _ reminiscing. i think today will have been a _ reminiscing. i think today will have
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been a very— reminiscing. i think today will have been a very unifying day because, after— been a very unifying day because, after all. — been a very unifying day because, afterall, he been a very unifying day because, after all, he was a man born into what _ after all, he was a man born into what one — after all, he was a man born into what one royal family and has devoted — what one royal family and has devoted his life to another and there — devoted his life to another and there they all are word today, together— there they all are word today, together on his behalf. you there they all are word today, together on his behalf. you are both distinguished _ together on his behalf. you are both distinguished writers _ together on his behalf. you are both distinguished writers and _ distinguished writers and commentators in this area. i'm just wondering what you have in mind for the way that you will describe what went on today and what do you think people will take away from what we have seen today? could you give us an insight into what your thoughts are, what the conclusions are, if you like? i are, what the conclusions are, if ou like? ~ . , you like? i think the intensely ersonal you like? i think the intensely personal nature _ you like? i think the intensely personal nature of _ you like? i think the intensely personal nature of the - you like? i think the intensely | personal nature of the service, summing — personal nature of the service, summing up such an extraordinary man: _ summing up such an extraordinary man. we— summing up such an extraordinary man, we have heard about all his achievements this week. this was somebody— achievements this week. this was somebody nominated for a nobel prize. _ somebody nominated for a nobel prize. and — somebody nominated for a nobel prize, and yet there was no reference _ prize, and yet there was no reference to his awards, world wildlife — reference to his awards, world wildlife fund, none of that in the service _ wildlife fund, none of that in the service today. it didn't need to be said because he is this colossus, and matching that i think with this
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intensely— and matching that i think with this intensely personal service in the circumstances that we all understand, and it was quite clear, even _ understand, and it was quite clear, even the _ understand, and it was quite clear, even the sovereign cannot bend the rules. _ even the sovereign cannot bend the rules, she _ even the sovereign cannot bend the rules, she is— even the sovereign cannot bend the rules, she is there on her ownjust like all— rules, she is there on her ownjust like all of— rules, she is there on her ownjust like all of her subjects at this time — like all of her subjects at this time we _ like all of her subjects at this time. we are incredibly sympathetic for her. _ time. we are incredibly sympathetic for her, very proud of her, very proud _ for her, very proud of her, very proud of— for her, very proud of her, very proud of him and of this institution on a day— proud of him and of this institution on a day like today.— on a day like today. katie, your thou~hts on a day like today. katie, your thoughts on — on a day like today. katie, your thoughts on how— on a day like today. katie, your thoughts on how you _ on a day like today. katie, your thoughts on how you will i on a day like today. katie, your thoughts on how you will be i on a day like today. katie, your- thoughts on how you will be drawing the themes together? the thoughts on how you will be drawing the themes together?— the themes together? the duke famously didn't _ the themes together? the duke famously didn't like _ the themes together? the duke famously didn't like a _ the themes together? the duke famously didn't like a first, i the themes together? the duke famously didn't like a first, he l famously didn't like a first, he probably wouldn't have wanted all the fuss that we have given him today but he deserved it and he often didn't want to talk about the legacy he will leave behind but he does leave behind a legacy. this wouldn't be the royal family that it is today that we are all incredibly proud of had it not been for the duke of edinburgh, so may he rest in peace. duke of edinburgh, so may he rest in eace. . . , ., duke of edinburgh, so may he rest in eace. ., ., , ., , ., duke of edinburgh, so may he rest in neace. ., ., , .,, ., , duke of edinburgh, so may he rest in peace. ., ., , ., , ., , , ., peace. katie, a pleasure to see you aaain and peace. katie, a pleasure to see you again and robert, _ peace. katie, a pleasure to see you again and robert, as _ peace. katie, a pleasure to see you again and robert, as ever, - peace. katie, a pleasure to see you again and robert, as ever, thanki peace. katie, a pleasure to see you i again and robert, as ever, thank you for your contributions both of you today. just a quick reminder for all of you watching at home, at 8:10pm on bbc two this evening we will have
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a programme looking back at the day's events here in windsor. as we have said and as we were discussing with robert and katie, the queen and her close family are now back in the state apartments here at windsor castle, no doubt reflecting on a deeply moving service. a very dignified, sharp and stylish military procession which symbolised all that was vital, all that was salient really in the long life of prince philip, the duke of edinburgh. he now rests in peace in the royal vault beneath st george's chapel, having fought the good fight, having finished the race and having kept faith. from windsor, goodbye.
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good afternoon from windsor, where the funeral of the duke of edinburgh hasjust taken place. the queen led by mourners at the service, where only 30 people were allowed because of covid restrictions. prince philip's coffin travelled to the service on a specially—adapted land rover — its design had been overseen by him. the duke's children, grandchildren and great grandchildrenjoined the solemn procession. the buglers of the royal marines sounded the last post — after the duke was laid to rest in the royal vault.

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