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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 17, 2021 4:20pm-4:51pm BST

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good afternoon from windsor, where the funeral of the duke of edinburgh hasjust taken place. the queen led by mourners at the service, where only 30 people were allowed because of covid restrictions. prince philip's coffin travelled to the service on a specially—adapted land rover — its design had been overseen by him. the duke's children, grandchildren and great grandchildrenjoined the solemn procession. the buglers of the royal marines sounded the last post — after the duke was laid to rest
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in the royal vault. and across the nation, at 3pm, gun salutes and a minute's silence took place. good afternoon from windsor castle, where the funeral of the duke of edinburgh has taken place this afternoon. although the service itself was small, due to covid restrictions, the duke's love of the military was reflected in the pageantry here, before the funeral in st george's chapel. inside the chapel, there were only 30 mourners — all members of the family or close friends. the queen sat alone —
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again due to covid rules — as she said goodbye to her husband of 73 years. our first report is from our royal correspondent, nicholas witchell. it correspondent, nicholas witchell. was that windsc fell it was that windsor castle that they fell in love. it was more the young lieutenant spent his leave at the castle visiting the then princess will —— elizabeth. they spent many of the happiest moments of their 73 years together at windsor and it was within the ancient walls of this castle that the nation paid its final tributes. castle that the nation paid its finaltributes. drawn castle that the nation paid its final tributes. drawn up in the spring sunshine on the castle�*s quadrangle with a military detachment, regiments and other service contingents with which the duke had a personal connection. it was on a smaller scale than without
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the pandemic but he after all had choreographed what was to follow. the land rover hearse which the duke had helped to design. the coffin was born by a party from the grenadier guards, surmounted with his sword and naval cap. with great care it was placed on the hearse. behind the hearse were members of the family walking to the chapel, headed by the
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prince of wales, and then the first sight of the queen, in the state bentley, taking its position at the rear of the procession as the hearse set off. among the members of the family walking behind the coffin were princes william and harry, not walking side by side but with their cousin peter phillips between them. the procession wound its way down the gentle hill of the castle towards st george's chapel.
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at the west steps of the chapel, a bearer party removed the coffin from the hearse to take it up the steps to the chapel. inside saint georges, the queen took her place. before entering the west dollars, the bearer party paused for the minute's silence. the coffin was born into the chapel. around it, the 30 members of the congregation, all of them masked. we
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30 members of the congregation, all of them masked.— 30 members of the congregation, all of them masked. ~ , ., , of them masked. we remember the many wa s in of them masked. we remember the many ways in which _ of them masked. we remember the many ways in which his — of them masked. we remember the many ways in which his long _ of them masked. we remember the many ways in which his long life _ of them masked. we remember the many ways in which his long life has _ of them masked. we remember the many ways in which his long life has been - ways in which his long life has been a blessing to us. we have been inspired by his unwavering loyalty to our queen, by his service to the nation and the commonwealth, by his courage, fortitude and faith. shill courage, fortitude and faith. all the music had been chosen by the duke. the first hen was the mariners hymn for those in peril at sea. the small congregation sat on its family groups. the queen sat alone, as did prince harry. after the prayers and
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commendation, a distinctive touch, royal marine buglers sounded the call to action stations. and finally at the end of her husband's funeral, the choir sang the national anthem. seldom can its words have had greater poignancy. # god save the queen.#
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nicholas witchell, bbc news. 0ur royal correspondent, sarah campbell, is with me now. from everything we know of him, this is the occasion the duke would have wanted? you are so right. we were told, despite having to be adapted due to the pandemic, it was to reflect and celebrate the life of the duke and it did that under blue skies and brilliant sunshine. a backdrop that couldn't have been more stunning and he was a military man, a naval man and it was a christian service with the readings chosen by the duke to reflect his naval background and love of the sea and in a chapel able to hold hundreds there were just 30 mourners and a choir ofjust four
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but no less moving. mourners and a choir of 'ust four but no less moving._ mourners and a choir of 'ust four but no less moving. very poignant seeinu the but no less moving. very poignant seeing the queen _ but no less moving. very poignant seeing the queen sitting - but no less moving. very poignant seeing the queen sitting there - seeing the queen sitting there alone. a , seeing the queen sitting there alone. , , , ., alone. many people will be able to em athise alone. many people will be able to empathise and _ alone. many people will be able to empathise and will _ alone. many people will be able to empathise and will have _ alone. many people will be able to i empathise and will have experienced a funeral where one has not been able to be comforted by members of the family due to the covid restriction so we saw the queen socially distanced and wearing a mask and she will be comforted by herfamily going forward mask and she will be comforted by her family going forward and at the end of the service she left my car. the family left and walked through the grounds of windsor castle and we saw prince william and harry walking up saw prince william and harry walking up to the ground is deep in conversation. going forward, thoughts are with the queen who has lost her confidant and companion, the man who has been honing support for all of these years.
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well, the duke of edinburgh was of course well—known personally here in windsor — but he made thousands of official visits all around the country in support of the queen and many charities, including the duke of edinburgh awards scheme. since he died, people he met have been recalling the time that they spent with prince philip. our correspondent danny savage reports now on people's memories of the duke. this is the legacy the duke of edinburgh has left behind. right, girls, it's your silver d of e training day. 0n the weekend of his funeral, young people are out facing the challenges of what they call their d of e. right, girls, are you ready? yes! ok, let's go. these schoolgirls from manchester were in the peak district, participating in the duke of edinburgh award scheme, very much aware of the significance of today. i think he was an amazing man, and was really important to the queen. 73 years of marriage is obviously quite a long time, so he has left a humongous legacy behind.
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he's, brilliant, we have got to take part in something like he has founded. i feel really, really sorry for the queen, because i know he was such a big, big part of her life, but i think he's going to be with us for a very long time. he's got such a big legacy with the duke of edinburgh award. alison bray is one of many thousands of people who would have gone to windsor today. she has worn black since he died. she and herfriend bev have been to all the recent big royal events and have made their own picture books of photos they took. but, today, she had to reluctantly stay at home. i like to go down to the events, because i like to be part of the atmosphere. i do feel extremely sad that i can't go, but at least i can watch it on the television. also watching at home in county durham was ronnie. eight years ago, he invited the duke to open a local school project.
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i do remember the day that i spent, and the moments we shared over lunch. he was quite a witty, funny man. he was inspirational, on the day. and i think he had this uncanny knack of putting everybody at ease. he changed people's lives for the better. the duke of edinburgh's century—long journey may have ended today, but, for many years to come, young people will be outdoors in his name acquiring the life skills he wanted them to have. danny savage, bbc news. here in windsor, outside the castle walls, the duke's funeral has been marked by small groups paying their respects. the police have been in evidence, to deter any large crowds from gathering. some people have stopped to leave flowers, many said the royal family were "setting an example" by limiting numbers at the event. 0ur royal correspondent daniela relph reports
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now on how the people and the town paid their respects to the duke. there was a quiet calm to windsor. picture perfect for a day of solemnity and remembrance. the town had been asked to do something different today, to stay away, to not gather and abide by covid rules. despite the warnings, people still came, just not in the usual numbers. just people still came, 'ust not in the usual numbers.— people still came, 'ust not in the usual numbers. just like to be here because of— usual numbers. just like to be here because of the _ usual numbers. just like to be here because of the whole _ usual numbers. just like to be here because of the whole situation - usual numbers. just like to be here because of the whole situation and| because of the whole situation and it is so sad. we because of the whole situation and it is so sad-— it is so sad. we are outside but we are inside in _ it is so sad. we are outside but we are inside in a _ it is so sad. we are outside but we are inside in a way _ it is so sad. we are outside but we are inside in a way so _ it is so sad. we are outside but we are inside in a way so that - it is so sad. we are outside but we are inside in a way so that is - are inside in a way so that is different. _ are inside in a way so that is different, you don't have that feeling — different, you don't have that feeling when you just watch it on tv. feeling when you 'ust watch it on tv. you can see people who came to -a tv. you can see people who came to pay respects —
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tv. you can see people who came to pay respects and _ tv. you can see people who came to pay respects and for— tv. you can see people who came to pay respects and for a _ tv. you can see people who came to pay respects and for a day _ tv. you can see people who came to pay respects and for a day we - tv. you can see people who came to pay respects and for a day we are - tv. you can see people who came to pay respects and for a day we are a l pay respects and for a day we are a community— pay respects and for a day we are a community here _ pay respects and for a day we are a community here so _ pay respects and for a day we are a community here so it— pay respects and for a day we are a community here so it is— pay respects and for a day we are a community here so it is nice. - pay respects and for a day we are a community here so it is nice. it. pay respects and for a day we are a community here so it is nice. at the pm, the gun — community here so it is nice. at the pm, the gun salute _ community here so it is nice. at the pm, the gun salute could _ community here so it is nice. at the pm, the gun salute could be - community here so it is nice. at the pm, the gun salute could be heard. pm, the gun salute could be heard beyond the castle walls. and windsor, like elsewhere, fell silent. at this retirement village in windsor it was an emotional watch. it affects you more than you think it is going to. in it affects you more than you think it is going to— it affects you more than you think it is going to. in the garden at the duke of edinburgh _
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it is going to. in the garden at the duke of edinburgh pub _ it is going to. in the garden at the duke of edinburgh pub people - it is going to. in the garden at the i duke of edinburgh pub people were clearly moved by the service. i think it is lovely to see people together. today is the day for family when you are mourning a loved one. such a sad occasion. irate family when you are mourning a loved one. such a sad occasion.— one. such a sad occasion. we should be focusing — one. such a sad occasion. we should be focusing on _ one. such a sad occasion. we should be focusing on the _ one. such a sad occasion. we should be focusing on the queen _ one. such a sad occasion. we should be focusing on the queen today. - one. such a sad occasion. we should be focusing on the queen today. it i be focusing on the queen today. it must _ be focusing on the queen today. it must he _ be focusing on the queen today. it must be heartbreaking after 73 years — must be heartbreaking after 73 ears. ., ., ., , years. today the normal royals did not a- -l . years. today the normal royals did not apply- 0n _ years. today the normal royals did not apply- 0n the _ years. today the normal royals did not apply. on the streets _ years. today the normal royals did not apply. on the streets of - years. today the normal royals did | not apply. on the streets of windsor not apply. 0n the streets of windsor it was restrained remembrance in memory of a man connected with this royal town. around the world, people in commonwealth nations have also been pausing to remember the duke — particularly as his work helped to encourage and develop young people in many different countries, as our south asia correspondent rajini vaidyanathan
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reports from delhi. it was a solo trip in 1959 which brought prince philip to the largest country in the commonwealth, india. as royal consort, he went on to visit the country three more times. seen, here, taking in the taj mahal in 1961. that same year, he made a trip to pakistan, one of his many to south asia. for more than 60 years, the duke was patron of the uk pakistan society. this decades on, and south asia has changed, and the british royal family occupies a different place in people's lives here. older generations who remember prince philip and his visits here, and his death has also brought to light his lasting legacy amongst younger people in the region through his duke of edinburgh award. the ramakrishna academy in kolkata in india, has been running the scheme for almost two decades. hundreds of children
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here have taken part. teachers say the programme, which encourages students to volunteer and go on expeditions, has transformed many lives. prince edward visited the school once to hand out his father's awards in person. we are really, really thankful to him, prince philip. 0ur programme, it gave opportunity to our children to mix up with the outside world. they face a lot of obstacles and they thought how to overcome those obstacles. more than 150,000 children in south asia, from all walks of life, have participated in the duke of edinburgh's international award. darinda from sri lanka, who wants to be an entrepreneur one day, says that it introduced her to skills and experiences she would never have otherwise had. so, i'm from sri lanka, where we are mostly focused on formal education. the duke of edinburgh really tapped into our lives,
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and made a brilliant change. i think the duke of edinburgh award was a safe space for me to transform as a young person and, for that, i'm really grateful for his royal highness, because, if not for his legacy, i would not be here. there are no superheroes here. prince philip led a life of service. inspiring many others to follow suit. he once referred to his awards as a "do—it—yourself growing up kit". and it is through this scheme, he leaves a lasting legacy, one which has touched people around the world. rajini vaidyanathan, bbc news, delhi. let's take a look at some of today's other news the number of people who've died with coronavirus worldwide has passed three million. cases of the virus continue to surge in large parts of the world, including india and brazil. the figures — compiled by thejohns hopkins university — are thought unlikely to represent a full tally of people
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who've lost their lives. the leading british choreographer, liam scarlett, has died at the age of 35. his death was announced a day after the royal danish theatre said it had cancelled the production of a ballet he had been working on, following allegations of offensive behaviour. he was investigated over sexual misconduct allegations were working for the royal opera house last year, but was cleared. doctors for the imprisoned russian opposition activist, alexei navalny, say blood tests have indicated he's at risk of kidney failure. mr navalny has been on hunger strike for 18 days, because he's not being allowed access to his doctors. prison officials say he's refused the treatment he's been offered. the first fans to return to a sporting event have arrived at the crucible in sheffield for the world snooker championship. it marks the start of
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the government's pilot programme in england, involving a gradual opening—up of events after lockdown, with a third of the venue's capacity being allowed in at first — before slowly being increased. 0ur sports correspondent laura scott reports. an iconic venue for a significant moment. 0pening its doors to a few hundred snookerfans, the crucible was tasked with kick—starting a science—led programme of crowd pilots that could have a pivotal bearing on what this summer's live events look like across the country. those in charge feel a responsibility to get it right. there is a huge amount of pressure on the team here. it is about the wider picture. the government test is about, can we produce protocols which will allow other venues to open? that's cinemas, it's theatres. it is everything that would be a public gathering in an indoor space. to take part, ticket holders had to show proof of a negative lateral flow test and sign a consent form.
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they were also asked to have pcr tests before and after the event to help assess any transmission risk, but the extremely vulnerable, under—18s and pregnant women were advised not to attend. after so many months away from live sport, there is said to be some reticence among fans to attend events like these again, and no session has yet sold out, but for others the opportunity to watch the action in person was one to savour. the reigning, defending champion of the world, the rocket, ronnie 0'sullivan! in advance of the tournament, ronnie o' sullivan had said he wanted protection from overexuberant fans, but the lucky few inside stayed calm, as he got the tournament under way. and when the nation paused to remember the duke of edinburgh, so did the afternoon action. it is obviously different when you are there. you get a bit more of the atmosphere and it's just nice to be able to actually go out for once. it was good to be back. not the best game but lovely to see ronnie.
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0ther pilots are taking place at wembley, with 4,000 fans attending tomorrow's fa cup semifinal. if the data proves that this and more could be done safely, it might not be too long before this sight becomes familiar again. laura scott, bbc news, sheffield. let's return to our main story — the funeral here in windsor castle of the duke of edinburgh. the queen has described the death of prince philip as "having left a huge void" in her life. they first met in 193a and got married after the war in 19117 — a relationship spanning nine decades. our home editor mark easton now reports from liverpool on how the queen and the duke of edinburgh have been a remarkable team in the story of the monarchy. | liverpool gives a true lancashirej welcome to princess elizabeth... in spring 1919, a young couple went to liverpool's anglican cathedral at the end of hope street, and drew a lovers' knot
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on the third pier of the nave. the entwined e and p remains carved into the fabric of the building to this day, the physical embodiment of a marriage that was to last more than 73 years. the princess and the duke move into... . among the choirboys attending that day was geoff holliday, now in his 80s. he recently lost his wife, helen, after almost 50 years of marriage, and feels for the queen as she bids a final farewell to her husband. i would say that the queen is feeling this tremendously at the moment. even though you are prepared in a way for such an event, and ifeel for her, actually, and i have a lot of respect for the duke as well. i thought he was a great guy. ijust can't imagine what it would be like after 72 years of having somebody that you can have a moan to or you can go home to and express your disappointments or problems or the things that are worrying you, and now there just to be an empty void. elizabeth and her husband waved to the cheering crowd... -
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their wedding in 19117 was a distraction from post—war austerity — "a flash of colour on the hard road we travel", as churchill put it. you are now husband and wife together. this weekend, victoria and kevin got married in liverpool town hall. cheering a moment ofjoy in a land struggling to recoverfrom the pandemic. the best feeling ever. yeah _ yeah, so happy. in liverpool, as across the commonwealth, the queen and prince philip came to represent constancy and commitment, a partnership that endured the pressures of family turbulence and public scrutiny. i think that the main lesson that we've learnt is that tolerance is the one essential ingredient of any happy marriage. and you can take it from me that the queen has the quality of tolerance in abundance. laughter
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and i thinkjack always thought i was his best friend as well. pat and jack mcgattigan will celebrate their 67th wedding anniversary tomorrow. still together in their merseyside home, they respect the example set by the queen and prince philip. she must be devastated, losing her husband after all this time. i mean, he's been there, steadfast, standing... not beside her but, you know... just behind her. it's very difficult, that, isn't it? what strikes me about your generation is that real sense of duty and of resilience and determination. it'sjust being tolerant, i think. and enjoying each other's company is the most... and being lucky. being lucky? - being lucky. yeah, we were lucky, finding each other. he has quite simply been my strength and stay all these years, and i and his whole family owe him a debt greater than he would ever claim or we shall ever know. the queen made her wedding vows before god,
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to love, to cherish, and — by tradition — to obey, till death us do part. mark easton, bbc news, liverpool. 0ur royal correspondent, sarah campbell is with me now. this does now mark a new phase for the queen, facing life alone. indeed, she has lost her confident, the widerfamily has indeed, she has lost her confident, the wider family has lost the patriarch, grandfather, great—grandfather and there were many poignant moments during the service. at one point when the duke of�*s body was limited to the royal board and as many styles and titles were read out, illustrating what an extraordinary life of service he has led. worth saying again, the longest serving consort in british history, one man who more than any others has helped the queen to carry out her life of duty and service and this evening, thoughts will be with the
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queen. her husband now rests in the royal boat, hisjourney queen. her husband now rests in the royal boat, his journey at an end. sarah campbell, thank you. that's all from me from windsor on this solemn but beautiful afternoon. in a moment, we'll have the news where you are, but first let's look back at some of the moments of the day, commemerating the duke of edinburgh. goodbye. "i vow to thee my country" plays.
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we are here today in st george's chapel to commit into the hands of god the soul of his servant, prince philip, duke of edinburgh. for god the soul of his servant, prince philip, duke of edinburgh.- philip, duke of edinburgh. for his resolute faith _ philip, duke of edinburgh. for his resolute faith and _ philip, duke of edinburgh. for his resolute faith and loyalty, - philip, duke of edinburgh. for his resolute faith and loyalty, or - philip, duke of edinburgh. for his resolute faith and loyalty, or his l resolute faith and loyalty, or his hi-h resolute faith and loyalty, or his high sense of duty and integrity, for his— high sense of duty and integrity, for his life — high sense of duty and integrity, for his life of service to the nation _ for his life of service to the nation and commonwealth. you're watching bbc news. special coverage from windsor of the funeral of the duke of edinburgh, which has taken place this afternoon. prince philip died on the 9th april, at the age of 99.
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earlier, my colleague, huw edwards, spoke to the royal biographer robert hardman and vanity fair's royal correspondent, katie nicholl. they began by discussing how the family will support the queen, following the duke of edinburgh's death. i think it will be a continuation of what we have seen over the past year, actually. i do think covid has forced the royal family, we have all seen that, we've seen them take to zoom, it has changed how they work. i think as the queen approaches her 95th birthday, now she is a widow, they are going to step up and support her. they have always supported her. the prince of wales for a long time has carried out the lion's share of overseas travel, laying a wreath at the cenotaph, he will go on to become the head of the commonwealth. we are seeing a gradual handing over. i think the queen is not going anywhere. she is going to reign over us
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for many more years. i think certainly, you mention the duke and duchess of cambridge, who are now is carrying out full—time royal duties. the count and countess of wessex are doing a brilliantjob and the queen is really going to need their support, and she has it. one of the more sensitive issues, i don't want to dwell on it much but it has certainly been a factor of interest is the relationship between william and harry. we saw them walking past us here earlier. together, together and talking. what did you make of it today? it was always going to be scrutinised, everyone was going to be watching. it was important not to be a focal point of today, but it was prince harry's homecoming. he has not been here for a year. this was a day when the brothers were going to put their differences aside. clearly, there are things that need to be sorted out. if there is one thing we have seen today, this is a family with real

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