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tv   BBC News Special  BBC News  April 17, 2021 4:50pm-6:30pm BST

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i think certainly, you mention the duke and duchess of cambridge, who are now is carrying out full—time royal duties. the count and countess of wessex are doing a brilliantjob and the queen is really going to need their support, and she has it. one of the more sensitive issues, i don't want to dwell on it much but it has certainly been a factor of interest is the relationship between william and harry. we saw them walking past us here earlier. together, together and talking. what did you make of it today? it was always going to be scrutinised, everyone was going to be watching. it was important not to be a focal point of today, but it was prince harry's homecoming. he has not been here for a year. this was a day when the brothers were going to put their differences aside. clearly, there are things that need to be sorted out. if there is one thing we have seen
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today, this is a family with real emotions and feelings and rifts, all being part of it. as i said to you yesterday, we all hope that they will move on, that this can be healed. but to see them together, i'm sure it brought back many memories for them and it would have been emotional for prince harry, reunited with his family under difficult circumstances but lovely to see them talking. also i must say, i noticed peter phillips, i know they were walking as a trio, but the way he stood back, whether that was something to do with hierarchy orjust to enable that image of the two brothers i think will be incredibly touching to many people. how do you see that relationship in the future? i think today we saw the start of them coming back together. i thought it was wonderful. at the end of the service, as all these state cars pulled up
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and there was a very strict order and we were expecting everyone to go in their official car and go up the hill. the prince of wales led the way and said i am not getting in the car, i'm walking and everyone else walked. at that moment it ceased to be a state occasion but became a family event. i expect now, subject to covid rules, they are like any other family. they are catching up, reminiscing. i think today will have been a very unifying day because, after all, he was a man born into what one royal family and has devoted his life to another and there they all were today, together on his behalf. you are both distinguished writers and commentators in this area. i'm just wondering what you have in mind for the way that you will describe what went on today and what do you think people will take away from what we have seen today? could you give us an insight into what your thoughts are, what the conclusions are, if you like? i think the intensely personal nature of the service, summing up such an extraordinary
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man, we have heard about all his achievements this week. this was somebody nominated for a nobel prize, and yet there was no reference to his awards, world wildlife fund, none of that in the service today. it didn't need to be said because he is this colossus, and matching that i think with this intensely personal service in circumstances that we all understand, and it was quite clear, even the sovereign cannot bend the rules, she is there on her ownjust like all of her subjects at this time. we are incredibly sympathetic for her, very proud of her, very proud of him and of this institution on a day like today. katie, your thoughts on how you will be drawing the themes together? the duke famously didn't like a fuss, he probably wouldn't have wanted all the fuss that we have given him today but he deserved it, and he often didn't want to talk about the legacy he will leave behind, but he does leave behind a legacy.
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this wouldn't be the royal family that it is today that we are all incredibly proud of, had it not been for the duke of edinburgh, so may he rest in peace. with me is our royal correspondent, sarah campbell. you have been here all day, sum up how it went. it you have been here all day, sum up how it went-— how it went. it couldn't have been a more stunning _ how it went. it couldn't have been a more stunning backdrop. _ how it went. it couldn't have been a more stunning backdrop. the - how it went. it couldn't have been a i more stunning backdrop. the weather, the blue skies, the brilliant sunshine. right from the moment it started we heard from so many members of the armed forces about what an honour it was for them to take part in the service. they felt they were giving a send off to one of their own, which of course the duke of edinburgh was. we've heard all about his military service and his connection with the armed forces in his role as duke of edinburgh. he was colonel in chief of various
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regiments, there was a very close understanding between him and members of the armed forces. it was very poignant watching them on the quadrangle before the procession, the music playing, nimrod plain, the black arm bands, very poignant. also in the quadrangle the horse and carriage. the duke of edinburgh was known for carriage riding, the carriage that he designed was there as well with his cap and cloth. there were lots of personal touches throughout the procession and the service. of course, the land rover hearse, built in 2003 service. of course, the land rover hearse, built in 2003 and modified over the years to his exacting standards. this is the vehicle that was bearing his coffin, the procession route lined by hundreds of members of the armed forces. then
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we got to the st george's chapel. we had been told it would be a service that would reflect his life of service and duty but we also knew it would be scaled back because of the pandemic. so rather than 800 mourners there were only 30 and it would be close family and relatives and that was it. i think it didn't detract from a powerful, poignant service, even having four members of the quiet singing rather than a whole choir seem to make it even more touching. there were lots of elements in the service, he chose the music, the readings, his love of the music, the readings, his love of the sea, nature, it all came through. i think also the images that will come out from st george's chapel, a huge building, built for hundreds. the image is of the queen alone, as so many people have experienced over the past year, not
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able to have any member of family put a comforting arm around her. she was wearing a mask, she bowed her head for most of the service. i think those images add to the poignancy is anything else. if they wanted to have a service which was a fitting farewell for the duke, that was it. figs fitting farewell for the duke, that was it. �* , fitting farewell for the duke, that wasit. a , was it. as you said, seeing the queen by _ was it. as you said, seeing the queen by herself, _ was it. as you said, seeing the queen by herself, a _ was it. as you said, seeing the queen by herself, a solitary i was it. as you said, seeing the - queen by herself, a solitary figure, conditions imposed by the covid restriction is of course but now she is alone and has to face life by herself. it is a very moving moment. i think it's very difficult to get i's head around losing a partner of 73 years, far longer than most of us have been alive. that is what the queen is facing. it is true to say that over the past year they spent a lot of time together, they were shielding at windsor castle and probably spent more time together
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over the past year than they perhaps otherwise would have done. since his retirement the duke had spent much of his time at the sandringham estate, painting, normal pastimes. but did bring them together. as you say, she is now looking at life, he was still on the end of the phone evenif was still on the end of the phone even if he physically wasn't here and that is what she will miss, miss being able to phone him up. he was the man who made her laugh. when you saw them out and about, there was often just a little look between them. they were able to choreograph each other very well but there was a clear, almost unsaid connection and she will have to look forward beyond that. the family have come together, they said they will rally round. princesses eugenie said, we will look after granny. that is what their role will be going forward. even though they were socially distanced in the chapel, afterwards
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when it had finished, the queen went off back to the private apartments, the family walked up the hill together. and we saw prince harry and prince william and catherine the duchess of cambridge coming together and having a very animated conversation between the two brothers. going forward that is what we look for the two, the next generations coming together and rallying around the queen. much comment about _ rallying around the queen. much comment about what _ rallying around the queen. much comment about what the - rallying around the queen. much comment about what the duke might have wanted himself, would he have been pleased?— have wanted himself, would he have been pleased? people who know him and all they say _ been pleased? people who know him and all they say he _ been pleased? people who know him and all they say he didn't _ been pleased? people who know him and all they say he didn't like - been pleased? people who know him and all they say he didn't like a - and all they say he didn't like a fuss and they say this very small, private family ceremony with this very important military aspect, say there were, that was still allowed to happen, that this would be what he would have wanted. and of course, he would have wanted. and of course, he would have had a chance to have really thought about how he wanted
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his funeral to play out. he ditches the readings, the music, he had a say. the land rover was very much his idea —— he did choose the readings and the music. it went off very much as he would have wanted. good afternoon from windsor castle, where the funeral of the duke of edinburgh has taken place this afternoon. although the service itself was small, due to covid restrictions, the duke's love of the military was reflected in the pageantry here, before the funeral in st george's chapel. inside the chapel, there were only 30 mourners, all members of the family or close friends. the queen sat alone — again due to covid rules — as she said goodbye to her husband of 73 years. 0urfirst report is from our royal correspondent,
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nicholas witchell. it was at windsor castle that they fell in love. it was wartime. the young lieutenant philip mountbatten spent his leave at the castle visiting the then princess elizabeth. they were married in 1947. they spent many of the happiest moments of their 73 years together at windsor. and it was within the ancient walls of this castle, that the nation paid its final tributes. castle, that the nation paid its finaltributes. drawn castle, that the nation paid its final tributes. drawn up in the spring sunshine on the castle's quadrangle with a military detachment. regiments and other service contingents with which the duke had a particular connection. the scale were smaller than would have been the case without the pandemic though that is hardly something that would have troubled him. he, afterall, had choreographed much of what was to
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follow. the land rover hearse which the duke had helped to design moved to its position by the state entrance. his coffin was borne by a bearer party from the grenadier guards. the was covered with personal standard and surmounted with his sword and naval cap. with great care, it was placed on the hearse. behind the harris were members of the royalfamily on the hearse. behind the harris were members of the royal family who were members of the royal family who were walking to the chapel, headed by the prince of wales. and then the first sight of the queen accompanied by a lady in waiting in the state to bentley taking its position of the
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procession as the hearse set off. among the members of the family walking behind the convent where princes william and harry. the focus of much attention not walking side by side but with their cousin, peter phillips, between them. the procession wound its way down the gentle hill of the castle towards st george's chapel. at the west steps of the chapel, a bearer party from the royal marines removed the coffin from the hearse to take it up the steps to the
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chapel. inside st george's the queen took her place in the choir. before entering the west door is the bearer party paused for the minute's silence signalled by a field gun fired by the royal horse artillery. the coffin was born into the chapel and around it to 30 members of the congregation, all of them asked. the bidding was delivered by the dean of windsor. ~ ., ., ,
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windsor. with grateful hearts we remember the _ windsor. with grateful hearts we remember the many _ windsor. with grateful hearts we remember the many ways - windsor. with grateful hearts we remember the many ways in - windsor. with grateful hearts we i remember the many ways in which windsor. with grateful hearts we - remember the many ways in which his long life has been a blessing to us. we have been inspired by his unwavering loyalty to our queen, his service to the nation and the commonwealth, by his courage, fortitude and faith. all the music had been chosen by the duke. the first hymn sung by the choir of all was the mariners him, for those in peril on the sea. the small congregation sat in its family groups. congregation sat in its family urou s. ., congregation sat in its family i mu 5, ., congregation sat in its family .|-ous_ . ., ., congregation sat in its family u-rous. ., ., ., groups. the queen sat alone. so too did prince harry. _ groups. the queen sat alone. so too did prince harry. after— groups. the queen sat alone. so too did prince harry. after the _ groups. the queen sat alone. so too did prince harry. after the players. did prince harry. after the players and the commendation, a distinctive touch typical of the duke. royal marine buglers sounded the royal navy's call to action stations.
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and finally, at the end of her husband's funeral, the choir sang the national anthem. with me is our royal
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correspondent, sarah campbell — we sell pageantry but also simplicity about the service reflecting possibly what the duke wanted. absolutely. we know that the plans that had been in place for many years had to be severely adapted because of the pandemic and that is the reason why crowds have been kept away from windsor and from all royal residences over the last week but we were told that even so, the funeral was to reflect and to celebrate his great life of service that the duke had lived and it did just that. it was the most stunning backdrop. the sun was shining, the sky was a perfect blue colour and this really reflected his role as a military man but also as a family man. it was a simple service, a christian service because he was a man of faith and the music and readings were chosen by the duke. many of them reflected his love of the sea, his love
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nature, his naval background. the chapel was built to hold hundreds of people and instead of 800 mortars there were just 30 so just lots of empty stalls in the quire. it didn't make it any left poignant. part empty stalls in the quire. it didn't make it any left poignant.- make it any left poignant. part of that poignancy — make it any left poignant. part of that poignancy was _ make it any left poignant. part of that poignancy was seeing - make it any left poignant. part of that poignancy was seeing the i make it any left poignant. part of- that poignancy was seeing the queen sitting all alone.— sitting all alone. indeed. i'm sure there are many _ sitting all alone. indeed. i'm sure there are many people _ sitting all alone. indeed. i'm sure there are many people over - sitting all alone. indeed. i'm sure there are many people over the l sitting all alone. indeed. i'm sure i there are many people over the last year that had been to a funeral and may be had to watch it via xoom, have not been able to put a comforting arm around somebody that is experiencing a huge amount of loss and i was that feeling, i think, today. a really stark image. head bowed, facemask on, surrounded by empty stalls and like i say, nobody there to give her a comforting hand because of social distancing. but going forward beyond the pandemic, the family they have said that they will come together. they said we will look after granny. at the end of the service you left by car, the state bentley, and it
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was nice to see the family leaving st george's chapel and walking up the hill and particularly, after all the hill and particularly, after all the headlines in the run—up to the funeral, seeing prince harry and prince william walking up the winter castle grounds together clearly deep in conversation. moving forward the royal family has lost its patriarch, the father, the grandfather, the great—grandfather. and the queen has lost her husband and today of all days a very, very difficult day for her. . , days a very, very difficult day for her. ., , ., ,~ days a very, very difficult day for her. ., , ., ,~' i. ,, her. can i 'ust ask you, the queen has not her. can ijust ask you, the queen has got used _ her. can ijust ask you, the queen has got used to — her. can ijust ask you, the queen has got used to working _ her. can ijust ask you, the queen has got used to working alone, . her. can ijust ask you, the queen | has got used to working alone, the duke had retired from royal duties in 2017 but this will still be a tremendous loss to her. yes, absolutely — tremendous loss to her. yes, absolutely right. _ tremendous loss to her. yes, absolutely right. she - tremendous loss to her. yes, absolutely right. she has - tremendous loss to her. yes, absolutely right. she has all. tremendous loss to her. yes, i absolutely right. she has all the sort of big national events since august 2017, you know, the cenotaph, remembrance sunday, the state 0pening remembrance sunday, the state opening of parliament and she has
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been accompanied by the members of the royalfamily so been accompanied by the members of the royal family so on a public level she has become used to having other members of the family supporting her or indeed carrying out engagements on her own but you are right, prince philip, even if he was not even windsor, he was still on the phone, still her confidant, she was to the person who made her laugh and the person who knew her best. we have seen the picture of when they met and she was 13 years old and they caught each other�*s eye. and she has lost that and that is irreplaceable. and that will be difficult going forward, i have no doubt. and she has done this week. you sell to audiences, she is carried on with a life of service and a life of duty. in the role of the monarch. i have no doubt she will continue to do that but obviously, a huge void has been left in her life with the last of her husband of 73 years. for in her life with the last of her husband of 73 years.- in her life with the last of her husband of 73 years. for all that insiaht husband of 73 years. for all that insight and _ husband of 73 years. for all that insight and analysis _ husband of 73 years. for all that insight and analysis thank - husband of 73 years. for all that insight and analysis thank you . husband of 73 years. for all that i insight and analysis thank you very much indeed.
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around the world, people in commonwealth nations have also been pausing to remember the duke — particulalry as his work helped to encourage and develop young people in many different countries, — "the duke's legacy" as our south asia correspondent rajini vaidyanathan reports from delhi. it was a solo trip in 1959 which brought prince philip to the largest country in the commonwealth, india. as royal consort he went on to visit the country three more times, seen here taking in at the taj mahal in 1961. that same year, he made trip to pakistan, one of his many to south asia. for more than 60 years was patron of the uk pakistan society. decades on and south asia has changed. the british royal family occupies a different place in
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peoples lives here. 0lder peoples lives here. older generations will remember prince philip for his visits here and his death has also brought to light his lasting legacy amongst younger people in the region. the duke of edinburgh award. in this academy they have been running the scheme for almost two decades. hundreds of children he had taken part. teachers say the programme, which encourages students to volunteer and go on expeditions has transformed many lives. prince edward visited the school once to hand out his father's awards in person. we school once to hand out his father's awards in person.— awards in person. we are really, really thankful _ awards in person. we are really, really thankful to _ awards in person. we are really, really thankful to him, _ awards in person. we are really, really thankful to him, prince . really thankful to him, prince philip. it gave opportunity to our children to mix with the outside world. they face a lot of obstacles and they are taught how to overcome those obstacles.—
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those obstacles. more than 150,000 children in south _ those obstacles. more than 150,000 children in south asia, _ those obstacles. more than 150,000 children in south asia, from - those obstacles. more than 150,000 children in south asia, from all - children in south asia, from all walks of life, have participated in the duke of edinburgh's international award. this girl who wants to be an entrepreneur says it introduced her to skills and experiences she would never have otherwise had. i experiences she would never have otherwise had.— experiences she would never have otherwise had. i am from sri lanka where we are _ otherwise had. i am from sri lanka where we are focused _ otherwise had. i am from sri lanka where we are focused on _ otherwise had. i am from sri lanka| where we are focused on education. the duke of edinburgh tapped into our lives amid a big change. i think the duke of edinburgh's award was a safe space for me to transform as a young person and for me am very grateful to his royal highness because if not for his legacy i would not be here.— because if not for his legacy i would not be here. prince philip led a life of service _ would not be here. prince philip led a life of service inspiring _ would not be here. prince philip led a life of service inspiring many - a life of service inspiring many others to follow suit. you want to refer to his awards as a do it yourself growing kit. it is through his scheme he leaves a lasting legacy, one which has touched people around the world. legacy, one which has touched people around the world. prince philip and the then princess elizabeth lived in malta
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between 1919 and 1951 — where philip was commander of the royal navy sloop, hms magpie. the couple returned to the island several times. we can speak now to the president of malta, george vella. good afternoon to you. thank you so much forjoining us on bbc news. i just wonder how is malta remembering prince philip?— prince philip? well, the relationship _ prince philip? well, the relationship between i prince philip? well, the| relationship between the prince philip? well, the - relationship between the royal couple and multi goes back many, many years as you have already said but i have to say that in spite of having watched his royal highness getting older and older and also being aware of the tolls at the last months, when the event happened there was a great sense of sadness and deep sympathy with her majesty
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and deep sympathy with her majesty and also the royal family. 0bviously, immediately, both prime ministerand 0bviously, immediately, both prime minister and myself sent personal condolences to her majesty and all the media were obviously reporting. to tell you that even the archbishop himself asked everybody to pray for the repose of the soul of his royal highness. there have been articles all of the press and i'm sure that today thousands and thousands were glued to the television to watch what was happening in windsor. find what was happening in windsor. and this is because malta held a very special place in the duke of edinburgh's card. tell us a little bit more about his relationship with mortar. ~ . ., , bit more about his relationship with mortar. ~ , ., ., , , mortar. welcome his relationship noes mortar. welcome his relationship goes much _ mortar. welcome his relationship goes much further _ mortar. welcome his relationship goes much further than _ mortar. welcome his relationship goes much further than is - mortar. welcome his relationship i goes much further than is commonly known because his mother, princess alice, spent some time and she was young and mortar. his grandfather was stationed in mortar. when his
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royal highness was married to the then princess elizabeth he was stationed, to the naval career, and he was stationed in malta. they started living in the villa which was owned by his uncle lord mountbatten. and they spent two years over the and the last time i met her majesty she described that as some of the best years of her life. she was simply a naval officer's wife and she could go around and go shopping and go dancing and enjoying herself. for then that was something they kept remembering and every time they met a maltese dignitary they always record the time in mortar. apart from the fact that we have all noticed that for them mortar was
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something special and the queen herself came to malta no less than six times in the last time she was here was in 2015 for the heads of government meeting. the prince himself, prince philip himself, beyond that even came in his own three or four beyond that even came in his own three orfour times on beyond that even came in his own three or four times on other occasions. he came by himself to present the constitutional instruments to the prime minister in 1964. the relationship is quite strong and what is happening now is that government has managed to acquire the villa for a very large sum of money but we intend to restore it back to its pristine beauty and the intention is to make it some sort of museum in commemoration of the royal family. and when the queen was informed
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about that she was really thrilled about that she was really thrilled about the prospect of seeing that place where she spent so much time being brought back to its pristine beauty. being brought back to its pristine beau . , , ., , beauty. very strong links between the ro al beauty. very strong links between the royal couple _ beauty. very strong links between the royal couple and _ beauty. very strong links between the royal couple and mortar, - the royal couple and mortar, enduring links, as well. as we know, one of the duke of edinburgh's main achievements was in establishing the award scheme and the international award scheme and the international award is in mortar. has that been a success? ~ , y award is in mortar. has that been a success? ~ , , ., , , success? absolutely, it has been uuite a success? absolutely, it has been quite a big _ success? absolutely, it has been quite a big success. _ success? absolutely, it has been quite a big success. it _ success? absolutely, it has been quite a big success. it was - success? absolutely, it has been i quite a big success. it was launched in 1961. i happened to be the patron of the malta brunch and i can tell you that up to 2019 more than 6500 young people have made use of this excellent form of non—formal education which gives them a sense
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of belonging to the communities and experiencing the adventure of developing and learning outside the classroom and it is something which many people opt to do. in his last two years two yea rs it two years it is somehow disrupted the proceedings even though very well know it is very flexible and one can take this adventure under different forms and circumstances but it has been very, very useful and as i am telling you, it is still very popular and hopefully the moment we get out of covid and we can go back to give who wants to go through the process to choose the format under which they want to go through it. we format under which they want to go throu~h it. ~ ., ,, ., ~ format under which they want to go throu~h it. . ., , , ., ,, ., format under which they want to go throu~h it. ~ ., ,, ., ~ ., through it. we are speaking to each other on the — through it. we are speaking to each other on the day _
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through it. we are speaking to each other on the day of— through it. we are speaking to each other on the day of prince - through it. we are speaking to each other on the day of prince philip's l other on the day of prince philip's funeral. do you envisage that the relationship, the special relationship, the special relationship between malta and the royal family will continue? relationship between malta and the royalfamily will continue? it relationship between malta and the royal family will continue? it will continue as _ royal family will continue? it will continue as it _ royal family will continue? it will continue as it was _ royal family will continue? it will continue as it was before. - royal family will continue? it will continue as it was before. first i royal family will continue? it will| continue as it was before. first of all because one has to realise that after all those years of relationship between malta and britain there are large communities of maltese residing in the uk and the same with large communities of british people living in mortar. it is something which definitely cannot be put aside. 0n the other hand, as i said, there is a lot of respect. i mentioned at the time they were staying in malta, there was lord mountbatten and pictures of prince charles and princess and bathing on
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the coastline along with lord mountbatten and his wife. these were family photos. so i can assure you one can think of any deterioration in the relationships between malta and the royal family and as in the relationships between malta and the royalfamily and as i said, the moment, we bring back the villa is a museum of the royalfamily the moment, we bring back the villa is a museum of the royal family and we are sure that it will attract lots and lots of interest from british and commonwealth tourists that come to see our country. i am sure it will- — that come to see our country. i am sure it will. we _ that come to see our country. i am sure it will. we are _ that come to see our country. i am sure it will. we are very _ that come to see our country. i am sure it will. we are very grateful to you for your time. thank you so much. we can speak now to the royal historian and biographer, robert lacey. just to start, really, your reflections on the afternoon. it has
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been an absolutely glorious day here in windsor and very solemn, powerful but in certain ways beautiful occasion as well.— but in certain ways beautiful occasion as well. , , , ., occasion as well. yes. it is strange to use the — occasion as well. yes. it is strange to use the word _ occasion as well. yes. it is strange to use the word like _ occasion as well. yes. it is strange to use the word like celebration i occasion as well. yes. it is strange | to use the word like celebration but there was a positive feeling here. but of course sadness, i think, centred on the queen. being in windsor. she is in there. i've spoken to a number of people here and said, well, they have slightly defied the government ban to come into windsor anyway but in a very polite and respectful way and they say, well, it is part of history and we wanted to be there but then they all said, we want to show our support to the queen. we want to let her know that we are here for her and, as a personal reflection on the service, one could not help constantly feeling, seeing her there
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on her own, going in on her own, leaving on her own, it was a very graphic illustration of the new reign of elizabeth that now lies ahead of us. 0bviously, prince charles and prince william will be beside her not taking her place in any way but backing her up. last year when the president of ukraine came for a state visit was prince william and catherine who received him in buckingham palace. the queen was here in windsor. that is the way things are going to go more in the future. but there is no question of abdication of stepping down nor the term that gets used, region. it is a technical word for a member of the royalfamily stepping in if technical word for a member of the royal family stepping in if there technical word for a member of the royalfamily stepping in if there is real incapacity. well, there is not incapacity. 0n the contrary. and a positive way to look at it is that we are looking at a news stage in the elizabethan age, a concluding stage, perhaps, but full of life in a new way. so
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stage, perhaps, but full of life in a new way-— stage, perhaps, but full of life in anewwa. , ., ., a new way. so you see, do you, other members of — a new way. so you see, do you, other members of the _ a new way. so you see, do you, other members of the royal— a new way. so you see, do you, other members of the royal family - a new way. so you see, do you, other members of the royal family coming | members of the royal family coming to greater prominence now? yes. members of the royal family coming to greater prominence now?- to greater prominence now? yes. i mean, obviously. _ to greater prominence now? yes. i mean, obviously, no _ to greater prominence now? yes. i mean, obviously, no prince - to greater prominence now? yes. i mean, obviously, no prince harry i mean, obviously, no prince harry although it was nice, i thought, after the service to see him and william gravitate towards each other quite naturally chat away. today one saw new prominence, i think, for edward and sophie, the wessex is and from what one hears, with all this new zooming that is becoming a new dimension of royal life, blessings of covid is that although the royal family have not been able to do the official functions the official way if you look at it, a lot of their appointments are virtual. and today come into contact with people in the
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same way that we are all doing. and one has sort of pleasure, also, on the zoom call of looking behind them and seeing the misplaced book ornament of something on their bookcase. so this clearly lies in the future of the family and, yes, i think in terms of the new firm, as it is called, the magnificent seven, i'm trying to work out how that is seven, the queen on one side and then charles and camilla, there is an, there are the wessex is and that's got me to five. a not very good with my maths. but the royal family is rallying round and that is the new reality we have to look forward to. the new reality we have to look forward to-_ the new reality we have to look forward to. . ~' ,, , . forward to. thank you very much. the time being- — forward to. thank you very much. the time being- we _ forward to. thank you very much. the time being. we will _ forward to. thank you very much. the time being. we will come _ forward to. thank you very much. the time being. we will come back- forward to. thank you very much. the time being. we will come back to i forward to. thank you very much. the time being. we will come back to you| time being. we will come back to you a little bit later but for the time
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being thank you very much. robert lacey there. robert lacey there. well, the duke of edinburgh was of course well—known personally here in windsor, but he made thousands of official visits all around the country in support of the queen and many charities, including the duke of edinburgh awards scheme. since he died, people he met have been recalling the time that they spent with prince philip. our correspondent, danny savage, reports now on people's memories of the duke. this is the legacy the duke of edinburgh has left behind. right, girls, so it's your silver d of e training day. 0n the weekend of his funeral, young people are now facing the challenges of what they call their d of e. right, girls, are you ready? yes! let's go. these schoolgirls from manchester were in the peak district, participating in the duke of edinburgh award scheme, very much aware of the significance of the day. i think he was an amazing man, and he was really important to the queen. 73 years of marriage is obviously quite a long time, so he's left
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a humongous legacy behind. he was brilliant. i feel honoured to be able to take part in something that he's founded. i feel really, really sorry for the queen because i know he was such a big, big part of her life. but i think that he's really going to be with us for a very long time — he's got such a big legacy with the duke of edinburgh award. allison bray is one of many thousands of people who would have gone to windsor today. she has worn black since he died. she and herfriend, bev, have been to all the recent big royal events, and have made their own picture books of photos they took. but, today, she had to reluctantly stay at home. i like to go down to the events, because i like to be part of the atmosphere. i do feel extremely sad that i can't go, but at least i can watch it on the television. also watching at home in county durham was ronnie. eight years ago, he invited the duke to open a local school project.
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i do remember the day, the moments we shared over lunch. he was quite a witty, funny man. he was inspirational on the day. i think he has this uncanny knack of putting everybody at ease. he changed people's lives for the better. the duke of edinburgh's century long journey may have ended today, but, for many years to come, young people will be outdoors in his name, acquiring the life skills he wanted them to have. danny savage, bbc news. mo leily came to the uk as a refugee from syria in 2013. he has since completed his bronze and gold duke of edinburgh awards. and hejoins me now. good afternoon to you. tell me a little bit about how important the duke of edinburgh
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award scheme was to you. good afternoon- _ award scheme was to you. good afternoon- i _ award scheme was to you. good afternoon. i think _ award scheme was to you. good afternoon. i think the _ award scheme was to you. good afternoon. i think the duke i award scheme was to you. good afternoon. i think the duke of. afternoon. i think the duke of edinburgh award has become part of my life and given me a lot of skills and stuff that i require now and have used in daily living, really. because you came to the uk 80 years ago, in very difficult circumstances. you were a refugee edge must have felt quite alone and did not know anyone. in that context, how does that help you. the duke of context, how does that help you. iie: duke of edinburgh context, how does that help you. "iie: duke of edinburgh award context, how does that help you. i““i2 duke of edinburgh award helped context, how does that help you. ii2 duke of edinburgh award helped me integrate into society and make many new friends. it improved my communication skills and the english language, as you can imagine, when i first arrived my english was not that great however, finishing the bronze and gold award it has
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improved a lot. i made many new friends by doing it and i am still in contact with many of them. it has been very life changing experience. so it has had a lasting legacy. tell us about some of the experiences that you remember. i went camping on my expedition on dartmoor. that is an experience i will always remember. i was with a group of friends. we had to camp for five days, i did was a bit challenging at times, particular one day i remember when we got a bit lost. debbie had to get together as a group and make sure we found our way. there were many other skills i have gained, i volunteered with the british red cross as part of my
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award. i have gained and developed a lot of skills through that. i was volunteering in refugee services. i have helped refugees and asylum seekers settle in the uk, and that was a rewarding experience. also it was a rewarding experience. also it was important to help others who have had a similar experience to me. when you got your gold award, you actually met the duke of edinburgh, didn't you? actually met the duke of edinburgh, didn't ou? ~ ., .,, actually met the duke of edinburgh, didn't ou? ~ ., ., ~ , didn't you? what was that like? yes, i did. that was— didn't you? what was that like? yes, i did. that was a _ didn't you? what was that like? yes, i did. that was a very _ didn't you? what was that like? yes, i did. that was a very proud - didn't you? what was that like? yes, i did. that was a very proud day i didn't you? what was that like? yes, i did. that was a very proud day for l i did. that was a very proud day for me. i was happy to be able to go to buckingham palace and meet the duke of edinburgh himself. that was in 2017. he had a little chat with us as a group, and he was encouraging us to make use of it and be active and make sure to keep up the hard
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work. you are now a medical student, so you have done very well. would you say that some of the skills and confidence that you gained during the duke of end of award have helped you achieve what you have now? certainly. i think it helped me gain confidence, to integrate, to make new friends, to improve my language. it did really help me gain my place at university, which i'm pretty much halfway through now. the duke of edinburgh award had a huge impact on my life and i am very proud to be here and be a gold award holder. well, congratulations to you, and thank you for speaking to us.
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a winner of a gold award in the duke of edinburgh scheme. here in windsor, outside the castle walls, the duke's funeral has been marked by small groups paying their respects. the police have been in evidence, to deter any large crowds from gathering. some people have stopped to leave flowers, many said the royal family were "setting an example" by limiting numbers at the event. 0ur royal correspondent, daniela relph, reports now on how the people and the town paid their respects to the duke. there was a quiet early calm to windsor. picture perfect for this day of solemnity and remembrance. the town, the backdrop to so many royal occasions, had been asked to do something different today — to stay away, to not gather, and abide by covid rules.
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despite the warnings, people still came, just not in the usual numbers. just like to be here, because of the whole situation. it's so sad, prince philip's passing. we are outside, but we are inside in a way, you know? so that's it, you just don't have that feeling when you watch it on tv. we can see people - who came to pay respect, and we feel— that we are a community here. so it's nice. at 3pm, the gun salute could be heard beyond the castle walls. and windsor, like elsewhere, fell silent.
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at the castle view retirement village in windsor, the funeral was an emotional watch. well, you are quite moved by it, you know, surprisingly. more than you think it's going to, yes. in the garden of the duke of edinburgh pub, just outside town, people were clearly moved by the service. i think it's lovely to see them all together. today is the day for family, when you are mourning a loved one, as they are today. so it'sjust lovely, and such a sad occasion. i think we should be - focusing on the queen today. it must be heartbreaking after 73 years. _ today, the normal rules didn't apply. 0n the streets of windsor, it was a restrained remembrance in memory of a man so strongly connected with this royal town. daniela relph, bbc news, windsor.
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dominic leblanc is president of the queen's privy council for canada and minister of intergovernmental affairs. good afternoon to you. tell us about your own interactions with prince philip. your own interactions with prince phili -. . ~' your own interactions with prince phili. ., ~ ,, your own interactions with prince phili. ., ~ ., your own interactions with prince phili. . ~ ., ., ., philip. thank you for having me on our philip. thank you for having me on your programme. _ philip. thank you for having me on your programme, this _ philip. thank you for having me on your programme, this very - philip. thank you for having me on your programme, this very sad i philip. thank you for having me on | your programme, this very sad day. philip. thank you for having me on i your programme, this very sad day. i had the privilege of speaking on behalf of the government on thursday when we had tribute to his royal highness, prince philip. ialso when we had tribute to his royal highness, prince philip. i also had a wonderful personal opportunity, which was very important to me, when my father was canada's than a general 25 years ago, her majesty the queen and his royal highness were in ottawa for canada day in
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july. her majesty had suggested that we have an informal sort of barbecue dinner literally in the garden of the governor general�*s residents. there were two tables of eight at the dinner. her royal highness and his role highness were staying there. i was struck at that time, i was a young assistant to the then prime minister, who was also at our table. he and the duke spoke at length about canada, about his royal highness's trips to canada. i was struck by his knowledge of canada, his affection for canada, and that is probably why canadians join so many people around the world at this sad time in honouring his service, and obviously paying our respects and obviously paying our respects and sip these to her majesty.
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have canada been pausing to reflect on prince philip's life?— on prince philip's life? there is no doubt. on prince philip's life? there is no doubt- like _ on prince philip's life? there is no doubt. like many _ on prince philip's life? there is no doubt. like many canadians, i on prince philip's life? there is no doubt. like many canadians, we l doubt. like many canadians, we watched the moving funeral, the procession, the events in windsor. canadians all week, in fact, have been speaking publicly of their affection for him, obviously of their respect for her majesty. canadians celebrated his decades of service. the privy council prepared for me some notes in terms of the over 60 visits that prince philip made to canada, and the tens of thousands of young canadians who benefited from the duke of edinburgh award. it was a moment to pause and remember a life of service, but also to honour her majesty and to think of the royalfamily
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to honour her majesty and to think of the royal family at what must be a very sad time. i think canadians from coast—to—coast in our country got up this morning, in british columbia, of course, our most western province, the time change with the united kingdom meant that people got up early to be able to follow live, including on the bbc, the ceremonies today. it was a moving occasion. so the ceremonies today. it was a moving occasion.— the ceremonies today. it was a moving occasion. the ceremonies today. it was a movin: occasion. , ., , ., moving occasion. so people have felt very connected _ moving occasion. so people have felt very connected to _ moving occasion. so people have felt very connected to the _ moving occasion. so people have felt very connected to the events - moving occasion. so people have felt very connected to the events here? | very connected to the events here? no question. the prime minister spoke with her majesty yesterday, he told me privately of the conversation. it was for him a moving occasion. he is a young boy, when his father was the prime minister in the 1970s and 1980s, had numerous occasions to meet her majesty and prince philip on their many visits to canada. so he also
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felt a personal connection over generations to his royal highness. i know the prime minister and his family were obviously watching the events today on television, like so many canadians were.— events today on television, like so many canadians were. thank you very much for that — many canadians were. thank you very much for that account _ many canadians were. thank you very much for that account of _ many canadians were. thank you very much for that account of the - many canadians were. thank you very much for that account of the impact i much for that account of the impact of the duke of edinburgh, the funeral and his association with canada. thank you very much indeed. the president of the queens privy councilfor the president of the queens privy council for canada. another of the many charities prince philip was a patron of was muscular dystrophy uk. we can speak to the charity's head of donor relations, debbie hoods. good afternoon. tell us a little about the impact that the duke of end bra had as a patron for the charity. —— the duke of edinburgh. i wanted to extent our condolences to
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the queen and royal family on this very sad day. we are very delighted that prince philip became our patron in 19 —— in that prince philip became our patron in 19 -- in 1966. that prince philip became our patron in 19 —— in 1966. he has given exposure to our charity over those decades. ., , ., ._ , exposure to our charity over those decades. .,, ., , ., decades. people always say of the duke that he _ decades. people always say of the duke that he was _ decades. people always say of the duke that he was knowledgeable, | decades. people always say of the i duke that he was knowledgeable, paid attention when people spoke to him, that he knew a great deal about the causes that he supported. was that the case in your experience? most definitel . the case in your experience? most definitely- we _ the case in your experience? most definitely. we have _ the case in your experience? ij�*ifsii definitely. we have heard from supporters who have anecdotes to tell, from the various events he attended over the years. he kept a close eye on the science and we were quick to update him. he will have seen some real changes and some real impact and progression on the
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treatments now available for people with muscular dystrophy. i understand you met him at an event. what was that like? i understand you met him at an event. what was that like?— what was that like? i did. i met him in 2016 when _ what was that like? i did. i met him in 2016 when he _ what was that like? i did. i met him in 2016 when he invited _ what was that like? i did. i met him in 2016 when he invited us - what was that like? i did. i met him in 2016 when he invited us to - what was that like? i did. i met him in 2016 when he invited us to the i in 2016 when he invited us to the palace to celebrate 50 years of his patronage. i was lucky to be one of the greeting party and i welcomed him to the event and then took him upstairs to meet 150 of our supporters and special guests. the overwhelming feeling from him was a real interest in the charity. he was interested to know individual stories, but he was a really charming person and he made everybody feel at ease. he had really done his research, and he even remembered meeting some of the people that were there around ten years previously, which is incredible when you think about the number of people he will have met. how would you sum up the legacy of
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his support for the charity? to how would you sum up the legacy of his support for the charity?— his support for the charity? to have a ro al his support for the charity? to have a royal patron. _ his support for the charity? to have a royal patron, such _ his support for the charity? to have a royal patron, such a _ his support for the charity? to have a royal patron, such a senior i his support for the charity? to have| a royal patron, such a senior royal, throughout 50 years of our history, we remain indebted for the exposure he gave us which led to a greater profile for ourselves, and in turn that means we can raise more funds to support the 70,000 people living with a muscle wasting condition that we support. so we remain indebted to him, and very thankful.— him, and very thankful. thank you so much. much has been made about the duke of edinburgh's involvement with wildlife conservation. in 1961, he became the first president of the world wildlife fund and also set up
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prestigious awards schemes to encourage young conservationists. earlier, the naturalist and broadcaster, sir david attenborough, described the impact prince philip had on the cause. he was right in there at the beginning. he was right in there at the beginning-— he was right in there at the beuainnin.~ . , beginning. when you say correctly that there was _ beginning. when you say correctly that there was a _ beginning. when you say correctly that there was a time _ beginning. when you say correctly that there was a time when i that there was a time when conservation didn't mean much to many people, but he, back at the end of the 50s, the bit 50s and into the 19605, of the 50s, the bit 50s and into the 1960s, when the word conservation at hardly opened up, he saw it universally and the world wildlife fund, as it then was called, owed a huge amount to him and his presence. he made it a real issue, an important issue and not something to be brushed aside, something that was essentially important. when he spoke
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about it, he spoke with a passion of about it, he spoke with a passion of a man that both cared about it but also knew about it. he knew about it also knew about it. he knew about it a lot. he also knew about it. he knew about it a lot. . ., ., a lot. he campaigned with vigour, he was a man who _ a lot. he campaigned with vigour, he was a man who wanted _ a lot. he campaigned with vigour, he was a man who wanted results, i a lot. he campaigned with vigour, he was a man who wanted results, he i a lot. he campaigned with vigour, he was a man who wanted results, he is known as a bit of an action man. what would you .2 today as some of the things he achieved in that area that a younger generation not familiar with prince philip would be able to recognise? the familiar with prince philip would be able to recognise?— able to recognise? the fact that conservation _ able to recognise? the fact that conservation now _ able to recognise? the fact that conservation now is _ able to recognise? the fact that conservation now is a _ able to recognise? the fact that j conservation now is a worldwide sensitivity, people know worldwide, notjust in this country. people used to think that looking after rare birds was interesting but not essential. we now know that it is perhaps even more essential than we realised back in the 1950s and 19605. realised back in the 1950s and 1960s. the future of the world now depends upon us solving these problems. if people are aware that there are problems, a great deal of that awareness is due to the fact
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that awareness is due to the fact that he made it clear and apparent. in the days since the duke's passing, there has been a great deal of talk about his other interests, from carriage driving to barbecueing. earlier the gardener and broadcaster, alan titchmarsh, shared a letter prince philip sent to him about how he tended the grounds of windsor. have i got time to read you a little bit of a letter he sent? go on, yes. i wrote a book on royal gardeners and i sent it to the queen, because you feel you ought to. i had a letter back from the duke about a fortnight later. it's quite closely typed, as you can see, and apparently he typed his own letters. he said that he had missed the series on television, unfortunately, but he enjoyed the book. he said, "on the chapter devoted to queen elizabeth ii, you go on to say outdoor activities included riding and horse racing for the queen, shooting and carriage driving for the duke. as i'm sure you appreciate, shooting does not go on all the year round, and i only took up carriage driving
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in 1973 after playing polo for 20 years." he then lists everything he has done in the home park here, the avenues he has planted, the oaks. and it goes on. "i don't expect you to do anything about this, but i thought it might interest you to know that active gardening still goes on in the royal gardens." that's you put in your place! it was. i cherish the document. the authentic voice of the duke of edinburgh, is read out by alan titchmarsh. earlier we heard from the right honourable patricia scotland, the secretary general of the commonwealth. she spoke to my colleague huw edwards about the duke of edinburgh's work and vision when it came to the commonwealth. he made a tremendous contribution to the commonwealth. if you think about what he did in 1956, when he created the studies leadership conference at the studies leadership conference at the edinburgh awards, he saw that there was huge common good and commitment that could come from the
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commonwealth. he said the commonwealth. he said the commonwealth was worth a great deal of personal sacrifice, because of the incredible opportunity to do good. that has been passed on to the next generation. if you think about what david just talked about in terms of climate change, he has passed that absolutely onto prince charles, who has been passionate about this issue for 50 years was up indeed, just this week, notwithstanding the bereavement, he held a roundtable with african leaders, talking about sustainability. so this is a new commonwealth. the duke of edinburgh said the new commonwealth was a construct built on the highest ideals of man. we have 54 countries now as our commonwealth, the largest number, with more countries wanting tojoin. that is part of his number, with more countries wanting to join. that is part of his legacy, part of his majesty's legacy. they were modernisers back in the 1950s.
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what is extraordinary is they have remained modernisers for the last 70 years. that commitment has been felt so deeply by all of the leaders around the commonwealth today, so as we honour him, he has been honoured by a third of humanity in 54 countries. so the commonwealth has a great future, but it has it because her majesty the queen, because of prince philip, and because of the commitment there is now from prince charles and the rest of the family and the 54 leaders working together for humanity. so it think it has got a great opportunity for us. prince philip carried out countless official engagements — creating lasting memories for those who attended. in 2007, he accompanied the queen to open a hindu temple in bradford. they were welcomed by hundreds of worshippers, including disha joshi, who was aged just nine at the time.
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it was honestly very, very exciting. i spent the whole morning practising my curtsey. at the age of nine, disha joshi presented a bouquet of flowers to the queen and prince philip. now 23, she remembers the day well. normally i would absolutely dread getting out of bed. however, this morning i was absolutely thrilled to be meeting both the queen and prince philip, so i woke up about 6am, threw my lenga on, that my mum and my dadima had picked out specially for me to wear. so it was a beautiful purple lenga, just so i thought i'd represent a little bit of my heritage and my culture. and it was absolutely brilliant. i got all dolled up, which was great. as you can imagine, a nine—year—old, absolutely loved getting my hair done, allowed to wear a little bit of make—up for once. it was may 2007 when prince philip accompanied his wife, the queen, to officially open the lakshmi narayan temple in bradford. the atmosphere was relatively split, i would say. just in a sense of, everyone quite young — such as myself at the time — we were ecstatic, really excited
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to, kind of, be there, whereas the elderly people there were probably a little bit more nervous, and trying to make sure everything was done correctly and everything was prim and proper. the royal couple met hundreds of worshippers and dignitaries, as well as observing some of the hindu traditions. when she actually entered the mandir, she took her shoes off, which i thought was a really, really nice touch. it showed how she was very culturally aware of what we as hindus and asians do as we enter the mandir and the temple. so, the queen and prince philip were the first generation to bridge that gap between all of those british indians who are very patriotic about britain, but also very, very heavily proud and involved in our hertiage and our indian cultures. disha says the memory will live with her forever. and her photograph? well, that takes pride of place at the family's home in bradford. shabnam mahmood, bbc news.
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the queen has described the death of prince philip as "having left a huge void" in her life. they had first met in 1934 and got married after the war in 1947 — a relationship spanning nine decades. our home editor, mark easton, now reports from liverpool on how the queen and the duke of edinburgh have been a remarkable team in the story of the monarchy. liverpool gives a true lancashire welcome to princess elizabeth. in spring 1949, a young couple went to liverpool's anglican cathedral at the end of hope street and drew a lover's knot on the third pier of the nave. the entwined e and p remains carved into the fabric of the building to this day, the physical embodiment of a marriage that was to last more than 73 years. among the choirboys attending that day was jeff holliday, now in his 80s. he recently lost his wife, helen, after almost 50 years of marriage and feels for the queen as she bids a final farewell to her husband. i would say that the queen
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is feeling this tremendously at the moment. even though you're prepared in a way for such an event, i feel for her, actually. i have a lot of respect for the duke as well. i thought he was a great guy. ijust can't imagine what it will be like after 72 years of having somebody you can have a moan to or you can go home to and express your disappointments or problems and things that are worrying you. and now there willjust be an empty void. elizabeth and her husband waved to the cheering crowds. their wedding in 1947 was a distraction from post—war austerity — "a flash of colour on the hard road we travel," as churchill put it. you are now husband and wife together. this weekend, victoria and kevin got married in liverpool town hall. a moment ofjoy in a land struggling to recover from the pandemic. the best feeling ever. yeah.
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just to be able to actually do it. so happy. in liverpool, as across the commonwealth, the queen and prince philip came to represent constancy and commitment, a partnership that endured the pressures of family turbulence and public scrutiny. i think the main lesson we've learned is that tolerance is the one essential ingredient in any happy marriage. and you can take it from me that the queen has the quality of tolerance in abundance! i was his best friend as well. pat and jack will celebrate their 67th wedding anniversary tomorrow. still together in their merseyside home, they respect the example set by the queen and prince philip. she must be devastated, losing her husband after all this time. he's been their steadfast, standing beside her, you know. just behind her! it's very difficult, that, isn't it?
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what strikes me about your generation is that real sense of duty and of resilience and determination. it's being tolerant and enjoying each other�*s company. and being lucky. being what? being lucky! yeah, we were lucky finding each other. he has quite simply been my. strength and stay all these years and i and his whole family owe him a debt greater. than he would ever claim or we shall ever know. i the queen made her wedding vows before god, to love, to cherish and by tradition, to obey. till death us do part. mark easton, bbc news, liverpool. we can speak now to the royal historian and biographer, robert lacey.
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robert, one of the images that will endure from the afternoon is the site of prince william and prince harry in conversation. what were your thoughts about that? yes. harry in conversation. what were your thoughts about that? yes, there was all this fuss _ your thoughts about that? yes, there was all this fuss beforehand - your thoughts about that? yes, there was all this fuss beforehand about i was all this fuss beforehand about them having to process with peter phillips in between them. i think people around the world were wondering if diana had an extra son they had never heard about. it all proved quite unnecessary because from what we can see, who knows, we're on the outside, but two brothers gravitated towards each other in a natural fashion. brothers gravitated towards each other in a naturalfashion. they were the fabulous three before meghan. she was not here today because of her pregnancy. i don't think we should underplay the reality of the split, the difference between the brothers on the matters
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of principle. but there is a difference between working royals, which harry and meghan have withdrawn from being, and the blood family. harry clearly remains very much part of the blood family. every official royal statement we have had since the beginning of this trouble, they have always been two elements, they have always been two elements, the queen has always expressed how she understands how harry feels, and his wish to do something different, and the realities of the split. that is what lies in the future. as of course lies a widowhood. we look at windsor here. we look back in history, the first queen of was on her own all the way through her reign. what we have been reminded of is how queen elizabeth and prince
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philip had that relationship. 0ne philip had that relationship. one thing different between victoria and the queen is that our queen has a son and a grandson, william, who are thoroughly committed and will be helping her and supporting her in the times ahead. that is some sort of historical context, and i think it bodes well for the future. thank ou so it bodes well for the future. thank you so much- _ with me is our correspondent, helena wilkinson. just picking up on the point that robert was making, the queen has had help from other members of the family in the last few years since the duke retired, but this is still a very new chapter in her life. it absolutely is and i think the striking image from the funeral which took place in the chapel from where we are, was the queen in that
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intimate area inside the chapel, sitting by herself, dressed in black with a facemask on. some members of herfamily opposite her, but because of social distancing, she was not able to sit with anyone else. her bubble was her husband, the duke of edinburgh, and there she was sitting opposite his coffin, saying a final goodbye to her husband of 73 years. many people in this country and around the world will be able to empathise with the queen somewhat, because many will have had funerals and not be able to be comforted by loved ones, especially at the funeral service. they will be able to understand what the queen has gone through today. we can see the royal standard flying here. the queen, after what must have been one of her most difficult days, if not her most difficult day today, saying goodbye to her husband. perhaps we
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will see her withdraw a bit from life, but she will no doubt in the next few days and weeks take comfort from herfamily. next few days and weeks take comfort from herfamily-— this is bbc news from windsor, where the funeral of the duke of edinburgh has just taken place. the queen led mourners at the service, where only 30 people were allowed because of covid restrictions. prince philip's coffin travelled to the service on a specially adapted landrover— its design had been overseen by him. the duke's children, grandchildren and great grandchildrenjoined the solemn procession.
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the buglers of the royal marines sounded the last post — after the duke was laid to rest in the royal vault. and across the nation, at 3pm, gun salutes and a minute's silence took place.
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you're watching bbc news, with special coverage from windsor of the funeral of the duke of edinburgh which has taken place this afternoon. although the service itself was small, due to covid restrictions, the duke's love of the military was reflected in the pageantry here, before the funeral in st george's chapel. inside the chapel, there were only 30 mourners, all members of the family or close friends. the queen sat alone — again due to covid rules — as she said goodbye to her husband of 73 years. 0ur royal correspondent, nicholas witchell reports. it was at windsor castle that they fell in love. it was wartime. the young lieutenant philip mountbatten spent his leave at the castle visiting the then—princess elizabeth. they were married in 1947. they spent many of the happiest moments of their 73 years
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together at windsor. and it was within the ancient walls of this castle, that the nation paid its final tributes. drawn up in the spring sunshine on the castle's quadrangle with a military detachment. regiments and other service contingents with which the duke had a particular connection. the scale was smaller than would have been the case without the pandemic though that is hardly something that would have troubled him. he, after all, had choreographed much of what was to follow. the land rover hearse which the duke had helped to design moved to its position by the state entrance.
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his coffin was borne by a bearer party from the grenadier guards. the was covered with personal standard and surmounted with his sword and naval cap. with great care, it was placed on the hearse. behind the hearse were members of the royal family who were walking to the chapel, headed by the prince of wales. and then the first sight of the queen accompanied by a lady in waiting, in the state bentley taking its position of the procession as the hearse set off.
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among the members of the family walking behind the coffin where princes william and harry. the focus of much attention not walking side by side but with their cousin, peter phillips, between them. the procession wound its way down the gentle hill of the castle towards st george's chapel. at the west steps of the chapel, a bearer party from the royal marines removed the coffin from the hearse to take it up the steps to the chapel. inside st george's, the queen took her place in the quire.
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before entering the west doors, the bearer party paused for the minute's silence signalled by a field gun fired by the royal horse artillery. the coffin was borne into the chapel and around it the 30 members of the congregation, all of them masked. the bidding was delivered by the dean of windsor. with grateful hearts we remember the many ways in which his long life has been a blessing to us. we have been inspired by his unwavering loyalty to our queen, his service to the nation and the commonwealth, by his courage, fortitude and faith. all the music had been
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chosen by the duke. the first hymn sung by the choir of four was the mariners hymn, for those in peril on the sea. the small congregation sat in its family groups. the queen sat alone. so too did prince harry. after the prayers and the commendation, a distinctive touch typical of the duke. royal marine buglers sounded the royal navy's call to action stations. and finally, at the end of her husband's funeral, the choir sang the national anthem.
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with me is our correspondent, helena wilkinson. 0ne one could to detect the duke of�*s own hand in so much of the proceedings this afternoon. absolutely. and i think it would have been incredibly proud of how his own funeral has gone today. know
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that he spent years planning his own funeral. the land rover that he spent about 18 years helping to adapt, to modify, which came out of the quadrangle which is not far from where we are. yet adapted that, he modified it. the songs in the chapel that were sung by a very small choir with only four members, all of those songs he chose himself so he planned it meticulously and it was a real reflection again of the songs that we had during the service. this love of the sea, his connection to the military. the processions outside which consisted of around 750 military personnel. 0ne poignant moment you may have noticed in the quadrangle when the was brought out. in the middle, his cabbage with two of his ponies that he drove, was there and are not the blanket which would have kept them warm when he
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went out carriage driving. his driving. his cap, his gloves and a little pot which we now know contained the sugar cubes that he gave to us ponies. so that was a beautiful touch, gave to us ponies. so that was a beautifultouch, i gave to us ponies. so that was a beautiful touch, i thought, gave to us ponies. so that was a beautiful touch, ithought, and gave to us ponies. so that was a beautiful touch, i thought, and we saw members of the royal family walking behind the duke of�*s often into the chapel, into the intimate quire area that we saw that in the package. and the most striking of images, the queen sitting by herself because of the covid restrictions on social distancing, her bubble was her husband the duke of edinburgh. but she had to sit alone in a facemask dressed in black. people empathise with the queen who had to hold a funeral for a loved one empathise with the queen who had to hold a funeralfor a loved one in the past year and have not been able to be comforted by members of their own family. an incredibly personal funeral. 0ne own family. an incredibly personal funeral. one that the duke had
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planned over many, many years, and it was done to military precision which is what the duke would have wanted and what he would have expected. fir wanted and what he would have exected. , , expected. or the proceedings in the service of course, _ expected. or the proceedings in the service of course, the _ expected. or the proceedings in the service of course, the pageantry, i service of course, the pageantry, they've all taken place here we are within the grounds of windsor castle but outside there is a world out there were people would have wanted to take part to some extent in what was going on and they've not been able to. �* , a, , able to. i've been outside the castle walls _ able to. i've been outside the castle walls for _ able to. i've been outside the castle walls for most - able to. i've been outside the castle walls for most of - able to. i've been outside the castle walls for most of the i able to. i've been outside the i castle walls for most of the day. the advice the peoples don't come to windsor because simply won't be able to see anything. we saw the procession, the funeral, that took place behind the castle walls but windsor is of cause of royal talent. it is seen so many big royal events over the years and many residents here saw the duke of edinburgh as a local. assembly was part of their community and they would often see him. i mentioned the carriage
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driving, out in the great park should talk to people so he was held by many with great affection by local people and i think some of them did come out today but there were others who did come from further afield. one man we spoke to said that he was so upset when he heard about the news of the duke of�*s death and came here because he felt he needed to. so what we saw just before the funeral began, outside the walls the castle, were bigger crowds of people. they were lining the streets. they all stood in silence when we had that minute silence and then there were some clapping after that minutes silence had finished. despite the guidance, the advice to people to stay at home and watch it on television, watch it on radio, still some people did want to come out and mark what has been a big occasions here in windsor. indeed. thank you. the duke of edinburgh was of course well—known
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personally here in windsor — but he made thousands of official visits all around the country in support of the queen and many charities, including the duke of edinburgh awards scheme. since he died, people he met have been recalling the time that they spent with prince philip. our correspondent danny savage reports now on people's memories of the duke. this is the legacy of the duke of edinburgh has left behind. on the weekend of his funeral young people about facing the challenges of what they call their dob. these schoolgirls were in the peak district participating in the duke of edinburgh award scheme. i think he was an amazing man,
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and he was really important to the queen. 73 years of marriage is obviously quite a long time, so he's left a humongous legacy behind. he was brilliant. i feel honoured to be able to take part in something that he's founded. i feel really, really sorry for the queen because i know he was such a big, big part of her life. but i think that he's really going to be with us for a very long time — he's got such a big legacy with the duke of edinburgh award. allison bray is one of many thousands of people who would have gone to windsor today. she has worn black since he died. she and herfriend, bev, have been to all the recent big royal events, and have made their own picture books of photos they took. but, today, she had to reluctantly stay at home. i like to go down to the events, because i like to be part of the atmosphere. i do feel extremely sad that i can't go, but at least i can watch it on the television. also watching at home in county durham was ronnie. eight years ago, he invited the duke to open a local school project. i do remember the day, the moments we shared over lunch. he was quite a witty, funny man.
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he was inspirational on the day. i think he has this uncanny knack of putting everybody at ease. he changed people's lives for the better. the duke of edinburgh's century long journey may have ended today, but, for many years to come, young people will be outdoors in his name, acquiring the life skills he wanted them to have. danny savage, bbc news. we can speak now to the associate editor at the daily telegraph, camilla tominey. good afternoon. just tell us what stood out for you this afternoon. well, i think, stood out for you this afternoon. well, ithink, externally stood out for you this afternoon. well, i think, externally and with all the pageantry, it was the kind
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of royal funeral we have come to expect with military precision, a huge amount of dignity and everything being in lockstep and perfectly timed but of course, once we got st george's chapel it was unusual to see the queen alone in a facemask alongside relatives with their faces covered in facemask alongside relatives with theirfaces covered in because it was so scaled—down it was quite stark inside that chapel. a very poignant moment of course when the coffin went down into the vaults and the tv feed cut away because what was a very public event merited a very private moment for the family at that point. very private moment for the family at that point-— at that point. well, it is that extremely — at that point. well, it is that extremely unique _ at that point. well, it is that l extremely unique combination at that point. well, it is that - extremely unique combination during a royalfuneral of the public extremely unique combination during a royal funeral of the public and the private. and as you say, the queen has cut a very solitary figure during this afternoon. it has pointed out by other people that has a public person she is carrying out
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royal duties by herself for some time is without the duke of edinburgh who retired from public duties four years ago. but it does still mark a very significant new chapter in her life, doesn't it? after marriage of so many decades. certainly does. the sense that she's been by the side for 73 years and now she will be by herself and this week we have notjust been remembering the duke but thinking forward to what the queen's ray might look like without him and, yes, she's going to be supported by figures like prince charles and the duke and duchess of cambridge and the wessex is of stepped up this week. other members of the family trying to rally around but at the end of the day as she approaches her 95th birthday next week this is extraordinarily difficult for her personally. life will go on, the show will go on and she will continue with her red boxes and speaking to the prime minister and
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actually we haven't seen that much to be devolved since prince philip retired from public life in 2017 and in fact she is carried on more or less as normal and i think that will there is bound to be some comment about the fact that prince william and harry were seen talking to each other. do you make of that. i was relieved to _ other. do you make of that. i was relieved to see _ other. do you make of that. i was relieved to see it, _ other. do you make of that. i was relieved to see it, to _ other. do you make of that. i was relieved to see it, to be _ other. do you make of that. i was relieved to see it, to be honest i relieved to see it, to be honest with you. a lot has been said and written about their relationship and the idea that there are bristling tensions between them. it was initially significant that they didn't work shoulder to shoulder in the possession and instead flanked their older cousin but then afterwards, and probably clearly conscious of the optics around their appearance at st george's chapel not side by side as we're used to seeing them, they gathered together, didn't they? afterwards. and they were meant to be convened back to the car but chose instead to walk no doubt because it has been such a bright and sunny day here. initially was of
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the duchess of cambridge speaking to a brother—in—law and then she seemed to move away to the side so that the two brothers could speak and i think thatis two brothers could speak and i think that is quite an important message to spend out. behind the scenes people say there are a family united and deceiving that the differences aside i think therefore kills the narrative of them being other on the day which is important as far as the whole perception of the event. it has been a beautiful day, as you say. thank you so much. thank you so much. much has been made about the duke of edinburgh's involvement with wildlife conservation. in 1961, prince philip was the co—founder of the then world life fund for nature, and was president of the charity from 1981 to 1996. we can speak to the director general of wwf international, marco lambertini.
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good afternoon. thank you so much forjoining us here. it has been said several times already that the duke of edinburgh was in many ways ahead of his time when it came to his interest in the environment. and in conservation.— in conservation. absolutely. apparently _ in conservation. absolutely. apparently as _ in conservation. absolutely. apparently as passion i in conservation. absolutely. apparently as passion for. in conservation. absolutely. i apparently as passion for nature started during a trip to the south atlantic and south pacific and since then he developed a true deep and genuine passion about the environment, nature and wildlife. he was ahead of his time. he was a visionary in so many ways. first of all and seeing the destruction of nature and the need for an organisation that was able to work internationally. it also he was one of the first to really begin to understand the link between nature and the development of humanity and the impact that the loss of nature could have on our lives. many of the
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speeches about this link and interdependency of humankind from nature. something that, of course, today we are extremely well aware. but at the time there was not much spoken about. and he served as president of your organisation for many years. he president of your organisation for many years-— president of your organisation for many years. president of your organisation for man ears. ., ., , many years. he went on to extend his atron many years. he went on to extend his patron edge — many years. he went on to extend his patron edge to _ many years. he went on to extend his patron edge to various _ many years. he went on to extend his patron edge to various other - patron edge to various other environmental causes and organisations. {iii environmental causes and organisations.— environmental causes and organisations. environmental causes and oruanisations. , ~ organisations. of course, ithink the legacy _ organisations. of course, ithink the legacy of — organisations. of course, ithink the legacy of prince _ organisations. of course, ithink the legacy of prince philip i organisations. of course, ithink the legacy of prince philip is i organisations. of course, ithink the legacy of prince philip is notj the legacy of prince philip is not just ww f, the whole environmental movement. he was a man of action ways. and this was no exception. so he played a very active role. not at all a figurehead. he visited 50 trips with wwf visiting projects and
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attending events. launching campaigns. he indicated new programmes like our marine programme and helped convene heads of state. so he was incredibly active and that is the way we remember him. a very important part of his legacy is to have passed down his passion to prince charles, prince harry and prince charles, prince harry and prince william. in prince charles, prince harry and prince william.— prince charles, prince harry and prince william. in that generation, particularly — prince william. in that generation, particularly with — prince william. in that generation, particularly with his _ prince william. in that generation, particularly with his grandson, i prince william. in that generation, particularly with his grandson, it i particularly with his grandson, it would seem a very natural preoccupation but for the duke of edinburgh he was at this time. absolutely. it was a time when concerns were more about economic development and these were the decades and we embraced spasmodic economic development. we don't think about the consequences of the impact of the environment and today we are
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aware but also unfortunate they were paying the consequences of that further short—sighted development model. and the prince was very clear about that and many he made the point very very strongly.— about that and many he made the point very very strongly. thank you very much- — around the world, people in commonwealth nations have also been pausing to remember the duke — particularly as his work helped to encourage and develop young people in many different countries, "the duke's legacy" as our south asia correspondent rajini vaidyanathan reports from delhi. it was a solo trip in 1959 which brought prince philip to the largest country in the commonwealth, india. as royal consort he went on to visit
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the country three more times, seen here taking in the taj mahal in 1961. that same year, he made trip to pakistan, one of his many to south asia. for more than 60 years was patron of the uk pakistan society. decades on and south asia has changed. the british royalfamily occupies a different place in peoples' lives here. older generations will remember prince philip for his visits here and his death has also brought to light his lasting legacy amongst younger people in the region. the duke of edinburgh award. in this academy they have been running the scheme for almost two decades. hundreds of children he had taken part. teachers say the programme, which encourages students to volunteer and go on expeditions,
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has transformed many lives. prince edward visited the school once to hand out his father's awards in person. we are really, really thankful to him, prince philip. it gave opportunity to our children to mix with the outside world. they face a lot of obstacles and they are taught how to overcome those obstacles. more than 150,000 children in south asia, from all walks of life, have participated in the duke of edinburgh's international award. this girl who wants to be an entrepreneur says it introduced her to skills and experiences she would never have otherwise had. i am from sri lanka where we are focused on formal education.
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the duke of edinburgh tapped into our lives and made a big change. i think the duke of edinburgh's award was a safe space for me to transform as a young person and for me am very grateful to his royal highness because if not for his legacy i would not be here. prince philip led a life of service inspiring many others to follow suit. you want to refer to his awards as a do it yourself growing—up kit. it is through his scheme he leaves a lasting legacy, one which has touched people around the world. so the funeral of the duke of edinburgh has taken place at windsor castle , allowing the queen, his family and the nation to bid a final farewell under unique circumstances to the longest—serving royal consort in british history. let's look back at some of the moments of the day, commemorating the life of the duke of edinburgh. goodbye.
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we are here today in st george's chapel to commit into the hands of odd the south of his servant prince philip, duke of edinburgh. for his resolute faith and loyalty, for his high sense of duty and
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integrity, for his life of service to the nation and commonwealth. there is a lot of fair weather across the uk at the moment and it looks like, for some, dry weather will be the story throughout the next ten days. a lot of sunshine across the uk this saturday afternoon and persist into the evening. at that affair weather cloud here or there but really not enough and that cloud to produce anything in the way of a shower. so here is the remainder of our day. why spend some time to this evening and we will see a front edging into northern ireland in western scotland during the small hours of sunday. it will bring wet weather but the front will bring wet weather but the front will be weakening all the while so the rain will become lighter as the hours go by. more cloud for scotland and northern ireland does mean a milder story here. a pretty
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widespread frost elsewhere takes us into sunday. under clear skies thanks to this high extending down from scandinavia. there is the front towards the far north—west for sunday but as you can see by sunday daytime there is not much rainfall left in association with it so you can see thicker cloud across scotland and northern ireland and it will be a grave day on sunday about temperature should not struggle too badly even with the cloud up ten or 12 degrees. further south and we are looking at the mid—teens across some sheltered spots. the dry weather is likely to become more of an issue across parts of the uk as we go further on into the month of april. many areas have not seen many significant surfaces this month and the week ahead titles away from scandinavia. move south but no rain on it and other high build on the atlantic for the end of the week so as you can see, the dead pool in any of these fronts that would bear meaningful rain in the next possibly ten days or so. monday, it was the
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far north—west of the uk it may give a little bit of life in for northern ireland and most of it stays shy of scotland. cloud across parts of england and wales and remaining dry hair. the best chance of any rainfall for england and wales may just be the odd isolated shower. scotland and northern ireland will possibly see something a little bit more persistent but even then, only to monday and tuesday as we can see of the week is that i establishes itself we are left with a lot of dry weather and i think quite a bit of sunshine as well.

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