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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  April 18, 2021 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with rogerjohnson and victoria fritz. our headlines today: reflections after the day the queen and the nation bid farewell to the duke of edinburgh. one of the defining images, her majesty sitting alone as she said goodbye to her husband of 73 years. the royal family will continue to grieve this week, although the period of national mourning has come to an end. also this morning, the melting of the world's biggest iceberg, once a quarter of the size of wales. celebrating 70 years of britain's
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first national park. this is one of the most popular areas of the peak district butjust imagine before the national park was formed, you were not allowed to walk across open more land like this. good morning. no quadruple for manchester city as chelsea beat them in their fa cup semi—final at wembley. good morning. it is a dry and sunny day across england and wales and a little warmer than yesterday. further north, there is more in the way of cloud and sunlight, patchy rain for scotland and northern ireland. all of the details coming up shortly. it's sunday 18th april. our top story: the royal family has honoured the duke of edinburgh's "humour and humanity" as he was laid to rest at st george's chapel windsor. the service was restrained, in line with the duke's wishes and coronavirus guidelines. the queen sat alone,
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just days before she turns 95. princes william and harry were seen chatting together as they left the service. the royal family will continue to mourn the loss of the prince philip this week, while the period of national mourning has come to an end. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell looks back on a funeral that was watched by millions of people around the world. drawn up in the spring sunshine on the castle�*s quadrangle with worker for were the military detachments. they stood with head espoused and rifles reversed. give a heads bowed. the scale would have been smaller without the pandemic but it is hardly something that would have troubled the duke. he after all had choreographed much of what was to follow. the land rover hearse which the jury could help to design moved
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to its position by the state entrance —— the duke. that coffiin was born on the shoulders of a bear a party from the grenadier guards. it was covered with duke's personal standard and surmounted with his sword and naval cap and a wreath from the queen. with great care, it was placed on the hearse. behind the hearse were members of the royal family, who were walking to the chapel, headed by the prince of wales. a royal salute sounded and the first site of the queen accompanied by a lady in waiting in the state bentley, taking position as the order was given for the party to step off. bell tolls.
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bell tolls. close by was one of the horse—drawn carriages the duke had taken such pleasure in driving. on the seat, his cap and gloves. among the members of the family walking behind the coffin were princes william and harry, the focus of so much attention. walking with their cousin peter phillips between them. bell tolls. the procession wound its way past the castle�*s round tower. by the side entrance to st george's chapel,
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other members of the royal family stood with their heads bowed. the queen made her way into the chapel, pausing to look back as the hearse moved on down the hill. on the wreath of white roses and lilies on the coffin they can't on which were the coffin they can't on which were the handwritten words" in loving memory". before they entered the chapel, the bearer party paused as a field gun signalled the start of a one—minute silence. gunfire. the service began with a tribute to the duke from the dean of windsor. we have duke from the dean of windsor. - have been inspired by his unwavering loyalty to our queen by his service to the nation and the commonwealth, by his courage, fortitude and faith. the small congregation sat in its
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family groups. the queen sat alone. so did prince harry. after the prayers and the commendation, a distinctive touch typical of the duke, oil marine bugle sound of the royal navy's call to action stations. and finally, at the end of her husband's funeral, the choir sang the national anthem. seldom can it's worth have greater poignancy. —— its words. it's worth have greater poignancy. -- its worde— it's worth have greater poignancy. -- its words. god save the queen. the mourners _ -- its words. god save the queen. the mourners departed, _ -- its words. god save the queen. the mourners departed, the - -- its words. god save the queen. i the mourners departed, the widowed queen to her castle, and two brothers, william and harry, walked away together, alongside the duchess
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of cambridge. the duke of edinburgh is gone but the brothers know that he would have wanted the family to move on and for differences to be healed. nicholas witchell, bbc news, windsor. our correspondent helena wilkinson is at windsorfor us. helena, although the official mourning period is now over, this is still a time for reflection for many? yes, absolutely, and the royal family will continue to observe a further week's morning. we expect the flags that were lowered to half—mast after the duke died last friday to be raised later on this morning —— mourning. but in windsor here today very much a day of reflection after what was an intimate private family funeral that was watched by millions across the world and a funeral, if we have heard, it had been planned by the duke of edinburgh over many years. from the land rover that he designed
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and modified to the songs that were sungin and modified to the songs that were sung in the chapel service yesterday. but the most striking image of course from yesterday, and the saddest of images, was the queen herself in the chapel, of course over the last year she had bubbled with her partner, her husband, prince philip, but yesterday she sat alone because of covid—i9 restrictions in the chapel itself and she looked onto the coffin and she said goodbye to her husband of 73 years. and last night the royal family tweeted this very poignant picture of the duke of edinburgh after the funeral.— picture of the duke of edinburgh after the funeral. thank you very much, helena. _ more than 200,000 new covid cases have been recorded in india for three days in a row, taking the total number to nearly 14.5 million. it makes it the world's second worst—infected country behind the united states. we're nowjoined by our south asia correspondent rajini vaidyanathan, who is in delhi this morning.
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dinky forjoining us this morning. —— thank you. huge numbers which must be causing a great deal of concern? , . ., , concern? yes, and actually in the last 30 minutes _ concern? yes, and actually in the last 30 minutes or— concern? yes, and actually in the last 30 minutes or so _ concern? yes, and actually in the last 30 minutes or so we - concern? yes, and actually in the last 30 minutes or so we got - concern? yes, and actually in the last 30 minutes or so we got the | last 30 minutes or so we got the latest figures for the past 2a hours, another record increase, we keep saying that day after day here at the moment, or than 61 new cases. and more than 1500 deaths and it is worth pointing out that some experts believe that the death toll and the case toll is actually far higher than we are seeing reported, due to the bodies and crematoriums, they do not match, the figures that have been released, so it could be a far higher toll and we are also seeing distressing scenes around the country with families trying to get their loved ones into hospitals, ambulances lining up outside, trying to get patients in and on social
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media, messages desperately being posted by people, saying have you got a bed? have you got oxygen? have you got medicine? it really feels like a dire situation here at the moment. . ~ like a dire situation here at the moment. ., ~ , ., the two russian men suspected of carrying out a poison attack in salisbury in 2018 have now been linked to an explosion at an arms depot in the czech republic. the czech authorities have issued pictures of alexander petrov and ruslan boshirov, who they say were in the country when the blast happened in 2014, leaving two people dead. a senior russian parliamentarian called the claim absurd. it is ten minutes past six. ijust want to tell you about this, icebergs. what was once the world's largest iceberg has finally broken apart. a—68, as it was known, covered an area of nearly 2,300 square miles when it broke away from antarctica in 2017.
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but satellite images show the �*mega—berg' has now virtually gone, broken into countless small fragments that the us national ice center says are no longer worth tracking. here's our science correspondent victoria gill. a1 million ton block of ice. when i speak a—68 broke away from antarctica back in 2017, it measures more than 2300 square miles. a quarter the size of wales. it was only by imaging it from space that scientists can actually follow the massive iceberg's journey as scientists can actually follow the massive iceberg'sjourney as it inched its way north. at one point it was on a direct collision course with the antarctic island of south georgia, potentially threatening to cut off vast populations of penguins and seals. but it was off that coast in the open ocean swell that the world's largest iceberg broke apart and now that it has officially been declared deceased the scientists who have been following itsjourney declared deceased the scientists who have been following its journey so they are surprised it survived as
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long as it did. they are surprised it survived as long as it did-— long as it did. this thing is incredibly _ long as it did. this thing is incredibly fragile _ long as it did. this thing is incredibly fragile and - long as it did. this thing is i incredibly fragile and flexible long as it did. this thing is - incredibly fragile and flexible as it moved around the oceans. it lasted for years like that as we moved around but eventually broke into four, five pieces and then those broke up again. but the endpoint for some of these fragments was quite interesting becausejust very suddenly overnight, theyjust fragmented into millions of little tiny pieces and you can see that on the satellite data. and that process i think is something that needs studying a little bit more because it might tell us a little bit about how ice shelves will break up in the future. �* ~j~ , , ., how ice shelves will break up in the future. �* , ., ., future. a-68 being the size of a small country — future. a-68 being the size of a small country made _ future. a-68 being the size of a small country made it _ future. a-68 being the size of a small country made it the - future. a-68 being the size of a small country made it the focus j future. a-68 being the size of a i small country made it the focus of global media attention. but the breaking away or carving of these giant icebergs is a natural part of the ebb and flow of the dynamic ice shelf. just hold journey and the breakup and demise of an iceberg of this scale, doesn't give you an insight into how climate change is going to affect the ice sheets at large in antarctica —— just whole
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journey? large in antarctica -- 'ust whole “ourne ? ., , journey? one event cannot tell us that much but _ journey? one event cannot tell us that much but what _ journey? one event cannot tell us that much but what we're - journey? one event cannot tell us that much but what we're looking | journey? one event cannot tell us l that much but what we're looking at is the regularity of these events. are they more frequent? an iceberg carving is a big factor in antarctica so if these events become more frequent than it is really important and we need to be looking at that. find important and we need to be looking at that. �* , ., . ~ �* ~i~ at that. and researching. while a-68 will be remembered _ at that. and researching. while a-68 will be remembered as _ at that. and researching. while a-68 will be remembered as a _ at that. and researching. while a-68 will be remembered as a social - at that. and researching. while a-68| will be remembered as a social media star that was visible from space, scientists will now be turning their attention to the newest chasm on the edge of the vast ice sheet and the next giant icebergs to set off on its own epicjourney. victoria gill, bbc news. astonishing pictures. a quarter the size of wales. crazy! here's louise with a look at the weather. morning, nothing crazy in the forecast, fairly straightforward, still quite quiet, have not seen much in the way of significant rain so far this april and it looks as
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though week three of april stays dry as well. norma over the next couple of days there will be a cooler spell arriving through the middle part of the week and that could bring a return to some overnight frosts so gardeners and growers, take note. —— warm—up. overthe gardeners and growers, take note. —— warm—up. over the next few hours we have seen this cloud rolling in off the atlantic, bringing some outbreaks of light, patchy rain into scotland and northern ireland today and elsewhere some clearing skies, early morning patchy mist and fog across england and wales should start to ease away and there is going to be a good slice of fun trying to come through. the brain is fairly light and budget into scotland and northern ireland this afternoon but it means a different afternoon but it means a different afternoon for you, more in the way of cloud around, cairns 10—12, but in the sunshine 15, 16 by the middle of the afternoon, and that was a pleasant out there but unfortunately if you are like me you suffer from hay fever with tree pollen it is high across england and wales, reaching its peak at the moment, so worth bearing in mind but we move
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the evening and overnight, you can see the rain is not moving very far very fast that we keep this north—west — south—east divide. england and wales largely fine and dry, some low cloud and mist rolling and often of the overnight lows perhaps not as cold as they have been. we still have that weather front out in the north—west, not moving very far at all and it is this high pressure welding, and it will weaken that weather front into the far north so we still have that threat of more cloud and nuisance rain just affecting the western isles, may be north—west of the great glen and maybe into western fringes of northern ireland but generally on monday like southerly breeze, plenty of sunshine coming through as we go through the day and temperatures peaking at 16 or 17 celsius with the sunshine quite strong now at this time of year so that will feel very nice indeed. there is that weather front still there, the high is gradually starting to move in and this high is going to be important because as the winds turn in a clockwise direction
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around that high, that means a return to the northerly flow and watch this, it will drive that cold air a little bit further south. perhaps not reaching the extreme south but it does mean that we are likely to see a change to the feel of our weather as we go through the week, all due to wind direction as it swings around when northerly or a north—westerly, temperatures just below par for this time of year. back to you. time now for the latest technology news — here's this week's edition of click. welcome to click. we're into the second year of the sofa shows now so it's time to mix it up a bit! can you see anything different? can you?
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can you, lara? i can't see anything. is it your hair again? no, it's not the hair — the hair is always changing. no, keep looking. keep looking. what can it be? i will, but what i do know is that you've been having all of the fun this week. i certainly have! i've been walking a dog! now, do you know, during lockdown, everyone seems to have bought a dog, right? i know. i actually signed up to the borrowmydoggie app, where you can look after someone else's, but no—one replied to my messages. seriously? what on earth did you write? well, i think the problem may have been that i was too focused on "this will be great fun for my eight—year—old" rather than "i am a person who you really want to look after your dog". both chuckle. no! you've really got to love a dog to borrow a dog, haven't you? no, well, this is a story about walking a dog, even if you don't really like dogs. the now famous frame of spot the dog, built by robot specialists boston dynamics. these youtube videos released by the company have been entertaining us for the past four or five years as the group have
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developed increasingly complex and animal—like movements. it's now possible, believe it or not, to take spot for a walk from your own home. all you need is one of these, and that's what i am going to do right now. so i can see spot's point of view and cody, who's filming us. i don't know why i'm waving to her — she can't see me. and if ijust waggle these sticks, i can actually... laughs. ..run straight towards cody and immediately, she picks the camera up because she thinks i'm gonna walk into her. 0k. so in theory, this is as easy as controlling any kind of in—game character. just with more serious consequences if i put it in the sea or something. the lag is nowhere near as bad as i thought it was going to be. over there is the golden gate bridge! look at that! oh, come on! he gets through the gate
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5,000 miles away! we have a person, so i can — i can move up and then i can kind of go into pose mode and play with him. i can wag my tail. giggles. i can do a downward dog and an upward dog. hello. and this thing does have collision detection on it so if i accidentally put it into a bench or a wall, the robot should stop beforehand. so up until now, spot has attracted the attention of the military and the police — they are controversially looking at using robotics in combat and in law enforcement — but now, boston dynamics has put spot up for sale to companies and developers. the idea is they buy one and they programme it to do whatever they want. the question is what do they want? let's talk to spot's real ownerjeff linnell. what are people's reactions to spot normally?
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i mean, they've all got their phones out here — look at that. is this their normal reaction? you know, it is. it's actually — it's pretty binary. dogs love it or hate it and people are fascinated by it and bring their phones out, or they completely ignore it and go on about their lives. it's one or the other. this — this dog here has — has cocked its ears. i'm gonna — i'm gonna try wagging my tail. spot's on sale for about $75,000 — or about £55,000 here in the uk — so my first question is who's going to buy it and what for? a key one is for inspections — if you need to go look at a gauge in a remote area, maybe it is on an oil derrick or some piece of infrastructure that's hard to access. obviously security is an application but spot is a general purpose mobility platform. it's the one robot that can kind of get anywhere, so what you want to do with it and what you want to put on it is really up to the end user, and people are coming up
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with all sort of things. one company that has already taken the lead of spot is cteh, a rescue service using spot to go into areas that are too dangerous for humans. spot is first and foremost about safety by distance. you know, we have people on the shoreline taking samples of water to be sent off for analysis and while we're doing that, if there's — if there's the fear that we need to be water sampling in the first place, then it is possible that even being in the area could be dangerous for those people. now with spot, we can do those same kind of things but before we've ever had to have a human suit up. all right, stairs mode. oh, my word! look! no way! he made it! i think we're gonna see them in our work life. you'll see them in warehouses, you'll see them in the back of a grocery store doing inventory, so it's starting to happen. reads: "do not enter. area closed to the public."
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do a little spin on the spot, why not? # do a little dance. # make a little move. one of the things we're interested in in putting this dog out there, right on the streets, is what do — what do people think of it? how do they react to it? here we go. i'm just going to do some tricks for him now because, you know, he wanted me to go and smell his hand, so i'm gonna wag my tail at him. wow! he dances! look at that! whoa! laughs. they're applauding me for doing tricks! spot's been tremendously successful for us. all sorts of folks are deploying spots and we have kind of a turnkey integration that lets a company get set up and have this capability right out of the box, so it is intuitive — i mean, you picked it up in 30 seconds and, you know, you've walked a couple of miles today with — with literally no training. jeff, thanks so much for letting me play with spot. i am happy to dog sit anytime.
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my pleasure! for the last few weeks, i've been putting four cloud gaming services to the test to see where we're at and whether cloud gaming could replace the pc or console. before i get into some comparisons, here's a quick look at the services i have been testing because, as you'll see, they're all very different in scope. playstation now has been around the longest and is a netflix—style, all—you—can—eat buffet of games. for 8.99 a month, you can stream more then 700 games to your ps4 or ps5 console or a windows pc, which sony says is the only way to access playstation—exclusive games without a playstation. xbox cloud gaming is currently in beta. it's a new part of xbox game pass ultimate — another all—you—can—eat buffet with hundreds of games for 10.99 a month. at the moment, if you play on an xbox or windows pc, you have to download the games as usual. but now, you can stream more than 100 of them to an android smartphone or tablet.
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nvidia's geforce now is a very different proposition. there's no all—inclusive library of games. instead, you can stream pc games you've already bought elsewhere on stores such as steam and epic games. it's aimed at pc gamers who might not have the latest graphics card, or want to play their pc games somewhere else, like on a phone or macbook. and then there's stadia from google. out of all the services, this is the closest to mimicking a full console experience without the console. it has its own store where you can buy individual games for a one—off fee and then stream them to your phone, tv, laptop, and more, for free. for 8.99 a month, pro subscribers can stream in ultra—high definition 4k and claim some free games every month. so as you can see, already we've got a huge range of different business models and a variety of supported devices and places to play. first things first, does this actually work? when you're gaming, any delay between pressing a button and seeing the action on screen is unacceptable. surely, putting your computer miles
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away in the cloud adds some latency? well, yes, it does, but honestly not enough that i could perceive. nvidia was the only company willing to put a figure on it for me. it said that sending your commands to the data centre and a picture being sent back adds about 20ms of latency. that might be important for competitive pro gamers but it's not really perceptible for casual play. everyone's experience will vary, but i never noticed any latency on any of the four services. you can see the action on the screen is reacting as soon as i move my finger on the touchpad. all of them have recommended minimum internet speeds to make sure everything runs smoothly and i was testing them on a 50 50megabits connection at home that could comfortably accommodate them. so let's look at some of those promised benefits of cloud gaming. and the first is top—of—the—range graphics without expensive equipment. at the moment, stadia is the only one offering 4k to pro subscribers, and it looks really crisp on my 4k tv. you do sometimes notice compression artefacts in the picture, like this blockiness. that wouldn't be there if the game
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was being rendered locally. now, that's the kind of thing you see sometimes when you're streaming movies and to be honest, it didn't spoil my enjoyment of the game. geforce now offers up 1080p high definition, which looks great on my tv as well, while the two all—you—can—eat services max out at 720p. i actually think that's fine for xbox, which is focusing on android phones at the moment and honestly, ps now looked absolutely fine on my pc, even though i was sat closer to the monitor. the graphics looked really sharp. in the race for everything to go 4k, we can forget that there's more to graphics than just resolution and honestly, i thought all four of these services looked great. geforce now subscribers also get ray—tracing enabled on some games for more realistic lighting effects. here's another game. look at the reflections on the floor with ray—tracing off and now on. everything just shines a bit more. for comparison, here's the same area on stadia without ray—tracing so you can see the difference. but, honestly, i think both look great and deliver on the promise of high quality graphics without a top—of the—range pc.
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obviously, the most important thing is the games. if you're already a playstation or xbox gamer, their cloud services can offer a lot of value. there's a lot to play, and there are blockbuster games on all four services. honestly, you would have to dig around and see what catches your eye and, as is always the way, you probably won't find all your favourite games on just one service. so is this the future of gaming? well, if playstation and xbox lean into this a bit more, i can see a future where people hop between different services on a month—to—month basis, playing the games they like and then maybe cancelling their subscription, like some people do with movie streaming services — although i'm not sure that would be in sony or microsoft's interests. what stadia has showed me is that putting a full console—style ecosystem into the cloud really can work, as long as your internet connection is good enough. that's it for the shortcut of click for this week. the full—length version is waiting for you on iplayer. as ever, you can keep up with the team on social media. find us on youtube, instagram, facebook and twitter at @bbcclick. thanks for watching
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and we'll see you soon. bye— bye.
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hello, this is breakfast with roger johnson and victoria fritts. it is approaching 630. the indian coronavirus mutation could scupper the uk's fight against coronavirus, but is according to a leading scientist and all that despite the lockdown and the vaccine programme leading to cases here falling to a seven—month low. 77 cases of the mutation have now been recorded in the uk. let's get the thoughts of one of our regular gps, doctor
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william. thank you forjoining me, doctor bird. let's start, if we pay, with what has happened over the last few days. the easing of restrictions and of course the first friday and saturday night out for lots of people. how concerned are you about the travelling that has been going on in the last couple of days? what kind of impact will it have on cases, do you think? i kind of impact will it have on cases, do you think?- kind of impact will it have on cases, do you think? i think there is no doubt _ cases, do you think? i think there is no doubt that _ cases, do you think? i think there is no doubt that there _ cases, do you think? i think there is no doubt that there is - cases, do you think? i think there is no doubt that there is going - cases, do you think? i think there is no doubt that there is going to | is no doubt that there is going to be a rise in people get cases coming up be a rise in people get cases coming up at the great thing is we have this sort of ring of protection around the people who are most vulnerable to the elderly and those who have long—term chronic missions because of the vaccination programme being so effective so although the cases will go up, it will be mostly younger people and we know that is not so much of a problem and therefore, yes, we will get the rise but the link between a rise of the vaccine, the virus coming through and getting infections and the deaths and hospitalisation has kind have been broken by the vaccination
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as we have heard so that is good news i guess we will get this rise. what we have to remember also is 0.1% of cases have actually been from outdoors, you know, from being outdoors is a much safer than being indoors and even being indoors now people have got their windows open and i know it is chilly in the evening but having your windows open and having the ventilation so if we can keep outdoors and just away from the huddling outdoors, you know, you have seen people huddle up in beer gardens et cetera which is bound to happen, it is still so much safer to be outdoors so that is i think reassuring so yes, we do predict a rise coming through in the summer but i think we will not see the dreadful kind of deaths and hospitalisation that we were all seeing earlier on. the hospitalisation that we were all seeing earlier on.— hospitalisation that we were all seeing earlier on. the anxiety does remain, people are still— seeing earlier on. the anxiety does remain, people are still worried - seeing earlier on. the anxiety does | remain, people are still worried and i wonder when people come to your surgery and they have their vaccination, what other things to people come to you with? what are they worried about? fist people come to you with? what are they worried about?— people come to you with? what are they worried about? at the moment, they worried about? at the moment, the amazing — they worried about? at the moment, the amazing thing _ they worried about? at the moment, the amazing thing is _ they worried about? at the moment, the amazing thing is that _ they worried about? at the moment, the amazing thing is that has - they worried about? at the moment, the amazing thing is that has not - the amazing thing is that has not
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been that kind of mass real concern and panic about the astrazeneca vaccine. orany and panic about the astrazeneca vaccine. or any of the vaccines causing the side effects. yes, people are aware of it and we have measured it up and accepted that yes, this is a risk that i want to take because we know that coronavirus is so much more dangerous, ten times more the risk of getting those clots than if you have the vaccination so that is really good. but people are now coming into the summer, some people have got the anxiety going out and i think there is going to be a lot of these people really not very confident in going out and i've said to them start slowly going out, start to kind of sea, get out the front door and go into the street. you don't need to go to the beer gardens or go to the shops yet. you can take yourtime gardens or go to the shops yet. you can take your time in doing that. i think for a lot of people that anxiety there is going to be a return to work and do normal things. but otherwise people are worried about lockdown the going to carry on, getting another wave again in
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the winter, and i've been hearing that life won't return to normal but i think that is a big concern and what is going to happen in the future, when will i be able to go on holiday and be able to meet my friends and go back to normal? and i think the answer is we are going to be having masks and social distancing probably for another year or two. distancing probably for another year ortwo. how distancing probably for another year or two. how far else it goes, i don't think we know yet. we don't know, that _ don't think we know yet. we don't know. that is _ don't think we know yet. we don't know, that is certainly _ don't think we know yet. we don't know, that is certainly true, - don't think we know yet. we don't know, that is certainly true, i - know, that is certainly true, i wonder also in the last week, we have had surgery testing for variance and one thing that has come back and certainly in terms of the press is what is going on in india —— surge testing. the indian strain, while only a variant of, under investigation and not a variant of concern, as we have seen with south africa for example, it is worrying, surely, to have the cases rising as they are in india and india is yet to be on the red travel ban list. yes, we are seeing now that it is
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becoming a variant of concern and obviously there is a huge amount of traffic between india and the uk. and that is a concern. all of the variance i think a concern. we are seeing france having at least 2000 people every day with the south african variant coming through so you know, you know, you almost feel inevitably that it is going to come across. but of course we are waiting for is the vaccination is to catch up. we know that the pfizer one can work very quickly, within six weeks they can create a new vaccine that will be able to combat these new variants, and also the astrazeneca a bit longer but they will be able to as well so we are really trying to do is can we catch up with these variants and get the vaccinations as a poster before the winter which will actually deal with them. if they come in much more quickly and take over —— booster. we will of course start to see the vaccination is not quite so effective. so a matter of time which is why they are putting so much effort, 200,000 pcr
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test into south london to try to combat the south african really nip it in the bud, and if there is indian figures coming up to say it is more infectious or more of a problem then of course we're going to have the same thing, just divide us time because inevitably virus always gets its way and we just have to be ahead of the game, that's all. and very briefly, if i may, yes, over half of uk adults have now had at least one dose of the vaccine but many of them are not of childbearing age so what are you saying to pregnant women who will be coming up next vaccinations? yes. pregnant women who will be coming up next vaccinations?— next vaccinations? yes, and that's actuall a next vaccinations? yes, and that's actually a question _ next vaccinations? yes, and that's actually a question that _ next vaccinations? yes, and that's actually a question that people - next vaccinations? yes, and that's i actually a question that people have been asking and we've got better guidance now so we know that if you're pregnant and you get covid—19 then you are too—3 times more likely to have a premature birth and there are other risk factors as well —— 2—3. so the data from the us shows during pregnancy you are completely safe, there is no extra risk at all in having the moderna or the
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pfizer—biontech vaccine. they do not have any figures for the astrazeneca one. so we cannot recommend that, it has not been recommended. so if you are pregnant, you can have the pfizer or moderna with really effectiveness and actually being really, really say. if you're thinking about becoming pregnant —— really, really safe. if you're thinking about becoming pregnant or you are post—natal you can have all three, pfizer, astrazeneca or moderna. so that is good news because we don't want to have those complications with pregnancy, because your immune system changes which is why things like chickenpox are worse so it is great we have those figures now to show how safe it is in pregnancy and it is going to prevent those premature births. thank you, doctor bird. let's catch up thank you, doctor bird. let's catch up with all of the sport, starting with fa cup semi—finals and one is on today but of course jane, chelsea? i on today but of course jane, chelsea?— on today but of course jane, chelsea? ~ , ., ., _ chelsea? i think it is fair to say it was not _ chelsea? i think it is fair to say it was not a — chelsea? i think it is fair to say it was not a classic _ chelsea? i think it is fair to say it was not a classic but - chelsea? i think it is fair to say it was not a classic but chelsea chelsea? i think it is fair to say i
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it was not a classic but chelsea by far the better team on the day and it means they will be going back to wembley to play in the final, playing against either leicester or southampton. manchester city's hopes of winning all four trophies this season were dashed after chelsea beat them 1—0 in the fa cup semi—final in wembley. beat them 1-0 in the fa cup semi-final in wembley. before the match that was _ semi-final in wembley. before the match that was one _ semi-final in wembley. before the match that was one minute's - semi-final in wembley. before the i match that was one minute's violence for prince philip, as there was in many sporting events yesterday. joe wilson reports. wembley in sunshine and in silence. for the duke of edinburgh. silence. two talented teams in good form competing to reach the fa cup final, dark blue of chelsea flowing until the finish. the manager who expected better. the second half again with kevin de in pain, the in manchester city's galaxy, his match was over
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and soon, chelsea were ahead, timo werner was quick, the city goal was drawn in and thus the goal was open. commentator: he puts the ball in the back of the manchester city net! 14} back of the manchester city net! 1-0 could have back of the manchester city net! 1—0 could have been two immediately, this time the goalkeeper was in the right place and they have the regrets. manchester city had their moments, belatedly, but in truth, not many. he has other competitions to consider but the fa cup opportunity is now chelsea's, as the season stretches towards trophies. wilson, bbc news. there was a crucial victory for newcastle in their bid to avoid relegation in the premier league, beating west ham 3—2 and are unknown point clears the drop zone. confirmation came yesterday that sheffield united are relegated following their defeat to wolves last night, joe scoring the only goal to send them down with six games to spare. the end of their two season stay in the top flight they
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managed to finish ninth last season and have only one form a game so far this campaign. norwich city have been promoted back to the premier league at the first time of asking. they lost 3—1 to bournemouth last night but had almost gone up because of other results. only watford, eight points behind them, can deny them the championship title. in scotland ranges in celtic go head—to—head today in the fourth round of the scottish cup, aberdeen are already through to the quarterfinals after penalty shoot—out went over livingston. ross scoring the decisive penalty after the match had finished 2—2 after extra time. not a bad first game in charge for the new manager stephen rice. two rugby, france will play england in next week's women's six nations final after a comprehensive victory over ireland. france, who are ranked fourth in the world, finished top of the pool and ran riot over the irish defence. two tries as they won by 56 points to
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15. ireland will face italy in a game for third place after they beat scotland in glasgow by 41 points— 20. to formula 1, lewis hamilton said he needed a perfect but a little bit more to be red bulls to pole position for this afternoon's a linear ammonia grand prix and he delivered just that in his mercedes to take pole by a whisker. sergio peris and max verstappen were second and third respectively in those red bull cars. all the's two valtteri bottas will start from eighth. they say all good things must come to an end and that was certainly the case for dan evans. his epic run in the singles at the monte carlo masters was stopped by stefan tsitsipas. evans had beaten novak djokovic on his way to the semi—finals. but stefan tsitsipas proved to be one step too far for the brutt as he was beaten in straight sets. he does have the chance of doubles success
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though, he is in today's final. great britain have an unassailable lead in their billiejean king cup play—off. that's following katie balter�*s win overjuliana olmos. the wind means the great britain progress to next yea r�*s wind means the great britain progress to next year's qualifier for the finals. and defending champion ronnie o'sullivan is through to the second round of the world snooker championship, a reduced crowd watched on at the crucible theatre in sheffield as part of a government pilot scheme to reintroduce spectators. o'sullivan showed his superiority over debutante mikejoyce. he took the match ten frames — four, finishing with three successive centuries. that is your sport. thank you, jane. now, this weekend marks 70 years since the peak district became a national park. it was the first in britain, allowing people to walk on moreland without being prosecuted. judy hobson has a story.
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this landscape has been protect the 70 years for all of us. —— in protected. 555 square miles of natural beauty. 50 protected. 555 square miles of natural beauty.— protected. 555 square miles of natural beauty. so this is heading u . natural beauty. so this is heading u- greens natural beauty. so this is heading up greens box. — natural beauty. so this is heading up greens box, up _ natural beauty. so this is heading up greens box, up to _ natural beauty. so this is heading up greens box, up to the - natural beauty. so this is heading up greens box, up to the top - natural beauty. so this is heading up greens box, up to the top of l natural beauty. so this is heading i up greens box, up to the top of kin discount. �* , ., ., , ., ., , discount. and it is a “ob of rangers like anna to help _ discount. and it is a “ob of rangers like anna to help us— discount. and it is a job of rangers like anna to help us appreciate - discount. and it is a job of rangers like anna to help us appreciate it i like anna to help us appreciate it —— kin discount. brute like anna to help us appreciate it -- kin discount.— like anna to help us appreciate it -- kin discount. we are kind of the link between _ -- kin discount. we are kind of the link between the _ -- kin discount. we are kind of the link between the landscape - -- kin discount. we are kind of the link between the landscape and - link between the landscape and visitors and residents, i guess —— kinder scout. it is about advising people that are coming out and making sure they are having a good time and not doing any damage. the first ranger i think had a horse so i don't have a horse, that has changed quite a bit. although i do have a pick up truck so i cannot complain. i would say they are all men at the start. and now it is kind of 50-50.
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men at the start. and now it is kind of 50—50. 50 men at the start. and now it is kind of 50-50. , .,, men at the start. and now it is kind of 50-50. y ., ., ., of 50-50. so why was the national ark of 50-50. so why was the national park created? _ of 50-50. so why was the national park created? this _ of 50-50. so why was the national park created? this is _ of 50-50. so why was the national park created? this is one - of 50-50. so why was the national park created? this is one of - of 50-50. so why was the national park created? this is one of the i park created? this is one of the most popular areas of the peak district butjust imagine before the national park was formed, you are not allowed to walk across fantastic open moorland like this. the not allowed to walk across fantastic open moorland like this.— open moorland like this. the cpra are now fighting _ open moorland like this. the cpra are now fighting for _ open moorland like this. the cpra are now fighting for tracts - open moorland like this. the cpra are now fighting for tracts of - open moorland like this. the cpra are now fighting for tracts of land | are now fighting for tracts of land to be used as national parks. other countries have their national parks in america's yosemite.— in america's yosemite. workers in cities like manchester _ in america's yosemite. workers in cities like manchester and - in america's yosemite. workers in l cities like manchester and sheffield needed access to the countryside but the more is mystically preserved for grass shooting. the mass press passed on kinder scout in 1922 show the strength of feeling with the people should have access to this landscape. the same year the rights of way act was passed. £311" landscape. the same year the rights of way act was passed.— of way act was passed. our town arks of way act was passed. our town parks have _ of way act was passed. our town parks have to — of way act was passed. our town parks have to be _ of way act was passed. our town parks have to be kept. _ of way act was passed. our town parks have to be kept. so - of way act was passed. our town parks have to be kept. so let - of way act was passed. our town parks have to be kept. so let us| parks have to be kept. so let us have the great open country. 19 years later, the peak district becomes britain's first national park, walkers can now stray off footpaths without fear of prosecution. it
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footpaths without fear of prosecution.— footpaths without fear of prosecution. footpaths without fear of rosecution. . , , , ., ., prosecution. it was hugely important for the public — prosecution. it was hugely important for the public to _ prosecution. it was hugely important for the public to be _ prosecution. it was hugely important for the public to be able _ prosecution. it was hugely important for the public to be able to _ prosecution. it was hugely important for the public to be able to roam, - for the public to be able to roam, to be able to enjoy the countryside on the doorstep. it was a green lung for those people. the on the doorstep. it was a green lung for those people.— for those people. the peak district is britain's most _ for those people. the peak district is britain's most accessible - is britain's most accessible national park, more than 13 million people visit it every year. 20 million live within one hour's travel. and while here they can enjoy 1600 miles of public rights of way. abs. enjoy 1600 miles of public rights of wa , �* , . ., enjoy 1600 miles of public rights of wa. ., enjoy 1600 miles of public rights of wa. way. a significant national park is -- the peak _ way. a significant national park is -- the peak district _ way. a significant national park is -- the peak district national- way. a significant national park is -- the peak district national park| —— the peak district national park is in my opinion more relevant today in its entirety of its 70 year existence. i in its entirety of its 70 year existence-— in its entirety of its 70 year existence. . ., , ., in its entirety of its 70 year existence. . . , ., ., existence. i am really grateful to be able to have these places - existence. i am really grateful to be able to have these places to l be able to have these places to explore — be able to have these places to explore and see wildlife and get off the beaten track. this explore and see wildlife and get off the beaten track.— the beaten track. this is the legacy of those who _ the beaten track. this is the legacy of those who campaigned - the beaten track. this is the legacy of those who campaigned for- the beaten track. this is the legacy of those who campaigned for the i of those who campaigned for the right to roam, so all of us can appreciate this precious landscape. judy hobson, bbc news. lovely pa rt lovely part of the world, the peak
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district. you may think that this programme at this time of morning at quarter to seven on a sunday morning isjust thrown quarter to seven on a sunday morning is just thrown together and there is no sequence to it and no theme to it but at that! anyone would think this was planned, louise! what do you need when you are celebrating 70 years, the 70th birthday? you need sunshine. this is the peak district yesterday but there is a repeat of formants today so not bad at all. getting a little warmer over the next few days. not for long but that does mean if you were out taking daily exercise and visiting friends and family you can enjoy a stop a warm start to the week ahead, call from mid week onwards but still a lot of dry weather. worth remembering as we get the cool weather returning, so too will the overnight frost. for the here and now, most of us are starting off once again dry, settled
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and sunny and not as chilly as yesterday but there is a weather front and it produces light patchy rain into scotland and northern ireland today and maybe a little more cloud into the far north—west of wales through the afternoon but most of us will stay dry settled and sunny once again. the temperatures are starting to respond now, 15, maybe 16 degrees. as we go through the evening... sorry, let me tell you about the pollen. if you are out working remember —— walking, remember tree pollen is high across england and wales. i am a sufferer�*s make sure you have medication with you. a little bit of low cloud, mist murk rolls in. not as cold as it has been and you can see that clearly. further west underneath the weather front temperatures will hold up at seven or eight degrees. it is still there on monday, not moving very
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fast at all. this area of high pressure is trying to come in and knocking on the door but it will take its time and in doing so. on monday the low cloud may take its time to melt away but it will do so and, again, largely fine and sunny and, again, largely fine and sunny and some sunshine extending up into parts of eastern scotland on the east of northern ireland as our weather front affects the western fringes. 16— 17 degrees. the high pressure then starts to push in for tuesday and the circulates in a clockwise direction around the high so unfortunately that means is that high drifts across us there is a change in wind direction. more of a northerly and once again that will dry slightly colder air further south. motley extreme self that will mean a change to the feel of things as we go through the middle part of the week. noticeably colder especially on the exposed coast.
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let's have a look at the latest movie releases now. hello and welcome to the film review. i am filling in and reviewing the releases for this week. the revenge thriller promising young woman is one of the most hotly anticipated releases of the year, and it's finally streaming in the uk this weekend. you just forgot your birthday. you don't want to have a party, you don't want to see your friends. you know i don't have any friends, mum.
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don'tjoke about it, don't. do you know how strange this is? you, you're still living here at home, working in that stupid coffee shop since you and nina dropped out of med school! you're out all night long doing god only knows what. 0k... i mean, you don't have any boyfriend, you don't have any friends! mum, you should've saved all of that for my birthday card. carey mulligan stars as cassie, a medical school dropout living in ohio. she works in a coffee shop and secretly spends her nights trolling bars and nightclubs, apparently intoxicated. when she's invariably taken home by an opportunistic man, she picks her moment to sober up, and he gets a shock. what are you doing? # i was busy thinking �*bout boys...# i won't spoil what happens next. much of promising young woman's power is in its surprises and a bit of misdirection. it's a wild ride that mixes dark comedy and a zippy score
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with a serious feminist message. i'm so sorry i didn't go with her. well, i'm sorry too. bafta winning and oscar—nominated writer/director, emerald fennell, tackles territory that's both important and uncomfortable. cassie calls men and women to task on their past behaviour, whether they were perpetrators or silent bystanders. thematically, there are shades of the jodie foster star of the accused here. i think you gave me a fake number the other day. doesn't sound like me. in terms of tone, this has more in common with 90s noir like to die for and the last seduction, a genre that's having a bit of a resurgence at the moment. promising young woman gives it a colourful spin. i like to call it bubble gum noir. this is a candy coloured pop soundtrack confection with music video moments. it's no surprise it's produced by margot robbie, who produced and starred in i, tonya and birds of prey. as ever, british actress mulligan
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fares well in an american role and brings the right mix of intelligence, dry wit and vulnerability. and the supporting cast members are meticulously chosen. promising young woman isn't perfect, some of the tonal shifts didn't work for me and had mixed feelings about the ending. but it tackles crucial issues around consent and contemporary culture in a very entertaining format. and it stands up to multiple viewings. it's on sky cinema and the now streaming service. next up, another darkly funny feature from a debut female director, the comedy horror i blame society. this is where i would bury stalin and murder her, if i did it. all i have to do is roll her into the grave, cover it up and make sure i take everything with me. yeah, ijust sort of wish there was that strong female lead. yeah, yeah. someone likeable. writer—director gillian wallace horvat also stars as an indie
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film—maker on a mission when her friends tell her that she'd make a good murderer, she's weirdly flattered and intrigued. gillian starts making a documentary explaining who she'd off first and how. but soon, she starts killing for real. and so what begins as an offbeat meta—comedy about guerrilla film—making becomes a satirical horror. whispers: i'm living my best life. this lacks both the polish and the budget of promising young woman, and its heroine is defiantly unsympathetic, but it still raises pertinent questions about the way women are perceived in the media and the film industry. so we have a bunch of projects set up, actually, here with strong female leads. well, i mean, i could definitely come up with some ideas. we wouldn't need you to, we already have a bunch. | gillian has hilariously awkward meetings with production companies who are clearly looking for a token woman to hire. these scenes feel like they come from a very real place. cool not all of the films
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extremities pay off. this had me laughing one minute and wincing the next. but it's definitely a talking piece, and one for fans of dark comedy horrors like alice lowe's prevenge. it's on digitalfrom monday the 19th of april. you're not going to stop me. onto sci—fi and the anthology film portal. who are you? i'm in some kind of hallucination that looks like i'm back in my apartment. there are copies of myself, clearly entities created by the door. what did you call me? one of the copies is engaging in a conversation with me. yeah, there you go again. what? you think you're the real vince? i'm getting psychosis beeps. you really think you're the real vince? i need help! what makes you so sure? which one of us is wearing the suit, smart guy? portal imagines a world where huge mysterious alien doors have appeared around the globe.
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some people feel strangely compelled to walk through them and are sucked into unknown territory. i think this is a good time to go. it's a reasonably engaging set up, and i enjoyed the first chapter set in high school detention, think the breakfast club meets the faculty. the tone shifts closer to flatliners in the second film, which starsjosh peck as a volunteer venturing inside the portal. i said, i got the suit. and there is a definite whiff of close encounters in the third part, which sees a scientist trying to communicate with the aliens. portal may not be that original, but it is intriguing. though the episodic style hampers the tension, and there is little resolution in the finale. it's more of a tantalising peak than a satisfying journey. portal is on digital and dvd from the 19th of april. if you're in a contemplative mood, may i suggest the documentary henry glassie: field work.
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what i do is i don't study people at all. i stand with people and study the things that they create. that's what interests me. what do they choose to present as emblems of their being? henry glassie is an american folklorist and ethnologist, but this film from pat collins is less about his life and more about his subjects. this doc patiently observes the rituals of working artists in brazil, turkey, north carolina and ireland. these are practitioners who spend most of their waking hours lovingly creating everything from rugs to religious icons. they aren't necessarily famous and even less likely to be rich, but they're incredibly talented.
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a momentary fulfillment of what it is to be human. this is what you might call a mood piece. once i adjusted to its very leisurely pace, ifound a quiet enjoyment in observing these master craftspeople with a consuming devotion to their work. all i have to do is put myself in the way of other people and they'll bump into me and teach me. it's on digital and virtual screenings now. now to modern—day tokyo and the adoption melodrama, true mothers. based on a novel by mizuki tsujimura and directed by the acclaimed japanese film—maker naomi kawase,
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this initially centres on a middle—class couple. when their young adopted son gets into trouble at school, they're concerned, implicitly worried that he might have inherited bad genes. the story then flashes back to their struggles to conceive and the decision to use an adoption association that takes in young expectant mothers — one of these is hikari. another flashback then takes us to hikari's teenaged romance and her contrastingly quick accidental conception. true mothers has the kind of literary narrative structure that can work better on the page, but i went willingly to unexpected places, absorbed by the characters and a hint of mystery. kawase has a delightful attention to visual detail, and her cast really delivers. both the adoptive mother and natural mother are fairly internal characters,
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but their expressions speak volumes. it also portrays male vulnerability with empathy. i can't recall the last time i saw a drama where two of the male leads broke down crying in separate scenes. true mothers is a sensitive film that ponders on compassion, parenthood, privilege, identity and more. it's on curzon home cinema now. finally, if you are looking for something to take your mind off the pandemic, then do not watch final days — a thriller about a man trying to sit out an apocalypse in isolation. tv: emergency broadcast... a remake of the korean film alive, it stars tyler posey as aiden, a single guy whose party lifestyle is suddenly curtailed by a zombie epidemic.
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stuck in his apartment with a limited supply of food and water, he has to barricade out a steady stream of flesh hungry neighbours. aiden eventually finds something to live for when he spies a beautiful neighbour across the courtyard, but getting to her is a challenge. i'll come to you. how? this feels like a fairly low—rent horror thriller, but the survival details have a certain morbid interest, and things improved dramatically when donald sutherland enters the picture, as you can imagine. you're not screaming. you're not either, but you've got blood there. oh...i cut myself on something. ultimately, there is enough suspense if you are in the mood for cheap thrills. it's on dvd and digital now. thanks for watching the film review with me, anna smith. i'll be back next week. meantime, stay safe. i'm not really looking to date anyone at the moment. right, yeah. me neither.
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would you be interested in a friendship, and i'm secretly pining for you the whole time? good morning. welcome to breakfast with rogerjohnson and victoria fritz. our headlines today: reflections after the day the queen and the nation bid farewell to the duke of edinburgh. one of the defining images — her majesty sitting alone as she said goodbye to her husband of 73 years. the royal family will continue to grieve this week, although the period of national mourning has come to an end. also this morning, going out: a first saturday night on the town after the further easing
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of england's lockdown restrictions. mancunian have turned manchester into a holiday spirit. the melting of the world's biggest iceberg, once a quarter of the size of wales. good morning. it's a dry and sunny day across england and wales and a little warmer than yesterday. further north, there's more in the way of cloud and some light, patchy rain for scotland and northern ireland. all the details coming up shortly. it's sunday 18th april. our top story: the royal family has honoured the duke of edinburgh's "humour and humanity" as he was laid to rest at st george's chapel in windsor. the service was restrained, in line with the duke's wishes and coronavirus guidelines. the queen sat alone, just days before she turns 95. princes william and harry were seen chatting together as they left the service. the royal family will continue to mourn the loss of the prince philip this week, while the period of national
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mourning has come to an end. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell looks back on a funeral that was watched by millions of people around the world. drawn up in the spring sunshine on the castle's quadrangle were the military detachments. they stood with heads bowed and rifles reversed. the scale was smaller than would have been the case without the pandemic — though that's hardly something that would've troubled the duke. he, after, all had choreographed much of what was to follow. the land rover hearse, which the duke had helped to design, moved to its position by the state entrance.
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the duke's coffin was borne on the shoulders of a bearer party from the grenadier guards. the coffin was covered with duke's personal standard and surmounted with his sword and naval cap, and a wreath from the queen. with great care, it was placed on the hearse. behind the hearse were members of the royal family, who were walking to the chapel, headed by the prince of wales. a royal salute sounded and the first sight of the queen, accompanied by a lady in waiting, in the state bentley, taking position as the order was given for the procession to step off. yells unintelligibly. bell tolls. band plays.
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bell tolls. close by was one of the horse—drawn carriages the duke had taken such pleasure in driving. on the seat, his cap and gloves. among the members of the family walking behind the coffin were princes william and harry — the focus of so much attention — walking with their cousin peter phillips between them. bell tolls. the procession wound its way past the castle's round tower. by the side entrance to st george's chapel, other members of the royal family stood with their heads bowed. the queen made her way into the chapel, pausing to look back as the hearse
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moved on down the hill. on the wreath of white roses and lilies on the coffin was a card, on which were the handwritten words "in loving memory". before they entered the chapel, the bearer party paused as a field gun signalled the start of a one—minute silence. the service began with a tribute to the duke from the dean of windsor. we have been inspired by his unwavering loyalty to our queen by his service to the nation and the commonwealth, by his courage, fortitude and faith. the small congregation sat in its family groups. the queen sat alone. so did prince harry. after the prayers and the commendation, a distinctive touch typical of the duke —
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royal marine buglers sounded the royal navy's call to action stations. and finally, at the end of her husband's funeral, the choir sang the national anthem. seldom can its words have had greater poignancy. # god save the queen. the family mourners departed, a widowed queen to her castle, and two brothers, william and harry, walked away together, alongside the duchess of cambridge. the duke of edinburgh is gone but the brothers know that he would have wanted the family to move on and for differences to be healed. nicholas witchell, bbc news.
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that image of the queen sitting alone in the chapel is on the front page of many of the newspapers this sunday morning and let's go live to windsor now. our correspondent helena wilkinson is at windsorfor us. helena, although the official mourning period is now over, this is still a time for reflection for many? of course mentioning the queen, it has no end for her, she has lost her husband. ~ ,,., , has no end for her, she has lost her husband. ~ , , ., ., husband. absolutely, and the royal famil will husband. absolutely, and the royal family will continue _ husband. absolutely, and the royal family will continue to _ husband. absolutely, and the royal family will continue to observe - husband. absolutely, and the royal family will continue to observe a i family will continue to observe a further week's mourning after what was an intimate family funeral yesterday here at windsor castle. we also expect the flags which were lowered to half—mast after the duke died last friday, both will be raised at some stage later this morning but the funeral here yesterday, again, it was intimate, it felt very personal indeed for the family but of course, watched by millions of people across the world
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and we saw, didn't we, so many personal touches because the duke spent years planning his own funeral, and the land rover that carried his coffin yesterday to the songs that were sung in the chapel service but as you mentioned there, the most striking and saddest picture from the funeral itself, the queen, because of covid—19 restrictions, she was unable to sit close to any members of her family. she did not have anyone to hold her hand or comfort her as she faced her husband's coffin and said goodbye to her husband of 73 years yesterday and last night, royal family tweeted this poignant photograph of the duke of edinburgh, some hours after the funeral service yesterday. prince harry and prince william, as nick said, spoke after the service as they were walking through the castle grounds. of course, we do not know what the brothers said to each other but perhaps a fitting end to the
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funeral yesterday and, no doubt, something the duke of edinburgh would have very much wanted. helena, thank ou, would have very much wanted. helena, thank you. we — would have very much wanted. helena, thank you, we will— would have very much wanted. helena, thank you, we will continue _ would have very much wanted. helena, thank you, we will continue to - thank you, we will continue to reflect on yesterday's events at windsor during the course of the programme this morning. the prime minister could lose the support of the red wall voters who backed him in 2019, unless he resolves the row about lobbying. that's according to a senior conservative mp. sir bernard jenkin says the lines between public service and private gain have become blurred. our political correspondent nick eardleyjoins us now. good to see you, good morning. he says they were blurred but when will a everclear? abs, says they were blurred but when will a everclear?— says they were blurred but when will a everclear?_ i i a everclear? a good question! i think -- when _ a everclear? a good question! i think -- when were _ a everclear? a good question! i think -- when were they - a everclear? a good question! i think -- when were they ever l a everclear? a good question! i- think -- when were they ever clear. think —— when were they ever clear. there has been a soul—searching exercise among some mps about what has happened over the last few weeks, that steady stream of stories about lobbying, about potential
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conflict of interest, from people in government when it comes to their relationship with private companies and i think what you're hearing from sirjenkins this morning is a reflection of the nervousness that some conservatives have —— jenkin. he is talking about is having a corrosive impact on public trust in politics and politicians and saying if you look at the voters who backed the tories for the first time because of brexit, how are they going to react if suddenly, there are story after story about potential conflicts of interest in government? the few in number ten is that they have investigations going on. i think there is nine different probes going on into both lobbying and conflicts of interest so you know, there is some way in which westminster is looking at itself to see what is going on but also remember there are those elections in three weeks in england, scotland
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and wales and i think there are some politicians who are nervous that this could have an impact on them and, more broadly, on the issue of public trust in politics if these stories keep coming.- public trust in politics if these stories keep coming. thank you very much, nick. — more than 200,000 new covid cases have been recorded in india for three days in a row, taking the total number to nearly 14.5 million. it makes it the world's second worst—infected country behind the united states. india has also suffered one of the highest number of fatalities. the number of covid—19 deaths around the world has risen to more than three million. the latest figures show that most fatalities have been in the united states, followed by brazil, mexico and india. the two russian men suspected of carrying out a poison attack in salisbury in 2018 have now been linked to an explosion at an arms depot in the czech republic. the czech authorities have issued pictures of alexander petrov and ruslan boshirov, who they say were in the country when the blast happened in 2014, leaving two people dead.
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a senior russian politician called the claim absurd. china and the us say they are committed to working together and with other countries on tackling climate change. it comes after several meetings between the us climate envoy john kerry and his chinese counterpart in shanghai last week. our energy and environment analyst roger harraben reports. china is currently the world's number one polluter with its massive carbon emissions from coal. but the us is most blame historically for the emissions that are heating the atmosphere. the superpowers must work together on the climate. since the controversy over china's treatments over it eager minority, us—china relations have been icy —— uigher. the climate envoyjohn kerry has been in china, urging superpower cooperation to reduce emissions. the
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round table a symbol of working together. us will announce its plant emissions reductions at a joe biden client and summit next week. he admitted... —— climate summit. it is admitted... -- climate summit. it is not easy for— admitted... -- climate summit. it is not easy for any _ admitted... —— climate summit. it 3 not easy for any country. we all face this challenge. but europe has set a goal of 55% reduction. the uk has set a goal of 68% reduction. so we are evaluating right now what we ourselves can do.— ourselves can do. china is already the world's _ ourselves can do. china is already the world's top — ourselves can do. china is already the world's top new _ ourselves can do. china is already the world's top new factor - ourselves can do. china is already the world's top new factor of i ourselves can do. china is alreadyj the world's top new factor of wind turbines and solar panels. the joint statement said finance must shift towards renewable, away from coal. environmentalists stay the statement is positive but warned that tackling climate change will need all nations to strive much harder —— environmentalists say. roger harraben, bbc news. it is almost 14 minutes past seven.
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the duke of edinburgh's funeral was nothing like the grand ceremony that had been planned — only 30 mourners were allowed to attend, in line with covid restrictions. but those who knew him say the scaled—back event was something prince philip would have preferred. author and historian professor kate williams joins us now. good morning and thank you for taking the time to talk to us. iloathed taking the time to talk to us. what were our taking the time to talk to us. what were your impressions _ taking the time to talk to us. what were your impressions of- taking the time to talk to us. hast were your impressions of the funeral? it was a moving day. everything was planned to the nth degree from the land rover that carried his coffin to the military parades including the choreography we had seen and it really was a sight to behold on saturday with the respect that the armed forces had for the duke and the respect he had for the duke and the respect he had for the duke and the respect he had for the armed forces. everything was
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planned, the readings, the music, but what was not planned, the last thing anybody ever wanted was that moving image, the vision of the queen sitting alone and unable to have anyone to comfort her while she mourned her husband and that was due to covid restrictions. for that she had been in a bubble with her husband and is now in no longer such a bubble. it was a stark reminder for so many people in this country and across the world of those we have lost over this past year and we have lost over this past year and we have been unable to mourn as we wish. fish have been unable to mourn as we wish. �* , ,., have been unable to mourn as we wish. �* , , , wish. an interesting point because as we said a _ wish. an interesting point because as we said a few— wish. an interesting point because as we said a few times, _ wish. an interesting point because as we said a few times, that i wish. an interesting point because| as we said a few times, that image of the queen on the front pages of the papers this morning but it is something that many people will empathise with after the last 12 months we have had with coronavirus. a few people on the radio was saying they thought maybe the queen would have quite appreciated being able to be alone with her thoughts in the
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chapel. i be alone with her thoughts in the cha el. ., , be alone with her thoughts in the chael. . , .., . , chapel. i have seen commentary sa in: chapel. i have seen commentary saying that _ chapel. i have seen commentary saying that she _ chapel. i have seen commentary saying that she is _ chapel. i have seen commentary saying that she is the _ chapel. i have seen commentary saying that she is the queen i chapel. i have seen commentary| saying that she is the queen and chapel. i have seen commentary i saying that she is the queen and she is 94, couldn't they find a way, perhaps sophie of wessex or a lady in waiting who came with her in the car? but i think the queen felt strongly that she wanted to make it very clear that there were no separate rules for the royal family. she would sit as others would have to sit in the united kingdom and i think the royalfamily to sit in the united kingdom and i think the royal family were very grateful that at least they got to have 30 people. there were periods during the last year when you could not even have a proper funeral at all. and although it is a shame for those who could not come such as the duchess of sussex and many members of the family could not come, why do members of the family, perhaps there may be able to be a bigger commemoration after covid times where members of the dukes charities and organisations and other people who worked with the duke of
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edinburgh and members of the wider family could commemorate him. as the queen has been bubbling with the duke herself throughout the year and she had been, her rooms were close to where his coffin was lying in the chapel, she has spent a lot of time with him and it was a chance for her to say goodbye but in front of all the cameras and those pictures are captured, there is no moment of privacy when you are a royal. you mention some _ privacy when you are a royal. you mention some of _ privacy when you are a royal. you mention some of the _ privacy when you are a royal. you mention some of the nice touches, that land rover, one thing that many people have remarked on was the riding carriage, the glove, the hat, the little red tub that he used to keep sugar lumps in to give to the horses. ile keep sugar lumps in to give to the horses. ., .. ., horses. he did love carriage riding and what i always _ horses. he did love carriage riding and what i always found _ horses. he did love carriage riding and what i always found striking i horses. he did love carriage riding i and what i always found striking was that he took a carriage riding after he finished with polo but every time i see him, it can be a scary sport. he loved it and didn't write to the end. we would often see him trundling around in a carriage and i
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think it was a sense of freedom. the carriage was there and he loved it and the ponies and all these private touches. so a beautifulfuneralfor the consort of the queen of the united kingdom and the personal reminiscence about a father and and great—grandfather. reminiscence about a father and and great-grandfather.— reminiscence about a father and and great-grandfather. some people have made comment _ great-grandfather. some people have made comment about _ great-grandfather. some people have made comment about the _ great-grandfather. some people have made comment about the duke i great-grandfather. some people have made comment about the duke of- made comment about the duke of cambridge in the duke of sussex talking to each other. i suppose the one thing, and you would not want to make much of it because at the end of the day it was about the duke of edinburgh yesterday, and that is absolutely pre—eminent. does with many families, a time of morning, a funeral, is a chance to come together and if there are differences in a family it is a chance to try and put them behind you and that is very much what the duke of edinburgh would have wanted. that is very true. and certainly the footage that showed harry moving up and talking to william was very
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striking. we don't know what he was saying and we believe that possibly the royalfamily, the immediate royalfamily the royalfamily, the immediate royal family may have had some sort of wake perhaps outside which is within the rules, for the duke and there may have been a chance for further conversation then. but certainly harry said he had not heard much from his father and there had been a lot of zooming with the queen and the duke of edinburgh but not so much with prince charles and prince william but he felt he would like to speak to them more and have more conversations. so perhaps that is something that will happen. , certainly, as you say you cannot read too much into it. you cannot say that things are all sorted out but perhaps a lot of water has gone under the bridge and harry and meghan did not feel supported in the family and that will not change overnight stop it is good to see you. overnight stop it is good to see ou. ., ~' overnight stop it is good to see ou. ., ~ , ., overnight stop it is good to see ou. . ~' i., ., overnight stop it is good to see ou. . ~ ., ., ~ ., , overnight stop it is good to see it was a beautiful day yesterday for many of us.
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louise is here to tell us if we can expect more of the same. good morning. more of the same for most of us is the answer to that. look at this beautiful start in suffolk this morning. but if, like me you are sniffling with itchy highs when you wake up first thing in the morning, unfortunately the tree pollen is at its peak at this time of year so that is high across england and wales today. not quite the case further north because we have rain around. moving its way into western scotland as you can see from northern ireland just pushing towards the isle of man as well and we may see a little more cloud encroaching across the far west of wales. but today it will be dry, settled and sunny and maybe even in eastern scotland clinging onto sunshine until the end of the afternoon. in terms of the feel of the weather with a light southerly breeze, damages will respond and we may see 15 16 breeze, damages will respond and we may see 1516 degrees is a high today, obviously not quite as warm
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underneath the cloud and the light patchy rain. the rain will continue through the night tonight but retreat a little further north and in actual fact with some clear skies we could see some mist and fog rolling in across parts of the vale of yorktown towards the east midlands into the lincolnshire area as well. notice chillier started the night is just past and certainly not as cold in the north—west with a cloud lingers. that weatherfront as cold in the north—west with a cloud lingers. that weather front is really going very fast at all. so we do it all again on monday although the rain perhaps not quite a significantjust lodging western significant just lodging western fringes of significantjust lodging western fringes of scotland. there will be more cloud to the north of scotland and maybe into the west of northern ireland but generally we keep that dry, settled and sunny thing going and a little warmer as well. temperatures could reach 17 degrees. 63 fahrenheit by monday afternoon. things will start to change, however, with this area of high pressure. it keeps things dry, the high—pressure, but the wind
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direction will swing around to a north—westerly or northerly for some and that means the cool air will push its way steadily south. haps not reaching the extreme south but through the middle part of the week you will notice that these friends to the feel of the weather. don't get used to the spring sunshine and warmth, keep the sunny weather for many but a noticeable difference to the feel of the weather, particularly after factoring in the strength of the direction of the wind. it's the first weekend since lockdown eased in england and there might be a few sore heads this morning, after an evening wining and dining in the sunshine with family and friends. adam mcclean was out in manchester speaking to people about their first saturday night out in 2021. in alleys, sidestreets and on pavements, pubs, bars and restaurants are open for business. tables and chairs here are spread
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out and full of happy customers. it has been absolutely electric. we could be out in a garden somewhere but we are not. we are here giving local business our money.- but we are not. we are here giving local business our money. cheers! we aueued for local business our money. cheers! we queued for two _ local business our money. cheers! we queued for two hours _ local business our money. cheers! we queued for two hours to _ local business our money. cheers! we queued for two hours to get _ local business our money. cheers! we queued for two hours to get in - local business our money. cheers! we queued for two hours to get in here. l queued for two hours to get in here. we got _ queued for two hours to get in here. we got to— queued for two hours to get in here. we got to the front of the queue and tbought— we got to the front of the queue and thought we cannot leave now so it was worth — thought we cannot leave now so it was worth the wait.— was worth the wait. everyone is ha - . was worth the wait. everyone is happy- we _ was worth the wait. everyone is happy- we have _ was worth the wait. everyone is happy. we have people - was worth the wait. everyone is happy. we have people around| was worth the wait. everyone is i happy. we have people around us. everyone _ happy. we have people around us. everyone is— happy. we have people around us. everyone is allowed _ happy. we have people around us. everyone is allowed out _ happy. we have people around us. everyone is allowed out and - happy. we have people around us. everyone is allowed out and there i everyone is allowed out and there are blue _ everyone is allowed out and there are blue skies. _ everyone is allowed out and there are blue skies. what— everyone is allowed out and there are blue skies. what more - everyone is allowed out and there are blue skies. what more could i everyone is allowed out and there i are blue skies. what more could you want? _ are blue skies. what more could you want? for— are blue skies. what more could you want? ., ,., ., , are blue skies. what more could you want? ., ., , ., are blue skies. what more could you want? ., ., . ., . are blue skies. what more could you want? ., ., . ., want? for some it was a chance to relax in the _ want? for some it was a chance to relax in the sun _ want? for some it was a chance to relax in the sun and _ want? for some it was a chance to relax in the sun and for _ want? for some it was a chance to relax in the sun and for others, i relax in the sun and for others, return to work. it relax in the sun and for others, return to work.— relax in the sun and for others, return to work. it was exciting 'ust to know that fl return to work. it was exciting 'ust to know that the i return to work. it was exciting 'ust to know that the stuff i to know that the stuff we have had on furlough have been brought back and everyone is really excited and working to get money in the back pocket. working to get money in the back nocket. . , ., , working to get money in the back nocket. . , , ., pocket. manchester has become a orca. pocket. manchester has become a orca- they — pocket. manchester has become a orca- they are _ pocket. manchester has become a orca. they are in _ pocket. manchester has become a orca. they are in the _ pocket. manchester has become a orca. they are in the holiday i orca. they are in the holiday spirit — orca. they are in the holiday spirit we _ orca. they are in the holiday spirit. we gave out 350 pavement licenses _ spirit. we gave out 350 pavement licenses to — spirit. we gave out 350 pavement licenses to all the bars but the virus _ licenses to all the bars but the virus is — licenses to all the bars but the virus is still with us and council
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offices — virus is still with us and council offices are _ virus is still with us and council offices are out every night checking that everyone is complying with regulations. that everyone is complying with regulations-— that everyone is complying with regulations. that everyone is complying with reuulations. . ., ,, ., regulations. eating and drinking out he approved — regulations. eating and drinking out he approved popular. _ regulations. eating and drinking out he approved popular. many - regulations. eating and drinking out he approved popular. many joined i he approved popular. manyjoined long queues to grab a table. it was about 1.5 hours- _ long queues to grab a table. it was about 1.5 hours- two hours. not i long queues to grab a table. it wasl about 1.5 hours- two hours. not too about 1.5 hours— two hours. not too bad, we had a few drinks in the queue, did ourfood whatever. you queue, did our food whatever. you can't have — queue, did our food whatever. you can't have a _ queue, did our food whatever. you can't have a booking all the time it takes _ can't have a booking all the time it takes the — can't have a booking all the time it takes the spontaneity out of going out sow — takes the spontaneity out of going out so... �* takes the spontaneity out of going outso... �* ., ., takes the spontaneity out of going outso...�* .,. out so... and some who are unhappy to wait managed _ out so... and some who are unhappy to wait managed to _ out so... and some who are unhappy to wait managed to have _ out so... and some who are unhappy to wait managed to have a _ out so... and some who are unhappy to wait managed to have a night i out so... and some who are unhappy to wait managed to have a night out. we went to ld, and we sat here, no queues _ we went to ld, and we sat here, no rueues. , , queues. the streets here in manchester's _ queues. the streets here in manchester's northern i queues. the streets here in i manchester's northern quarter are about as normal as they have been for months. the roads are closed to cars but open to people and as night falls and the temperature drops all the tables here are still full. it is nice. not bad. it's _ the tables here are still full. it is nice. not bad. it's northern | is nice. not bad. it's northern weather and _ is nice. not bad. it's northern weather and we _ is nice. not bad. it's northern weather and we are _ is nice. not bad. it's northern weather and we are used i is nice. not bad. it's northern weather and we are used to i is nice. not bad. it's northern | weather and we are used to it. is nice. not bad. it's northern i weather and we are used to it. it weather and we are used to it. [it won't weather and we are used to it. it won't stop us. this _ weather and we are used to it. it won't stop us. this weekend i weather and we are used to it. it won't stop us. this weekend the | won't stop us. this weekend the weather was on the _ won't stop us. this weekend the weather was on the side - won't stop us. this weekend the weather was on the side of i
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won't stop us. this weekend the i weather was on the side of business and for now at least when choosing what to wear, remember a night out means a night out side. adam mclean, bbc news. let's speak now to michael kill from the night time industries association. not a huge amount of social distancing going on in that piece. as you can appreciate it is a very challenging environment but it is great to be back. a busy weekend and the majority of customers have adhered to the measures that have been put in place by the businesses. as you can understand it is a very exciting time for people who have been under lock down for a long period and think there will be a bit of a bedding period and think there will be a bit ofa bedding in period and think there will be a bit of a bedding in period for people to get used to things and for things to settle, particularly over the first weekend. i settle, particularly over the first weekend. ,, ., settle, particularly over the first weekend. ~ ., , ., settle, particularly over the first weekend. ~ ., ., settle, particularly over the first weekend. ,, ., . , weekend. i know you have been s-ueakin weekend. i know you have been speaking to _ weekend. i know you have been speaking to some _ weekend. i know you have been speaking to some people i weekend. i know you have been speaking to some people within j weekend. i know you have been i speaking to some people within the association. how busy was it over the last few days?— association. how busy was it over the last few days? extremely busy. most of these _ the last few days? extremely busy. most of these businesses _ the last few days? extremely busy. most of these businesses have - most of these businesses have monopolised on the fact that the
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excitement to return. they have taken bookings for many weeks back but we're still seeing many people coming out with our bookings and who are willing to queue. the from the customers to come to our business is strong and i think the hospitality sector as a whole have done a fantasticjob sector as a whole have done a fantastic job to sector as a whole have done a fantasticjob to make sure they create safe environments. this fantastic job to make sure they create safe environments. this week has been overwhelming. _ create safe environments. this week has been overwhelming. one - create safe environments. this week has been overwhelming. one of- create safe environments. this week has been overwhelming. one of the| has been overwhelming. one of the fact is, of course, in determining or not indoor hospitality will return will be how well—behaved the public is between now and then. what can venues do about that? how well—behaved will the public be? i think the business without a doubt have taken this on very seriously and i think that the customers are starting to get engage and understand that they have to take up some of the responsibility here. we some of the responsibility here. , are seeing it across the country. i spoke to many businesses last night who have seen responsible people,
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considering all of these important businesses and the fact that they have not had them for a period has meant they really stepped up and started to consider their actions. we have seen some positive moves but as you can appreciate the first weekend has been a bit of a challenge and i think it will start to settle as we go through the following weeks. we to settle as we go through the following weeks.— to settle as we go through the following weeks. to settle as we go through the followin: weeks. ~ ~' ., ., ., following weeks. we know over half of uk adults — following weeks. we know over half of uk adults have _ following weeks. we know over half of uk adults have now— following weeks. we know over half of uk adults have now had - following weeks. we know over half of uk adults have now had at - following weeks. we know over half of uk adults have now had at least. of uk adults have now had at least one dose of the vaccine. crucially, not the younger half. where do you stand on things like vaccine passports in terms of hospitality? we don't believe that vaccine passports are necessary. i think there are other mitigating measures that could be put in place. we have put those forward to government and we believe that the vaccine passport as a whole is just too intrusive from our perspective. so there are some considerable challenges around it and we are working through those
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at the moment but the fact of the matter is that from our perspective we have done an amazing job with measures. there are other mitigating measures. there are other mitigating measures alongside the vaccination rollout that i think can be put in place that would not be as challenging in terms of civil liberties and discrimination which has been highlighted by many many different businesses including the church and also retail which is something that the government has suggested is on the agenda as well. but would they be effective? that is the crucial thing. that is what we have been doing for the last year, trying to do things that are effective in preventing transmission. ~ , ~ transmission. absolutely. ithink the vaccination _ transmission. absolutely. ithink the vaccination rollout _ transmission. absolutely. ithink the vaccination rollout as - transmission. absolutely. ithink the vaccination rollout as a - transmission. absolutely. i think| the vaccination rollout as a whole has been phenomenal. i think there are other measures that have been put in place that have, without a doubt, controlled and kept up with the management of this virus as we move forward. we are aware that many of these people, including the youngsters at the core of our market
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are not going to be vaccinated until the end of the year so even looking at vaccination passports for that reason alone, they will not have them and then we will be drawing back to lateral flow tests which we also know were a challenge around the efficacy and also challenges logistically which are some of the key elements that we have put forward to highlight that this is not a workable practice. michael kill thank you — kill thank you very much for your time. the andrew marr programme's coming up on bbc one at 9. what's in store, andrew? good morning. a very, very busy morning is what is in store. you will have noticed that the ring cell scandal has not gone away and we are joined george used the agricultural secretary, a close ally of david cameron. i'mjoined by secretary, a close ally of david cameron. i'm joined by rachel trees.
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many other political leaders, the leaders of the green party and the liberal democrats. i have the russian ambassador, the poet laureate and i have susan hopkins, a senior adviser to public health england. everything you could possibly hope for, almost. thank you very much- — possibly hope for, almost. thank you very much- a — very much. a block of ice the size of a small country — will find out why the world's biggest iceberg has finally broken apart and what it will mean for climate change. hello, this is breakfast with rogerjohnson and victoria fritz. it is half past seven.
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it was a moving day for many yesterday as the duke of edinburgh was laid to rest. one of those at windsor was his biographer and friend, gyles brandreth. hejoins us this morning. thank you for taking the time to speak to us. you were in windsor and obviously not one of the 30 but you were there to observe what was happening and what were your impressions of the funeral? it was a memorable and moving day and a beautiful day in so many ways. the sunshine was glorious. it was extraordinary to reflect on a remarkable life. the duke of edinburgh, when he was prince philip of greece, he took his first journey, 100 years ago, into a greek orthodox church to be baptised in an old mercedes car that had once belonged to the german kaiser, but was 100 years ago, and yesterday he took his lastjourney to st george's chapel in windsor in a land rover
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hearse of his own design and i reflected on what an amazing journey that had been for him, those 100 years from corfu to windsor. by the land rover, interestingly, ifound myself chatting to the commanding officer of the grenadier guards who was one of the eight pallbearers who marched alongside the land rover hearse and he told me it was really quite noisy and was rather belching a bit! and the poor driver had quite a bit! and the poor driver had quite a struggle because he had to keep it at two miles an hour because it is not built to go that slowly and so he was on the clutch all of the time of that was quite a challenge for him. but of course what was so remarkable about the whole day where the duke's personal touches. he had designed that land rover himself, devoted two [and rovers at you with remember, when he had that unfortunate accidents happening, no—one was seriously hurt, but he wrote of his own land rover at the
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time and went back to sandringham house and ordered another one but then realised perhaps is driving days were over ——to land rovers. got the last laugh because he did make his exit on a land rover. there are so many personal touches that sort of did ring tears to the eyes. for me, it was seeing the courage that are used to drive with the two ponies and his cap and his gloves on the... i ponies and his cap and his gloves on the... ~ , ., ponies and his cap and his gloves on the... ~ the... i think your internet may have just _ the... i think your internet may have just frozen, _ the... i think your internet may have just frozen, gyles, - the... i think your internet may have just frozen, gyles, mid i havejust frozen, gyles, mid anecdote, which was rather unfortunate. can we go back? let’s unfortunate. can we go back? let's t aaain. unfortunate. can we go back? let's try again- you _ unfortunate. can we go back? let's try again. you are _ unfortunate. can we go back? let's try again. you are talking _ unfortunate. can we go back? let's try again. you are talking about - unfortunate. can we go back? let'sj try again. you are talking about the loves, try again. you are talking about the gloves. gyles- _ try again. you are talking about the gloves, gyles. well,... _ try again. you are talking about the gloves, gyles. well,... oh, - try again. you are talking about the gloves, gyles. well,... oh, no! - try again. you are talking about the gloves, gyles. well,... oh, no! i. gloves, gyles. well,... oh, no! i think we — gloves, gyles. well,... oh, no! i think we might _ gloves, gyles. well,... oh, no! i think we might have two try - gloves, gyles. well,... oh, no! i think we might have two try to i gloves, gyles. well,... oh, no! i. think we might have two try to get you back on a better intimate connection. rather unfortunate,
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isn't it? —— better internet. i agree, those images when it comes to the close—up pictures on the courage of his gloves and hat but also the little tug that he used to keep the sugar lumps in for the ponies, it felt incredibly poignant and i think that was the first moment you sort of really felt the man, i think. absolutely. the front page of the papers this morning, one particular photograph, two of the broadsheets, the telegraph and the times both have big shots of the pageantry but most of the others, the observer, the sunday mirror, the mail, the sun on sunday, they all have the photograph that i'm sure you can even see there on the camera of the queen as she sat alone there in st george's chapel yesterday, alone, alone with her thoughts and the mail on sunday saying it was a fitting farewell. a touching photograph.
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utterly poignant, wasn't it? no matter what your thoughts may be on the royal family, i think everyone can connect to that image of the queen by herself. it was utterly universal, you know? a picture of solitary grief and, you know, and loss. after 73 years of marriage, one could only begin to try to understand what that may feel like for the queen. and kate williams, when we spoke to her earlier, many people, as she said, will empathise with that, having gone through many, many thousands of people going through loss over the last 12 months because of coronavirus at having to suffer alone. gyles is back and hopefully your internet is more reliable! talk to us about the courage for the third time lucky! now, i wasjust courage for the third time lucky! now, i was just saying the things that moved me and touched me so long seeing the courage, he was such a
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keen carriage driver, such a keen sportsman all of his life. when i first knew him, it was because he was the president of the national playing association, i am wearing their tie! playing association, i am wearing theirtie! he playing association, i am wearing their tie! he loved sports of all kind, particularly cricket and later apollo and eventually this carriage driving, and he almost invented the international rules for carriage driving —— polo. and to see his own carriage with the gloves and cap and the little container that had the sugar lumps for the ponies was touching. more formally, his abnormal —— admiral�*s cap, his insignia but his family, and talking about feeling empathy for the queen, so many did, particularly when her head was bowed so low, very moving. but also if you are of my generation, the generation of the prince of wales, and you've also lost a father, you would be feeling for him and you can see the anguish on his face but it was so good to
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see the family there, united, separated in the church but united, including the descendents of three of prince philip's sisters. he led this very interesting life, he was an international person, descended on both sides of his family from royalty. on his mother's side, and great—great—grandson of queen victoria. as the queen is a great great granddaughter of queen victoria. but on his father's side descended from all sorts of kings and kaiser is and —— two, russian and kaiser is and —— two, russian and greek ancestry and it reflected both in russian and greek ancestry in the hymns that were chosen and there he had four older sisters and they all got married in the late 19205 they all got married in the late 1920s and lived in germany, they married different german princes, and three of their descendants were at the service yesterday and his german family meant a lot to him and he kept in touch with them. his nephews and his nieces and indeed
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supported them, you know, with financially and emotionally over the years. —— both financially. it was lovely to see. and he's carriage driving family, now mountbatten, who married into the family. so in the end it was good to see harry and william chatting quite normally. so it was what i thought was brilliant about it was it was a mixture of a ceremonialfuneral about it was it was a mixture of a ceremonial funeral with the pageantry, particularly because of the prince's military associations, the prince's military associations, the raf represented. he once told me that given his own choice, he would have joined the raf rather than the navy but the navy was there, the raf was there, the army was there, all of that, there was the pageantry and then there was the simplicity of the service, the beauty of the service, and the family service, so it was the best of both worlds. i think it was exactly as he would have wanted. in the last week, a much more
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complete and perhaps complex portrait of the late duke has emerged, alan titchmarsh put it yesterday a man with two eyes, a heady eye and a twinkly i and i beady eye and a twinkly i and i think i had to david attenborough described him as an amalgam really of formality and friendliness. do those feel like accurate descriptions to you of the man? totally accurate. i thought sir david attenborough was particularly good because he actually pinpointed one of the stronger things about the duke of edinburgh— you never quite knew where he you were with him because he could be very friendly and then he could also the next day be quite fierce. so you had to be on your toes with him at all times. he was the most multifaceted person i have ever known. you would need to write a book to see the whole of his story, which i only discovered when i wrote a book about him and i sat down with him. what was the challenge with him was he did so
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many things, was interested in so much and was such an interesting human being but he hated talking about himself. and i once asked him, because his main role as well as the extraordinary range of work that he did with his awards scheme from interest in mental health and environment and all of that sort of work that he did, his main role in life for 70 years was to support the queen and i asked him about their chemistry and he rocked and said what kind of a question is that? it was only pertinent personal question but i persisted because i thought you have asked me to write this short biography of you —— harrumphed. i ought to ask about that because that has been your role and he would not answer it but he did point b towards a book by a man called and to understand the expiry who he admired because he was a pony aviator that prince philip was fascinated by and flew many over his lifetime and he was a french pilot aviator but he was also the man who
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wrote the little prince —— antoine de saint—exupery and the quotation he showed me was this. it simply read" love consists not necessarily in gazing into one another�*s eyes but in looking in the same direction" and i think that is the secret of him and the queen. they were not necessarily lovey—dovey sort of couple that you would expect in a modern world. there are no photographs for example when they were photographed more than 70 years and no photographs in the world of them holding hands. there were some formal photographs of him taking her hand at the state open a parliament but not holding hands, it was not their style, but not holding hands, it was not theirstyle, but but not holding hands, it was not their style, but they shared a common purpose, values, and i think yesterday the queen as we know is driven by duty but she is sustained by faith and she will have found yesterday's service a combination of her faith and also the ceremonial,
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that meant so much to her and to him. they looked in the same direction. him. they looked in the same direction-— him. they looked in the same direction. , , �* . . ~ direction. gyles brandreth, thank ou so direction. gyles brandreth, thank you so much _ direction. gyles brandreth, thank you so much for— direction. gyles brandreth, thank you so much for those _ direction. gyles brandreth, thank you so much for those insights. l direction. gyles brandreth, thankj you so much for those insights. it is really interesting and yes, i mean, ourthoughts is really interesting and yes, i mean, our thoughts are obviously with the queen as she will continue to mourn the loss of her husband of 73 years. one, thank you very much for your time. fascinating, wasn't it? interesting to hear those kind of anecdotes. it is 742 so let's catch up with the weather forecast. it was a glorious day at windsor yesterday for the funeral of the duke of edinburgh and more in store today, louise? for duke of edinburgh and more in store today. louise?— today, louise? for most of us, yes, absolutely — today, louise? for most of us, yes, absolutely glorious _ today, louise? for most of us, yes, absolutely glorious out _ today, louise? for most of us, yes, absolutely glorious out there - today, louise? for most of us, yes, absolutely glorious out there and i absolutely glorious out there and not as cold as it was in the last few mornings, some lovely sunshine coming through but unfortunately that does mean for england and wales where we will see the best of the sunshine we are also likely to see the highest of the pollen and it is tree pollen at the moment that is at its maximum. a different story for the north and west because it is not
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glorious for all of us, quite a lot of cloud about and some rain moving through northern ireland and scotland, just starting to put into the isle of man and we may see a little more cloud pushing towards west—facing coasts of wales as well but elsewhere it is dry, settled, sunny, hardly a breath of air across england and wales, lots of sunshine so little more warmth coming through as well. eyes of 16 degrees. a bit more of a breeze where we have the rain and there could be quite murky conditions as well be the rain eases and lingers on higher ground so a different story here. that weather front will actually drift a little bit further north through the night and kept quite a lot of cloud in scotland and northern ireland on the whole and we could see a little bit of low cloud, mist and fog drifting off the north sea affecting let's say hold down through the vale of york into linkage and the east midlands as well. not quite as cold as the night has passed but a great deal of dry weather to come for the start of the new working week —— into lincolnshire. not moving very
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far very fast but either not bringing that much in the way of significant rain on monday. drifting into western parts of northern ireland and maybe the west of scotland as well but elsewhere, it is dry, settled in emphasis with the sunshine and again, that warmth to come. 17 degrees possibly the high through monday afternoon, 63 fahrenheit, just above where we should be now at this time of year. it is not going to last, this warmth. the dry weather will last, as high pressure built in from the north—west but unfortunately, the winds are going to change direction again. a bit more of a north—westerly or a northerly as the high drift its way steadily east across the country, dragging in the cold air across most of the country, not for all, but it does mean a noticeable dip in the temperature through the middle part of the week so we back to single figures with a breeze coming in off the north sea with a little bit on the chilly side. �* . . .. with a little bit on the chilly side. 1, . ~ ., ,, cases of coronavirus are still falling across the uk,
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while the vaccination programme continues with pace. let's ta ke a look at the latest figures. more than 32 million people have now had their first dose of a coronavirus vaccine. the number of people who've had their second dose of the vaccine in the latest 24 hour period is 485,000. that takes the overall number of people who've had their second jab to nearly 9.5 million people. we're nowjoined by epidemiologist mike tildesley. good morning and thank you for taking the time to talk with us. one thing we have been talking about this morning is this indian variant. how concerning is that? i this morning is this indian variant. how concerning is that?— this morning is this indian variant. how concerning is that? i always say that when these _ how concerning is that? i always say that when these new _ how concerning is that? i always say that when these new variants - how concerning is that? i always say| that when these new variants emerge it is a concern and it is important we get as much information as quickly as possible. what is concerning about this variant is that there appear to be these two mutations which may make the virus, may make the vaccines less effective
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and may make the virus more transmissible. the key thing here is made, we are still trying to gather evidence. it is not surprising that new variants emerge, they emerge all the time. but if we do get evidence that they are evading the vaccine and are more transmissible than what we need to do is take action to suppress those. maybe surge testing is needed to stamp down on local clusters of infection if we get evidence that this is a real variant of concern. evidence that this is a real variant of concern-— of concern. and the thing with mutations _ of concern. and the thing with mutations is _ of concern. and the thing with mutations is that _ of concern. and the thing with mutations is that the - of concern. and the thing with mutations is that the vaccine l of concern. and the thing with i mutations is that the vaccine can of concern. and the thing with - mutations is that the vaccine can be tweaked, can't it? that is what happens with the flu vaccine every year. happens with the flu vaccine every ear. ~ , , ., y happens with the flu vaccine every ear. ~ , ,., , ~ ., year. absolutely. and the longer term this is _ year. absolutely. and the longer term this is what _ year. absolutely. and the longer term this is what we _ year. absolutely. and the longer term this is what we might - year. absolutely. and the longer. term this is what we might expect. as you quite rightly say with the flu vaccine, every time you have a vaccine, if you are one of those people gets vaccinated every autumn, it is not the same when you had the previous year. it will be tweaked to combat whatever happens to be
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circulating at the time. we're not quite there yet with covid vaccinations that can be tweaked to protect against new variants but my understanding is that vaccine companies are working on this and in the long—term we be able to provide boosters to people to protect against whatever new variants are circulating. at the moment it is a case of trying to push the can down the road and keep the variants as low as possible in this country to give the vaccine company time to develop these booster shots. across the uk we see _ develop these booster shots. across the uk we see relaxation _ develop these booster shots. across the uk we see relaxation is - develop these booster shots. across the uk we see relaxation is in - the uk we see relaxation is in restrictions at different rates in different places. is there any data yet, i guess it is too early, to see what has happened in the last week but are you optimistic that things will remain on track for the roadmap? it will remain on track for the roadmap?— will remain on track for the roadmap? will remain on track for the roadma? , . . , ., roadmap? it is a little early to sa , as roadmap? it is a little early to say. as you — roadmap? it is a little early to say, as you said, _ roadmap? it is a little early to say, as you said, because - roadmap? it is a little early to i say, as you said, because every roadmap? it is a little early to - say, as you said, because every time there is a policy change you need about two weeks before you can see evidence of what that does to cases and then another one or two weeks before we can see if there has been
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a negative impact on hospital admission or death. so we will need until the end of april before we have good evidence as to what this change has done. i see nothing yet that suggests the roadmap is in jeopardy and i think that is important. but the key message of course that we need to send out to people's, overwhelmingly, people have been doing extremely well and adhering to the rules in place. social distancing measures will still be in place for a while and we do need people to abide by those rules that are in place so that hopefully we can safely continue with the roadmap. we hopefully we can safely continue with the roadmap.— hopefully we can safely continue with the roadmap. we saw some ictures with the roadmap. we saw some pictures from — with the roadmap. we saw some pictures from last _ with the roadmap. we saw some pictures from last night - with the roadmap. we saw some pictures from last night of - with the roadmap. we saw some | pictures from last night of people getting their first saturday night out for a long time. i suppose the messages to not be too giddy. i messages to not be too giddy. iw:3 looking at those pictures myself. the problem is we always see the pictures of people who do not adhere to rules and that is a worry. we need to send out the message that people need to abide by social distancing guidelines. the vast
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majority of people have been extremely responsible and while they have enjoyed the opportunity to go out and have a drink in a pub, they have done so safely and made sure that they maintain distance. hopefully if we can do that for a little longer we can get back to the roadmap for easing restrictions by the end ofjune. find roadmap for easing restrictions by the end ofjune._ roadmap for easing restrictions by the end ofjune. and everyone is now hoinu the end ofjune. and everyone is now hoping they — the end ofjune. and everyone is now hoping they will _ the end ofjune. and everyone is now hoping they will be _ the end ofjune. and everyone is now hoping they will be able _ the end ofjune. and everyone is now hoping they will be able to _ the end ofjune. and everyone is now hoping they will be able to go - the end ofjune. and everyone is now hoping they will be able to go on - hoping they will be able to go on holiday. many people will stay in the united kingdom, obviously, but the united kingdom, obviously, but the traffic light system could be fluid? there is suggestion now that india, the prime minister is due to go there for a visit which he says he will do but that could be put onto a red list, you would imagine, given the k—8 they case rates there. it is always a difficult one for the travel industry. it will be hard over the next few months because there will be a situation potentially with certain countries may have to escalate to higher levels on this list if there are serious concerns. probably, to give
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a little confidence to travellers for the summer, i think there needs to be clear guidelines released to say when the government thinks the country might be escalated so that people can, if necessary, get back in time before they have to go into the quarantines or take the necessary precautions that they need to. it will be a difficult few months but hopefully with his traffic light system people will have some confidence that they can safely travel to countries lower down on the list as we get into the summer months. you down on the list as we get into the summer months.— down on the list as we get into the summer months. you mention social distancinu. summer months. you mention social distancing- in — summer months. you mention social distancing. in terms _ summer months. you mention social distancing. in terms of— summer months. you mention social distancing. in terms of mask - distancing. in terms of mask wearing, something we have become accustomed to over the last 12 months or so, do you think that needs to be a more regular thing going forward? even as we, hopefully, leave coronavirus behind us. i hopefully, leave coronavirus behind us. ~' , . hopefully, leave coronavirus behind us. ~ , ., ., hopefully, leave coronavirus behind us, " , ., ., " us. ithink it is hard. iwould like to strive in— us. ithink it is hard. iwould like to strive in the _ us. ithink it is hard. iwould like to strive in the future _ us. ithink it is hard. iwould like to strive in the future to - us. ithink it is hard. iwould like to strive in the future to be - us. ithink it is hard. iwould like to strive in the future to be in i us. ithink it is hard. iwould like to strive in the future to be in a l to strive in the future to be in a situation where we can actually go
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out and socialise safely without masks. i think we need to take it slowly. we need to ease out of these restrictions. but i think, the key things i would like to see going forward, the key changes are supporting people to stay at home if they have symptoms of disease. so we do not encourage people to go to work when they are sick. good hygiene practices going forward. i worry about long—term use of masks in social settings because i think they have harm as well as benefit. we know they help, of course they do. but they are also damaging to social interaction, particularly in a place like school. it is difficult for children to wear a mask in the classroom. i can understand why they are in place now but we do need a clear roadmap to a society where we can hopefully, in most settings, lose the mask in the future. thank ou for lose the mask in the future. thank you for talking _ lose the mask in the future. thank you for talking to _ lose the mask in the future. thank you for talking to us. _ lose the mask in the future. thank you for talking to us. very - lose the mask in the future. thank you for talking to us. very grateful to hear from you. what was once the world's largest iceberg has finally broken apart. a—68, as it was known,
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covered an area of nearly 2,300 square miles when it broke away from antarctica in 2017. but satellite images show the "mega—berg" has now virtually gone, broken into countless small fragments that the us national ice center says are no longer worth tracking. here's our science correspondent, victoria gill. a i—million ton block of ice. when iceberg a—68 broke away from antarctica back in 2017, it measured more than 2300 square miles — a quarter the size of wales. it was only by imaging it from space that scientists could actually follow the massive iceberg's journey as it inched its way north. at one point, it was on a direct collision course with the antarctic island of south georgia, potentially threatening to cut off vast populations of penguins and seals. but it was off that coast in the open ocean swell that the world's largest iceberg broke apart and now that it's
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officially been declared deceased, the scientists who've been following itsjourney so they are surprised it survived as long as it did. so this thing is incredibly fragile and flexible as it moved around the oceans. it lasted for years like that as it moved around but eventually broke into four, five pieces and then those broke up again. but the endpoint for some of these fragments was quite interesting because just very suddenly overnight, theyjust fragmented into millions of little tiny pieces and you can see that on the satellite data. and that process, i think, is something that needs studying a little bit more because it might tell us a little bit about how ice shelves will break up in the future. a—68 being the size of a small country made it the focus of global media attention. but the breaking away, or calving, of these giant icebergs is a natural part of the ebb and flow of the dynamic ice shelf. does the whole journey and the break—up and demise of an iceberg of this scale, does it give you any insight into how climate change is going to affect the ice sheets at large in antarctica?
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one event cannot tell us that much but what we're looking at is the regularity of these events. are they becoming more frequent? and an iceberg calving is a big factor in unaudible from antarctica, so if these iceberg calving events are becoming more frequent, then it is a really important factor that we need to be looking at and researching. while a—68 will be remembered as a social media star that was visible from space, scientists will now be turning their attention to the newest chasm on the edge of the vast ice sheet and the next giant berg to set off on its own epicjourney. victoria gill, bbc news. we're nowjoined by marine biologist huw griffiths. thank you forjoining us. this was a social media star and it melted away. what did we learn, if
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anything, about its demise? firstly it is normal— anything, about its demise? firstly it is normal for— anything, about its demise? firstly it is normal for an _ anything, about its demise? firstly it is normal for an iceberg - anything, about its demise? firstly it is normal for an iceberg to i anything, about its demise? firstly it is normal for an iceberg to die i it is normalfor an iceberg to die in this way. it is a natural fate. they move generally northwards out of the coldest seawater in the world and hit some of the roughest seas as they head towards south georgia and thatis they head towards south georgia and that is what breaks them up. but the water also warms as you head north. in between the rakes of and its eventual death, we have had a lot of information that we have been able to collect from satellite images and teams from the antarctic survey who have been down there and putting things like gliders, autonomous vehicles, under the iceberg to see how it changes the ocean beneath. just looking now at pictures of the iceberg and icebreaking away. it is very easy, when we look at pictures like this, to think that when ice is breaking away this has to be
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something to do with climate change, the reason why this is happening. what can we infer from this iceberg when it comes to climate change? it is a nice visual metaphor for climate change but it is probably come from a natural event. icebergs break off ice shelves all the time and ice shelves are just dig chains of freshwater ice that had been pushed off [and by glaziers and are floating on the sea around antarctica there. if they did not break up they would eventually end “p break up they would eventually end up covering the entire ocean. so the end is falling off like a conveyor belt is more ice is pushed off behind. this came from the licensee which is part of a chain of larson ice shelves and larson a and b in my lifetime have already collapsed completely. and the larson sea is seen as one of the most vulnerable to climate change. it is an important place to study and to see that one iceberg like this could take i2% of the licensee away with
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it shows that big icebergs, if they become more frequent, can eat away at the ice shelf faster than they can be replenished. we at the ice shelf faster than they can be replenished.— at the ice shelf faster than they can be replenished. we know that the size and the — can be replenished. we know that the size and the scale _ can be replenished. we know that the size and the scale of— can be replenished. we know that the size and the scale of this, _ can be replenished. we know that the size and the scale of this, a _ size and the scale of this, a quarter of the size of wales, one of the reasons again so much attention. what sort of impact would that have on the local ecosystem when all that water becomes meltwater and enters the sea? it water becomes meltwater and enters the sea? . , water becomes meltwater and enters the sea? ., , ., , ., water becomes meltwater and enters the sea? ., the sea? it has it has an impact when it starts _ the sea? it has it has an impact when it starts as _ the sea? it has it has an impact when it starts as well _ the sea? it has it has an impact when it starts as well because l the sea? it has it has an impact| when it starts as well because it the sea? it has it has an impact i when it starts as well because it is hundreds of metres thick and it can scrape the sea floor, bulldoze life for hundreds of miles in its path and then as it moves away from these shallow areas it melts and changes the water chemistry. cell as well as any minerals in that icy was i have boulders dropping off the bottom of the iceberg that land at the bottom of the sea and you have which, fundamentally, changes what types of microscopic plants and animals can live on the surface
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water around the iceberg. sometimes thatis water around the iceberg. sometimes that is good and icebergs can be seen to fertilise the ocean around them and make plankton blooms happen that feed more animals. other times it made disrupt the food train — chain in that area. it it made disrupt the food train - chain in that area.— it made disrupt the food train - chain in that area. it happens to the data collected _ chain in that area. it happens to the data collected as _ chain in that area. it happens to the data collected as a - chain in that area. it happens to the data collected as a result i chain in that area. it happens to the data collected as a result of| the data collected as a result of the data collected as a result of the breakdown of a68? that the data collected as a result of the breakdown of a68? that data will feed into a lot — the breakdown of a68? that data will feed into a lot of _ the breakdown of a68? that data will feed into a lot of things. _ the breakdown of a68? that data will feed into a lot of things. the - feed into a lot of things. the movement of the iceberg is important data. how it broke up, how it lasted so long given how big it how choppy the waters were. that will teach physicists and oceanographers and biologists a lot of information because we have this hourly satellite information on the position and size of the iceberg, in a way that we had never really had access to before.— access to before. doctor griffiths, thank ou access to before. doctor griffiths, thank you very — access to before. doctor griffiths, thank you very much _ access to before. doctor griffiths, thank you very much for - access to before. doctor griffiths, thank you very much for your i access to before. doctor griffiths, | thank you very much for your time today. it is interesting to do you
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do forget that, like an ice cube, nine tenths of the iceberg is underwater, not what you can see above and it is huge above the water. but this is where we say goodbye to viewers on bbc one. bye for now.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with rogerjohnson and victoria fritz. our headlines today: cannon fires. a day of refelection for members of the royal family, after the queen and the nation bid farewell to the duke of edinburgh. the family will continue to grieve this week, although the period of national mourning has come to an end. one of the defining images, her majesty sitting alone as she said goodbye to her
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husband of 73 years. the number of coronavirus deaths around the world has risen to above 3 million. the united states has suffered the most fatalities. celebrating 70 years of britain's first national park. this is one of the most popular. areas of the peak district butjust imagine before the national park was formed, you were not - allowed to walk across open moorland like this. - chelsea will be back at wembley for the fa cup final. a hakim ziyech goal stopping manchester city's chances of a quadruple, as chelsea win their semifinal match. good morning. it's a dry and sunny day across england and wales and a little warmer than yesterday. further north, there's more in the way of cloud and some light, patchy rain for scotland and northern ireland. all the details coming up shortly.
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it's sunday 18 april. our top story: the royal family has honoured the duke of edinburgh's humour and humanity as he was laid to rest at st george's chapel in windsor. the service was restrained, in line with the duke's wishes and coronavirus guidelines. the queen sat alone, just days before she turns 95. princes william and harry were seen chatting together as they left the service. the royal family will continue to mourn the loss of the prince philip this week, while the period of national mourning has come to an end. these pictures are live from downing street this morning. the union flag has been raised back to the top of the flagpole in the past couple of minutes to signify the end of that national period of mourning. and the same is true of buckingham palace as well. the flag now raised after a week of national mourning. the
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national mourning coming to an end but the period of grief and mourning for the royalfamily but the period of grief and mourning for the royal family itself will continue for many weeks to come. our correspondent helena wilkinson is at windsorfor us. it was an intimate funeral, and the duke had a hand in planning it as well? we understand he planned the land rover back in 2003? he we understand he planned the land rover back in 2003?— rover back in 2003? he did, vietoria- _ rover back in 2003? he did, victoria. you _ rover back in 2003? he did, victoria. you are _ rover back in 2003? he did, victoria. you are right. i rover back in 2003? he did, | victoria. you are right. you're rover back in 2003? he did, i victoria. you are right. you're in windsor where the queen is today will be one of reflection after what was probably one of the hardest days for her in her life, if not the hardest. as you rightly say the funeral was very private, a family funeral was very private, a family funeral here yesterday, and it was touched with very personal details because we know that the duke of edinburgh had spent years planning his own funeralfrom edinburgh had spent years planning his own funeral from the land rover
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that he had modified to the songs that he had modified to the songs that were sung in the chapel at the funeral service yesterday, but the most striking image, of course, was that of the queen sitting alone in the chapel because of covid restrictions. she was not able to have any family members next to her in the chapel and it was an incredibly lonely, sad picture, as you can see there. she didn't have anyone to hold her hand as she looked onto her husband's coffin as she said goodbye to him after 73 years of marriage. and i thought during the ceremonial park yesterday, attaching part was when the duke's carriage was brought out with two of his ponies. you can see the two ponies and on top of the carriage was the duke's blanket,
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gloves and hat. and also a box containing the sugar cubes he used to give to his ponies. prince harry and prince william after the service were seen chatting to each other after what has been a difficult year for the relationship. what they said to each other we don't know, of course, but i think a fitting end and one that the duke would no doubt have wanted. we and one that the duke would no doubt have wanted-— have wanted. we understand that at gordonstoun — have wanted. we understand that at gordonstoun school— have wanted. we understand that at gordonstoun school a _ have wanted. we understand that at gordonstoun school a lone - have wanted. we understand that at gordonstoun school a lone piper i gordonstoun school a lone piper played flowers of the forest on the harbour wall is a wreath was laid in the water. that piece of music was played again during the service at st george's chapel. very touching pieces of music were used throughout. the readings as well really showed and displayed his love
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of nature, his great christian faith and hopefully those would have been of great comfort to the queen. although the official mourning period is now over, where do we go from here? where does the queen go from here? where does the queen go from here? where does the queen go from here? you from here? where does the queen go from here? ., . from here? you are right, the national period _ from here? you are right, the national period of _ from here? you are right, the national period of mourning i from here? you are right, the l national period of mourning has from here? you are right, the - national period of mourning has come to an end. in the last couple of minutes or so, the flags have been raised to full mast. they were lowered to half mast on the day that the duke of edinburgh died last friday but what you there is buckingham palace and the flag at that royal residence has now been raised to full mast. but the royal family will continue to observe a weeks mourning themselves. they will still carry out engagements we are told when it is appropriate of course but for the queen, yes, the
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day after her husband's funeral, she will no doubt today be reflecting. we can now show you a picture of the royal family tweeted yesterday, our poignant picture of the duke of edinburgh put outjust hours after he was laid to rest here at st george's chapel.— he was laid to rest here at st george's chapel. helen wilkinson, thank ou george's chapel. helen wilkinson, thank you very _ george's chapel. helen wilkinson, thank you very much. _ george's chapel. helen wilkinson, thank you very much. some i george's chapel. helen wilkinson, i thank you very much. some touching and poignant images. worth noting that the queen is 95 this week. she celebrates her birthday on wednesday, although celebrations may not be what she is doing, but she turns 95. the prime minister could lose the support of the red wall voters who backed him in 2019, unless he resolves
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the row about lobbying. that's according to a senior conservative mp. sir bernard jenkin says the lines between public service and private gain have become blurred. our political correspondent nick eardleyjoins us now. i guess it has always been this way. this is probably gone on for years, hasn't it? ,., ., ., i. �* hasn't it? good morning, you're absolutely _ hasn't it? good morning, you're absolutely right, _ hasn't it? good morning, you're absolutely right, there - hasn't it? good morning, you're absolutely right, there has i hasn't it? good morning, you're l absolutely right, there has always been this issue of lobbying and potential conflicts of interest between ministers who are in government one minute and a couple of years later end up lobbying a successive government for access. i think the difference this time is the extent of it. the real concern at westminster is that this is becoming a really big issue. a lot of mps are really nervous actually that this is having a pretty corrosive effect on public trust in politics. so bernard jenkin is one
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of them, he is writing in the observer this morning that it could have a big impact on the government because borisjohnson won over a bunch of voters who supported brexit and previously voted labour. he says that they might not support him in the future. it shows a wider concern going on in politics about the way that the story keeps developing, really, and that steady stream of stories we've seen over the last few weeks about potential conflicts of interest from civil servants, from previous ministers, from ministers being involved in some of that lobbying, even if it doesn't break the rules there is that concern that may be the rules aren't strong enough or may be the principles behind those rules need to be tightened up a bit. that's another thing that bernard jenkins was talking about in the observer this
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morning. looking at how the current rules are drilled into ministers, to ensure the follow the highest standards in government. i lose track, seven or eight investigations are going on into this. this has gone on for some time, but it's really in the spotlight at the moment and there is a lot of concern about the extent of it in westminster.— about the extent of it in westminster. ., , ., westminster. nick eardley, thanks very much- — the number of covid—i9 deaths around the world has risen to more than three million. the latest figures show that most fatalities have been in the united states, followed by brazil, mexico and india. our reporter gareth barlow has the details. mexico, 211,000 dead and 2.3 million infected, a country now desperately inoculating as it experiences
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the third highest death toll after the us and brazil. globally, at least three million people have died, according to figures compiled byjohn hopkins university. but the realfigure is thought to be even higher. in madagascar, schools have been transformed into temporary hospitals. in zimbabwe, prisoners released early, desperate efforts to release the burden on health care systems straining under the pressure of the deadly virus. no country left untouched. canada continues to face an incredibly serious situation with this third wave. cases are rising rapidly. in many cases, in many places, numbers are higher than they have ever been before. and far too many hospitals are stretched way too thin. the news of three million registered deaths comes a day after the head of the world health organization warned the globe was approaching
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the highest rate of infection. more than 140 million infections have been identified so far. around the world, cases and deaths are continuing to increase at worrying rates. globally, the number of new cases per week has nearly doubled over the past two months. this is approaching the highest rate of infection that we have seen so far during the pandemic. as cases climb in india, brazil, canada and other countries such as papa new guinea, there is no doubt the pandemic is far from over. and with 860 million doses of vaccines administered and a global population of almost eight billion, there is still a long way to go. gareth barlow, bbc news. china and the us say they are committed to working together and with other countries on tackling climate change. it comes after several meetings between the us climate envoy john kerry and his chinese
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counterpart in shanghai last week. our energy and environment analyst roger harraben reports. china is currently the world's number one polluter with its massive carbon emissions from coal. but the us is most to blame historically for the emissions that are heating the atmosphere. the superpowers must work together on the climate. since the controversy over china's treatments over its uighur minority, us—china relations have been icy. but america's climate envoy john kerry has been in china, urging superpower cooperation to reduce emissions. the round table a symbol of working together. the us will announce its planned emissions reductions at a joe biden climate summit next week. he admitted... it's not easy for any country. we all face this challenge. but europe has set a goal of 55% reduction.
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the uk has set a goal of 68% reduction. so we are evaluating right now what we ourselves can do. china's already the world's top new factor of wind turbines and solar panels. thejoint statement said finance must shift towards renewables, away from coal. environmentalists say the statement is positive, but warned that tackling climate change will need all nations to strive much harder. roger harrabin, bbc news. the time is approaching a quarter past eight. the duke of edinburgh had a personal hand in planning his funeral. he'd spent more than a decade designing the specially modified land rover that would be used as his hearse. it was one of a number of unique touches that marked the ceremony. his friend and religious adviser martin palmerjoins us now.
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martin, good morning to you and thank you for taking the time to talk to us this morning. it’s thank you for taking the time to talk to us this morning.- talk to us this morning. it's a pleasure- _ talk to us this morning. it's a pleasure- i — talk to us this morning. it's a pleasure. i know— talk to us this morning. it's a pleasure. i know you - talk to us this morning. it's a pleasure. i know you spoke l talk to us this morning. it's a | pleasure. i know you spoke to talk to us this morning. it's a i pleasure. i know you spoke to the duke of edinburgh _ pleasure. i know you spoke to the duke of edinburgh about - pleasure. i know you spoke to the duke of edinburgh about the i pleasure. i know you spoke to the i duke of edinburgh about the content of the service. can you give us some insight? it of the service. can you give us some insiuht? . , , of the service. can you give us some insiuht? ., , . of the service. can you give us some insiuht? .,, , . ~ , insight? it was very much in keeping with him. insight? it was very much in keeping with him- he — insight? it was very much in keeping with him. he really— insight? it was very much in keeping with him. he really felt— insight? it was very much in keeping with him. he really felt these - insight? it was very much in keeping with him. he really felt these vast, i with him. he really felt these vast, great state funerals were awkward to some degree. on one occasion, he said to me, half the people there won't know who i was and i won't know who they were. there is a sense that there is a certain anonymity to it. it was a high point to not have a sermon. he didn't want all this fuss. i remember going to do the recce visit for a series of meetings in washington, dc and i went with the head of his security and we met with the chief of police at the
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national airport and we met with the chief of police of dc and before we could say anything, they said there would be helicopters overhead and outriders. we looked at each other. you won't get out of the plane. they said, there will be four helicopters. you don't understand. one extra car for protection. these police chiefs looked at us as if we were idiots, and then they realised that he had done this all the time. presidents and prime ministers want all the business. but that was him. he just wanted to get into the city and get on with what he was doing. and the service reflected that very strongly. although covid obviously limited the numbers that would have loved to have been there, that knew
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him, but it's simplicity in its starkness was appropriate. from a religious perspective, which he and i discussed a great deal, i think for millions of people who have lost a loved one, notjust to covid in the past year but accidents or natural death, and have not been able to go to a funeral, have not been able to mourn, this has been a cathartic event for many. this was about the prince, it was about the queen now being a widow, but i think for many it will be about the funerals they were not able to go to, those that they were not able to mourn for. on one level, his great gift to us yesterday was the right to mourn. it’s gift to us yesterday was the right to mourn. v . gift to us yesterday was the right to mourn. �*, ., ., to mourn. it's a point well made, lots of people — to mourn. it's a point well made, lots of people will _ to mourn. it's a point well made, lots of people will have _ to mourn. it's a point well made, l lots of people will have empathise because they will have gone through a loss this year and not been able
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to say goodbye in the way they wanted to. just as the queen had to sit alone, there will be many other people who felt that same experience of being alone in a time of loss over the past 12 months. interesting there was no eulogy. i suppose that plays into what you were saying about not wanting any fuss? that was his oint about not wanting any fuss? that was his point about _ about not wanting any fuss? that was his point about no _ about not wanting any fuss? that was his point about no sermon. _ about not wanting any fuss? that was his point about no sermon. he - about not wanting any fuss? that was his point about no sermon. he just i his point about no sermon. he just felt that if one's deeds did not tell the story, then you didn't need someone trying to sum it up in five minutes. to make a moral point out of someone's death. he wanted it to be dignified, as it was, it was superbly dignified and reflected on very much. a wonderful choice of ecclesiastic us, i suppose many people will be trying to find that reading and discover it is not in the bible. certain christian
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traditions and injudaism do not consider it in the canon of the bible. and psalm 104 could well have been written by the israelites and influenced by the him to the sun. there was a certain way that his choices showed a great understanding. d0 choices showed a great understanding.- choices showed a great understanding. choices showed a great understandinu. , ., ~ ., understanding. do you think we have not to understanding. do you think we have got to know — understanding. do you think we have got to know him _ understanding. do you think we have got to know him better— understanding. do you think we have got to know him better in _ understanding. do you think we have got to know him better in the - understanding. do you think we have got to know him better in the past i got to know him better in the past week than maybe we did during his long life? week than maybe we did during his lona life? ., , , ., ,, long life? honestly, roger, ithink that happens _ long life? honestly, roger, ithink that happens so — long life? honestly, roger, ithink that happens so often. _ long life? honestly, roger, ithink that happens so often. it's - long life? honestly, roger, ithink that happens so often. it's so i long life? honestly, roger, ithink| that happens so often. it's so often that happens so often. it's so often that we only really learn about the depth and wisdom, the experience and knowledge, the gift people are brought, when they have died. because we do tend to sort of
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diminish people very often, i think. yet at a funeral or leading up to a funeral, that is put to one side, that sort of dismissive attitude and i think it gives us a chance to really hear about him and, you know, i worked with him for 36 years, i've got hundreds of stories about him and i would be delighted to share a few of those with people. he had his humour, his wits, of course you could be a grumpy so—and—so at times, but he could also be the most fascinating person to sit and have a conversation with. we fascinating person to sit and have a conversation with.— conversation with. we are very crateful conversation with. we are very grateful to _ conversation with. we are very grateful to you _ conversation with. we are very grateful to you for _ conversation with. we are very grateful to you for sharing i conversation with. we are very | grateful to you for sharing your reminiscences this morning. martin palmer, a friend. in the last 20 minutes, union flags across the uk have been raised from half—mast to mark the end of the national period of mourning for the
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duke. this was the scene at buckingham palace. also the flags above downing street, they have been raised to full mass to mark the year of the national period of mourning for the duke of edinburgh. the royal family will continue to mark another week of official mourning, but as we all know, that period doesn't really stop at the end of a week and i'm sure it will continue for many weeks to come. time for some weather now. here's louise with the forecast. did you notice how still the flags were? that's because there is hardly breath of air across england and wales at the moment and means it will feel a little warmer out there. some lovely blue sky and sunshine.
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this picture from the peak district. a bit more in the way of cloud and rain around, but generally are a theme as we go through the week is quite a warmer start in comparison to last week, but the polar weather is set to return from mid week onwards. the story at the moment is the sunshine of england and wales, but patchy rain is moving through scotland, northern ireland and the isle of man. not significant rainfall but it's producing a lot of cloud and pretty murky conditions. more of a breeze here as well by comparison. elsewhere, with ascension coming through, we might see some more cloud out in the west, but feeling warm and pleasant. it looks likely we will continue to see a good deal of dry weather. the weather front producing the rain is not going very far very fast. it
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will sit out in the atlantic for the start of monday. a blanket of cloud first thing on monday morning means the temperatures overnight not falling too low. we could see some mist and fog just pushing in off the north sea affecting parts of the east yorkshire, east lincolnshire and maybe into the east midlands. we will see the fog tend to thin and break back to the north sea. a good deal of sense coming through. perhaps extending further north into scotland as well, just that cloud and rain along western fringes of scotland and northern ireland. 17 degrees possible. but the cooler feel will arrive from wednesday. high pressure will nudge in. we will see more of a northerly breeze and so the blue tones, colder air, is set to push its way a bit further
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south as we go through the middle part of the week. so it's looks likely on wednesday that we will start to see and feel the difference with single figures returning along exposed north sea coast and the breeze is significant as well. back to you too. later today, thousands of football fans are expected to return to live matches, as part of a government scheme looking at reopening large venues safely after the pandemic. let's take a look at a few of the test events coming up. today, 4,000 people are due to watch the fa cup semifinal at wembley. and fans have already returned to the world snooker championships in sheffield this weekend. 200 people watched each session yesterday and it's possible that a capacity crowd of nearly a thousand will be at the final on 03 may. but it's notjust sporting events. later this month, around 3,000 people could be allowed into a nightclub in liverpool.
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one of the lucky leicester fans heading to wembley today is anjna kotecha—karia. we can speak to her now, alongside her husband kamlesh. how are you both feeling? looking forward to watching football again? absolutely. really looking forward to it. very excited about seeing our team play. live, as it were. the last time _ team play. live, as it were. the last time we _ team play. live, as it were. the last time we saw _ team play. live, as it were. the last time we saw them - team play. live, as it were. the last time we saw them play was last march _ last time we saw them play was last march we _ last time we saw them play was last march. we have been watching on tv. they have _ march. we have been watching on tv. they have been doing all right over the past 12 months. you've missed out on some good football! absolutely, definitely. this out on some good football! absolutely, definitely. this is a test event. _ absolutely, definitely. this is a test event, but _
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absolutely, definitely. this is a test event, but anjna - absolutely, definitely. this is a test event, but anjna has i absolutely, definitely. this is a test event, but anjna has got l test event, but anjna has got tickets— test event, but anjna has got tickets and is taking our son, not me _ tickets and is taking our son, not me. ~ . tickets and is taking our son, not me, ~ ., ., tickets and is taking our son, not me. . ., ., , ., tickets and is taking our son, not me. ~ ., ., ., ., ., ., me. what do you have to do in order to rear me. what do you have to do in order to gear yourself— me. what do you have to do in order to gear yourself up _ me. what do you have to do in order to gear yourself up for _ me. what do you have to do in order to gear yourself up for this? - me. what do you have to do in order to gear yourself up for this? we i me. what do you have to do in order to gear yourself up for this? we had | to gear yourself up for this? we had to gear yourself up for this? we had to do a lateral _ to gear yourself up for this? we had to do a lateral flow— to gear yourself up for this? we had to do a lateral flow test _ to gear yourself up for this? we had to do a lateral flow test yesterday i to do a lateral flow test yesterday at our nearest testing centre. and then we show that proof of negative test as we go into the ground today. we also have to because of the research they are doing, we have to do a pcr before the match and then five days after. so that home testing. j five days after. so that home testinu. ., ., , ., ., testing. i wonder how you are feelin: testing. i wonder how you are feeling about _ testing. i wonder how you are feeling about going. - testing. i wonder how you are | feeling about going. obviously testing. i wonder how you are i feeling about going. obviously it will be exciting to watch live sport, but do you have any concerns or anxieties about being in a crowd again? it’s or anxieties about being in a crowd auain? �* , , or anxieties about being in a crowd auain? h , , , again? it's quite funny because me and my son — again? it's quite funny because me and my son are _ again? it's quite funny because me and my son are in _ again? it's quite funny because me and my son are in the _ again? it's quite funny because me and my son are in the same - and my son are in the same
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household, but we need to be spaced out and will sit apart. i feel it will be good and we are driving there, whereas normally we would take public transport. we are going to have to wear facemasks the whole time we're watching the match, but to watch live football, it's a small inconvenience, really.— inconvenience, really. we're still waitinu inconvenience, really. we're still waitin: to inconvenience, really. we're still waiting to find _ inconvenience, really. we're still waiting to find out _ inconvenience, really. we're still waiting to find out what - inconvenience, really. we're still waiting to find out what the i waiting to find out what the protocols will be, going forward, but if it were to be that you had to go through some of testing regime longer term to go back to the stadiums, would you be with that? absolutely. covid is here to stay for a number of years and we just need to live with it and this is a step to going back to normality, i
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feel. in some ways, this is going to be the new normal to see live events and it's a good way to do it. i and it's a good way to do it. i think most football fans would be thrilled _ think most football fans would be thrilled to take a test to return to the stadium with other fans. just very quickly. _ the stadium with other fans. jut very quickly, thoughts on the game today? we very quickly, thoughts on the game toda ? ~ , ., ., , ., very quickly, thoughts on the game toda ?~ , ., ., ., today? we 'ust wanted to be a great match, as today? we just wanted to be a great match, as always. _ today? we just wanted to be a great match, as always. and _ today? we just wanted to be a great match, as always. and for— today? we just wanted to be a great match, as always. and for leicester| match, as always. and for leicester to win and make it to the final and who knows what will happen next? chelsea are waiting for one of you. thank you very much for talking to us and have an enjoyable and safe day today. thank you. they look really excited. another test event is being held next month.
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it's a live concert at sefton park in liverpool. let's speak now to claire mccolgan from culture liverpool, who are co—organising it, and also professor iain buchan who's leading the research for the pilot scheme. thank you very much both of you for joining us at this morning. we appreciate your time. what kind of testing procedures do you have in place for this event? we testing procedures do you have in place for this event?— place for this event? we have lateral flow _ place for this event? we have lateral flow testing, _ place for this event? we have lateral flow testing, so - place for this event? we have lateral flow testing, so we i place for this event? we have i lateral flow testing, so we have centres across the city and people will have to take a lateral flow test before any of the four events this weekend in liverpool. iloathed this weekend in liverpool. what concerns are — this weekend in liverpool. what concerns are you _ this weekend in liverpool. what concerns are you hearing, i this weekend in liverpool. what concerns are you hearing, if i this weekend in liverpool. what concerns are you hearing, if any, about what people are worried about? do you expect a lot of people to be coming? do you expect a lot of people to be cominu ? .. do you expect a lot of people to be cominu ? ~ ,., do you expect a lot of people to be cominu ? ~' ,., ~' coming? oh, ithink so. ithink there's been _ coming? oh, ithink so. ithink there's been such _ coming? oh, ithink so. ithink there's been such a _ coming? oh, ithink so. ithink there's been such a pent i coming? oh, ithink so. ithink there's been such a pent up. i coming? oh, ithink so. ithink. there's been such a pent up. such coming? oh, ithink so. ithink- there's been such a pent up. such a pent up kind of excitement about getting live events up and running.
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in liverpool, we are doing four test events from four different sectors. we are turning the dial up slowly so i think people will be excited to go to events how they used to. the music event is in the open air. others are in different locations. i think people will be desperate to kind of feel that emotion again that you get from being at a live event. it will just be you get from being at a live event. it willjust be really exciting. professor, in terms of collecting research from this upcoming event, it will be fascinating to find out what we learn and then how we can use that for more and bigger events in the future. use that for more and bigger events in the future-— in the future. certainly. we will be buildin: a in the future. certainly. we will be building a safety _ in the future. certainly. we will be building a safety net _ in the future. certainly. we will be building a safety net around i in the future. certainly. we will be | building a safety net around events but one _ building a safety net around events but one that works really well with local communities and public health teams. _ local communities and public health teams, addressing five main questions. how well is testing working? _ questions. how well is testing working? to minimise the risk of
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catching — working? to minimise the risk of catching the virus at events. how fresh _ catching the virus at events. how fresh is _ catching the virus at events. how fresh is the — catching the virus at events. how fresh is the air at indoor venues? did any— fresh is the air at indoor venues? did any of— fresh is the air at indoor venues? did any of the restrictions affect enjoyment and how viable are the nreasures— enjoyment and how viable are the measures that we put in place? measures — measures that we put in place? measures that might include allowing more flow— measures that might include allowing more flow around the event to keep a practical— more flow around the event to keep a practical distance between people. importantly, do the public health teams _ importantly, do the public health teams have all of the information they need — teams have all of the information they need to ramp up safety measures if rates _ they need to ramp up safety measures if rates were _ they need to ramp up safety measures if rates were to rise? using a national— if rates were to rise? using a national early warning system. we were national early warning system. were saying national early warning system. - were saying earlier that possibly the snooker, an indoor event, could have a near capacity crowd for the final. how confident are you that we will get back to events running at capacity is it used to run at and how long might that take? it capacity is it used to run at and how long might that take? it depends on the background _
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how long might that take? it depends on the background and _ how long might that take? it depends on the background and the _ how long might that take? it depends on the background and the findings i on the background and the findings of the _ on the background and the findings of the research programme as to how well the _ of the research programme as to how well the measures work in the venues. — well the measures work in the venues, how practical they are. rates— venues, how practical they are. rates are — venues, how practical they are. rates are very low at the moment so this is— rates are very low at the moment so this is a _ rates are very low at the moment so this is a good time to test building these _ this is a good time to test building these safety nets. if we can move quickly _ these safety nets. if we can move quickly to — these safety nets. if we can move quickly to adapt we can keep the news _ quickly to adapt we can keep the news open and these events —— we can keep venues— news open and these events —— we can keep venues and events open. do news open and these events -- we can keep venues and events open.- keep venues and events open. do you exect keep venues and events open. do you expect rates — keep venues and events open. do you expect rates will _ keep venues and events open. do you expect rates will go _ keep venues and events open. do you expect rates will go up _ keep venues and events open. do you expect rates will go up because i keep venues and events open. do you expect rates will go up because of - expect rates will go up because of the easing? it expect rates will go up because of the easing?— the easing? it is very difficult to sa that the easing? it is very difficult to say that as _ the easing? it is very difficult to say that as we _ the easing? it is very difficult to say that as we start _ the easing? it is very difficult to say that as we start mixing - the easing? it is very difficult to | say that as we start mixing again there _ say that as we start mixing again there could be an increase around july time — there could be an increase around julytime it— there could be an increase around july time. it is difficult to predict _ july time. it is difficult to predict but people have really taken to their— predict but people have really taken to their hearts the vaccination campaign _ to their hearts the vaccination campaign which has given this country— campaign which has given this country huge protection and i would encourage _ country huge protection and i would encourage everyone who hasn't been vaccinated _ encourage everyone who hasn't been vaccinated so far to get the vaccine _ vaccinated so far to get the vaccine. a, . r' vaccinated so far to get the vaccine. n, ., ,~' i. ., vaccinated so far to get the vaccine. n, ., ,~' , ., ., ., vaccine. may i ask you, claire, a hue vaccine. may i ask you, claire, a
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huge part _ vaccine. may i ask you, claire, a huge part of— vaccine. may i ask you, claire, a huge part of liverpool _ vaccine. may i ask you, claire, a huge part of liverpool life - vaccine. may i ask you, claire, a huge part of liverpool life is - vaccine. may i ask you, claire, a huge part of liverpool life is the | huge part of liverpool life is the culture and nightlife. it has been a long time since we've seen liverpool really going at full capacity. let's hope and presume that this event will be a success. what would you hope to see happening next in terms of attendees and long—term protection for people when they want to go out and about? for protection for people when they want to go out and about?— to go out and about? for us it's about getting — to go out and about? for us it's about getting venues _ to go out and about? for us it's about getting venues up - to go out and about? for us it's about getting venues up to - to go out and about? for us it's about getting venues up to full| about getting venues up to full capacity. we are working with four promoters which have really taken leadership of their sectors. it is important for them to get to full capacity to make it work for them commercially. what i'm really excited about is those big open—air free events you see in the city when you see giants walking the streets, supple parades, that is the kind of thing we want to get back to. so much of city life is about what happens on the streets and festivals. i think for the event
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sector, this sector has been shut down for the last year and a half and hasn't been up and running, it hasn't tried to be up and running, so to try this is really important forjobs and businesses, but also forjobs and businesses, but also for what makes a city's life, what makes us want to live here and what makes us want to live here and what makes us want to live here and what makes us human, really. it is really important we get the testing right, that we trial these events and take the learning from them and then use this to open up the rest of the country. this to open up the rest of the count . . .. this to open up the rest of the count . ., ,, i. . ., this to open up the rest of the count. ., ,, . ., country. thank you so much for your time this morning. _ coming up in the next half hour: we'll find out why the old english sheepdog has been listed as a vulnerable breed for the first time. the tiny 8:35am. ——the time is 8:35am.
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hello, this is breakfast with rogerjohnson and victoria fritz. let's see some of today's papers — and of course they all feature the duke of edinburgh's funeral on theirfront pages. "the loneliest goodbye" is the sunday mirror headline — over a full page image of the queen sitting alone in st george's chapel. the sunday telegraph also focuses on the queen's solitude yesterday. it says she sat alone to bid her "final farewell" to the duke — and the paper has selected an image in which we also see prince philip's coffin, draped in his flag.
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the mail on sunday declares the funeral a "fitting farewell". it also claims to have what it calls "the inside story of how kate got harry and wills talking again". and the sunday times does feature the funeral on its front page, but it also returns to its ongoing reporting of david cameron's lobbying for the collapsed financial firm, greensill capital. the paper claims mr cameron was looking for the firm to get access to the details of nhs workers, during the height of the first wave of coronavirus last year. a spokesman for the former prime minister said the discussions were about the efficient delivery of staff payments. here to have a look through the papers with us today is ruth marvel, chief executive of the duke of edinburgh award. good morning. i know you've picked
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out some stories but a thought from you festival on the duke of edinburgh and the scheme you run which is absolutely central to his legacy —— a thought from you, first of all. legacy -- a thought from you, first of all. , ., , , legacy -- a thought from you, first ofall. , ., _ �* legacy -- a thought from you, first ofall. ,., _ �* , legacy -- a thought from you, first ofall. , ., _ �* , .«r of all. obviously we've been talking a lot about the _ of all. obviously we've been talking a lot about the duke _ of all. obviously we've been talking a lot about the duke of— of all. obviously we've been talking a lot about the duke of edinburgh l a lot about the duke of edinburgh and his legacy this week, as he was the founder of the award and millions of young people thanks to him have had the opportunity to take part in our life changing programmes. i thought yesterday's funeral was a really fitting tribute. it was described in one of the papers is pitch perfect pageantry and i thought that summed it up beautifully. it was quiet and dignified and that really reflected the duke and his outlook. i particularly liked the personal touches. there was the pot that he
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used to feed his horses sugar lumps from on the seat of his courage which i thought was a lovely way of bringing the man into the event. {line bringing the man into the event. one of my children is doing a duke of edinburgh practice expedition today. good luck. . . edinburgh practice expedition today. good luck. ,, ., ., ., ., good luck. shall we have a look at some of the _ good luck. shall we have a look at some of the stories? _ good luck. shall we have a look at some of the stories? the - good luck. shall we have a look at some of the stories? the sunday. some of the stories? the sunday mirror, you've picked out a couple of stories here. the one about start slowly if you're anxious about going out have lockdown.— out have lockdown. yes, i think actually there _ out have lockdown. yes, i think actually there was _ out have lockdown. yes, i think actually there was a _ out have lockdown. yes, i think actually there was a lot - out have lockdown. yes, i think actually there was a lot of - out have lockdown. yes, i think - actually there was a lot of coverage in the other papers this morning about the relaxation of lockdown and people being able to get back to socialising. this piece in the sunday mirror caught my eye because it reflected some of the anxiety that many people are feeling about the resumption of normal social
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life. according to a survey of io life. according to a survey of 10 million people are worried that they forgotten how to have a conversation. i thought it was important to reflect on the fact that everybody is going to find this more or less easy i think to re—acclimatise to some of these normal activities. being patient and kind with people at recognising different people will feel differently about how quickly they can get back to going to the pub and going to football matches and gigs was a nice moment and pause in amongst all the excitement about getting back to normal. this amongst all the excitement about getting back to normal.— getting back to normal. this is an interesting _ getting back to normal. this is an interesting story _ getting back to normal. this is an interesting story you've _ getting back to normal. this is an interesting story you've picked i getting back to normal. this is an | interesting story you've picked out interesting story you've picked out in the papers. this is all about spelling rules and the idea that universities are considering going easy on spelling mistakes. why would they decide to do that?—
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they decide to do that? apparently they decide to do that? apparently the university _ they decide to do that? apparently the university of— they decide to do that? apparently the university of hull _ they decide to do that? apparently the university of hull has - they decide to do that? apparently i the university of hull has announced it is no longer going to penalised students for incorrect spellings. this has been picked up in a number of papers this morning. the daily mail is concerned that this will have an impact on standards and is concerned about dumbing down. there was a really interesting piece in the times which talked about an organisation which oversees spelling rules in english which has voted to try and simplify english spellings and apparently it takes three years longer for children learning english to master the language than it does in other languages, sol to master the language than it does in other languages, so i thought it was an interesting reflection on language and having three children who have been through phonics at
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primary school, i can see the challenges of the numerous different ways of spelling words that we have and how difficult that is for children to learn quickly. it’s children to learn quickly. it's interesting, _ children to learn quickly. it's interesting, i— children to learn quickly. it's interesting, i see you were mentioning the english spelling society, apparently advocates the spelling reform included the late prince philip.— prince philip. apparently, yes. certainly people _ prince philip. apparently, yes. certainly people who - prince philip. apparently, yes. certainly people who work - prince philip. apparently, yes. | certainly people who work with dyslexic people have highlighted how challenging english spellings are to master. there were a lot of interesting perspectives on that. this is from the observer, it is interesting household object that can be made from carbon capture. they say that you can make it out of thin air. , , ., , .., they say that you can make it out of thin air. , , ., , .. , they say that you can make it out of thinair. , , ., , , , thin air. this story caught my eye. scientists have _ thin air. this story caught my eye. scientists have worked _ thin air. this story caught my eye. scientists have worked out - thin air. this story caught my eye. scientists have worked out how. thin air. this story caught my eye. scientists have worked out how to j scientists have worked out how to
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use the carbon capture process to make things out of thin air and it has been hailed as something that could be quite transformational in terms of our battle against climate change. apparently thin air can be used to create yoga mats and vodka and toothpaste, apparently. i thought it was a great day for science although they were quick to point out this isn't going to solve all of our climate challenges, it is only one part of the solution. it’s only one part of the solution. it's incredible- _ only one part of the solution. it's incredible. a decent profit margin on that. on friday i interviewed someone he was trying to make rocket fuel out of plastic bottles and polystyrene. it's amazing what is going on in science. ruth marvel, thank you forjoining us this morning. let's have some sport, shall we?
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we are going to start with the fa cup final. just one goal separating the two sides. as we've been hearing, there will be 4,000 fans inside wembley this evening for the fa cup semi—final between leicester and southampton — the latest government pilot event. the winner of that match will face chelsea in the final. they ended manchester city's hopes of an historic quadruple after beating them i—o. it was far from a classic, but chelsea were the better side and hakim ziyech scored the goal their play deserved. they can still win both the fa cup and the champions league this season. we wa nted we wanted to enjoy the extra competition. we know that we are in the champions league semifinal and the champions league semifinal and the race for the top four, we said, k, let's take this as an opportunity to show up on the highest level,
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let's see where we are. they did and it was very good game. there was a crucial victory for newcastle in their bid to avoid relegation in the premier league. they beat west ham 3—2 and are now nine points clear of the drop zone. but confirmation came yesterday that sheffield united are relegated, following their defeat to wolves last night. willianjose scored the only goal at molineux to send them down with six games to spare. it's the end of their two—season stay in the top flight, they managed to finish ninth last season, but have only won four games so far this campaign. so, sheffield united relegated, while norwich city have sealed an immediate return to the premier league. they lost to 3—1 bournemouth last night, but automatic promotion had already been sealed because of results earlier in the day. only watford can now deny them the championship title. premiership winners rangers face holders celtic this afternoon in the fourth round of the scottish cup. aberdeen are already through to the quarter finals after a penalty shoot out win over livingston.
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ross mccrorie scoring the decisive penalty after the match had finished 2—2 after extra time. not a had first game in charge for new aberdeen manager stephen glass. france will play england in next weeks women's six nations final after a comprehensive win over ireland. france — who're ranked fourth in the world — finished top of their pool and ran riot over the irish defence, with cyrielle banet scoring two tries as they won by 56—15. meanwhile, scotland lost to italy. world champion lewis hamilton will hope to make it two wins out of two this season as he starts from pole for this afternoon's emilia romagna grand prix. the mercedes driver took top spot in qualifying by a whisker at imola, the 99th pole position of his career. just behind are the red bulls of sergio perez and max verstappen, with hamilton's team—mate
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valterri bottas down in eighth. he might have been knocked out in the semi—finals of the monte carlo masters — having beaten world number one novak djokovic earlier in the week — but dan evans still has a chance of silverware in the principality today. he's chasing a first career doubles title — alongside fellow brit neal skupski. yesterday's win in the last four means evans has knocked out the top seeds in both singles and doubles this week. great britain have an unassailable lead in their billiejean king cup play—off following katie boulter�*s win over giuliana olmos. the win means great britain progress to next years qualifier for the finals. defending champion ronnie o'sullivan is through to the second round of the world snooker championship. a reduced crowd watched on at the crucible theatre in sheffield as part of the government pilot scheme to reintroduce spectators. o'sullivan beat debutant markjoyce ten frames to four, having struggled for large parts of the match, before finishing strongly. and he said the fans
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were a contributing factor. if there wasn't a crowd i would have sunk even lower into my chair and just thought, can i get out of here as quickly as i can, sort of thing. it is great having a crowd because they feel is you to try a bit, they paid their money to come and watch. there is no betterfeeling. when i look back at some of my best moments and you see the reaction of the crowd, who doesn't like to give them a good night? it really makes a difference, more than 300 fans watching on there. you are heading off. i'm off to read the news for andrew marr on bbc one. now let's get a final look at the weather with louise. hello. not only a nice day but a relatively dry week ahead, certainly a warmer start this week in
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comparison to last week. cooler air is set to return from the middle of the week and gardeners take note. that means we could see a return to some significant frost. but for the here and now we have got some rain around, actually. affecting scotland and northern ireland, it is right and northern ireland, it is right and patchy, starting to move into the isle of man. there is more cloud around, more of a breeze here and fairly murky as well to higher ground. elsewhere some sunshine and with a light southerly breeze across the majority of england and wales it's going to feel noticeably warmer. we could see temperatures peaking at 16. not a bad day for many. as we move through the evening and overnight, but with a front bringing the rain in scotland, drifting north—west out of scotland but just a drifting north—west out of scotland butjust a legacy of cloud as it lurks out in the atlantic. not much in the way of rain overnight but that will prevent temperatures from
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falling too far. we could see some low cloud, mist and fog rolling in off of the north sea affecting eastern england in particular. not as cold start tomorrow morning in comparison to the last few. there will be some sunshine around, favoured spots will be england and wales. the low cloud and fog easing through the day and more sunshine tomorrow in scotland. we could see the odd spit and spot of rain but not amounting to very much. they temperatures will be up. so, as we go through the middle part of the week, the difference is that this high pressure is going to move on from the atlantic. the wind direction will change. we are going to see a return to more of a northerly which will gradually drag that colder air further south. for many, particularly once again on exposed north sea coasts, a dip in
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temperature and a cool breeze coming in. make the most of the sunshine if he can and if you're out and about today, particularly in the peak district, i understand it is quite an important weekend. we are celebrating something. we certainly are! this weekend marks 70 years since the peak district became a national park. it was the first in britain, allowing people to walk on moorland without being prosecuted. judy hobson has the story. piano music plays. this landscape has been protected for 70 years for all of us. 555 square miles of natural beauty. so, this is heading up grindsbrook, up to the top of kinder scout... and it's the job of rangers like anna to help us appreciate it. so, we are kind of the link between the landscape
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and visitors and residents, i guess, so it's about advising people that are coming out, making sure they are having a good time and not doing any damage. the first ranger, i think, had a horse, so, i don't have a horse — that's changed quite a bit. although i do have a pick—up truck, so i can't complain! i would say they were all men at the start, and now it's kind of 50—50. so why was the national park created? this is one of the most popular areas of the peak district, butjust imagine, before the national park was formed, you were not allowed to walk across fantastic open moorland like this. file: the cpre are now fighting for great tracts of land to be - used as national parks. other countries have their national parks, like america's yosemite. workers in cities like manchester and sheffield needed access to the countryside, but the moors were strictly preserved for grouse shooting.
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the mass trespass on kinder scout in 1932 showed the strength of feeling that people should have access to this landscape. the same year, the rights of way act was passed. our town parks have to be cramped, so let us have the great, open country. 19 years later, the peak district becomes britain's first national park — walkers can now stray off footpaths without fear of prosecution. it was hugely important - for the public to be able to roam, to be able to enjoy the countryside on their doorstep. _ it was a green lung for those people. i the peak district is britain's most accessible national park. more than 13 million people visit it every year, 20 million live within an hour's travel. and while here, they can enjoy 1600 miles of public rights of way. the peak district national park
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is probably, in my view, - more relevant today than it has been over the entirety of its 70 _ years of existence. i am really grateful to be able to have these places to explore and see wildlife and get off the beaten track. this is the legacy of those who campaigned for the right to roam, so all of us can appreciate this precious landscape. judy hobson, bbc news. it's one of the nation's best—loved dog breeds. but the old english sheepdog — as seen in dulux adverts — is in danger of dying out in britain, according to the kennel club. last yearjust 227 old english sheepdog puppies were registered with the club — the lowest number in 60 years. let's speak now to bill lambert from the kennel club, and to sean and lucy norwood from the organisation heroes, which rescues and rehomes
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old english sheepdogs. i would like to start with you. why have the numbers dwindled as they have? we have the numbers dwindled as they have? ~ . , ., . have the numbers dwindled as they have? . . , ., . ., have? we are seeing a decline in a lot of the larger _ have? we are seeing a decline in a lot of the larger breeds. _ have? we are seeing a decline in a lot of the larger breeds. the - have? we are seeing a decline in a lot of the larger breeds. the old i lot of the larger breeds. the old english sheepdog is one of our really well loved breeds, we registered 6000 in 1999. you rarely see them now being walked so they have declined and it's a shift in people's living patterns. they are living in cities rather than the countryside. they require a certain degree of exercise but also a lot of greening so they aren't necessarily for everybody. greening so they aren't necessarily for everybody-— greening so they aren't necessarily for eve bod . ., ,., ., for everybody. there are some larger breed dos for everybody. there are some larger breed dogs which _ for everybody. there are some larger breed dogs which are _ for everybody. there are some larger breed dogs which are also _ for everybody. there are some larger breed dogs which are also large - for everybody. there are some larger breed dogs which are also large and i breed dogs which are also large and also require a lot of space and time, and yet those numbers are rising. is there a pattern to what falls out of favour and what becomes
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more popular? irate falls out of favour and what becomes more pepuiar?_ more popular? we think a lot of it is down to — more popular? we think a lot of it is down to seeing _ more popular? we think a lot of it is down to seeing dogs _ more popular? we think a lot of it is down to seeing dogs in - more popular? we think a lot of it is down to seeing dogs in popular| is down to seeing dogs in popular culture and popular media. the queen's corgis were very popular in the 50s and 60s when they were being photographed a lot in the newspapers with her children. we see popular culture now and lots of dogs appearing on social media. i think sometimes people need reminding about our breeds because we have 222 different breeds with different characteristics. it is really important people do their research and find out about the breed that is right for them. who and find out about the breed that is right for them-— right for them. who do you have there? we _ right for them. who do you have there? we have _ right for them. who do you have there? we have bluebell. - right for them. who do you have there? we have bluebell. thenl right for them. who do you have - there? we have bluebell. then we've not dais . there? we have bluebell. then we've
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got daisy- and _ there? we have bluebell. then we've got daisy. and this _ there? we have bluebell. then we've got daisy. and this is _ there? we have bluebell. then we've got daisy. and this is willow. - there? we have bluebell. then we've got daisy. and this is willow. i - got daisy. and this is willow. understand willow has been got daisy. and this is willow._ understand willow has been unwell? willow was born with double hip dysptasia — willow was born with double hip dysptasia. we _ willow was born with double hip dysplasia. we are _ willow was born with double hip dysplasia. we are fundraising i willow was born with double hip dysplasia. we are fundraising to care for— dysplasia. we are fundraising to care for her~ _ dysplasia. we are fundraising to care for her. she's— dysplasia. we are fundraising to care for her. she'sjust - dysplasia. we are fundraising to care for her. she'sjust eight - dysplasia. we are fundraising to i care for her. she'sjust eight weeks old the _ care for her. she'sjust eight weeks old the moment. _ care for her. she's 'ust eight weeks old the moment._ old the moment. they are lovable, faithful and — old the moment. they are lovable, faithful and have _ old the moment. they are lovable, faithful and have a _ old the moment. they are lovable, faithful and have a reputation - old the moment. they are lovable, faithful and have a reputation for i faithful and have a reputation for being incredibly trustworthy but they aren't for everyone, are they? they're not for everyone but there is a large — they're not for everyone but there is a large old english community. we organised _ is a large old english community. we organised a _ is a large old english community. we organised a walk and we had 75 at the walk — organised a walk and we had 75 at the walk. grooming is important, but many— the walk. grooming is important, but many of— the walk. grooming is important, but many of our— the walk. grooming is important, but many of our friends and owners keep them _ many of our friends and owners keep them in _ many of our friends and owners keep them in short coats, it is up to
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personal— them in short coats, it is up to personal choice.— them in short coats, it is up to personal choice. bluebell has a full coat, personal choice. bluebell has a full coat. daisv — personal choice. bluebell has a full coat. daisv has _ personal choice. bluebell has a full coat, daisy has a _ personal choice. bluebell has a full coat, daisy has a shorter— personal choice. bluebell has a full coat, daisy has a shorter coat - personal choice. bluebell has a full coat, daisy has a shorter coat and l coat, daisy has a shorter coat and it's easier— coat, daisy has a shorter coat and it's easier to — coat, daisy has a shorter coat and it's easier to maintain. _ it's easier to maintain. magnificent. _ it's easier to maintain. magnificent. i- it's easier to maintain. magnificent. i wonderl it's easier to maintain. - magnificent. i wonder what led it's easier to maintain. _ magnificent. i wonder what led you to rescuing old english sheepdogs. ads, to rescuing old english sheepdogs. a love of the breed. it'sjust as we've — love of the breed. it'sjust as we've been— love of the breed. it'sjust as we've been working - love of the breed. it'sjust as we've been working with - love of the breed. it'sjust as we've been working with our| love of the breed. it's just as - we've been working with our own dogs and got _ we've been working with our own dogs and got to— we've been working with our own dogs and got to know— we've been working with our own dogs and got to know people, _ we've been working with our own dogs and got to know people, that's - we've been working with our own dogs and got to know people, that's how. and got to know people, that's how we became — and got to know people, that's how we became involved _ and got to know people, that's how we became involved in _ and got to know people, that's how we became involved in helping - and got to know people, that's how we became involved in helping outi we became involved in helping out with rescuing _ we became involved in helping out with rescuing. then— we became involved in helping out with rescuing. then we _ we became involved in helping out with rescuing. then we founded i with rescuing. then we founded heroes — with rescuing. then we founded heroes with— with rescuing. then we founded heroes with a _ with rescuing. then we founded heroes with a colleague. - with rescuing. then we founded heroes with a colleague. heroes is a not-for-profit _ heroes with a colleague. heroes is a not-for-profit organisation. - heroes with a colleague. heroes is a not-for-profit organisation. we - heroes with a colleague. heroes is a not-for-profit organisation. we just | not—for—profit organisation. we just love the _ not—for—profit organisation. we just love the breed and typically english breeders, _ love the breed and typically english breeders, as you said, they are associated _ breeders, as you said, they are associated with dulux and that is
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why they — associated with dulux and that is why they became popular and they are still associated with the brand. the figures _ still associated with the brand. the figures at _ still associated with the brand. the figures at the kennel club quoted, you have _ figures at the kennel club quoted, you have to consider... a figures at the kennel club quoted, you have to consider... its lot figures at the kennel club quoted, you have to consider. . .— you have to consider... a lot of breeders _ you have to consider... a lot of breeders didn't _ you have to consider... a lot of breeders didn't breed - you have to consider... a lot of breeders didn't breed during i you have to consider... a lot of. breeders didn't breed during covid so there _ breeders didn't breed during covid so there was— breeders didn't breed during covid so there was less _ breeders didn't breed during covid so there was less breeding - breeders didn't breed during covid so there was less breeding at - breeders didn't breed during covid so there was less breeding at the| so there was less breeding at the end of— so there was less breeding at the end of last — so there was less breeding at the end of last year. _ so there was less breeding at the end of last year.— end of last year. bill, what you think needs — end of last year. bill, what you think needs to _ end of last year. bill, what you think needs to be _ end of last year. bill, what you think needs to be done - end of last year. bill, what you think needs to be done in - end of last year. bill, what you | think needs to be done in order end of last year. bill, what you i think needs to be done in order to bring this breed back from the brink? i bring this breed back from the brink? .. �* , bring this breed back from the brink? ~ �* , .., bring this breed back from the brink? ~ �* , .. , ., , brink? i think it's educating people and lettin: brink? i think it's educating people and letting them _ brink? i think it's educating people and letting them know— brink? i think it's educating people and letting them know that - brink? i think it's educating people and letting them know that the - brink? i think it's educating people i and letting them know that the breed exists, letting them know the characteristics. it is very important to go to a reputable breeder, someone who really knows about the breed and can tell you the history and why they make good pets in the right environment. most breeders go to a lot of trouble to make sure that the home the puppy is going to is absolutely right for
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them. it's very important you go to them. it's very important you go to the right breeder in the first place. the right breeder in the first lace. . .. the right breeder in the first lace. . ~' ,. , the right breeder in the first lace. ., ~' , . the right breeder in the first lace. . ,, , ~ ., place. thank you very much for 'oinin: place. thank you very much for joining us _ place. thank you very much for joining us this _ place. thank you very much for joining us this morning. - that's it from breakfast today. dan and louise will be back tomorrow morning from 6:00. have a great day.
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this is bbc world news. our top stories: the two russian men suspected of carrying out the salisbury nerve agent attack three years ago are being sought by police in the czech republic. a senior conservative mp warns borisjohnson he'll lose the support of the so—called red wall voters in former labour seats, unless he resolves the row about lobbying. cannon fires. a day of refelection for members of the royal family, after the queen and the nation bid farewell to the duke of edinburgh. china and the us commit to working together and with other countries on tackling climate change.
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once the world's largest iceberg, but now it's broken apart.

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