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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 18, 2021 9:00am-9:30am BST

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this is bbc world news. our top stories: the two russian men suspected of carrying out the salisbury nerve agent attack three years ago are being sought by police in the czech republic. a senior conservative mp warns borisjohnson he'll lose the support of the so—called red wall voters in former labour seats, unless he resolves the row about lobbying. cannon fires. a day of refelection for members of the royal family, after the queen and the nation bid farewell to the duke of edinburgh. china and the us commit to working together and with other countries on tackling climate change.
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once the world's largest iceberg, but now it's broken apart. satellite images show the mega—berg has virtually gone. hello and welcome to bbc news. police in the czech republic say they want to question the two russian men suspected of carrying out the salisbury nerve agent attack, after linking them to a fatal explosion four years earlier. 18 russian diplomats have been expelled from prague, after the czech government said there was strong evidence moscow was involved in the blast. gareth barlow reports. the czech republic, 2014. an explosion at an arms depot leaves two people dead. an explosion at an arms depot leaves two people dead,
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damages nearby homes and send smoke rising from the ruins. following years of investigations, the czech authorities allege these two men were behind the blast. alexander mishkin and anatoliy chepiga, also known as alexander petrov and ruslan boshirov, the two russian intelligence officers the uk says in 2018 carried out the poisoning of a former russian agent on british soil. announcing the news on saturday, the czech foreign minister said 18 russian diplomats would now have to leave the country. translation: as foreign minister of the czech republic, i made the decision to expel all personnel at the russian embassy in prague, identified by our secret services as officers of russia's secret services. within 48 hours, 18 staff of the russian embassy must leave the czech republic. the czech prime minister said the two suspects were members of the gru, russia's military intelligence service. a senior russian parliamentarian called the claim absurd.
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it all follows tit—for—tat expulsions of diplomats by the us and russia at the end of last week and western concern over the build—up of russian troops along the ukrainian border. the latest development a serious escalation in a region that is already on a political knife edge. gareth barlow, bbc news. a senior british conservative mp has warned borisjohnson he'll lose the support of the so—called red wall voters in former labour seats, unless he resolves the row about lobbying. an inquiry has begun into the former uk prime minister david cameron's communications with cabinet ministers while he was working for the collapsed finance firm, greensill capital. our political correspondent nick eardley is with me. this is a row over lobbying that has been going on for quite a few weeks. but talk about the political ramifications of the potential possible political ramifications of all of this. figs possible political ramifications of all of this. �* , possible political ramifications of allofthis. a possible political ramifications of all ofthis. a ., possible political ramifications of allofthis. a ., all of this. as you say, we have sad this stream — all of this. as you say, we have sad this stream of— all of this. as you say, we have sad this stream of stories _ all of this. as you say, we have sad this stream of stories over - all of this. as you say, we have sad this stream of stories over the - all of this. as you say, we have sad this stream of stories over the pasti this stream of stories over the past month or so, some of them about
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david cameron and his lobbying of ministers, some about potential conflict—of—interest, notjust a cabinet ministers but also senior civil servants as well. and i think there is an increasing nervousness at westminster this is damaging trust in politics but also within the conservative party that this is having a real impact on them. so bernard jenkin who has been a tory mp since 1992 is a fairly prominent figure in the party. he is saying that unless borisjohnson gets on top of this and persuade people that something is being done to address these perceived conflicts of interest and the blurring of the boundaries, then people will lose trust in his government and in particular those people who voted conservative in the general election partly because they were standing up for brexit, they will lose trust in
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the government and potentially they will stop voting conservative in national elections in scotland and wales and local elections in england. the thing a lot of people are starting to think about is the story has been going on for so long and there is a real spotlight now on the relationship between government and the private sector. and unless he gets on top of this issue, thus trust —— those trust issues will get worse. he has asked a senior lawyer to look into greensill capital. there are eight different probes going on now. i think we will hear from david cameron at some of the
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enquiry is that mps are going to hold. it is this broad question of the relationship between private and public sectors and although the government are arguing that they are taking this seriously, there is also that perception, isn't there, that for a lot of people this would fail the sniff test. if you sniff it and it doesn't smell right, then something needs to be done. and i think were probably at that point now where you're going to hear conservative mps and others saying this is not going away and you need to get on top of it. hick this is not going away and you need to get on top of it.— to get on top of it. nick eardley, thank you _ to get on top of it. nick eardley, thank you very _ to get on top of it. nick eardley, thank you very much _ to get on top of it. nick eardley, thank you very much indeed. - the duke of edinburgh has been remembered for his humour humanity as he was laid to rest at st george's chapel in windsor. the service was restrained, in line with the duke's wishes and coronavirus guidelines. princes william and harry were seen chatting together as they left the service. the period of official national mourning has now come to an end.
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our royal correspondent nicholas witchell looks back on a funeral that was watched by millions around the world. drawn up in the spring sunshine on the castle's quadrangle were the military detachments. they stood with heads bowed and rifles reversed. the scale was smaller than would have been the case without the pandemic — though that's hardly something that would've troubled the duke. he, after all, had choreographed much of what was to follow. the land rover hearse, which the duke had helped to design, moved to its position by the state entrance. the duke's coffin was borne on the shoulders of a bearer party from the grenadier guards. the coffin was covered
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with the duke's personal standard and surmounted with his sword and naval cap, and a wreath from the queen. with great care, it was placed on the hearse. behind the hearse were members of the royalfamily, who were walking to the chapel, headed by the prince of wales. a royal salute sounded and the first sight of the queen, accompanied by a lady in waiting, in the state bentley, taking position as the order was given for the procession to step off. he issues command. bell tolls. band plays. bell tolls.
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close by was one of the horse—drawn carriages the duke had taken such pleasure in driving. on the seat, his cap and gloves. among the members of the family walking behind the coffin were princes william and harry — the focus of so much attention — walking with their cousin peter phillips between them. bell tolls. the procession wound its way past the castle's round tower. by the side entrance to st george's chapel, other members of the royal family stood with their heads bowed. the queen made her way into the chapel, pausing to look back as the hearse moved on down the hill. on the wreath of white roses and lilies on the coffin was a card, on which were the handwritten words
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"in loving memory". before they entered the chapel, the bearer party paused as a field gun signalled the start of a one—minute silence. the service began with a tribute to the duke from the dean of windsor. we have been inspired by his unwavering loyalty to our queen, by his service to the nation and the commonwealth, by his courage, fortitude and faith. the small congregation sat in its family groups. the queen sat alone. so did prince harry. after the prayers and the commendation, a distinctive touch typical of the duke — royal marine buglers sounded the royal navy's call to action stations.
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and finally, at the end of her husband's funeral, the choir sang the national anthem. seldom can its words have had greater poignancy. # god save the queen #. the family mourners departed, a widowed queen to her castle, and two brothers, william and harry, walked away together, alongside the duchess of cambridge. the duke of edinburgh is gone, but the brothers know that he would have wanted the family to move on and for differences to be healed. nicholas witchell, bbc news. let's speak now to victoria murphy, royal commentator and contributing editor at town and country magazine.
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thank you for being with us. i suppose that image of the queen alone there will be the abiding image of this funeral?- alone there will be the abiding image of this funeral? good morning. yes, i image of this funeral? good morning. yes. i don't — image of this funeral? good morning. yes, i don't think _ image of this funeral? good morning. yes, i don't think it's _ image of this funeral? good morning. yes, i don't think it's any _ image of this funeral? good morning. yes, i don't think it's any surprise - yes, i don't think it's any surprise that so many of the newspapers this morning went with that picture on the front page, a powerful image of the front page, a powerful image of the queen looking very small, alone, sitting on those grand pews of st george's chapel. she is bubbling with staff and was not able to form a bubble with any other family members. it is representative of the times we are in and a visual of the queen on her own as a widow. i suppose the duke who planned this whole funeral quite meticulously would have been pleased with the way it went? i would have been pleased with the way it went? ., would have been pleased with the way it went? ~ , ,
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would have been pleased with the way itwent? , , , ., _ it went? i think so, yes. obviously it went? i think so, yes. obviously it had to be _ it went? i think so, yes. obviously it had to be very _ it went? i think so, yes. obviously it had to be very much _ it went? i think so, yes. obviously it had to be very much scaled - it went? i think so, yes. obviously it had to be very much scaled back at the last minute and has been in the planning for many years. but we have repeatedly been told that the service yesterday still very much reflected his wishes and i think some of what really came across was this combination of the profile, the role he had, the position he had, but also the man that he was. you had his royalflag, his insignia, his long list of titles read out, but you also had things reflecting the presley was behind—the—scenes, is interesting reflected in the land rover and the carriage as he loved carriage driving. and i think the visual of his naval cap on top of the coffin, reminding us of the active service he gave and the career he gave up to support the queen in her duties. and that sums up queen in her duties. and that sums up his legacy. the queen in her duties. and that sums up his legacy-— up his legacy. the papers are reflecting _ up his legacy. the papers are reflecting on _ up his legacy. the papers are reflecting on william - up his legacy. the papers are reflecting on william and - up his legacy. the papers are i reflecting on william and harry talking to each other after the
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funeral, looking like they perhaps are healing the rift between them, who knows, but certainly breaking the ice? , . ., who knows, but certainly breaking theice? , . .,~ ., , �* the ice? exactly. who knows. but there was a _ the ice? exactly. who knows. but there was a lot _ the ice? exactly. who knows. but there was a lot of _ the ice? exactly. who knows. but there was a lot of discussion - the ice? exactly. who knows. but| there was a lot of discussion when it was revealed that they would not be walking shoulder to shoulder in the ceremony, but because peter phillips was not in line with them, it actually looked like they could have been side by side. at the end of the service, they provided us with a visual that does counteract the suggestions they are not speaking and an idea that this rift has become so deep that they cannot walk side by side. we know there is a lot for them to work through, but it seems that perhaps those conversations have started. find it seems that perhaps those conversations have started. and the duke has been _ conversations have started. and the duke has been such _ conversations have started. and the duke has been such a _ conversations have started. and the duke has been such a stabilising - duke has been such a stabilising influence on the monarchy for such a long period of time. inevitably some of the papers talking about the future of the monarchy?- future of the monarchy? yeah, exactl . future of the monarchy? yeah, exactly. you've _ future of the monarchy? yeah, exactly. you've seen _
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future of the monarchy? yeah, exactly. you've seen the - future of the monarchy? yeah, | exactly. you've seen the queen future of the monarchy? yeah, i exactly. you've seen the queen in recent years, she is handed over some of her responsibilities to prince charles and other family members who step in for her. i think it's possible we will see a continuation of that as she turns 95 soon. the platinumjubilee is in the planning for next year. when day—to—day engagements resume, we will see her take up her duties. even in the morning period, she has done an audience and the idea that she is carrying on with her duties, that prevails —— even in the morning period. the two russian men suspected of carrying out the salisbury nerve agent attack three years ago are being sought by police in the czech republic a senior conservative mp warns
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borisjohnson he'll lose the support of the so—called red wall voters in former labour seats — unless he resolves the row about lobbying. a day of refelection for members of the royal family, after the queen and the nation bid farewell to the duke of edinburgh. more now on the news that police in the czech republic are looking to question the two russian men suspected of carrying out the salisbury nerve agent attack after linking them to a fatal explosion four years earlier. dominic raab says the actions were reckless and dangerous. our correspondent in prague joins reckless and dangerous. our correspondent in praguejoins us now. what is the latest on this. what are the authorities in the czech republic saying?- what are the authorities in the czech republic saying? there are 18 members of — czech republic saying? there are 18 members of the _ czech republic saying? there are 18 members of the russian _ czech republic saying? there are 18 members of the russian diplomatic| members of the russian diplomatic corps in prague who are now packing their bags. they have been given 48
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hours to leave. the authorities say those 18 are the members of the embassy that they have identified as members of russia's security services. eitherthe members of russia's security services. either the gru or the svr. they are on their way back to moscow within the hours that come, but this comes at a very delicate time for relations between russia and the czech republic. tomorrow, the deputy prime minister was due to fly to moscow to discuss the reordering of the vaccine against covid. that is now not happening. there were also plans to modernise a nuclear power station and that is under question now because relations between russia and the czech republic, this is perhaps their lowest since the fall of the iron curtain. tell perhaps their lowest since the fall of the iron curtain.—
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of the iron curtain. tell us more about what _ of the iron curtain. tell us more about what the _ of the iron curtain. tell us more about what the agents - of the iron curtain. tell us more about what the agents are - of the iron curtain. tell us more i about what the agents are accused of the iron curtain. tell us more - about what the agents are accused of doing and why they would want to have done this?— have done this? well, there are allegations _ have done this? well, there are allegations and _ have done this? well, there are allegations and authorities - have done this? well, there are allegations and authorities say i have done this? well, there are - allegations and authorities say they have strong suspicion that military intelligence was involved in this explosion or series of explosions at a czech munitions facility in 2014. but that's the question, why would they do something tantamount to some sources to an act of war against this country? all the information, all the unconfirmed information in the czech media is that these two men were sent to booby—trap a consignment of arms bound for ukraine in 2014. ukraine were fighting russia back rebels in the east of the country at the time. they were alleged to have booby—trapped a consignment and for some reason the device went off too early and exploded not in ukraine as
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had been planned but in the czech republic, setting off an explosion that detonated 50 tonnes of munitions held at that facility and killing two people. so it was an operation that in a sense went disastrously wrong and led to the loss of life for these two czech employees. loss of life for these two czech employees-— the number of covid—19 deaths around the world has risen to more than three million. the latest figures show that most fatalities have been in the united states, followed by brazil, mexico and india. more than 370,000 people have now died from coronavirus in brazil. yet president bolsonaro refuses to lock down despite a sharp rise in infections. and the effects of the pandemic are widening the divide between the rich and the poor. six out of ten families no longer has sufficient access to food, and what started as a health crisis, has now become a social crisis. mark lowen has this report from sao paolo.
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every day, the faces of despair multiply. the food lines in sao paulo's largest favela go on and on. with most here working in the grey economy, covid has destroyed jobs. queues have more than tripled in recent months, as the pandemic takes lives and livelihoods of brazil's poorest. i am very worried that if coronavirus gets worse, people in the favela will turn to crime or start looting supermarkets, says this man. when a father are starving and trying to feed his children, desperation hits. for this woman and her family, this is now their only meal of the day. she lost herjob in a manicure studio with the pandemic and they are unable to pay the rent. translation: i've lost hope. we will have to live on the street or under a bridge soon. sometimes i think i should give my
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children away to social services. with the pandemic, six out of ten brazilian households now lack sufficient access to food. government hand—outs last year helped, but they've been reduced as money runs scarce. covid has gone from health crisis to acute social one, too, as brazil's profound inequality deepens. no such concerns for the wealthiest food producers and backers of the president. it's corn harvest time on this man's 1,300 hectares. the agricultural richness of this country makes hunger hard to fathom.
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president bolsonaro, he says, is cutting through a corrupt establishment. but with the president's anti lockdown stance, slow vaccine purchase and more than 365,000 dead here, his critics call his handling genocidal. the president bolsonaro is not focused on killing anyone. - he wants to preserve - the liberties of the people. he wants people to get out, to get to work. - the cost of that is the second worst death toll in the world and a hospital collapse. no, it's not true because 365,000, we don't know if they died by corona. with a public health disaster, economic woes and a divisive leader, brazil is facing a perfect storm. it urgently needs a way out from the darkness of the pandemic. but there is still no sign of it or of the hope this devastated nation craves. mark lowen, bbc news, sao paulo. the united states and china say they are committed to working together on tackling climate change.
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after several meetings via videocall between the american climate envoy, john kerry, and his chinese counterpart, they also agreed to take action to reduce emissions, as well as to help developing countries to finance a switch to low—carbon energy. the united nations nuclear agency has confirmed that iran has started enriching uranium to higher levels than previously achieved, complicating ongoing international talks over a deal with tehran. the international atomic energy agency said the natanz plant had produced uranium of 60% purity, bringing it closer to the level required for nuclear weapons. what was once the world's largest iceberg has finally broken apart. a—68, as it was known, covered an area of nearly 2,300 square miles when it broke away from antarctica in 2017. but satellite images show the mega—berg has now virtually gone, broken into countless small fragments that the us national ice center says are no longer worth tracking. here's our science
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correspondent, victoria gill. a 1—billion tonne block of ice. when iceberg a—68 broke away from antarctica back in 2017, it measured more than 2,300 square miles — a quarter the size of wales. it was only by imaging it from space that scientists could actually follow the massive iceberg's journey as it inched its way north. at one point, it was on a direct collision course with the antarctic island of south georgia, potentially threatening to cut off vast populations of penguins and seals. but it was off that coast in the open ocean swell that the world's largest iceberg broke apart and now that it's officially been declared deceased, the scientists who've been following itsjourney so they are surprised it survived as long as it did. so this thing is incredibly fragile and flexible as it moved around the oceans. it lasted for years like that as it moved around but eventually broke into four, five pieces and then
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those broke up again. but the end point for some of these fragments was quite interesting because just very suddenly overnight, theyjust fragmented into millions of little tiny pieces and you can see that on the satellite data. and that process, i think, is something that needs studying a little bit more because it might tell us a little bit about how ice shelves will break up in the future. a—68 being the size of a small country made it the focus of global media attention. but the breaking away, or calving, of these giant icebergs is a natural part of the ebb and flow of the dynamic ice shelf. does the whole journey and the break—up and demise of an iceberg of this scale, does it give you any insight into how climate change is going to affect the ice sheets at large in antarctica? one event on its own can't tell us that much but what we're looking at is the regularity of these events. are they becoming more frequent?
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and an iceberg calving is a big factor in ice loss from antarctica. so, if these iceberg calving events are becoming more frequent, then it is a really important factor that we need to be looking at and researching. while a—68 will be remembered as a social media star that was visible from space, scientists will now be turning their attention to the newest chasm on the edge of the vast ice sheet and the next giant berg to set off on its own epicjourney. victoria gill, bbc news. there is a lot of dry weather and the forecast for the rest of the day and for the week ahead. some beautiful spring sunshine and feeling quite pleasant out there now. it looks as though the beginning of this week will be a bit warmer than last week because of the
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wind direction, but the wind changes once again, noticeably cooler from midweek. we could see a return to more significant showers. there is some rain over western scotland, northern ireland and the isle of man. more cloud into western fringes of wales and south—west england as well. forthe of wales and south—west england as well. for the remainder of the day, dry and settled with a light breeze. temperatures will respond. we could see the highs of 15 or 16 degrees. a bit cooler into the far north under the cloud, one of a breeze here and it stays quite murky as well at higher ground. that weather front will retreat further north and west overnight but it still sitting out in the atlantic and it's still going to continue to bring quite a lot of cloud into the far north—west, so here it will stay on the mild side through the night. we could draw in a bit more low cloud and fog through the vale of york, into lincolnshire and perhaps into north norfolk as
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well. not as cold start as previous mornings. we keep those temperatures up mornings. we keep those temperatures up just above freezing for many. so on monday are largely dry story to begin with. that fog will be burning its way back to the north sea. good sunshine coming through. cloudy with light patchy rain into the western isles. maybe 17 degrees is the expected high. it looks like as we move out of monday into tuesday that this area of high pressure is going to build in from the atlantic and drift its way steadily eastwards. that will push and we cannot weather front considerably but more importantly it means a change of wind direction. more of a northerly flow which will drag slightly cooler air across the country and that will mean a change to the feel of the weather. and so particularly on those exposed east coasts, cooler with the breeze coming in off the sea. take care.
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this is bbc world news. the headlines. the two russian men suspected of carrying out the salisbury nerve agent attack three years ago are being sought by police in the czech republic. a senior conservative mp warns borisjohnson he'll lose the support of the so—called red wall voters in former labour seats — unless he resolves the row about lobbying. a day of refelection for members of the royal family, after the queen and the nation bid farewell to the duke of edinburgh. china and the us commit to working together and with other countries on tackling climate change.

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