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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 18, 2021 1:00pm-1:30pm BST

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good afternoon. the environment secretary, george eustice, has told the bbc that the government will "look at" any recommendations made to change the rules around lobbying.
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inquiries have begun into former prime minister david cameron's communications with cabinet ministers while working for the collapsed firm greensill capital. it comes as a senior conservative mp warned borisjohnson he'd lose support from former labour voters unless he resolves the lobbying row. here's our political correspondent, nick eardley. david cameron's lobbying of ministers on behalf of a finance company has led to wider questions about the relationship between government and the private sector and about possible conflicts of interest. a number of enquiries have been set up to look at the issues. the environment secretary used to work for mr cameron. he insisted his former boss hadn't broken the rules but there was a hint that the rules might have to change. it but there was a hint that the rules might have to change.— might have to change. it may be something _ might have to change. it may be something that _ might have to change. it may be something that is _ might have to change. it may be something that is looked - might have to change. it may be something that is looked at - might have to change. it may be something that is looked at as i might have to change. it may be something that is looked at as a | something that is looked at as a result of all this and i said there's a number of parliamentary committees that are exploring it. it absolutely matters to the prime
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minister, which is why he set up a review. �* ., ., , ., , ., minister, which is why he set up a review. �* ., ., ,, ,, ., �* review. but not to you, you don't think there's _ review. but not to you, you don't think there's a _ review. but not to you, you don't think there's a big _ review. but not to you, you don't think there's a big problem? - review. but not to you, you don't think there's a big problem? no, i think there's a big problem? no, what i'm think there's a big problem? no, what i'm saying _ think there's a big problem? no, what i'm saying is _ think there's a big problem? iirr, what i'm saying is there may be a problem which is why we've set up a review. , . ., . , ., review. there is concern this row will impact _ review. there is concern this row will impact on — review. there is concern this row will impact on trust _ review. there is concern this row will impact on trust in _ review. there is concern this row will impact on trust in politics. i will impact on trust in politics. lobbying is part of what goes on here, lots of people try to influence their mps in different ways. but listen to this, from a senior tory... ways. but listen to this, from a senior tory- - -— ways. but listen to this, from a senior tory... boris defeated what he regarded. _ senior tory. .. boris defeated what he regarded, has— senior tory... boris defeated what he regarded, has described - senior tory... boris defeated what he regarded, has described as, . senior tory... boris defeated what | he regarded, has described as, and out of— he regarded, has described as, and out of touch— he regarded, has described as, and out of touch elite in the 2016 referendum. won a general election victory _ referendum. won a general election victory he — referendum. won a general election victory. he is seen as different from _ victory. he is seen as different from his— victory. he is seen as different from his predecessors. and he has won a _ from his predecessors. and he has won a lot _ from his predecessors. and he has won a lot of— from his predecessors. and he has won a lot of support as a consequence and he will lose that support— consequence and he will lose that support unless he acts decisively now _ support unless he acts decisively now. . , ., �* , support unless he acts decisively now. . �*, support unless he acts decisively now. �*, , now. labour's rachel reeves faced auestions now. labour's rachel reeves faced questions this _ now. labour's rachel reeves faced questions this morning _ now. labour's rachel reeves faced questions this morning about - now. labour's rachel reeves faced questions this morning about why l now. labour's rachel reeves faced i questions this morning about why the former labour first minister of wales took a job despite being advised not to buy an independent committee. the party thinks the rules more broadly need tightening
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up. rules more broadly need tightening u, . ., �* , rules more broadly need tightening up. what we've seen this week is that tory sleaze _ up. what we've seen this week is that tory sleaze is _ up. what we've seen this week is that tory sleaze is back _ up. what we've seen this week is that tory sleaze is back and - up. what we've seen this week is that tory sleaze is back and it's l that tory sleaze is back and it's bigger— that tory sleaze is back and it's bigger than_ that tory sleaze is back and it's bigger than ever. _ that tory sleaze is back and it's bigger than ever. we _ that tory sleaze is back and it's bigger than ever. we need - that tory sleaze is back and it's bigger than ever. we need reali bigger than ever. we need real change — bigger than ever. we need real change to— bigger than ever. we need real change to restore _ bigger than ever. we need real change to restore trust - bigger than ever. we need real change to restore trust in - bigger than ever. we need real change to restore trust in our. change to restore trust in our democracy— change to restore trust in our democracy and _ change to restore trust in our democracy and in _ change to restore trust in our democracy and in the - change to restore trust in our democracy and in the very. change to restore trust in our- democracy and in the very essence of public— democracy and in the very essence of public service, — democracy and in the very essence of public service, which _ democracy and in the very essence of public service, which matters - democracy and in the very essence of public service, which matters to - democracy and in the very essence of public service, which matters to so i public service, which matters to so many _ public service, which matters to so many of _ public service, which matters to so many of us — public service, which matters to so many of us and _ public service, which matters to so many of us. and matters _ public service, which matters to so many of us. and matters to - public service, which matters to soi many of us. and matters to people public service, which matters to so . many of us. and matters to people in our countrx — many of us. and matters to people in our country-— our country. we've seen a steady stream of — our country. we've seen a steady stream of questions _ our country. we've seen a steady stream of questions in _ our country. we've seen a steady stream of questions in recent - our country. we've seen a steady i stream of questions in recent weeks about the connections between politics and private companies. many from government to opposition are now looking for answers. nick eardley, bbc news. two russian men suspected of carrying out the salisbury poisonings are being linked to an explosion at an arms depot in the czech republic in 2014. the bbc has learnt details of a trail of evidence linking the explosion to a unit of russian military intelligence. 18 russian diplomats are being expelled from prague over the incident. our security correspondent, gordon correra, is here. what is the link between salisbury and what happened in the czech
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republic? and what happened in the czech reublic? ~ , , ., republic? when this explosion ha--ened republic? when this explosion happened in — republic? when this explosion happened in 2014 _ republic? when this explosion happened in 2014 it _ republic? when this explosion happened in 2014 it was - republic? when this explosion i happened in 2014 it was assumed republic? when this explosion - happened in 2014 it was assumed to be an accident, killing two people and only under the salisbury poisoning that investigators started to go back over some pieces of the puzzle and re—examine them. one of the things they found was an e—mail requesting access to the arms depot, which blew up with the names of two people who wanted to visit it and when they looked at the pictures attached to the passport scans requesting that access, they could see these were the same images as the men who were alleged to have carried out the salisbury poisoning. they entered the czech republic using the same cover names that they used when coming to the uk in 2018. a trail of evidence built up suggesting the same unit of russian military intelligence carried out this blast in 2014 possibly targeting a bulgarian arms dealer and some of those individuals had gone on to carry out the salisbury poisoning. russia has denied any role in this but the czech s are
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taking this seriously. they are suggesting another sign of growing intelligence russian activity. gordon, thank you much indeed. more than 200,000 new cases of coronavirus have been recorded in india for three days in a row, taking the total number to nearly 14.5 million. it makes it the world's second worst infected country behind the united states. india has also suffered one of the highest number of fatalities. the global number of covid—19 deaths has now passed 3 million. in brazil, more than 370,000 people have now died. yet the president there, jair bolsonaro, refuses to lock down despite a sharp rise in infections. mark lowen reports from sao paolo. every day, the faces of despair multiply. the food lines in sao paulo's largest favela go on and on. with most here working in the grey economy, covid has destroyed jobs.
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queues have more than tripled in recent months, as the pandemic takes lives and livelihoods of brazil's poorest. for luciana firmino and herfamily, this is now their only meal of the day. she lost herjob in a manicure studio with the pandemic and they're unable to pay the rent. translation: i've lost hope. we will have to live on the street or under a bridge soon. sometimes, i think i should give my children away to social services. she sobs. with the pandemic, six out of ten brazilians households now lack sufficient access to food. government hand—outs last year helped, but they've been reduced as money ran scarce. no such concerns for the wealthiest food producers and backers of the president.
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it's corn harvest time on federico da vila's 1,300 hectares. frederico da vila's 1,300 hectares. but with the president's anti—lockdown stance, slow vaccine purchase, and more than 365,000 dead here, his critics call his handling genocidal. the president bolsonaro is not focused on killing anyone, he want to preserve the liberties of the people. he want people to get... to get out, to get work. with the public health disaster, economic woes, and a divisive leader, brazil is facing a perfect storm. it urgently needs a way out from the darkness of the pandemic. mark lowen, bbc news, sao paulo. football will take its first step towards having fans back in stadiums later when leicester play southampton in the fa cup semifinal. 4,000 supporters are being allowed in wembley as part of a coronavirus trial. yesterday, fans were allowed into the crucible theatre in sheffield, for the start
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of the world snooker championship. what was the biggest iceberg in the world has completely broken up. a68, as it was known, measured around 2,300 square miles when it broke away from antarctica, in 2017. here's victoria gill. a1 billion tonne block of ice. when iceberg a68 broke away from antarctica back in 2017, it measured more than 2,300 square miles, a quarter the size of wales. it was only by imaging it from space that scientists could actually follow the massive iceberg's journey as it inched its way north. at one point, it was on a direct collision course with the antarctic island of south georgia, potentially threatening to cut off vast populations of penguins and seals. but it was off that coast in the open ocean swell that the world's largest iceberg broke apart. it lasted for years like that, as it moved around,
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but eventually broke in two, four, five pieces and then those broke up again. but the end point for some of these fragments was quite interesting because just very suddenly overnight, theyjust fragmented into millions of little tiny pieces. and you could see that on the satellite data. and that process, i think, is something that needs studying a little bit more because it might tell us a little bit about how ice shelves break up in the future. a68 being the size of a small country made at the focus country made it the focus of global media attention. but the breaking away or calving of these giant icebergs is a natural part of the ebb and flow of the dynamic ice shelf. what we are looking at is the regularity of these events — are they becoming more frequent? and iceberg travelling is a big factor in ice loss from antarctica. so, if these iceberg calving events are becoming more frequent, then it's a really important factor that we need to be looking at and researching. while a68 will be remembered as a social media star
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that was visible from space, scientists will now be turning their attention to the newest chasm on the edge of the vast ice sheet and the next giant berg to set off on its own epicjourney. victoria gill, bbc news. you can see more on all of today's stories on the bbc news channel. the next news on bbc one is at 5.35pm, bye for now. goodbye for now. hello. you're watching the bbc news channel. let's get more now the news that the czech republic wants to question two russian men suspected of carrying out the salisbury nerve agent attack, after linking them to a fatal explosion four years earlier. earlier i spoke to mark galeotti, author and russia crime analyst. i asked him what he thought the russians were up to in the czech republic?
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it seems that the munitions which exploded in 2014 were about to be bought by a bulgarian arms dealer and then transformed to ukraine. this was the point that russia had just annexed the crimean peninsula so it looks like this was an attempt to deprive the ukrainians of munitions. the arms dealer also got caught with another chalk, which suggests a pattern. it also suggests a certain pattern of blunders. the speculation at the moment is that the gru officers had booby—trapped the munitions and they wanted it to go off until later, perhaps in ukraine. so it's an unfortunate mix of malice, covert operations and incompetence.
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these two characters, we know their faces from the aftermath of the salisbury attack. they said they were in salisbury to look at the cathedral and its spire. what would you say then about what it says about the gru and russian intelligence generally? talk about a level of incompetence? the kremlin has basically been operating in a wartime footing since 2014. they're much less bothered about being named and shamed, called out and activities being identified because they feel they are in this existential political struggle with the west. in the past, the gru has not suffered political damage from apparent embarrassments. they set the moment that russia
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feels that it can and must operate these kind of covert sabotage operations which are nudging closer to the boundaries of what we would consider to be an act of war because it can get away with it, basically. until quite recently, the czechs have been quite reticent but they have now pivoted. the russians are almost proud of these covert operations that they seem to be running in quite a few countries around the world 7 they are basically operating at the same kind of tempo and aggression as at the peak of the cold war in the west, at least. there is not pride if things go wrong, but if you look at the gru itself, its culture is to be an action centred organisation. they control the russian special forces. i remember once talking to a former gru officer.
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there is a sense of themselves as a match oh risk wartime operation. so for at least britain has been encouraging them to go out and break stuff. we have had a reaction from moscow. the russian ministry of foreign affairs have said that they will be taking tough retaliatory measures against the czech republic over their expulsion of those 18 diplomats. they say we will take retaliatory measures that will force the authors of this provocation, says moscow, to fully understand the foundation of normal ties between
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our countries. foundation of normal ties between our countries. the royal family has honoured the duke of edinburgh's "humour and humanity" as he was laid to rest at st george's chapel in windsor yesterday. just 30 people were allowed to attend — in line with covid restrictions. the queen sat alone, days before she turns 95. the royal family will continue to mourn the loss of prince philip this week, while the period of national mourning has come to an end. supporters of the russian opposition politician, alexei navalny have warned that he risks dying in prison �*in a matter of days' — after more than two weeks on hunger strike. sophia tran—thomson reports. he is vladimir putin's most vocal opposition activist. even from the penal colony east of moscow where he is being held, alexei navalny�*s anti—kremlin rhetoric has continued. but after 18 days on hunger strike, a doctor who received blood test results showing navalny has dangerously high levels
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of potassium in his system, says he could die in prison. he wrote on social media, our patient could die at any moment. and said he should be observed in intensive care. fatal arrhythmia can develop, causing cardiac arrest. navalny is on hunger strike to demand access to an independent medic, after his lawyer said he was suffering from two spinal hernias and was beginning to lose feelings in his hand. the prominent anti—corruption campaign are a near fatal poisoning with a nerve agent last summer. when he returned to russia, he was arrested on arrival and is serving two and half years on a fraud charge widely seen as politically motivated. vladimir putin is a killer. he tried to kill navalny last year and now put and feels he can finish the job. britain has a history. he has been in powerfor 21 years and he recently signed this law that
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will allow him to stay in power for the rest of his life. he is a dictator. we are on the verge of another tragic death of an opposition leader in russia. and unless you do something now, your ambassadors can go lay flowers at the place of navalny�*s murder, like they do now on the bridge where my great friend and ally was murdered. president biden has condemned the treatment of navalny, calling it unfair and completely inappropriate. on friday, the prosecutorfiled a lawsuit to declare a network of political offices as extremist organisations. threatening the anyone linked could face criminal prosecution. but his supporters are pressing ahead with plans to protest, to demand his release once they get half a million signatures of support. with some 50,000 still to go, they now say his deteriorating health makes that rally more urgent than ever. sophia tran—thomson, bbc news.
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speaking on the andrew marr show russia's ambassador to uk, andrei kelin, was asked if mr navalny would be allowed to die in prison. of course he will not be allowed to die in prison but i can say that— alexei navalny behaves like a hooligan. his purpose with all that is to attract attention for him. also saying that today is left hand is sick, tomorrow it is is leg that is second all that stuff. the european court human rights has ruled that the charges against him for money laundering they say are between and unfair. isn't it true that he is in prison because he is a threat to president putin for democratic reasons. not at all. he has violated his terms of parole and that is why he has been given a sentence and i have to say that julian assigned here in britain was arrested british police
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because he had also violated terms of parole. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's chetan. good afternoon. fans return to wembley this afternoon, with 4,000 set to be in attendance for the fa cup semi final between leicester and southampton as part of a government pilot event, tickets have been limited to local residents and key workers. awaiting the winners in the final are chelsea who ended manchester city's hopes of winning a quadruple. they made the breakthrough in the second half as timo werner set up hakim ziyech for the only goal of the game. it's a fourth fa cup final in five years for them. in the english premier league, where sheffield united have been relegated following their 1—0 defeat to wolves, it's another big day in the fight for survival third from bottom fulham, who are seven points from safety, kick off at arsenal at 1:30. second placed manchester united
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take on burnley at 4pm. there's an old firm derby at ibrox to look forward to this afternoon in the last 16 of the scottish cup. rangers are going for the double after clinching their first league title in a decade, whilst the holders celtic have won the cup four seasons running. league 2 stranraer are currently hosting premiership hibernian, and hibs lead 1—0 in that one with the second halfjust underway. after the holders manchester city thrashed aston villa 8—0, there are 14 more matches in the fourth round of the women's fa cup this afternoon. it's currently half time between birmingham city and coventry, with the home side inil up thanks to claudia walker's early goal. you can watch it live via the red button and iplayer — or the bbc sport website — where you can also follow the rest of the day's action. the british number one dan evans may have missed out on the singles final at the monte carlo masters,
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but he has been playing in the doubles final today with his partner neal skupski, they're at the top of your screen, they were taking on nikola mektic and mate pavic. and having squared the match at one set all it wasn't to be for the british pair, who lost the champions tie break to the very happy croatians. mark cavendish has ended the tour of turkey in style by winning the final stage. after almost three and a half hours of racing the briton wearing blue on the left of your screen had enough energy left to pip belgium's jasper philipsen to claim his fourth stage win of the race. spain'sjose manuel diaz was the overall winner. the reigninig olympic champion eliud kipchoge has won the nn mission marathon in the netherlands. his final race before he defends his title at the postponed tokyo games. the kenyan, who's 36, clocked two hours, four minutes and 30 seconds in his first outing since his shock defeat at last year's london marathon.
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reigning masters champion yan bingtao is through to the second round of the world snooker championship in sheffield. resuming his match at 4—4 against martin gould, yan took control of the morning session to come through 10 frames to 6. on the other table, anthony mcgill and ricky walden are tied at four frames apiece. and just before we go, time to tell you that miami is to host its first grand prix in 2022 after formula 1 secured a 10—year dealfor a race in florida. the news comes ahead of this afternoon's emilia romagna grnad prix at imola which starts at 2 o'clock. lewis hamilton starting from pole position. you can follow live text coverage of the build up on the bbc sport website right now. china and the us say they are committed to working together and with other countries on tackling climate change. it comes after several meetings between the us climate envoy john kerry and his chinese counterpart in shanghai last week. our energy and environment analyst
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roger harraben reports. china is currently the world's number one polluter with its massive carbon emissions from coal. but the us is most to blame historically for the emissions that are heating the atmosphere. the superpowers must work together on the climate. since the controversy over china's treatments over its uighur minority, us—china relations have been icy. but america's climate envoy john kerry has been in china, urging superpower cooperation to reduce emissions. the round table a symbol of working together. the us will announce its planned emissions reductions at a joe biden climate summit next week. he admitted... it's not easy for any country. we all face this challenge. but europe has set a goal of 55% reduction. the uk has set a goal
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of 68% reduction. so we are evaluating right now what we ourselves can do. china's already the world's top new factor of wind turbines and solar panels. thejoint statement said finance must shift towards renewables, away from coal. environmentalists say the statement is positive, but warned that tackling climate change will need all nations to strive much harder. roger harrabin, bbc news. conspiracy theories about coronavirus vaccines and the pandemic have spiked on social media in recent months. what is it like to believe these theories — and then to reject the online movement with which you've been involved? our specialist reporter marianna spring spoke to one woman about her experiences. conspiracy theories, including about vaccines, have boomed on social media during the pandemic and family and friends of those who believe them have been voicing their concerns.
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catherine knows better than most what that is like. nowadays, she lives a quiet life in the isle of wight with her family but she used to be an ardent believer in conspiracy theories including that vaccines are part of a sinister global plot to kill millions of people. a i felt extremely part of a club when i was a a i felt extremely part of a club when i was a | conspiracy theorist. and i do see it as, sadly, a bit of a cult. i hate to refer to and even access as cult—like because i know myself what it is like to be on that side and i would have hated to be referred to as that. i believe in conspiracy theories stem from the antiestablishment upbringing but then along came social media and it opened up a whole new world of anti—vaccine content. there were hundreds of youtube videos, facebook videos, means, articles, clips that will catch your attention in the
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news feed. followed an online map often refers to youtube. system for recommending videos will serve one's a bit similar to those you have already watched. the company says it has changed its algorithm and removes harmful anti—vaccine content but critics say social media sites have continued to push conspiracy to millions during the pandemic. there is a fundamental system trying to produce similar minded content and until we get to grips with that fundamental business with these companies we are going to see real difficulties in challenging specific issues like over disinformation or conspiracy theories. catherine noticed that many promoting conspiracy theories are mine were also trying to make money and she started their motives. it was not an overnight euphoric epiphany whatsoever. so, for me, the fundamental thing that enabled me to climb out over this alternative
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reality was becoming even more critical. you need to be able to listen and understand their fears, understand their concerns. catherine hopes experience might help just one person affected by online conspiracy theories. and marianna spring's report is part of a special podcast series, the anti—vax files, available to stream and download now on bbc sounds. one of the largest exhibitions of original art works to open in the uk as lockdown restrictions are eased — is from a british woman known as "'the felt lady'. lucy sparrow�*s fabric fantasies have gathered fans worldwide and her latest exhibition is a felt pharmacy: alex stanger has been to visit the "national felt service" chemist on the east coast of england.
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this is a chemist like no other. all 15,000 items stocked on these shelves are made of felt, created to raise a smile rather than curing illness. since herfirst uk exhibition in 2014, lucy sparrrow�*s felt—made shops have popped up in the states and china. all the items on the shelves here are for sale, but it will probably cost you a little bit more than your usual trip to the chemist as they are all art collecta bles. they were made at lucy's new headquarters in suffolk. welcome to felt ho. lucy and her team have been working from this old ambulance station for the last year on this exhibition, which will be her first in the uk in five years. actually, i'm nervous about doing a show back in the uk because us brits are so reserved. you do a show in america and i'm not evenjoking, people start screaming, crying, laughing. the original opening of the show had
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to be postponed because of lockdown restrictions which, according to lucy, has made the exhibition all the more relevant. all my work is focused around presenting the everyday in a way that makes us notice it more. when the pandemic was starting, it was sort of chemists and food shops that were the only places you could go. they became so central to everything that we were going through. yes, i'd like to think this is the way i reacted to the pandemic by making and immortalising the chemist out of felt. even if there is a rush on paracetamol, don't worry, felt favourites will be restocked until the exhibition closes on may 8th. now for the tale of a dog, who refused to let a disability hinder his exercise regime. a car accident when he was just a —year—old left dexter with two injured front legs. but his owner taught him to adapt and thrive, as russell trott reports.
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putting his best feet forward, dexter the dog has amazed medical experts. his owner kentee was faced with having to put him to sleep when he was just a year old, after he had injured his front legs in a car accident. but although he was feeling a little "ruff", she recognised something in dexter — that he was a fighter, and so she put him through surgery and therapy sessions, and effectively taught him to run on his hind legs. we didn't think you'd make it. his front legs got caught underneath the wheel. i couldn't put another dog down without giving him a chance. he's become something of a celebrity in his hometown of ouray, colorado, and he's put a smile on the faces of his family and the locals. kentee describes dexter as goofy, sweet and smart, and she credits

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