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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 18, 2021 2:00pm-2:31pm BST

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hello, this is bbc news with the latest headlines. a senior conservative mp warns borisjohnson he'll lose the support of so—called �*red wall�* voters in former labour seats unless he resolves the row about lobbying. the two russian men suspected of carrying out the salisbury nerve agent attack three years ago are being sought by police in the czech republic. the czechs, for example, in the past, until quite recently, have been reticent about picking a fight with moscow and it is quite interesting how the czechs have pivoted, and they have been very robust in their response. a warning from nhs providers — it's chief executive says it will take five years for some hospitals to catch up with the backlog caused by the pandemic a day of reflection for members of the royal family, after the queen and the nation bid
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farewell to the duke of edinburgh. once the world's largest iceberg — but now no more — satellite images show the "mega—berg" has virtually gone. good afternoon. the environment secretary george eustice has told the bbc that the government will "look at" any recommendations made to change the rules around lobbying. inquiries have begun into former prime minister david cameron's communications with cabinet ministers while working for the collapsed firm greensill capital. it comes as a senior conservative mp warned borisjohnson he'd lose support from former labour voters unless he resolves the lobbying row. here's our political correspondent nick eardley. david cameron's lobbying of ministers on behalf of a finance
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company he worked for has led to wider questions about the relationship between government and the private sector and about possible conflicts of interest. a number of inquiries have been set up to look at the issues. the environment secretary used to work for mr cameron. he insisted his former boss hadn't broken the rules, but there was a hint the rules might have to change. it may be something that is... that is looked at, as a result of all this and i said there's a number of parliamentary committees that are exploring it. it absolutely does matter to the prime minister, which is why he set up a review. but not to you, you don't think there's a big problem? no, what i'm saying is there may be a problem, which is why we've set up a review. there's concern this row will impact on trust in politics. lobbying is part of what goes on here, lots of people try to influence their mps in different ways. but listen to this, from a senior tory... boris defeated what he regarded, had described as, an out—of—touch elite in the 2016 referendum and won
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a general election victory. he is seen as different from his predecessors. and has won a lot of support as a consequence. and he will lose that support, unless he acts decisively now. labour's rachel reeves faced questions this morning, too, about why the former labour first minister of wales took a job despite being advised not to by an independent committee. the party thinks the rules, more broadly, need tightening up. what we've seen this week is that tory sleaze is back and that - it's bigger than ever. we need real change to restore trust in our democracy and in the very- essence of public service, - which matters to so many of us and matters to people in our country. we've seen a steady stream of questions in recent weeks about the connections between politics and private companies. many, from government to opposition,
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are now looking for answers. nick eardley, bbc news. police in the czech republic say they want to question the two russian men suspected of carrying out the salisbury nerve agent attack after linking them to a fatal explosion four years earlier. 18 russian diplomats have been expelled from prague, after the czech government said there was strong evidence moscow was involved in the blast. the foreign secretary dominic raab said the british government stands in full support of the czech republic, and called the actions of russian intelligence services �*reckless and dangerous�*. gareth barlow reports. the czech republic, 2014. an explosion at an arms depot leaves two people dead, damages nearby homes and sends smoke rising from the ruins. following years of investigations, the czech authorities allege these two men were behind the blast. alexander mishkin and anatoliy chepiga, also known as alexander petrov and ruslan boshirov, the two russian intelligence
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officers the uk says in 2018 carried out the poisoning of a former russian agent on british soil. announcing the news on saturday, the czech foreign minister said 18 russian diplomats would now have to leave the country. translation: as foreign minister of the czech republic, _ i made the decision to expel all personnel at the russian embassy in prague, identified by our secret services as officers of russia�*s secret services. within 48 hours, 18 staff of the russian embassy must leave the czech republic. the czech prime minister said the two suspects were members of the gru, russia�*s military intelligence service. a senior russian parliamentarian called the claim absurd. it all follows tit—for—tat expulsions of diplomats by the us and russia at the end of last week and western concern over the build—up of russian troops along the ukrainian border. the latest development a serious escalation in a region that is already on a political knife edge.
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gareth barlow, bbc news. let�*s stay on this. our security correspondent gordon corera told us that the explosion in the czech republic in 2014 was widely— assumed to be an accident. but after the salisbury poisonings investigators went back over the evidence. one of the things they found with an e—mail requesting access to the arms depot that blew up with the names of two people who wanted to visit it. when they looked at the pictures attached to the passport scans they could see these are the same images of the men that carried out the salisbury poisoning and they had entered the czech republic using the same cover names, the same. is they had used to come to the uk in 2018. so a body of evidence built up suggesting that this same unit of russian military intelligence had carried out this blast in 2014, possibly targeting a bulgarian arms
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dealer. russia has denied any role in this but the czech republic is clearly taking it seriously, expelling 18 diplomats who they say are intelligence operatives. the royal family has honoured the duke of edinburgh�*s "humour and humanity" as he was laid to rest at st george�*s chapel in windsor. the service was restrained, in line with the duke�*s wishes and coronavirus guidelines. princes william and harry were seen chatting together as they left the service. the period of official national mourning has now come to an end. the funeral service was watched by 13.62 million tv viewers in the uk. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports. drawn up in the spring sunshine on the castle�*s quadrangle were the military detachments. they stood with heads bowed
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and rifles reversed. the scale was smaller than would have been the case without the pandemic — though that�*s hardly something that would�*ve troubled the duke. he, after all, had choreographed much of what was to follow. the land rover hearse, which the duke had helped to design, moved to its position by the state entrance. the duke�*s coffin was borne on the shoulders of a bearer party from the grenadier guards. the coffin was covered with the duke�*s personal standard and surmounted with his sword and naval cap, and a wreath from the queen. with great care, it was placed on the hearse. behind the hearse were members of the royalfamily, who were walking to the chapel, headed by the prince of wales. a royal salute sounded
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and the first sight of the queen, accompanied by a lady in waiting, in the state bentley, taking position as the order was given for the procession to step off. he issues command. bell tolls. band plays. bell tolls. close by was one of the horse—drawn carriages the duke had taken such pleasure in driving. on the seat, his cap and gloves. among the members of the family walking behind the coffin
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were princes william and harry — the focus of so much attention — walking with their cousin peter phillips between them. bell tolls. the procession wound its way past the castle�*s round tower. by the side entrance to st george�*s chapel, other members of the royal family stood with their heads bowed. the queen made her way into the chapel, pausing to look back as the hearse moved on down the hill. on the wreath of white roses and lilies on the coffin was a card, on which were the handwritten words "in loving memory". before they entered the chapel, the bearer party paused as a field gun signalled the start of a one—minute silence. the service began with a tribute to the duke from the dean of windsor.
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we have been inspired by his unwavering loyalty to our queen, by his service to the nation and the commonwealth, by his courage, fortitude and faith. the small congregation sat in its family groups. the queen sat alone. so did prince harry. after the prayers and the commendation, a distinctive touch typical of the duke — royal marine buglers sounded the royal navy�*s call to action stations. and finally, at the end of her husband�*s funeral, the choir sang the national anthem. seldom can its words have had greater poignancy.
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# god save the queen #. the family mourners departed, a widowed queen to her castle, and two brothers, william and harry, walked away together, alongside the duchess of cambridge. the duke of edinburgh is gone, but the brothers know that he would have wanted the family to move on and for differences to be healed. nicholas witchell, bbc news. let�*s speak now to the daily mail�*s robert hardman — author of queen of the world. good afternoon, robert. hello, ben. the ceremony _ good afternoon, robert. hello, ben. the ceremony very — good afternoon, robert. hello, ben. the ceremony very much _ good afternoon, robert. hello, ben. the ceremony very much in - good afternoon, robert. hello, ben. the ceremony very much in line - good afternoon, robert. hello, ben. the ceremony very much in line with | the ceremony very much in line with prince philip�*s wishes, reflecting his life, there were some poignant moments, were there?— his life, there were some poignant moments, were there? there were so man . we moments, were there? there were so many- we were _ moments, were there? there were so many. we were mourning _ moments, were there? there were so many. we were mourning the - moments, were there? there were so many. we were mourning the loss - moments, were there? there were so many. we were mourning the loss of. many. we were mourning the loss of someone coming up to his 100th
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birthday and normally people would expect a celebration of someone who lived his life to the full but it was intensely moving and powerful throughout. forsome was intensely moving and powerful throughout. for some people it would have been perhaps the site of his driverless carriage standing to attention or the wonderful sight of all his regiments heads bowed as those incredibly stirring works of music play but i think a lot of people would have been incredibly moved at the sight of the queen on her own and is now a widow. let�*s her own and is now a widow. let's touch on that _ her own and is now a widow. let's touch on that very _ her own and is now a widow. let's touch on that very vivid _ her own and is now a widow. let's touch on that very vivid image of the queen. roberts, are you still there? i the queen. roberts, are you still there? ., the queen. roberts, are you still there?- so _ the queen. roberts, are you still there?- so the _ the queen. roberts, are you still there?- so the queen - the queen. roberts, are you still there?- so the queen sat i the queen. roberts, are you still there? i am. so the queen sat alone yesterday. —
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there? i am. so the queen sat alone yesterday, dominating _ there? i am. so the queen sat alone yesterday, dominating a _ there? i —n so the queen sat alone yesterday, dominating a lot of the newspapers today and social media. we don�*t know how the ceremony and the passing of prince philip will affect at the wider family, perhaps you can shed some light on that. robert hardman, are you there? iam. can i am. can you see me? yes, wejust i am. can you see me? yes, we 'ust wanted you — i am. can you see me? yes, we 'ust wanted you to fl i am. can you see me? yes, we 'ust wanted you to reflect i i am. can you see me? yes, we 'ust wanted you to reflect on i i am. can you see me? yes, we 'ust wanted you to reflect on how i i am. can you see me? yes, wejust wanted you to reflect on how the . wanted you to reflect on how the prince make passing could reflect on the queen and the wider family. yes. the queen and the wider family. yes, i think that's — the queen and the wider family. yes, i think that'sjuicy _ the queen and the wider family. yes i think that's juicy comes before i think that�*s juicy comes before self, -- i think —— i think that duty comes before self. she will emphatically not do what her great—great—grandmother did in 1861, queen victoria, and retreat
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from view. she will with heavy heart and with the support of her family continue with all her duties because she took a coronation oath and she is sticking to it. just she took a coronation oath and she is sticking to it.— is sticking to it. just finally, you not to is sticking to it. just finally, you got to know _ is sticking to it. just finally, you got to know the _ is sticking to it. just finally, you got to know the duke _ is sticking to it. just finally, you got to know the duke pretty - is sticking to it. just finally, you | got to know the duke pretty well interviewing him a few times, how might his humour rub off on the royalfamily? might his humour rub off on the royal family?— might his humour rub off on the r0 al famil ? ~ .,, , , royalfamily? well, he was intensely ractical royalfamily? well, he was intensely practical man- _ royalfamily? well, he was intensely practical man. it _ royalfamily? well, he was intensely practical man. it is _ royalfamily? well, he was intensely practical man. it is an _ royalfamily? well, he was intensely practical man. it is an old _ royalfamily? well, he was intensely practical man. it is an old saying - practical man. it is an old saying but it is true in his case. if you are interviewing him you would have to make sure you�*re done a lot of preparation and done your homework but he was very wise and very engaging and so many issues. what has rubbed off on so many of the family is that pragmatism, yes, they are a very ancient institution but it is one that has to move with the
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times and has to be in tune with popular thinking and also innovate. he was a great innovator and i think that will carry on. robert hardman, i think we got through that without any downfall questions. the headlines on bbc news... a senior conservative mp warns borisjohnson he�*ll lose the support of so—called �*red wall�* voters in former labour seats unless he resolves the row about lobbying. the two russian men suspected of carrying out the salisbury nerve agent attack three years ago are being sought by police in the czech republic. a day of reflection for members of the royal family, after the queen and the nation bid farewell to the duke of edinburgh. nhs providers has warned that it will take five years for some hospitals to catch up with the backlog of patient care caused by the coronavirus pandemic. the trusts in england worst impacted, won�*t return to pre—covid levels, for between three to five years. that according to the association
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which represents nhs trusts. while, nhs providers also says that covid—19 has resulted in the biggest backlog of care in england for 20 years. let�*s speak to chris hopson, chief executive of nhs providers which represents hospital trusts in england. the biggest backlog of care in england for two decades. how do you go about fixing that? it is england for two decades. how do you go about fixing that?— go about fixing that? it is going to be a very important _ go about fixing that? it is going to be a very important and _ go about fixing that? it is going to i be a very important and challenging task. what we have said we need a plan that is a team plan between the nhs and government. on the nhs side we are going to have to do a range of different things. we are going to have to be bold and transformational, we are going to need to change the way that we provide some of this care but that is going to need the government to come up with extra funding. in the past you may remember in the early 20005 past you may remember in the early 2000s when we had similar sizes of waiting list problems we got round
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it by paying more overtime and using the private sector. this time, particularly given the range of other things we have to do the same time, we will have to be bolder. we�*ll have to adopt new technology solutions, get trusts working much more effectively together to improve productivity but the important thing is this a very big challenge. people have been doing some work over the last month to look at how they plan to deal with this in the conclusion they have come to is that in the worst areas, as you say, the areas with the biggest problems with the current trajectory, they are currently looking at a three to five year wait to get through that backlog. everyone knows that is not appropriate and we have to better but we need to really work with government tab a plan to do that. you havejust government tab a plan to do that. you have just set out what a big challenge that is. is three to five years to optimistic? i challenge that is. is three to five years to optimistic?— years to optimistic? i don't think it is. it is interesting _ years to optimistic? i don't think it is. it is interesting talking - years to optimistic? i don't think it is. it is interesting talking to l it is. it is interesting talking to trust chief executives as i do every
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day of the week. they are absolutely clear that every single statistics on the waiting list, they know the pain that people have any impact this can have. what particularly worries people is that we know if you leave care for too long you do get into places where people, for example, actually experience permanent disablement. you get to a point where people would never be able to get back to work. so every single trust chief executive is where are the consequence of these delays but this is one of the prices of covid. as soon as we got hit with covid we had to dial back on the amount of elective surgery we were doing because that was the only way we could create the space to treat covid patients. we are not in a situation because the nhs hasn�*t been doing what it should be doing,
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it is having to focus elsewhere, and thatis it is having to focus elsewhere, and that is the challenge that we have got. that is the challenge that we have not. ., that is the challenge that we have mt, ., , , that is the challenge that we have not. ., , , ., got. that focus elsewhere on the andemic got. that focus elsewhere on the pandemic and — got. that focus elsewhere on the pandemic and covid-19, - got. that focus elsewhere on the pandemic and covid-19, that - got. that focus elsewhere on the pandemic and covid-19, that is l pandemic and covid—19, that is likely to affect staffing levels in the nhs. i visited a hospital a few months ago during the pandemic and the majority of the staff i spoke to their said they were really considering their future working in the nhs. so if the staff numbers and there you have an even bigger problem. there you have an even bigger roblem. ~ , , ., ., problem. absolutely, one of the thins problem. absolutely, one of the thin . s we problem. absolutely, one of the things we have _ problem. absolutely, one of the things we have been _ problem. absolutely, one of the things we have been saying - problem. absolutely, one of the things we have been saying is i problem. absolutely, one of the l things we have been saying is that is notjust about things we have been saying is that is not just about the things we have been saying is that is notjust about the money but about having the right size of workforce. we know we need to support our staff who have been through some very difficult periods over the last 12 months but have done some absolutely amazing things so we need to retain our staff but we also need to ensure that we grow the workforce but we also know, and you mention how we run covid and ordinary care alongside each other, here is a great example, we know that during covid we had to take a number of operating theatres out of
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commission, we had to ask any consists —— any i ,we , we had to ask them to help out with covid patients. how do you ensure at the same time as dealing with coronavirus waves you can allow hospitals to continue to do elective surgery so you don�*t have two so you don�*t have to take your operating rooms out of service. so we want to get through this backlog we have to do things differently but we need the government to give us the funding to do that
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more than 200,000 new cases of coronavirus have been recorded in india for three days in a row, taking the total number to nearly 14.5 million. it makes it the world�*s second worst—infected country — behind the united states. india has also suffered one of the highest number of fatalities. the global number of covid—19 deaths has now passed three million. in brazil, more than 370,000 people have now died. yet the president there, jair bolsonaro, refuses to lock down despite a sharp rise in infections. mark lowen reports from sao paolo. every day, the faces of despair multiply. the food lines in sao paulo�*s largest favela go on and on. with most here working in the grey economy, covid has destroyed jobs. queues have more than tripled in recent months, as the pandemic takes lives and livelihoods of brazil�*s poorest. for luciana firmino and herfamily, this
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is now their only meal of the day. she lost herjob in a manicure studio with the pandemic and they�*re unable to pay the rent. translation: i've lost hope. we will have to live on the street or under a bridge soon. sometimes, i think i should give my children away to social services. she sobs. with the pandemic, six out of ten brazilians households now lack sufficient access to food. government hand—outs last year helped, but they�*ve been reduced as money ran scarce. no such concerns for the wealthiest food producers and backers of the president. it�*s corn harvest time on frederico da vila�*s 1,300 hectares. but with the president�*s anti—lockdown stance, slow vaccine purchase, and more than 365,000 dead here, his critics
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call his handling genocidal. the president bolsonaro is not focused on killing anyone, he want to preserve the liberties of the people. he want people to get... to get out, to get work. with the public health disaster, economic woes, and a divisive leader, brazil is facing a perfect storm. it urgently needs a way out from the darkness of the pandemic. mark lowen, bbc news, sao paulo. what was the biggest iceberg in the world has completely broken up. a68, as it was known, measured around 2,300 square miles when it broke away from antarctica, in 2017. here�*s victoria gill. a1 billion tonne block of ice. when iceberg a68 broke away from antarctica back in 2017, it measured more than 2,300 square miles, a quarter the size of wales. it was only by imaging it from space that scientists could actually
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follow the massive iceberg�*s journey as it inched its way north. at one point, it was on a direct collision course with the antarctic island of south georgia, potentially threatening to cut off vast populations of penguins and seals. but it was off that coast in the open ocean swell that the world�*s largest iceberg broke apart. it lasted for years like that, as it moved around, but eventually broke in two, four, five pieces and then those broke up again. but the end point for some of these fragments was quite interesting because just very suddenly overnight, theyjust fragmented into millions of little tiny pieces. and you could see that on the satellite data. and that process, i think, is something that needs studying a little bit more because it might tell us a little bit about how ice shelves break up in the future. a68 being the size of a small country made it the focus of global media attention. but the breaking away, or calving, of these giant icebergs is a natural
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part of the ebb and flow of the dynamic ice shelf. what we're looking at is the regularity of these events — are they becoming more frequent? and iceberg travelling is a big factor in ice loss from antarctica. so, if these iceberg calving events are becoming more frequent, then it's a really important factor that we need to be looking at and researching. while a68 will be remembered as a social media star that was visible from space, scientists will now be turning their attention to the newest chasm on the edge of the vast ice sheet and the next giant berg to set off on its own epicjourney. victoria gill, bbc news. now for the tale of the dog who wouldn�*t let an accident hinder his exercise routine. when he was just a year old, dexter was hit by a truck, and was left unable to use his injured front legs. so his owner taught him to walk on two legs like a human. with his new skills,
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dexter can still enjoy walks around his home town in colarado. ok, let�*s pause for a moment and take a look at the weather with susan powell. we have seen a lot of sunshine across the uk across the weekends but more cloud around in scotland and northern ireland. for northern ireland there was some rain around but that could be the most significant rain we see for the uk as a whole when the next ten days or so. so through the evening some late sunshine and temperatures will fall with quite a widespread frost. saved from the cold will be northern
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island in western scotland where there is a bit of cloud. some patchy fog in eastern england but the sun should make short work of that on monday. after a chilly start, lots of sunshine. it also becomes largely confined to the very west of northern ireland so eastern counties should enjoy some decent brightness come up to 14 in belfast with a little bit of rain to the west. day of the week ahead after 17 degrees and also one of the milder nights over that monday into tuesday. we should be frost free because we have got a little bit of a southerly air direction. on tuesday, across england and wales, reasonable temperatures with sunshine. but that weather front does eventually push as a south on tuesday saw a bit of rain for eastern scotland, clear skies to the north, under those clearer skies we will see a frost starting to return for scotland
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overnight tuesday into wednesday and then wednesday daytime, cold air follows across the uk, perhaps a few showers across england and wales but it�*s that plunge of cool atlantic air which will make things feel quite different towards the end of the week. still looking dry, still still largely light winds. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... the two russian men suspected of carrying out the salisbury nerve agent attack three years ago are being sought by police in the czech republic. a senior conservative mp warns borisjohnson he�*ll lose the support of the so—called �*red wall�* voters in former labour seats, unless he resolves the row about lobbying. a warning from nhs providers — its chief executive says it will take five years for some
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hospitals to catch up with the backlog caused by the pandemic. once the world�*s largest iceberg, but now its broken apart — satellite images show the "mega—berg" has virtually gone. now, it�*s time for the week in parliament. hello again, and welcome to the week in parliament, a week that saw the worlds of money and politics collide. dodgy contracts, privileged access, jobs for their mates — this is the return of tory sleaze. the prime minister promises an independent review of lobbying, and acknowledges there�*s a problem. i, indeed, share the widespread concern about some of the stuff that
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we�*re reading at the moment, mr speaker.

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