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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 18, 2021 9:00pm-9:31pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world: as concern grows over the health of kremlin critic alexei navalny, russia's ambassador to london says he won't die behind bars. he will not be allowed to die in prison, but i can say that mr navalny, he behaves like a hooligan, absolutely. as india imposes new covid measures, is a local variant now growing in the uk? how nasa is attempting to make history with the first powered flight on another planet. and controversy over plans for top european football clubs to form a new super league.
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hello, and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. russia's ambassador in london has insisted alexei navalny will not be allowed to die in prison. andrei kelin told the bbc the opposition leader's medical treatment would be taken care of. supporters of mr navalny claim he could die within days. and the united states�* national security advisor, jake sullivan, has said there will be consequences if navalny dies behind bars. russia's ambassador to the uk was talking to the bbc�*s andrew marr. of course he will not be allowed to die in prison, but i can say that mr navalny behaves like a hooligan, absolutely, in trying to violate every rule that has been established. his purpose of doing that is to attract attention for him, also by saying that today his left hand is sick, tomorrow his leg is sick and all of that stuff...
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the european court of human rights has ruled that the charges against him for money laundering are, they say, "arbitrary and unfair. " isn't the truth that he is in prison because he is a threat to president putin, for democratic reasons? no, not at all. he has violated his terms of parole and that is why he has been given a sentence and i have to say that julian assange here in britain was arrested by british police because he had also violated the terms of parole. i've been speaking about the ambassador�*s remarks with maria snegovaya from the george washington university's institute for european, russian and eurasian studies. the reality is that he is not wrong. russian _ the reality is that he is not wrong. russian authorities have a history since _ russian authorities have a history since the — russian authorities have a history since the soviet times of letting people — since the soviet times of letting people die outside ofjail. what they do— people die outside ofjail. what they do instead, they destroyed the health— they do instead, they destroyed the health of— they do instead, they destroyed the health of people while they are kept in health of people while they are kept
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thait, _ health of people while they are kept injail, irreparably, to the extent the damage is done and cannot be cured _ the damage is done and cannot be cured subsequently. then they let the person outside the prison, so that this — the person outside the prison, so that this person dies outside the prison— that this person dies outside the prison and — that this person dies outside the prison and the kremlin that weighs left without any blame for a person's— left without any blame for a person's death. de facto, the goal is achieved — person's death. de facto, the goal is achieved. the person's death. de facto, the goal is achieved-— person's death. de facto, the goal is achieved. the us and the eu are -auttin is achieved. the us and the eu are putting increasing _ is achieved. the us and the eu are putting increasing pressure - is achieved. the us and the eu are putting increasing pressure on - putting increasing pressure on russia, will that work will have an impact on alexei navalny�*s position? it depends, so unfortunately for this that — it depends, so unfortunately for this that ducked —— like the sanctions _ this that ducked —— like the sanctions that the us imposed on russia, _ sanctions that the us imposed on russia, it — sanctions that the us imposed on russia, it was not sufficient to stop _ russia, it was not sufficient to stop them doing things outside of the country, but if such sanctions are continued i would encourage the united _ are continued i would encourage the united states to also consider the sanctions — united states to also consider the sanctions package that was suggested by mr navalny and his colleagues before _ by mr navalny and his colleagues before he — by mr navalny and his colleagues before he was imprisoned. that includes — before he was imprisoned. that includes a — before he was imprisoned. that includes a number of russian oligarchs _ includes a number of russian oligarchs. perhaps that might be some _ oligarchs. perhaps that might be some kind of deterrent, in addition
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with serious sectoral control on russia's— with serious sectoral control on russia's economy.— with serious sectoral control on russia's economy. what kind of actions can _ russia's economy. what kind of actions can expect _ russia's economy. what kind of actions can expect in _ russia's economy. what kind of actions can expect in russia - russia's economy. what kind of actions can expect in russia to l actions can expect in russia to react to navalny�*s deteriorating condition? react to navalny's deteriorating condition? , , ., , react to navalny's deteriorating condition? ., . condition? russia 'ust announced [an e. .. condition? russia 'ust announced large... onh condition? russia 'ust announced large... on april— condition? russia just announced large... on april the _ condition? russia just announced large... on april the 21st, - condition? russia just announced large... on april the 21st, which l condition? russia just announced | large... on april the 21st, which is a realty— large... on april the 21st, which is a really strong move because it is the same — a really strong move because it is the same day when put in's russian address— the same day when put in's russian address is— the same day when put in's russian address is scheduled, so this is taking — address is scheduled, so this is taking the _ address is scheduled, so this is taking the agenda away from putin, which _ taking the agenda away from putin, which is _ taking the agenda away from putin, which is a _ taking the agenda away from putin, which is a very bold move. unfortunately the reality in society in russia _ unfortunately the reality in society in russia is still very fractured, isotated — in russia is still very fractured, isolated and not strong enough because — isolated and not strong enough because originally the russian opposition had a call to get 500,000 registered _ opposition had a call to get 500,000 registered on the website in support of navalny, after which they would have stopped the protest, but several— have stopped the protest, but several weeks in they have only been able to— several weeks in they have only been able to garner 60,000 registrations, so they— able to garner 60,000 registrations, so they have now to schedule the protests. — so they have now to schedule the protests, even if they missed the benchmark they announced themselves, so society _ benchmark they announced themselves, so society is _ benchmark they announced themselves, so society is weak and therefore in order— so society is weak and therefore in order to _ so society is weak and therefore in order to stop these horrible atrocities there is really a serious
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crackdown — atrocities there is really a serious crackdown in russia's position right now in— crackdown in russia's position right now in the — crackdown in russia's position right now in the kremlin, they really need help from _ now in the kremlin, they really need help from the west as well. adding to the diplomatic tensions between russia and europe , moscow has expelled 20 czech diplomats after prague sent a similar number of russians home. it's all about russia's alleged involvement in a deadly explosion at an arms depot seven years ago. the czechs say it involved the same two russian agents who britain claims tried to kill a former spy with a nerve agent three years ago. our security correspondent, gordon corera, has the story. the aftermath of a deadly explosion. in october 2014, this arms depot in the czech countryside blew up. it took a month to find the remains of two men who worked there. it was widely assumed to have been an accident, until now. a key piece of evidence came when investigators found an e—mail requesting permission for two men to inspect the site. attached were scans of the men's passports, a copy of which the bbc has obtained. if you recognise them, this is why.
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they're the same two men wanted in connection with the salisbury poisoning in the uk. in 2018, they were spotted on cctv and accused of smearing nerve agent on the front door of sergei skripal�*s house. the two denied any involvement, saying they visited salisbury to see the cathedral spire. the e—mail with the passport scans claimed the men were from the national guard of tajikistan, and gave false names. the pair arrived in prague in october 11th, using the same names as in salisbury. on october 13th, they went to stay in ostrava, near the arms depot, and they left the country on october 16th, the day of the explosion. but why was the depot targeted? the bbc has been told that a bulgarian arms dealer, emilian gebrev, stored weapons there. six months later in bulgaria, another team from russian military intelligence is believed to have tried to kill gebrev.
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this cctv shows an alleged member of the team moving around gebrev�*s car. it's alleged that poison was smeared on its door handle, leaving him fighting for his life, though he did survive. one expert says these incidents paint a picture of how this team operates. it actually seems to have been military intelligence's in—house team of miscellaneous throat—slitters and general saboteurs. there are probably about 20 operational staff and maybe 200 support personnel. the czech prime minister last night announced that 18 russian diplomats were to be expelled. moscow has responded that the allegations are absurd. the revelations about this explosion may not be the last. investigations into the activities of russian military intelligence are ongoing, and more cases may still be uncovered. gordon corera, bbc news. let's take a look at some of the other stories making the news... 11 people have died and nearly 100 others injured
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in a train accident in egypt. several carriages were derailed in the accident that took place north of the capital, cairo. egypt's rail system has a poor safety record — last month, at least 20 people were killed in a collision between two trains. university students in south africa have been evacuated after several buildings were set ablaze. a wildfire started on the slopes of table mountain, spreading to the university of cape town campus. firefighters have been trying to quench the blaze with water bombs dropped from helicopters. strong winds are fanning the flames and thick smoke can be seen from several kilometres away. germany is commemorating the victims of coronavirus at national ceremonies. almost 80,000 people have died there of the virus, and the country is currently battling a third wave. president frank—walter steinmeier has said the nation needs to pay a dignified farewell to those who've lost their lives in the pandemic. angela merkel also attended the service held in the kaiser wilhelm memorial church in berlin.
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to coronavirus now, and in brazil, a study has found six in ten households now face food shortages due to the pandemic. government hand—outs introduced last year have been reduced, as public debt rises. deaths continue to soar in the country, as mark lowen reports from sao paulo. every day, the faces of despair multiply. the food lines in sao paulo's largest favela go on and on. with most here working in the grey economy, covid has destroyed jobs. queues have more than tripled in recent months, as the pandemic takes lives and livelihoods of brazil's poorest. for luciana firmino and herfamily, this is now their only meal of the day. she lost herjob in a manicure studio with the pandemic and they're unable to pay the rent. translation: i've lost hope. we will have to live on the
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street or under a bridge soon. sometimes i think i should give my children away to social services. she sobs. with the pandemic, six out of ten brazilian households now lack sufficient access to food. government hand—outs last year helped, but they've been reduced as money ran scarce. no such concerns for the wealthiest food producers and backers of the president. it's corn harvest time on frederico da vila's 1,300 hectares. but with the president's anti—lockdown stance, slow vaccine purchase, and more than 365,000 dead here, his critics call his handling genocidal. the president bolsonaro is not focused on killing anyone, he want to preserve the liberties of the people. he want people to get...
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to get out, to get work. with the public health disaster, economic woes, and a divisive leader, brazil is facing a perfect storm. it urgently needs a way out from the darkness of the pandemic. mark lowen, bbc news, sao paulo. the indian city worst affected by coronavirus — delhi — has ordered all residents returning from a major hindu festival on the ganges to quarantine at home for ia days. the order applies to all those attending the kumbh mela between april 11th and the end of the month. they must also be registered and tested. anyone found to have flouted the rules must go to government quarantine centres. india has reported a ninth straight day of record covid cases. meanwhile, in the uk, more than 70 cases of a new indian variant have been identified, leading to calls that india should be put on the government's red list for travel. let's find out more from mike tildesley, associate professor in infectious diseases at the university of warwick.
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welcome to you, thanks very much for being with us. what more do we know about this new indian variant and how much they concern it is? so how much they concern it is? sr obviously we do need to remember that we do get a variance emerging all the time and many of those are pretty benign, are not really much different from any other variant circulating and occasionally we get variants that crop up that we are a bit more worried about. so with this indian variant, there do appear to be a couple of mutations which we think may make the virus more transmissible and also may make it easier to evade the vaccine. now, there is a big fact—finding exercise that has to go on at the moment because there is still a lot of uncertainty around this, but i think we need to get as much information as possible, as we can, to determine how risky this variant is and of course... inaudible the number of cases through rapid surge testing, so we don't get it taken off in the uk.—
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surge testing, so we don't get it taken off in the uk. what about in india, do taken off in the uk. what about in india. do we _ taken off in the uk. what about in india, do we know _ taken off in the uk. what about in india, do we know what _ taken off in the uk. what about in india, do we know what kind - taken off in the uk. what about in india, do we know what kind of. taken off in the uk. what about in india, do we know what kind of an impact it is having there? i india, do we know what kind of an impact it is having there?- impact it is having there? i think there are multiple _ impact it is having there? i think there are multiple issues - impact it is having there? i think there are multiple issues going i impact it is having there? i think i there are multiple issues going on in india because they are going through a big surge in cases at the moment and they have done a very good job at actually suppressing the virus in the latter end of 2020 and in the first month or two of this year, but we have seen a big surge in cases through march and april, so there has been really concerning possibly partly because of this variant and other more transmissible variants that do appear to be circulating quite widely in india at the moment, so it is a real concern and they clearly needs to be action taken to suppress those cases in india. ~ , ., taken to suppress those cases in india. ~ ., .,~ india. when you say action taken, referred to _ india. when you say action taken, referred to the _ india. when you say action taken, referred to the fact _ india. when you say action taken, referred to the fact a _ india. when you say action taken, referred to the fact a moment - india. when you say action taken, | referred to the fact a moment ago that there are more than 70 cases of it here in the uk, but india isn't on the government's red list at the moment. at what point does it decide that a country need to go on the red list? what information does it need to have? . ~ list? what information does it need to have? ., ,, , ,
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to have? yeah, i think this is really difficult _ to have? yeah, i think this is really difficult one. _ to have? yeah, i think this is - really difficult one. unfortunately this is a question that i think the government are going to have to answerfor probably government are going to have to answer for probably several countries over the months to come. we are likely to get variance emerging in different countries and of course the government needs to be responsive to any rise in cases in particular countries and then if necessary escalate them. obviously, there is a balance here that needs to be achieved, i totally understand the need to try to keep international links open, which is why it is really important when these variants do emerge that we do understand the risk attached to them and if we believe that they are high risk of getting a foothold in this country and taking off, then such action might be necessary. ok. country and taking off, then such action might be necessary. ok, mike tildesle , action might be necessary. ok, mike tildesley, thank _ action might be necessary. ok, mike tildesley, thank you _ action might be necessary. ok, mike tildesley, thank you very _ action might be necessary. ok, mike tildesley, thank you very much - action might be necessary. ok, mike tildesley, thank you very much for l tildesley, thank you very much for speaking to us. the headlines on bbc news... as concern grows over the health of kremlin critic alexei navalny, russia's ambassador to london says he won't die behind bars. nasa is attempting to make history with the first powered
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flight on another planet. it will launch a small helicopter, called ingenuity, from the surface of mars. on board is a small piece of history from earth, a tiny square of material from the wright brothers plane that first flew over a century ago. as our science correspondent, rebecca morelle, reports, it's a trial of technology that could transform how we explore distant worlds. the parachute has deployed... this mission has already revealed mars as never seen before with the first ever footage of a thrilling descent, as the rover is lowered down to the martian surface. touchdown confirmed. now nasa is ready to make history again. this time, it will try to launch a helicopter. the first attempt at powered flight on another planet, this animation reveals how it might look. but with the extreme conditions on mars and the fact that there's barely any atmosphere, it won't be easy. it feels absolutely nuts, of course. i mean, we've been flying
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on earth forjust over a hundred years and now, yeah, we're going to go to another planet and fly. it's crazy, right? but that's the beauty of exploration and the beauty of engineering. nasa's helicopter is a feat of engineering. it weighsjust 1.8 kilograms — that's 4 lbs — and it has two long rotors which spin in opposite directions at up to 2,500 revolutions per minute. this is much faster than a helicopter on earth, but it needs this speed to lift off in the extremely thin martian atmosphere. its first test flight takes it three metres above the ground for 30 seconds before rotating and finally landing. then for the next 30 days, it will begin to fly much further afield. the helicopter has been lowered from where it was stored beneath the rover onto a carefully selected strip of terrain, free of boulders. it will capture footage as it flies, looking down on
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the rover and the rover�*s camera will film the helicopter, providing multiple views for the scientists to study. one of the things that a helicopter is very well suited for isjust looking around, scouting. it can traverse places without being hindered by the terrain. it could dojust kind of scouting missions for our future rovers, perhaps, or even for astronauts. the helicopter is part of nasa's most ambitious mars mission to date. these are all images taken in the last few weeks. on the ground, the rover will be searching for signs of life, but the helicopter will add an airborne dimension to how we explore other planets, opening up new frontiers in flight. rebecca morelle, bbc news. quite incredible! sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's mark edwards. hello, well, senior uefa figures are said to be furious at 12 premier league clubs, some of the biggest clubs in football, including some of the big six in england, have signed
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up the big six in england, have signed up to a breakaway european super league. manchester city, tottenham hotspur, manchester united, and many others, inter milan, juventus and many others are part of this. uefa is set to confirm plans for a new look champions league and sports minister nigel huddleston, who was at wembley cup stadium today, was asked for his thoughts on this european super league. i am laserfocused on what is best for the fans and english football. i am not convinced that what has been announced would be, i have not seen the full details yet, but i'm pretty sceptical about it. i don't think it would necessarily create the opportunities or the level playing field we would like to see in football. it seems a bit of a closed shop idea. i am sceptical at the moment, but i will wait to see the details. fans were finally back inside wembley as leicester city beat southampton 1—0
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in the fa cup semifinal. it might not look like it, but there were 4,000 people allowed as part of the government's pilot scheme. on the pitch, kelechi iheanacho's goal was enough to put leicester into their first fa cup finalfor more than half a century. they'll play chelsea next month, who beat manchester city on saturday. we got the chance to create history and that is what this game is all about, creating a memory as players, management staff, as a club. and like you say, for the supporters. i have been made fully aware since my time at leicester how important this trophy is to the supporters and have always tried to get that respect. —— back to give it to respect. meanwhile over in the english premier league, a mason greenwood brace helped manchester united keep the title race just about alive. ole gunnar solskjaer�*s side beat burnley 3—1 at old trafford, with edinson cavani scoring the third, to move eight points behind manchester city with six games to go. burnley stay just above the relegation zone — they're six points clear of the bottom three. fulham were seconds away
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from closing the gap on burnley, but suffered a heartbreaking last minute equaliser at arsenal to draw i—i. josh maja had given scott parker's side the lead in the second half, but substitute eddie nketiah scored in the 97th minute to grab a dramatic point for arsenal, who stay 9th in the table. lyon's five—year reign as women's european champions is over, they lost their champions league quarterfinal to paris saint germain. lyon had won the first leg 1—0 in paris, but an own goal from skipper wendie renard saw them lose 2—1, going out on away goals. psg will now face barcelona in the last four. there was extraordinary drama at the emilia romagna grand prix in italy, a chaotic incident—strewn race with red bull's max verstappen taking his first win of the year. the treacherous conditions catching out the vast majority of drivers at one time or another. there was a huge crash involving mercedes driver valtteri bottas and george russell of the williams team.
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while lewis hamilton had to fight back to finish second and keep hold of his place at the top of the standings. but it was his rival max verstappen who took the chequered flag, as lando norris finished a well deserved third. australia's neil robertson is safely through to the second round of the world snooker championship, at the crucible. he beat china's liang wenbo by 10—3 in sheffield, making three century breaks on the way to victory. he'll face the winner of the match between ali carter and jack lisowski in the next round. that's all the sport for now. back to you, samantha. mark, thank you very much, we will see you later. now staying with sport — or are we? boxing fans might not approve of saturday's fight between a youtube star — jake paul — and former wrestler — ben askren. paul is a social media presence with 20 million subscribers and a controversial reputation. so do stunts like this end up demeaning just about everyone involved ?
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let's get more on this. joining me now from liverpool is sportsjournalist nick peet. welcome to come are great to have the only programme. you have written about this, first of all tell us who this it is proving so controversial. i think it is because jake paul has come into boxing and he has really jumped straight to the top. he has circumnavigated ten or 15 years of amateur boxing experience and he is already pulling on the kind of numbers that most professional fighters can only dream of, but he is using his social media influence, his role on youtube, the audience that he himself has generated via youtube, whether you like it or not, and he has pulled it over to the boxing ring. and just because of the way boxing is set up, without a global governing body, you know, you can get a licence to box in regional states in america or in the uk here with the british boxing board of control. it isjust with the british boxing board of control. it is just a lot easier to present yourself as a professional athlete. he has seen an opportunity, he is not the only one and you know
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what? now that this is a regular occurrence, a regular occurrence, i don't necessarily think it is a bad thing for the sport any more. so jake paul has 20 million or so followers and you say that is not a bad thing for the sport, but if he is circumnavigating15 or 20 years of experience, what does that say to people who are coming up through the ranks and during the hard stuff? i ranks and during the hard stuff? i think if he was facing actual boxes and he was competing for boxing titles, then yes, absolutely. if he was getting opportunities for british titles or in this case obviously american titles or even world titles, then of course, but the difference there being that if he was getting those opportunities he was getting those opportunities he certainly wouldn't be winning fights because he would be competing against guys on a completely different level. who he is competing against his fellow youtube is, fellow basketball stars and this weekend a former wrestler. all meet him there, boxing debuts as well, so it is reallyjust celebrity boxing, is all it is, and if he ever did
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compete against a boxer with genuine experience who could actually box, then of course he would come up short and he would lose out. what i don't mind about it is the fact that he is pulling in a completely different demographic, we are getting a completely different audience watching boxing and twofold, the boxes that are competing on his order cards and at the weekend there were one or two fights there, they have never fought in front of the kind of audiences that this is generating and also i think the young demographic that are tuning in to watch jake paul, maybe they like the look of boxing, maybe they like the look of boxing, maybe they stuck around at what the actual real boxing later on and even better, maybe after the weekend they go to a boxing gym this week and join local clubs. just go to a boxing gym this week and join local clubs.— go to a boxing gym this week and join local clubs. just how lucrative was this so _ join local clubs. just how lucrative was this so jake _ join local clubs. just how lucrative was this so jake paul? _ join local clubs. just how lucrative was this so jake paul? well, - join local clubs. just how lucrative was this so jake paul? well, i - join local clubs. just how lucrative i was this so jake paul? well, i know ben askren — was this so jake paul? well, i know ben askren walked _ was this so jake paul? well, i know ben askren walked away _ was this so jake paul? well, i know ben askren walked away with - was this so jake paul? well, i know ben askren walked away with a - ben askren walked away with a guaranteed half $1 million, which is more money here than he ever earns competing inside the ufc, so the money is absolutely insane, but then these youtube is and influences were
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led to believe they generate this kind of money purely through youtube hits anyway, so the guys... you can't hate the player. you can hate the game, you can't hate the player. he has made this money. and what advice i would give out to boxers who are jealous of the platform he is presenting himself on and the money he is generating is go out there and start social media. you know? this guy has worked in one area, he is dominant in the youtube area. you are a boxer with lots of potential. starter youtube channel! you know, focus on your social media, invest in you and bring in that audience yourself.— media, invest in you and bring in that audience yourself. sounds like a aood that audience yourself. sounds like a good plan — that audience yourself. sounds like a good plan for— that audience yourself. sounds like a good plan for all _ that audience yourself. sounds like a good plan for all of _ that audience yourself. sounds like a good plan for all of us. _ that audience yourself. sounds like a good plan for all of us. maybe - that audience yourself. sounds like a good plan for all of us. maybe it. a good plan for all of us. maybe it is not too late for me to start taking up boxing, who knows! great talk you. thanks, nick peet, thank you. maybe not! now for the tale of the dog who wouldn't let an accident hinder his exercise routine. when he was just a year old, dexter was hit by a truck, and was left unable to use his injured front legs. so his owner taught him to walk
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on two legs like a human. with his new skills, dexter can still enjoy walks around his home town of ouray in colarado. wonderful pictures there! that is it from me, you can reach me on twitter. he was the weather. some areas today have been basking in warm april sunshine, but not everywhere. a weak weather front across scotland and northern ireland, producing more cloud than england and wales. a little bit of patchy rain. whereas in england and wales, there has been plenty of sunshine. another dry day. this weather system sitting to our west, overnight it will take the rain away from scotland and northern ireland before bringing it back in later on monday and into tuesday. overnight, despite the cloud, it will become mainly dry. parts of eastern scotland will turn clearer, with a england and wales,
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parts of eastern scotland will turn clearer, whereas for england and wales, plenty of clear skies. some low cloud, mist and fog in parts of eastern england, but when it is clear, a chance of frost going into the morning. with cloud, temperature is well above freezing.s well above freezing. that will be north—west scotland tomorrow. some rain into the western isles, perhaps into the far north—west of the mainland and western counties of northern ireland. the best of sunshine in northern ireland will be on eastern counties. whereas for england and wales, low cloud and mist and fog clears away from eastern parts. plenty of sunshine and the chance of an isolated shower in south—east england. and it will feel warm in that sunshine. as we go monday into tuesday, outbreaks of rain start further east into scotland, through northern ireland. mainly dry in england and wales. though again, some low cloud, mist and fog pushing into parts of eastern england, generally those temperatures are higher into tuesday morning. so just an isolated frost possible. then on tuesday we start to nudge this area of cloud, and it has to be said, not very much rain, very slowly away from scotland and northern ireland with clear
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skies following on behind. ahead of that, more cloud than in recent days and the slight chance of picking up a shower, but still feeling warm. turning cooler and include where they're pushing into northern scotland. as this weather front works its way southwards, barely any rain going into wednesday, another area of high pressure coming in to settle things down once again. somewhat cooler air introduced, these are your temperatures later in the week... not far away from average, but still the chance of a touch of frost in places overnight. if you are looking for some rain, you're going to be disappointed, much of the week ahead is dry.
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hello this is bbc news. the headlines. the us national security advisor has said there will be consequences if putin critic
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alexei navalny dies in prison. russia says that won't happen, but mr navalny's supporters say he is being killed in front of the whole world. millions have enjoyed the first weekend since england's lockdown was eased. but there are concerns as health officials confirm 77 cases of the indian variant across the uk. the organisation representing nhs trusts in england says it will take five years for some hospitals to catch up with the backlog caused by the pandemic. the government says it will examine any recommendation made by the inquiry, into the lobbying row, involving david cameron. angerfrom the premier league and uefa as reports suggest the �*big six' in england have signed up to a new european super—league. germany is commemorating the victims of coronavirus at national ceremonies. almost 80,000 people have died there of covid, and the country is currently battling a third wave. now on bbc news.
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