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tv   The Papers  BBC News  April 18, 2021 10:30pm-11:01pm BST

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hello and welcome to our look ahead hello. this is bbc news. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow mornings papers in a moment with kezia dugdale and john stevens — first the headlines. millions enjoy the first weekend since england's lockdown was eased — but concerns as health officials confirm 77 cases of the indian variant across the uk. the organisation representing nhs trusts in england says it will take five years for some hospitals to catch up with the backlog caused by the pandemic two russians suspected of carrying out the salisbury
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nerve agent poisonings, are now accused, over a czech arms depot explosion, in 2014. the suspects, are thought to be agents, working for russian military intelligence. football chiefs warn europe's top clubs not to join a new super—league, after reports of an announcement, on a breakaway tournament. and, preparing for lift—off — the revolutionary nasa helicopter set to hover, above the surface of mars. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are kezia dugdale, director ofjohn smith centre at glasgow university and a former leader of scottish labour — alsojohn stevens, the deputy political editor of the daily mail. tomorrow's front pages.
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let's start with the metro — it says pressure is mounting on government to put india on the �*red list of countries�* after cases of a new variant were found in the uk. according to the financial times — the us and china have pledged to work together to combat climate change. the i contains an exclusive interview with former eu chiefjean claudejunker in which he criticises former david cameron over his handling of brexit. the sun front page carries a photo of harry and william at their grandfather's funeral on saturday — saying that the princes spoke for two hours after the funeral. the front page of the daily mail reflects on the queen's upcoming 95th birthday — her first without the duke of edinburgh in seven decades. and the guardian has an interview with a former chief constable who says that slashing poverty is best way to cut crime. let's make a start. with the metro.
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calls grow to put india on the red list, this is because of this variance that's been found here, 77 cases so far. but it has been in britain longer than it appears to have, or longerthan britain longer than it appears to have, or longer than it was identified in india so it has been here for quite a few weeks. fix, identified in india so it has been here for quite a few weeks. a great deal of concern _ here for quite a few weeks. a great deal of concern about _ here for quite a few weeks. a great deal of concern about this - here for quite a few weeks. a great deal of concern about this indian i deal of concern about this indian variant of covid. not only because it appears to be more transmissible and perhaps even less responsive to the vaccine than previous other variants or strains we worried about but you are right to say there's been a lot of travel from the united kingdom to india throughout 20 31, talking about over 100,000 journeys during that time and able to move between the two countries, this is leading to the call to add india to britain's red list, thus the countries that if you are troubled you must quarantine. really serious
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call and we look at the figures today 250,000 new cases of covid a day, so spiralling out of control in india. ~ , ., day, so spiralling out of control in india. ~ ,4 4 india. we spoke of the epidemiologist - india. we spoke of the epidemiologist tonight india. we spoke of the - epidemiologist tonight who said india. we spoke of the _ epidemiologist tonight who said that what's really required is a proper border control of people arrive, because they mentioned the quantity and hotels but few are allowed out after about five days if they are not showing signs which is not the case in other countries like australia and new zealand. we've been nowhere near as strict as other countries. i been nowhere near as strict as other countries. ~ 4 been nowhere near as strict as other countries. ~' 4 , 4 countries. i think the whole point of havin: countries. i think the whole point of having these _ countries. i think the whole point of having these red _ countries. i think the whole point of having these red lists - countries. i think the whole point| of having these red lists countries or people — of having these red lists countries or people had to go into a hotel to quarantine — or people had to go into a hotel to quarantine there were not able to 'ust quarantine there were not able to just slip _ quarantine there were not able to just slip home was to be able to stop— just slip home was to be able to stop cases — just slip home was to be able to stop cases like this with variance and concern. i think the big question— and concern. i think the big question for the government is why are they— question for the government is why are they being so slow with india and where — are they being so slow with india and where they putting it on the red list in _ and where they putting it on the red list in one _ and where they putting it on the red list in one of the suspicions is boris — list in one of the suspicions is borisjohnson is planning a trip to india _ borisjohnson is planning a trip to india next— borisjohnson is planning a trip to india next week and this kind of a
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question— india next week and this kind of a question about are the government putting _ question about are the government putting off putting india onto the red list _ putting off putting india onto the red list so borisjohnson is able to make _ red list so borisjohnson is able to make his — red list so borisjohnson is able to make his trip with all of his aides without_ make his trip with all of his aides without having to go to hotel quarantine on the way back? if that's— quarantine on the way back? if that's what the government is doing that's what the government is doing that i_ that's what the government is doing that i think— that's what the government is doing that i think that's particularly concerning. but itjust seems strange — concerning. but itjust seems strange that it's not going in the list with— strange that it's not going in the list with all of these cases at the moment — list with all of these cases at the moment i — list with all of these cases at the moment. 4 �* ~' , 4 list with all of these cases at the moment. 4 �* ,, , 4 ., moment. i don't think you are the only person _ moment. i don't think you are the only person to _ moment. i don't think you are the only person to ask _ moment. i don't think you are the only person to ask themselves - moment. i don't think you are the | only person to ask themselves that question. the ft is going to do very well out of this tonight. breakaway goal, clubs tojoin well out of this tonight. breakaway goal, clubs to join super league. this is not going down well with you a foot and the premier league. i was sa in: that a foot and the premier league. i was saying that l — a foot and the premier league. i was saying that i feel _ a foot and the premier league. i was saying that i feel cursed _ a foot and the premier league. i was saying that i feel cursed every time on here, _ saying that i feel cursed every time on here, i'm — saying that i feel cursed every time on here, i'm not the biggest football— on here, i'm not the biggest football fan though seems to be a massive _ football fan though seems to be a massive football story, even i can see the _ massive football story, even i can see the anger about this tonight. your— see the anger about this tonight. your proposal is that 12 clubs in europe — your proposal is that 12 clubs in europe from this new super league, six of— europe from this new super league, six of them — europe from this new super league, six of them would be english clubs. and then _ six of them would be english clubs. and then in — six of them would be english clubs. and then in this new league there would _ and then in this new league there would not —
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and then in this new league there would not be any way to get promoted or relegated, those 12 clubs with the fixed — or relegated, those 12 clubs with the fixed clubs in there. lots of the fixed clubs in there. lots of the smaller clubs still have the chance — the smaller clubs still have the chance to — the smaller clubs still have the chance to do well in the premier league — chance to do well in the premier league and they get into this league — league and they get into this league. and we've seen that there's been _ league. and we've seen that there's been quite — league. and we've seen that there's been quite a swift reaction from the political— been quite a swift reaction from the political leaders, for both boris johnson — political leaders, for both boris johnson and keir starmer. and they are saying _ johnson and keir starmer. and they are saying the fans need to be at the heart — are saying the fans need to be at the heart of this, if fans are not happy— the heart of this, if fans are not happy that— the heart of this, if fans are not happy that football clubs should not be doing _ happy that football clubs should not be doing this. it�*s happy that football clubs should not be doing this-— be doing this. it's about money, it would seem _ be doing this. it's about money, it would seem like _ be doing this. it's about money, it would seem like a _ be doing this. it's about money, it would seem like a lot _ be doing this. it's about money, it would seem like a lot of _ be doing this. it's about money, it would seem like a lot of things - be doing this. it's about money, it| would seem like a lot of things and sports but particularly football. yes these are amongst the riches clubs in the world and they will do very well being an exclusive club together where they can dominate the tv rights. it's also, highly amusing to see the politicians jump into this very quickly because of course it's a win—win for politicians because if their teams are not in this together super league and they've got a kind of underdog to battle for here. the bottom line really is this is quite on sporting. this is no meritocracy. you get
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there because you've already got the big money and a lot of people will think that is well out of order and not in the spirit of how we like to appreciate sport in this country. that idealism seems to have left football a long time ago. we will come back to the financial times in a while but let's look at the eye first of all. jean claudejunker, i should never have trusted cameron. this is the former eu chief of accusing david cameron of incompetence. things go from bad to worse for the former prime minister. he is not having an easy ride of it so to speak. as of the running from six consecutive sundays across the newspapers, of the stories in today public newspapers, it is altogether a bit different and former president of the european commission saying
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that if he had had his time again he might have done things differently and one thing you would not have done is listen to david cameron when he asked to basically bite out of the break that negotiations and e referendum. he reports today that david cameron said that they will make the case. and jean claude junker said he took david cameron at his word it did not do the types of media gigs that might have benefited the campaign that was not in the uk making the case for the eu often enough during the european referendum and he said he really regrets that. referendum and he said he really regrets that-— referendum and he said he really regrets that. also goes on to talk about how _ regrets that. also goes on to talk about how sad _ regrets that. also goes on to talk about how sad he _ regrets that. also goes on to talk about how sad he is _ regrets that. also goes on to talk about how sad he is that - regrets that. also goes on to talk about how sad he is that britain l regrets that. also goes on to talk| about how sad he is that britain is no longer part of the eu and what a positive force we were as a country as part of that group of 28. for ears i as part of that group of 28. for years i was _ as part of that group of 28. for years i was the _ as part of that group of 28. for years i was the paper's brussels correspondent and sol years i was the paper's brussels correspondent and so i have a slight fondness _ correspondent and so i have a slight fondness of— correspondent and so i have a slight fondness ofjean claude junker, at least _ fondness ofjean claude junker, at least he _ fondness ofjean claude junker, at least he was quite a character. i
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can see — least he was quite a character. i can see what he was annoyed and david _ can see what he was annoyed and david cameron told him not to play a part in— david cameron told him not to play a part in the _ david cameron told him not to play a part in the referendum to stay silent — part in the referendum to stay silent on — part in the referendum to stay silent on the sidelines. after their main _ silent on the sidelines. after their main side — silent on the sidelines. after their main side lost i can see what he would _ main side lost i can see what he would be — main side lost i can see what he would be annoyed and said if he had had his— would be annoyed and said if he had had his time again maybe you should've _ had his time again maybe you should've said more but there are plenty— should've said more but there are plenty of— should've said more but there are plenty of problems with the remain campaign _ plenty of problems with the remain campaign but i think in absence it was not _ campaign but i think in absence it was not one of them. and if he had taken _ was not one of them. and if he had taken part— was not one of them. and if he had taken part it— was not one of them. and if he had taken part it would've been damaging for david _ taken part it would've been damaging for david cameron. gf taken part it would've been damaging for david cameron.— for david cameron. of people took exce tion for david cameron. of people took exception to _ for david cameron. of people took exception to barack _ for david cameron. of people took exception to barack obama - for david cameron. of people took exception to barack obama when l for david cameron. of people took. exception to barack obama when he waited and so it could have gone that way. let's go to the daily mail, loneliest birthday. john, the queen marking her 95th birthday on wednesday. 0bviously, without prince philip on this occasion. and no new portrait which i guess is not a surprise. portrait which i guess is not a surrise. , , ._ ., portrait which i guess is not a surrise. , , ”i ., ,': surprise. the first birthday and 73 ears surprise. the first birthday and 73 years without _ surprise. the first birthday and 73 years without a _ surprise. the first birthday and 73 years without a duke _ surprise. the first birthday and 73 years without a duke of— surprise. the first birthday and 73 | years without a duke of edinburgh surprise. the first birthday and 73 i years without a duke of edinburgh by her side _ years without a duke of edinburgh by her side. it's going to be a very
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sad personal moment for her and obviously— sad personal moment for her and obviously with coronavirus restrictions the family are not going — restrictions the family are not going to — restrictions the family are not going to be able to rally around her in the _ going to be able to rally around her in the same — going to be able to rally around her in the same way as they would normally— in the same way as they would normally be. i should say there's not going — normally be. i should say there's not going to be an official portrait release _ not going to be an official portrait release for her birthday and we are not going _ release for her birthday and we are not going to have gun salutes around the country — not going to have gun salutes around the country. but according to the mail my— the country. but according to the mail my colleague is reporting the queen— mail my colleague is reporting the queen will— mail my colleague is reporting the queen will spend the day with her new corgi — queen will spend the day with her new corgi puppies in the windsor estate _ new corgi puppies in the windsor estate so— new corgi puppies in the windsor estate so taking solace and having time out _ estate so taking solace and having time out to think for herself. that will be a very _ time out to think for herself. trust will be a very comforting thing to do as anyone has got a dog knows that soothing that presence can be. but this is a start for new era for the queen and there will be other people around her will need to provide support.— people around her will need to provide support. there's 'ust no celebrate her i provide support. there's 'ust no celebrate her birthday h provide support. there'sjust no celebrate her birthday this - provide support. there'sjust no - celebrate her birthday this weekend i can't imagine anyone was in a partner of 73 years would you like marking their birthday and she will spend it in windsor with her immediate staff and in her windsor bubble so to speak. reflect on the
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weekend and the coverage of the duke of edinburgh's funeral there was that once a little picture which i think will stand the test of time and sadly that's of the queen very much on her own in a church. and a lot of people feeling deeply sad and very sorry for the queen at the moment. very sorry for the queen at the moment-— moment. certainly are. with gibberish — moment. certainly are. with gibberish the _ moment. certainly are. with gibberish the financial - moment. certainly are. with l gibberish the financial times. moment. certainly are. with i gibberish the financialtimes. i gibberish the financial times. i really interesting story. staff christ brews as pubs real from covid exodus. when you have onlyjust reopened in england on monday and you can drink outside. i was at a pub in leicester to mark the occasion. they are now finding that they can't get the staff back who were furloughed.— they can't get the staff back who were furloughed. they are still shut in scotland... _ were furloughed. they are still shut in scotland... that's _ were furloughed. they are still shut in scotland... that's wasted - in scotland... that's wasted england. — in scotland... that's wasted england. you _ in scotland... that's wasted england, you see. - in scotland... that's wasted england, you see. even i in scotland... that's wasted england, you see. even if. in scotland... that's wasted england, you see. even if it| in scotland... that's wasted i england, you see. even if it was a soft drink l _ england, you see. even if it was a soft drink i would _ england, you see. even if it was a soft drink i would be _ england, you see. even if it was a soft drink i would be very - england, you see. even if it was aj soft drink i would be veryjealous. this is sort of a twist in the story. pubs are opening their gates again to welcome customers back in
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only to find that their staff, if they were on furlough, have either moved on into other employment that they might consider to be more secure over the next few months, a great deal of concern about the hospitality sector and for the next 12 months at least because they will not be able to profit there way they did before for as long as we are all drinking outside and having to keep two metres apart. if they haven't moved onto anotherjob at another industry it may have moved home because so people working in hospitality and retail and tourism sectors are eu migrants and they might have been turned home. one firm said the could've lost up to 20% of their staff stop and where you get your staff from then? because people but very interesting to know where they have moved onto if they've not gone back home to another country, what have they found it during this period where employment, unemployment has gone up so markedly? the employment, unemployment has gone up so markedl ? , 4 , , , .,
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so markedly? the story suggest that some of them _ so markedly? the story suggest that some of them l _ so markedly? the story suggest that some of them i have _ so markedly? the story suggest that some of them i have gone _ so markedly? the story suggest that some of them i have gone into i some of them i have gone into essential— some of them i have gone into essential retail, supermarkets being the boom _ essential retail, supermarkets being the boom area, the boom of delivery services _ the boom area, the boom of delivery services recoveries like amazon doing _ services recoveries like amazon doing well. after last few months you've _ doing well. after last few months you've had the rules costly changing and it _ you've had the rules costly changing and it will— you've had the rules costly changing and it will point the curfew and a meal— and it will point the curfew and a meal with — and it will point the curfew and a meal with drinks, currently updating and having _ meal with drinks, currently updating and having people having to scan when _ and having people having to scan when they— and having people having to scan when they come in. and now saying they can _ when they come in. and now saying they can only open outside and having — they can only open outside and having to — they can only open outside and having to have marquees and things like that _ having to have marquees and things like that if— having to have marquees and things like that. if the putting all your preparations and live your staff are left. preparations and live your staff are left then — preparations and live your staff are left. then you really tricky situation to be in.- left. then you really tricky situation to be in. the last thing an of situation to be in. the last thing any of them _ situation to be in. the last thing any of them need _ situation to be in. the last thing any of them need is _ situation to be in. the last thing any of them need is another i situation to be in. the last thing i any of them need is another lockdown is sort of tightening a restriction. that's it for the papers this hour. don't go anywhere, well you can't, can you? a captive set of gas all these months. kezia and john will be back at 11.30 for another look at the papers. coming up next it's click.
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welcome to click. we're into the second year of the sofa shows now so it's time to mix it up a bit! can you see anything different? can you? can you, lara? i can't see anything. is it your hair again? no, it's not the hair — the hair is always changing. no, keep looking. keep looking. what can it be? i will, but what i do know is that you've been having all of the fun this week. i certainly have! i've been walking a dog! now, do you know, during lockdown, everyone seems to have bought a dog, right? i know. i actually signed up
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to the borrowmydoggie app, where you can look after someone else's, but no—one replied to my messages. seriously? what on earth did you write? well, i think the problem may have been that i was too focused on "this will be great fun for my eight—year—old" rather than "i am a person who you really want to look after your dog". both chuckle. no! you've really got to love a dog to borrow a dog, haven't you? no, well, this is a story about walking a dog, even if you don't really like dogs. the now famous frame of spot the dog, built by robot specialists boston dynamics. these youtube videos released by the company have been entertaining us for the past four or five years as the group have developed increasingly complex and animal—like movements. it's now possible, believe it or not, to take spot for a walk from your own home. all you need is one of these, and that's what i am going to do right now. so i can see spot's point of view and cody, who's filming us. i don't know why i'm waving to her — she can't see me. and if ijust waggle these sticks, i can actually...
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laughs. ..run straight towards cody and immediately, she picks the camera up because she thinks i'm gonna walk into her. 0k. so in theory, this is as easy as controlling any kind of in—game character. just with more serious consequences if i put it in the sea or something. the lag is nowhere near as bad as i thought it was going to be. 0ver there is the golden gate bridge! look at that! oh, come on! he gets through the gate 5,000 miles away! we have a person, so i can — i can move up and then i can kind of go into pose mode and play with him. i can wag my tail. giggles. i can do a downward dog and an upward dog. hello. and this thing does have collision detection on it so if i accidentally put it into a bench or a wall,
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the robot should stop beforehand. so up until now, spot has attracted the attention of the military and the police — they are controversially looking at using robotics in combat and in law enforcement — but now, boston dynamics has put spot up for sale to companies and developers. the idea is they buy one and they programme it to do whatever they want. the question is what do they want? let's talk to spot's real ownerjeff linnell. what are people's reactions to spot normally? i mean, they've all got their phones out here — look at that. is this their normal reaction? you know, it is. it's actually — it's pretty binary. dogs love it or hate it and people are fascinated by it and bring their phones out, or they completely ignore it and go on about their lives. it's one or the other. this — this dog here has — has cocked its ears. i'm gonna — i'm gonna try wagging my tail.
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spot's on sale for about $75,000 — or about £55,000 here in the uk — so my first question is who's going to buy it and what for? a key one is for inspections — if you need to go look at a gauge in a remote area, maybe it is on an oil derrick or some piece of infrastructure that's hard to access. 0bviously security is an application but spot is a general purpose mobility platform. it's the one robot that can kind of get anywhere, so what you want to do with it and what you want to put on it is really up to the end user, and people are coming up with all sort of things. 0ne company that has already taken the lead of spot is cteh, a rescue service using spot to go into areas that are too dangerous for humans. spot is first and foremost about safety by distance. you know, we have people on the shoreline taking samples of water to be sent off for analysis and while we're doing that, if there's — if there's the fear that we need to be water sampling
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in the first place, then it is possible that even being in the area could be dangerous for those people. now with spot, we can do those same kind of things but before we've ever had to have a human suit up. all right, stairs mode. oh, my word! look! no way! he made it! i think we're gonna see them in our work life. you'll see them in warehouses, you'll see them in the back of a grocery store doing inventory, so it's starting to happen. reads: "do not enter. area closed to the public." do a little spin on the spot, why not? # do a little dance. # make a little move. one of the things we're interested in in putting this dog out there, right on the streets, is what do — what do people think of it? how do they react to it? here we go. i'm just going to do some tricks for him now because, you know, he wanted me to go and smell his hand,
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so i'm gonna wag my tail at him. wow! he dances! look at that! whoa! laughs. they're applauding me for doing tricks! spot's been tremendously successful for us. all sorts of folks are deploying spots and we have kind of a turnkey integration that lets a company get set up and have this capability right out of the box, so it is intuitive — i mean, you picked it up in 30 seconds and, you know, you've walked a couple of miles today with — with literally no training. jeff, thanks so much for letting me play with spot. i am happy to dog sit anytime. my pleasure! for the last few weeks, i've been putting four cloud gaming services to the test to see where we're at and whether cloud gaming could replace the pc or console. before i get into some comparisons, here's a quick look at the services i have been testing because, as you'll see, they're all very different in scope.
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playstation now has been around the longest and is a netflix—style, all—you—can—eat buffet of games. for 8.99 a month, you can stream more then 700 games to your ps4 or ps5 console or a windows pc, which sony says is the only way to access playstation—exclusive games without a playstation. xbox cloud gaming is currently in beta. it's a new part of xbox game pass ultimate — another all—you—can—eat buffet with hundreds of games for 10.99 a month. at the moment, if you play on an xbox or windows pc, you have to download the games as usual. but now, you can stream more than 100 of them to an android smartphone or tablet. nvidia's geforce now is a very different proposition. there's no all—inclusive library of games. instead, you can stream pc games you've already bought elsewhere on stores such as steam and epic games. it's aimed at pc gamers who might not have the latest graphics card, or want to play their pc games somewhere else, like on a phone or macbook. and then there's stadia from google. out of all the services, this is the closest to mimicking
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a full console experience without the console. it has its own store where you can buy individual games for a one—off fee and then stream them to your phone, tv, laptop, and more, for free. for 8.99 a month, pro subscribers can stream in ultra—high definition 4k and claim some free games every month. so as you can see, already we've got a huge range of different business models and a variety of supported devices and places to play. first things first, does this actually work? when you're gaming, any delay between pressing a button and seeing the action on screen is unacceptable. surely, putting your computer miles away in the cloud adds some latency? well, yes, it does, but honestly not enough that i could perceive. nvidia was the only company willing to put a figure on it for me. it said that sending your commands to the data centre and a picture being sent back adds about 20ms of latency. that might be important for competitive pro gamers but it's not really perceptible for casual play. everyone's experience will vary, but i never noticed any latency
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on any of the four services. you can see the action on the screen is reacting as soon as i move my finger on the touchpad. all of them have recommended minimum internet speeds to make sure everything runs smoothly and i was testing them on a 50 megabits connection at home that could comfortably accommodate them. so let's look at some of those promised benefits of cloud gaming. and the first is top—of—the—range graphics without expensive equipment. at the moment, stadia is the only one offering 4k to pro subscribers, and it looks really crisp on my 4k tv. you do sometimes notice compression artefacts in the picture, like this blockiness. that wouldn't be there if the game was being rendered locally. now, that's the kind of thing you see sometimes when you're streaming movies and to be honest, it didn't spoil my enjoyment of the game. geforce now offers up 1080p high definition, which looks great on my tv as well, while the two all—you—can—eat services max out at 720p. i actually think that's fine for xbox, which is focusing on android phones at the moment and honestly, ps now looked absolutely fine on my pc, even though i was sat closer to the monitor.
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the graphics looked really sharp. in the race for everything to go ak, we can forget that there's more to graphics than just resolution and honestly, i thought all four of these services looked great. geforce now subscribers also get ray—tracing enabled on some games for more realistic lighting effects. here's another game. look at the reflections on the floor with ray—tracing off and now on. everything just shines a bit more. for comparison, here's the same area on stadia without ray—tracing so you can see the difference. but, honestly, i think both look great and deliver on the promise of high quality graphics without a top—of the—range pc. obviously, the most important thing is the games. if you're already a playstation or xbox gamer, their cloud services can offer a lot of value. there's a lot to play, and there are blockbuster games on all four services. honestly, you would have to dig around and see what catches your eye and, as is always the way, you probably won't find all your favourite games on just one service.
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so is this the future of gaming? well, if playstation and xbox lean into this a bit more, i can see a future where people hop between different services on a month—to—month basis, playing the games they like and then maybe cancelling their subscription, like some people do with movie streaming services — although i'm not sure that would be in sony or microsoft's interests. what stadia has showed me is that putting a full console—style ecosystem into the cloud really can work, as long as your internet connection is good enough. that's it for the shortcut of click for this week. the full—length version is waiting for you on iplayer. as ever, you can keep up with the team on social media. find us on youtube, instagram, facebook and twitter at @bbcclick. thanks for watching and we'll see you soon. bye— bye.
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hello. no significant rain on the way again this week, there isn't lentic weather system close to present norther ireland and scotland so a little rain during monday. but for most of the uk it's high—pressure and dry and after a chilly start it will feel quite warm in the sunshine. his theory of high—pressure extending across from scandinavia, the theory of low pressure getting present northern ireland and scotland and notjust macleod but a little rain and when you have the class to start today you have the class to start today you will avoid frost but a touch of frost, each is: parts of england or wales and close to or perhaps a touch below freezing in the coldest rural areas. and despite the clearing from england on the assumption following a behind across much of england and wales and scotland and that apache club developing an ice that is shower later in the day cannot be ruled out in southeast england, but the cloud is the cuts across western counties of northern ireland, which are most
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parts of scotland and epics of rain occasionallyjust parts of scotland and epics of rain occasionally just ten to parts of scotland and epics of rain occasionallyjust ten to 12 degrees here. really quite warm when you get the sunshine elsewhere. 0vernight it to tuesday the cloud and chance of seeing rain by tuesday morning, low cloud mist and fog returning to parts of eastern england, generally temperatures a bit higher going into tuesday morning so frost will be harder to come by. low cloud mist and fog gradually clearing from eastern england on tuesday, the word apache club developing and a shower can't be ruled out on tuesday. scotland and northern ireland not much rain left on this weather front, northern scotland brightening up front, northern scotland brightening up but here behind the weather front the air, the wind is changing direction and it will feel colder here. south of the weather front is still warm and light winds where you get some of those sunny spells continuing. a cooler air behind this weather front with cloud and not much rain continues to push south overnight and into wednesday across the uk. in the new area of high
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pressure taking over getting plenty of dry weather in the second half of the week but the wind around to that coming in for the northeast will be colder along north coasts, generally temperatures will come a little bit but yet again it will continue to feel really quite warm when you get to see some sunshine. though there is still the risk comes the threat of frost overnight and regardless of growers no significant rain this week. —— for gardeners and growers.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. as concern grows over the health of kremlin critic alexei navalny, russia's ambassador to london says he won't die behind bars. he will not be allowed to die in prison, but i can say that mr navalny, he behaves like a hooligan, absolutely. as india imposes new covid measures — is a local variant now growing in the uk? football chiefs warn europe's top clubs not to join a new super—league, after reports of an announcement, on a breakaway tournament. how nasa is attempting to make history with the first powered flight on another planet.

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