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tv   The Papers  BBC News  April 18, 2021 11:30pm-11:46pm BST

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hello. this is bbc news with martine croxall. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow morning's papers in a moment. first, the headlines. millions enjoy the first weekend since england's lockdown was eased, but concerns as health officials confirm 77 cases of the indian variant across the uk. the organisation representing nhs trusts in england says it will take five years for some hospitals to catch up with the backlog caused by the pandemic. two russians suspected of carrying out the salisbury nerve agent poisonings, are now accused over a czech arms depot explosion in 2014. the suspects are thought to be agents working for russian military intelligence. football chiefs warn europe's top clubs not to join a new super—league after reports of an announcement on a breakaway tournament. and preparing for lift—off — the revolutionary nasa helicopter set to hover above the surface of mars.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are kezia dugdale, director ofjohn smith centre at glasgow university and former scottish labour leader and john stevens, the deputy political editor of the daily mail. welcome both. let's start with the metro. it says pressure is mounting on government to put india on the �*red list of countries' after cases of a new variant were found in the uk. according to the financial times, the us and china have pledged to work together to combat climate change. the i contains an exclusive interview with former eu chiefjean claudejunker in which he criticises former david cameron over his handling of brexit. the sun front page carries a photo of harry and william
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at their grandfather's funeral on saturday, saying that the princes spoke for two hours after the funeral. the times leads on new powers being introduced to prosecute and deport foreign spies operating in britain. and the guardian has an interview with a former chief constable who says that slashing poverty is best way to cut crime. let's start with the metro. calls grow to put india on read list. john, they can't do that yet, though, if the prime minister's still going to go ahead with his visit. , ~ , , visit. yes, the prime minister is auoin to visit. yes, the prime minister is going to india — visit. yes, the prime minister is going to india next _ visit. yes, the prime minister is going to india next week. - visit. yes, the prime minister is going to india next week. i - visit. yes, the prime minister is going to india next week. i was| visit. yes, the prime minister is - going to india next week. i was one of the journalist going to india next week. i was one of thejournalistjoining him. the cases are rocketing in india.
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there's also this problem of this new variant. we've had 77 cases of this new variant, which we think possibly came from india. we think they could be more transmissible and they could be more transmissible and they can also be resistant to the vaccine. so, the big thing for boris johnson, who's gone to all these efforts, it be such a massive issue for the government if we let in some variants that were resistant to the vaccine. you think the government would do everything it could to stop the chances of that. it's got this red list of countries that if you're coming in from, red list of countries that if you're coming infrom, you red list of countries that if you're coming in from, you have to quarantine in a hotel for ten days. you're not able to quarantine at home. so far, the government hasn't put india on this list. ijust don't really understand the arguments. all the arguments on the, bliss, i've
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never... . ., , the arguments on the, bliss, i've never... _, , ., the arguments on the, bliss, i've never... , ., ., never... other countries have had much never. .. other countries have had much stricter— never... other countries have had much stricter rules. _ never... other countries have had much stricter rules. if _ never... other countries have had much stricter rules. if you're - never... other countries have had much stricter rules. if you're in i never... other countries have had much stricter rules. if you're in a| much stricter rules. if you're in a quarantine hotel, there you will stay for two weeks.— quarantine hotel, there you will stay for two weeks. yes, there's definitely a _ stay for two weeks. yes, there's definitely a parallel _ stay for two weeks. yes, there's definitely a parallel between - stay for two weeks. yes, there's i definitely a parallel between those countries _ definitely a parallel between those countries that have keep their covid-i9 — countries that have keep their covid—19that's very low and the strength— covid—19that's very low and the strength of their respective border controls _ strength of their respective border controls. the site would be new zealand. — controls. the site would be new zealand. i— controls. the site would be new zealand, i think still barely into double — zealand, i think still barely into double figures when it comes to covid-i9 — double figures when it comes to covid—19that's. what's interesting about— covid—19that's. what's interesting about this — covid—19that's. what's interesting about this list of 39 countries as many— about this list of 39 countries as many of— about this list of 39 countries as many of these countries have actually — many of these countries have actually more rates than india yet it does. _ actually more rates than india yet it does, which begs more questions. ithink— it does, which begs more questions. i thinkjohn — it does, which begs more questions. i thinkjohn puts his finger on it. the prime — i thinkjohn puts his finger on it. the prime minister could turn back to the _ the prime minister could turn back to the united kingdom, but he would have to _ to the united kingdom, but he would have to pay— to the united kingdom, but he would have to pay the price himself. let's look at the time. these are
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tougher laws being promised. we got this tit—for—tat expulsion going on between the czech republic and russia. , ., , ., russia. yes, lots of heightened tension here. _ russia. yes, lots of heightened tension here. the _ russia. yes, lots of heightened tension here. the story - russia. yes, lots of heightened tension here. the story in - russia. yes, lots of heightened tension here. the story in the l russia. yes, lots of heightened - tension here. the story in the times is about— tension here. the story in the times is about the — tension here. the story in the times is about the forthcoming queen's speech— is about the forthcoming queen's speech where the prime minister will play out _ speech where the prime minister will play out legislation for the coming years _ play out legislation for the coming years. he's suggesting in this article — years. he's suggesting in this article today that they will operate article today that they will operate a hostile _ article today that they will operate a hostile state. so anyone working on behalf — a hostile state. so anyone working on behalf of the government has to make _ on behalf of the government has to make themselves known to the authorities, and if they don't, they will be _ authorities, and if they don't, they will be committing a criminal offence _ will be committing a criminal offence. this is an idea that exists in america — offence. this is an idea that exists in america. actually, it's not the first— in america. actually, it's not the first time — in america. actually, it's not the first time the uk has been looking to the _ first time the uk has been looking to the us — first time the uk has been looking to the us when it comes to dealing with hostile states. in the past couple — with hostile states. in the past couple weeks, the uk government appointed — couple weeks, the uk government appointed the first director general of homeland security. that's not where _ of homeland security. that's not where they were familiar with in the uk. where they were familiar with in the uk it's_ where they were familiar with in the uk. it's drawn from what they do in the united — uk. it's drawn from what they do in the united states.—
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the united states. toughening up that sopported — the united states. toughening up that sopported by _ the united states. toughening up that supported by lots _ the united states. toughening up that supported by lots of - the united states. toughening up| that supported by lots of different countries. britain is saying they support the czech republic. joe biden taking a tougher line then president prompted with the kremlin, john. ., ,., president prompted with the kremlin, john. ., , ., , president prompted with the kremlin, john. ., , , ., . john. yeah, so this is the two cited scored. john. yeah, so this is the two cited scored- the — john. yeah, so this is the two cited scored. the czech _ john. yeah, so this is the two cited scored. the czech republic- john. yeah, so this is the two cited scored. the czech republic says i john. yeah, so this is the two cited l scored. the czech republic says they might be behind and exploded that happened behind a facility in 2014 and we saw the world coming together again. this idea, this registerfor foreign agents has been kicking around for a while. remember last year when the intelligence and security committee came up with the russian report, and one of the criticisms and there was the government hadn't been building enough to tackle the aggression of russia, so this was suggested as one of the possible ideas that the government could take forward. let’s government could take forward. let's look at the guardian. _
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cut poverty to reduce crime. this is andy cook, the chief constable a merseyside police. he's stepping down, i think this is an interview he's going to mark his retirement. usually when you hear from police officers and chiefs, they're calling for more money for their particular part of public service. but he says if you have £5 billion to spend on cutting crime, he would spend £1 billion on law enforcement and the other 4 billion on tackling poverty and creating opportunity, and he says that one of the problems that he sees is that a lot of young people think they don't have much choice. they think that crime is the only answer, so he's saying if you show them, if you work hard and earn good money and get a greatjob, then you might be able to pluck some people away from that life of crime. it’s pluck some people away from that life of crime.— life of crime. it's an interesting idea from _ life of crime. it's an interesting
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idea from a _ life of crime. it's an interesting idea from a police _ life of crime. it's an interesting idea from a police officer, - life of crime. it's an interesting l idea from a police officer, kezia. yes, i think it's fantastic. it draws— yes, i think it's fantastic. it draws a _ yes, i think it's fantastic. it draws a little bit on something called — draws a little bit on something called the violence reduction unit, which _ called the violence reduction unit, which is _ called the violence reduction unit, which is operating in glasgow for a lon- which is operating in glasgow for a longtime — which is operating in glasgow for a long time and gets a lot of credit. the idea — long time and gets a lot of credit. the idea of— long time and gets a lot of credit. the idea of lots of young people in particular— the idea of lots of young people in particular offers a type of security and opportunity that's absent from the rest _ and opportunity that's absent from the rest of— and opportunity that's absent from the rest of their lives, so if you can address that gap and tackled the inequality— can address that gap and tackled the inequality they face, you can change the crisis _ inequality they face, you can change the crisis. it's why you got this senior— the crisis. it's why you got this senior chief constable challenging the system and talking about a different — the system and talking about a different way.— the system and talking about a different wa . ., , ._ , ., different way. kezia, stay with you for the daily _ different way. kezia, stay with you for the daily telegraph. _ duke's death forces a royal review. this is princes charles and william talking about that central core.— about that central core. they've been talking — about that central core. they've been talking for— about that central core. they've been talking for a _ about that central core. they've been talking for a long - about that central core. they've been talking for a long time - about that central core. they've i been talking for a long time about the monetisation of the monarchy, but unfortunately the death of the
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duke of— but unfortunately the death of the duke of edinburgh brought that forward — duke of edinburgh brought that forward. he had dozens and dozens of different— forward. he had dozens and dozens of different organisations he was connected to, all of which need to be redistributed across the royal family~ _ be redistributed across the royal family. the two future kings are going _ family. the two future kings are going to — family. the two future kings are going to meet to discuss this. they will discuss — going to meet to discuss this. they will discuss the questions like how many— will discuss the questions like how many active members of the royal family— many active members of the royal family should there be and what type of role _ family should there be and what type of role will _ family should there be and what type of role will there be in the future. yes, _ of role will there be in the future. yes. it's— of role will there be in the future. yes. it's in— of role will there be in the future. yes, it's in part about what it cost to maintain a royalfamily. it’s to maintain a royalfamily. it's this the size _ to maintain a royalfamily. it's this the size of _ to maintain a royal family. it�*s this the size of the numbers of working royals. if you do that, you have less people to perform all the engagements, and obviously with the duke and duchess of sussex, no longer carrying engagements to share around... this article talking about the possibility that the earl of
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wessex might be asked to perform some more dts. we've seen a lot over the couple of weeks after prince philip's death. they seem quite down to earth and popular, and it's possible we might see more of them in the next few years. let’s possible we might see more of them in the next few years.— in the next few years. let's look at the financial _ in the next few years. let's look at the financial times _ for a couple of stories, john. hs pt -- hsbc —— hsbc scraps a decorative floor. it's happening to everybody. -- hsbc scraps a decorative floor. it's happening to everybody. we've had different _ it's happening to everybody. we've had different offices _ it's happening to everybody. -- had different offices experimenting, but actually, given their credit, the chief executive of hsbc is saying if he's expecting his work is to do it, he and his fellow bosses should be doing as well. they are getting to a top floor, and it says in the article that they are putting in the article that they are putting in meeting rooms and collaborative working spaces, and i have no idea
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what a collaborative working space is. i suspect is quite similar to a meeting room! buti is. i suspect is quite similar to a meeting room! but i think this shows they are going to have an adjustment as people go back to the office if places are trying to cut down the number of deaths. i think that could possibly lead to a lot of rows, and i think we will have problems anyway when people go back to the office. i know from my own experience of going in after being at home and having control of all my surroundings and noise and having the radio on, then going back into an office and there being people talking and noise and people making phone calls, it is an adjustment to make. it’s people making phone calls, it is an adjustment to make. it's interesting because we — adjustment to make. it's interesting because i've been _ adjustment to make. it's interesting because i've been coming _ adjustment to make. it's interesting because i've been coming into - adjustment to make. it's interesting because i've been coming into the i because i've been coming into the office three days a week the whole way through, and i love the fact that i don't have to stay at home of the time! not that i don't love you all at home, i do! but it really is causing a lot of organisations and companies are reese think about what they need, how they're prepared to
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operate —— a rethink. i they need, how they're prepared to operate -- a rethink.— they need, how they're prepared to operate -- a rethink. i haven't been at my desk — operate -- a rethink. i haven't been at my desk at _ operate -- a rethink. i haven't been at my desk at the _ operate -- a rethink. i haven't been at my desk at the university - operate -- a rethink. i haven't been at my desk at the university of- at my desk at the university of glasgow— at my desk at the university of glasgow for over a year. i don't know— glasgow for over a year. i don't know when— glasgow for over a year. i don't know when i'll be going back because the vast _ know when i'll be going back because the vast majority of what i can do, i the vast majority of what i can do, i can— the vast majority of what i can do, i can do— the vast majority of what i can do, i can do from home and do it, i think— i can do from home and do it, i think i'm— i can do from home and do it, i think i'm a— i can do from home and do it, i think i'm a very well. so this is a fundamental challenge of what the workplace will look like in the future — workplace will look like in the future. let's be reminded, the e>
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don't have as _ other than turn up. what if they don't have as much _ other than turn up. what if they don't have as much room - other than turn up. what if they don't have as much room at - other than turn up. what if they - don't have as much room at home... let's finish with a quick comment from both of you. the staff crisis that pubs are facing now that they opened up again in england. not to rub it in! i opened up again in england. not to rub it in! ~ ., �*, ., , rub it in! i know, it's hard. this is another— rub it in! i know, it's hard. this is another problem _ rub it in! i know, it's hard. this is another problem for - rub it in! i know, it's hard. this is another problem for the - is another problem for the hospitality sector. the idea that 'ust hospitality sector. the idea that just about to reopen, their staff are gone — just about to reopen, their staff are gone. they returned to the home countries _ are gone. they returned to the home countries because they were eu migrants — countries because they were eu migrants. are those people here in the uk _ migrants. are those people here in the uk finding alternatives more... another— the uk finding alternatives more... another challenge for the pub sector — another challenge for the pub sector. �* . another challenge for the pub sector. �* , , ., ,, ., sector. it'll be interesting to know which sectors _ sector. it'll be interesting to know which sectors they've _ sector. it'll be interesting to know which sectors they've found - sector. it'll be interesting to know which sectors they've found more| which sectors they've found more permanent stable employment, john. i think the ft suggested someone had gone to work at supermarkets and some of them were delivering parcels for companies such as amazon. if you're running a pub or a restaurant, this isjust another problem and you will be tearing your hair off after the all the other
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things you've done these months. these months. that's it for the papers tonight. chris on twitter pointed out at 10:30 p:m., iwas chris on twitter pointed out at 10:30 p:m., i was so reclast —— relax, i was almost reclining. i'm so comfortable here. don't forget to buy a paper in the morning. coming up, it's the film review. night night. hello, and welcome to the film review with me, anna smith. i'm filling in for mark kermode to review this week's releases. the revenge thriller promising young woman is one
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of the most hotly anticipated releases of the year, and it's finally streaming in the uk this weekend. you just forgot your birthday. you don't want to have a party, you don't want to see your friends. you know i don't have any friends, mum. don'tjoke about it, don't. do you know how strange this is? you, you're still living here at home, working in that stupid coffee shop since you and nina dropped out of med school! you're out all night long doing god only knows what. 0k... i mean, you don't have any boyfriend, you don't have any friends! mum, you should've saved all of that for my birthday card. carey mulligan stars as cassie, a medical school dropout living in ohio. she works in a coffee shop and secretly spends her nights trawling bars and nightclubs, apparently intoxicated.
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when she's invariably taken home by an opportunistic man, she picks her moment to sober up, and he gets a shock.

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