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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 15, 2021 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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this is bbc news with me christian fraser. after weeks of fevered speculation, boris johnson has finally pulled the trigger on a cabinet reshuffle. there's a new foreign secretary — liz truss — her predessor was demoted after widespread critisicm of his handling of the withdrawal from afghanistan. it's a month since the fall of kabul — we have a special report from mazari sharif in the north on what life is like under the taliban. there are four dead bodies laid out here. one of them has a note on top of it saying "these men were kidnappers, anyone who wants to do the same, this is going to be thier punishment." and the amateur astronauts, for civilians who've never been to space
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are about to blastoff on a mission around earth. hello and welcome. borisjohnson has his eyes on a post—brexit, post—covid future. not that those two seismic issues have been entirely put to bed, the fallout will occupy government for years to come. but suddenly there is a question mark over what the purpose of this government really is. and a reshuffle usually gives us a clue. the trouble is this wasn't the most radical of reshuffles, today, certainly not the night of the long knives. yes, the foreign secretary dominic raab, paid the price over his handling of the afghanistan crisis. gavin williamson also expelled as the education secretary. but the chancellor, the home secretary and the health secretary all stayed put. the most intriguing move of the day was the decision to send
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cabinet secretary michael gove, to the department of housing. which might ordinarily be seen as a demotion. except housing is now a key part of the prime ministers levelling up agenda. maybe a clue to where the renewed focus will be. here's our political editor laura keunsberg. nerves all round. who is out and who is in, prime minister? reshuffles matter, who the boss wants in, and who the boss wants out. to start, where would he end up? which way? the black belt brexiteer foreign secretary who was in charge from his grecian holiday during the fall of kabul. dominic raab, down but not out. after lengthy conversations, perhaps a dollop of confrontation. have you still got a job, sir? the former lawyer takes charge of the courts and prisons at the justice department. it is not clear if number ten had bargained on giving him the bauble of deputy prime minister, too, but he emerged with that,
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a title that has not been held since 2015. are you expecting a promotion? his replacement, liz truss, much loved by tory members, moving up into herfifthjob at the cabinet table. but time waits for no minister. for a quartet of the cabinet, the clock ran down on their time in office. robert was an unlucky name today, robertjenrick from housing and robert buckland from justice both out, but spared the shame of a sacking in downing street, their own statements on social media sufficed. along with the predicted departure of the now former education secretary, gavin williamson. i sort of have to do quite a few tests. who many would claim failed rather a lot of those tests, in charge of confusion over exam grades and millions of school pupils during the pandemic. taking his place, nadim zahawi, a huge thumbs up from downing street after overseeing
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the vaccine programme. promotion for him to the ducation department. and another borisjohnson lawyer leased the dean darius, a bestselling author and inhabitant of the tv celebrityjungle, has triumphed in this wild terrain, promoted to look after culture and sport. a grinning michael gove, with a job technically less senior, now in charge of housing, councils and the union. but downing street wants this to be a day for the doers. the top ranked around here, who number ten hopes can get things done. a day of many moves, a day when political fortunes rise and fall. and in the last few minutes boris johnson just and in the last few minutes boris johnsonjust said we and in the last few minutes boris johnson just said we will work tirelessly to level up the whole country. on housing and infrastructure. on housing and infrastructure. let's bring in our uk political correspondent rob watson. interesting that statement and the moves. you see this in america in germany and france and here in the uk it is the era of big government,
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big spending. yes uk it is the era of big government, big spending-— big spending. yes although if i could ut big spending. yes although if i could put this _ big spending. yes although if i could put this in _ big spending. yes although if i could put this in some - big spending. yes although if i could put this in some contextj big spending. yes although if i - could put this in some context 1st, could put this in some context ist, i think i rather agree with you that this is a radical shake—up of the government in terms of personnel. i'm not sure that it is particularly in terms of policy. after all this remains a probably pro brexit populace centred government. the other thing add add in terms of contactors over the last 20 years britain has moved far more from a cabinet government, collective government we got these big beast ministers to a far more presidential system. it started under tony blair edits continued through to boris johnson who after all, is absolutely the first among equals. i think he sees himself more as pericles one of his ancient greek heroes in a modern prime minister. —— heracles. absolutely i think some people have been rather surprised that this
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government, this post—brexit government, this post—brexit government some of thought that maybe there will be plenty of deregulation, smaller, slimmer government, lower taxation for the that's not the way talking. ha. government, lower taxation for the that's not the way talking.- that's not the way talking. no. i was going _ that's not the way talking. no. i was going to — that's not the way talking. no. i was going to raise _ that's not the way talking. no. i was going to raise that - that's not the way talking. no. i was going to raise that issue, i that's not the way talking. no. i i was going to raise that issue, you say it's a centre—right government. of say it's a centre—right government. of course they won a lot of seats of the north beyond what we see the red wall, labour heartland. in a way they straddle the centre left in the centre right, don't they? you see that in the spending for the they spent £36 billion on health and social care, there are big tax increase is coming, he's now pledging seemingly more housing. because he is but one of his key ministers there, michael gove, more spending on infrastructure. ijust wonder if you are in the traditional conservative party member whether you recognise this as a conservative government. i you recognise this as a conservative government-— government. i stand correctly chastised _ government. i stand correctly chastised by _ government. i stand correctly chastised by you, _ government. i stand correctly chastised by you, christian. i government. i stand correctly i chastised by you, christian. that serves me right for using phrases that trip off the tongue. certainly
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it's pro brexit, it's populist. i think you're right. in some ways to describe it as center—right, sorted to me because it makes you think of a small state, low tax government. of a small state, low tax government. of course that is not the direction this government is heading in. of course what some inside the party worry about is that it is just immensely difficult trying to have a broad coalition where you are trying to appeal to more working—class voters in the north of the country were not particularly bothered about lower taxes and do want to see an active state sorting out some of the problems which undoubtedly led many of them to vote for brexit. but of course the conservative party is traditionally also appealed to the middle classes and businesses who are absolutely very worried indeed about keeping taxes low. iliiui’ith about keeping taxes low. with a olo . ies about keeping taxes low. with apologies to — about keeping taxes low. with apologies to our _ about keeping taxes low. with apologies to our world viewers, i just want to touch on the core intrigue. some will remember back in 26 human borisjohnson was running
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for prime minister that michael gove pretty much stabbed him in the front and said he couldn't support him and didn't believe he was the right man. and he's been moved to housing today. as i said, that might seem like a demotion except if you put on screen thejobs like a demotion except if you put on screen the jobs that this prime minister has handed to michael gove, is overly two currently overseeing local government, leveling out, the union, elections, only yesterday he put him in charge of supply shortages was up he clearly trusts him even though he might not like them. ~ ., , ., ., i. them. world viewers again if you cive us, them. world viewers again if you give us. why? — them. world viewers again if you give us, why? because _ them. world viewers again if you give us, why? because this- them. world viewers again if you give us, why? because this is. give us, why? because this is positively shakespearean. these men went to university together at oxford, their history goes back a long way. so it is utterly intriguing to people whether they are here are watching from somewhere else. it's interesting that you mentioned that and it reminds me that people have raised two issues
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about this reshuffle. one is that by and large borisjohnson has gone for loyalists and definite pro brexiteers. michael gove, doesn't quite fit into that. he certainly is not been a loyalist. they have had distinct rivalries for months and years which then brings us to the second theory that i've heard about this reshuffle which is boris johnson is going for doers. people that see the world the same way as him and whether you like the reforms that they've got in mind are not the kind of people that you could trust like most do not michael gove. his supporters would say it's sort of get things done. even if you don't particularly like those things that he would get them done. absolutely intriguing, the relationship between borisjohnson and michael gove, my goodness that could be a play there. could knit or something? we should write that. we are the doers.
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it's a month to the day since the taliban stormed into kabul and the president ashraf ghani fled to take refuge in the united arab emirates. there is no longer any credible military challenge to taliban rule. but there are plenty of daunting problems ahead. they face a mounting economic crisis, internally, there are cracks beginning to show in the taliban leadership, which fuels further scepticism about their public commitment to human rights. on today's programme — we have a snapshot — of life under the taliban. a special report from the north of the country. secunder kermani and cameraman malik mudassir have sent this report from the north, from mazari sharif. crossing into the islamic emirate. this is the border with uzbekistan. the taliban even have their own stamps. an hours drive away on the service life appears to be continuing as normal though many are suffering with a shortage of cash in
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bank. this was the blue mosque, the cities cultural heart shortly before the taliban takeover last month. now, the group have allocated separate times for men and women to visit. some are still coming. but there seem fewer than before. my host here is a leading local taliban figure. your critics would say you are killing off the cultural life in this country. why do you need to change the culture? what's wrong about the culture that was already here? everyone was muslim.
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chatter. we literallyjust came out of the blue mosque and saw a crowd gathered in the city centre. we made our way to the middle of it, and there are four dead bodies laid out here. one of them has a note on top of it saying, "these men were kidnappers. anyone who wants to do the same, this is going to be their punishment. " all around me, there is a huge crowd of people trying to push their way forward to have a look at the sight. a group of young children were rescued by the taliban from the kidnappers. many praised the group for tackling violent crime that had plagued major cities. but many others here don't feel safe. private universities like this one have reopened. female and male students are separated by a curtain,
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as per new taliban rules. but with money tight and the future unclear, only a handful are turning up. how does it feel studying, but not knowing whether you will be able to work or not in the future? the last time the taliban were in power, they imposed even more restrictions. but, however they may have involved since then, afghan cities have changed much more. the taliban control the country, but still need to win hearts and minds. secunder kermani, bbc news, mazar—i—sharif. i'm joined now by senator chris murphy who represents connecticut and is on the senate foreign
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relations committee. great to have you with us on the program. thank you for your time. at some point your committee is going to be asked to make a decision on whether to on freeze the funding for the taliban for that would you vote to release the funds and what conditions would you attach? i think it's too early — conditions would you attach? i think it's too early to _ conditions would you attach? i think it's too early to know _ conditions would you attach? i think it's too early to know the _ conditions would you attach? i think it's too early to know the answer - conditions would you attach? i think it's too early to know the answer to | it's too early to know the answer to that question. the tele— has to prove that it has changed, that it is —— taliban. that is good to make a commitment to girls education that is going to allow for some semblance of freedom of press in that country i don't know that we've seen no signs yet. my constituents in connecticut have no interest in supporting a violent and repressive taliban regime. there are plenty of the way that we can support the afghan people. we can continue to support ngos inside afghanistan that are doing humanitarian relief. but i'm certainly not ready to suggest
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that american taxpayer dollars should go to anyone in the taliban government, they have a lot to prove. government, they have a lot to rove. ., �* , government, they have a lot to rove. . �* , , government, they have a lot to rove. . h , government, they have a lot to rove. ., �*, , y., 4' prove. that's interesting, you think that ou prove. that's interesting, you think that you could _ prove. that's interesting, you think that you could direct _ prove. that's interesting, you think that you could direct money - prove. that's interesting, you think| that you could direct money towards these ngos without it going into the hands of the taliban? iliiui’eiiii these ngos without it going into the hands of the taliban?— hands of the taliban? well we do that already _ hands of the taliban? well we do that already in _ hands of the taliban? well we do that already in countries - hands of the taliban? well we do that already in countries where l hands of the taliban? well we do | that already in countries where we have repressive regimes for that in gaza the united states has supported humanitarian relief there. we do it without funnelling the money through hamas. so in afghanistan we should be willing to partner with the afghan people and we can do that as we do in other dangerous parts of the world without supporting the taliban government. it the world without supporting the taliban government. if afghanistan colla ses taliban government. if afghanistan collapses into _ taliban government. if afghanistan collapses into civil— taliban government. if afghanistan collapses into civil war _ taliban government. if afghanistan collapses into civil war and - taliban government. if afghanistan collapses into civil war and the - taliban government. if afghanistan | collapses into civil war and the 0pm and a refugee start to spill across the border they don't appear on your border, they appear on europe's borders. ijust wonder if border, they appear on europe's borders. i just wonder if you border, they appear on europe's borders. ijust wonder if you are under pressure from european colleagues, people like boris
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johnson who was saying we have to deal with the taliban because if we don't it's going to wash up on our shores? �* , ., ~' don't it's going to wash up on our shores? �*, ., ~ ., , , shores? let's not kid ourselves, afghanistan _ shores? let's not kid ourselves, afghanistan has _ shores? let's not kid ourselves, afghanistan has been _ shores? let's not kid ourselves, afghanistan has been a - shores? let's not kid ourselves, afghanistan has been a war- shores? let's not kid ourselves, | afghanistan has been a war zone pushing refugees all across the world for 20 years. everything a year there were 10,000 afghan civilians being killed or badly injured in the middle of this war. i don't think that was good for afghanistan. we will obviously watch what happens inside that country but as you may know, there are many of my colleagues here in the united states senate that would like us to begin funding and sending arms to the afghan resistance to essentially stoke a new civil war inside that country. i don't think that is a wise course of policy for america to take. i think it would in fact incentivise the increased refugee flows that those in europe are worried about.— flows that those in europe are worried about. , .,
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worried about. yesterday you sat and listened to the _ worried about. yesterday you sat and listened to the evidence _ worried about. yesterday you sat and listened to the evidence given - worried about. yesterday you sat and listened to the evidence given by - worried about. yesterday you sat and listened to the evidence given by a i listened to the evidence given by a secretary of state, anthony blinking. you know that he was asked a question about that last drone attack to the attack in kabul before the us troops withdrew and you would also go on sure you start reporting that looks entirely possible that theyin that looks entirely possible that they in fact killed an aid worker who is working for the us ngos. some of his children were killed, three of them toddlers. were you satisfied with the answers you got from the secretary of state and would your committee keep abreast of where this investigation goes? we committee keep abreast of where this investigation goes?— investigation goes? we will keep abreast of this _ investigation goes? we will keep abreast of this investigation. - investigation goes? we will keep l abreast of this investigation. there is a limited amount of the information the secretary of state can provide an open setting. if this drone strike ended up killing civilians instead of its intended terrorist targets it would unfortunately be very representative of the us drone programme over the past 20 years. i have been a critic of the way in which i believe the
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united states has been overly reliant on drones. there are some studies suggesting that eight or nine out of ten cases are drones ended up hitting the wrong target. often we are essentially providing bulletin board recruitment material to terrorist organisers when we kill civilians with drones. so we have to understand the limitations of our intelligence, the tendency for our drones to ultimately inflict more civilian casualties than we intend for them and maybe this incident in kabul is an impetus for us to start being much more selective in the way in which we use this technology. i want to shift focus, bear with us because i know very recently you are part of a crew gushed during a congressional delegation that went to lebanon. we have a report from lebanon in a very keen to get your thoughts on it. lebanon a country thatis thoughts on it. lebanon a country that is on the
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brink of currency collapse. their nightly blackouts because of an old fuel. tomorrow has a lot will drive a shipment into lebanon. iranian oil is under us sanctions, while hezbollah is a proscribed terrorist organisation. so here's our correspondent in lebanon anna foster to tell us how this is going to work. what is crucial to understand is how desperate things are here in lebanon right now. you can't find vital medicines here, people will que up for hours to fill up their cars with petrol. and look at the beirut skyline, there are whole buildings behind me in complete darkness because there is no state electricity and people can't afford the black—market diesel to keep their generators running. against that backdrop in just a few hours' time, trucks will roll across the syrian border organised by his hezbollah which the us has designated a foreign terrorist organisation. and they are carrying fuel from iran. again, itself subject to us sanctions. so what people have now is a really
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difficult decision to make. they need this fuel to keep their businesses running, to keep their lights on, they needed to live. but they fear the repercussions of us sanctions and how that could cripple their businesses. and essentially really affect their lives in a serious way. what they want is guidance from the us. the us has allowed this shipment to take place but will there be repercussions in the future? these are incredibly difficult dilemmas for people to deal with and they really want to will there be repercussions for those businesses and organisations in lebanon that take the oil? that’s in lebanon that take the oil? that's not my decision _ in lebanon that take the oil? that's not my decision to _ in lebanon that take the oil? that's not my decision to make, _ in lebanon that take the oil? that's not my decision to make, that's - in lebanon that take the oil? that'sj not my decision to make, that's the biting administrations decision. but i did make clear when i was in lebanon a week ago that the receipt of this oil potentially does subject lebanon to sanction. i will draw issue with one thing your reporters,
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lebanon doesn't need the soil, there are tankers sitting in the mediterranean that deliver oil to that country within days. the problem is the lebanese political leadership has been so dysfunctional that they haven't been able to form a government. days ago they finally did and the imf and the united states are standing by, ready to help lebanon bring oil and fuel into that country through legitimate channels. so there is no shortage of fuel that is available to the country of lebanon. the shortage is of political leadership in that country. now that they have a government the united states can be a true partner with the lebanese people. this isjust a pr stunt by has the law. those trucks aren't bringing in enough fuel to power more than a handful of days in a handful of cities. it did not ultimately they need a permanent solution through partnership through the united states, imf we are ready and willing to try and rebuild lebanon as our economy, that's where
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lebanon as our economy, that's where lebanon future is put up not some relationship with iran and his brother to bring in oiljust to draw cameras to the border for a good photo up. i cameras to the border for a good hoto u. ~' ., cameras to the border for a good hoto u. ~ ., ., i. ., photo up. i know that you looked at one other solution _ photo up. i know that you looked at one other solution and _ photo up. i know that you looked at one other solution and that - photo up. i know that you looked at one other solution and that was - one other solution and that was moving fuel from egypt through jordan and syria into lebanon. as i understand it, people in lebanon say that's all well and good but we cannot use that pipeline for years, it will take months to set up. which is wh in it will take months to set up. which is why in the _ it will take months to set up. which is why in the short _ it will take months to set up. which is why in the short run _ it will take months to set up. which is why in the short run we _ it will take months to set up. which is why in the short run we need - it will take months to set up. which is why in the short run we need to l is why in the short run we need to be able to bring these tankers that are in the mediterranean into lebanon to be able to deliver enough fuel to be able to bridge towards a longer—term solution. i'm very supportive of this pathway. in fact the united states has been hard at work trying to unlock a way to get egyptian gas into lebanon. it's true that pipeline needs some improvements but we can work with the world bank to finance that. in fact were doing it everything that they try to work through those issues. so that's a prospect in the
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long run. the tankers in the short run. iran and his brother are not the answer. run. iran and his brother are not the answer-— run. iran and his brother are not the answer. ., , , , ., the answer. one other issue before i take to them — the answer. one other issue before i take to them that _ the answer. one other issue before i take to them that let _ the answer. one other issue before i take to them that let you _ the answer. one other issue before i take to them that let you go. - take to them that let you go. president biden said the administration would be different, it would take on the authoritarian regime would stand up for human rights around the world. theyjust decided to send us aid to egypt, no strings attached despite the thousands of documented human rights abuses in egypt. is that a missed opportunity? this abuses in egypt. is that a missed opportunity?— opportunity? this was a missed opportunity- — opportunity? this was a missed opportunity- i— opportunity? this was a missed opportunity. i advise _ opportunity? this was a missed opportunity. i advise the - opportunity. i advise the administration to hold back about $300 million of aid to egypt. frankly, i cancelled them to read direct some of that to lebanon to help support the military there which is one of the stabilising forces in the country. what the administration decided was to hold back only about a and do not deliver
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that aid to egypt until they make substantial, tangible progress on human rights. i think they should have gone further. but it is significant that the administration did decide to hold back some substantial amount of funding and i'm hopeful that that will be enough leverage to get the cc regime to release some political prisoners and make some other reforms to open up space for dissent. i agree that it was a missed opportunity, they could've strike doing accents a stronger message. at the very least it's not business as usual were knocking to continue to give a blank check to the cc regime. it knocking to continue to give a blank check to the cc regime.— check to the cc regime. it seems to be a could've _ check to the cc regime. it seems to be a could've been _ check to the cc regime. it seems to be a could've been a _ check to the cc regime. it seems to be a could've been a santa - check to the cc regime. it seems to be a could've been a santa could'vej be a could've been a santa could've taken without much cost to national security for the up or maybe the administration sees it differently. it may be a cynical way to look at it but maybe they do see a national security threat from egypt and that's why they supply the funding. my that's why they supply the funding. my argument is that maybe 30 years ago we needed to essentially send $1
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billion of money to egypt to get them to participate in activities that work in dissent with our national security. today they have independent reasons, for instance have a security partnership with israel. that's important to egypt today in a way that maybe it wasn't 30 years ago. i'm not sure that if we were to degrade or lessen the amount of military aid we send to egypt that they would walk away from the work they do in gaza, the partnership they have with israel or the counterterrorism work we are engaged in. they have good reasons on their own merit for their own reasons to engage in that partnership with the united states notwithstanding the amount of aid that we give them on an annual basis. ,, ., ., , ~ , , �* basis. senator chris murphy i'm really grateful _ basis. senator chris murphy i'm really grateful for _ basis. senator chris murphy i'm really grateful for your - basis. senator chris murphy i'm really grateful for your time - really grateful for your time tonight. thanks for going on a whole range of issues that were interested in. it's really good heavy on the program. thank you very much. do you stay with us on the program. were going to talk about a new book that
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just come out for bob woodward was an interesting revelations. to stay with us for that. hello. in the coming days, the weather will continue with a rather gentle slide into autumn. the days are becoming shorter, the leaves are beginning to show something of a tint, but there's nothing too dramatic to come in terms of strong winds to start taking them off the trees just yet or any especially heavy rain in the short term. if anything, i think some decent spells of sunshine in the next few days. but one taste of autumn i think that we will see is some early fog. overnight, we've got this ridge of high pressure building up from the southwest of the uk. that means very light winds and clear skies. and as we move into autumn, that is the perfect set up for us to see some fog developing, potentially in areas very similar to those we saw it developing last night, parts of northern england, down into the welsh marches and down
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towards the west country. but overall, it's a mild, actually slightly humid night, with temperatures in the low teens for some. and then we look at thursday daytime, and our ridgejust slowly continues to keep pushing its way across the uk. that will mean a lot of fine weather for thursday. perhaps some showers initially across the northeast of scotland, but we should see those clearing as the hours go by. some fairly widespread sunshine. could take a while to get the clearest of the skies where any mist and fog lingers, but come the afternoon, the story will start to lean to the cloudier side for northern ireland as we begin to see a weather front approaching. and it's that weather front, then, that's our biggest question mark on our weather story for friday. it looks like the eastern side of the uk will be clear with some spells of sunshine. this weather front at the moment looks like it could bring some quite persistent rain into northern ireland and into western scotland. later on in the day, some heavier rain getting into the southwest of england and wales. it could also be accompanied
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by some quite gusty winds. pretty slow to move its way eastwards, though, that weather front, so a real east—west split — temperatures 16, 17 in the rain, perhaps 21, 22 degrees towards the east of the uk. it does try and make its way eastwards through the small hours of friday, into the early hours of saturday, and then leave a legacy of perhaps best referred to as showers across the southern half of the uk for the first half of the weekend. of the two days, i think perhaps sunday offering up the driest and brightest weather, but still some showers possible through sunday for southern england.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. borisjohnson has fired a string of cabinet ministers — and promoted new faces to replace them — in a major reshuffle. we'll dig into new reporting that claims top us general mark milley secretly called his chinese counterpart over concerns then—president donald trump could spark a war with china. the world anti—doping agency will review whether cannabis should remain a banned substance after a top us athlete was forced to miss the tokyo olympics. and the amateur astronauts — how four civilians who've never been to space are about to blast off on their own for a three day trip around earth.
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america's top general, mark milley made secret plans to prevent former president donald trump from mis—using nuclear weapons — that's according to a new book called peril — written by washington post journalists. they write that the chair of the joint chiefs of staff was deeply shaken by the events of january six and was certain that trump had gone into a serious mental decline in the aftermath of the election. so wade was the general lack trump could go rogue, he established a back channel to his military coper in china to reassure him there was no possibility of an attack. last night, the former president for phoned newsnight to tell them the claims are absurd. so, first of all, if that is -
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actually true, which is hard to believe that he would have called . china and done these things and was willing to advise them of an attack i or in advance of an attack, that'si treason. and i would think, i've had some because today saying that's - treason. president biden says he has complete confidence in them. i'm not going to add more speak to an anonymous unconfirmed reports about conversations with limited context from here, but what i can assure you ——now was general milly, he has been chairman of the joint of chiefs are almost eight months of his presidency. they've worked side by side through a range of international events, the president has complete confidence in his leadership his patriotism and his fidelity to our constitution. you m. i'm joined now by miles taylor. get to happy with us. bob woodward
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says they have interviewed some 200 people. have some of the claims he read stuff i resonate with your experience in the white house? you know, i experience in the white house? you know. i hate — experience in the white house? you know. i hate to _ experience in the white house? gm. know, i hate to say it, but they absolutely do. look, general nellie's concern about the president's mental state was something that goes all the way back to the first year. —— general milley. in the very first year of the trump administration, people that were very close to the president, his cabinet secretaries, his hand—picked nominees to run the departments and agencies were talking in private about whether they thought he had the mental acuity to even do the job. there was consideration when i was there of invoking the 20 that the amendment of the us constitution which would allow guests cabinet to deem this president unfit for office and sidelined him. that never happens, primarily because many of those concerned cabinet members were worried they could potentially spark civil war in the united states. at
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those rates but the president's mental health and other faded. those rates but the president's mental health and otherfaded. i would just add that it seems to me that general milley, again someone who is donald trump's hand—picked top military adviser site the most serious national security threat to the united states didn't seem to be russia, china or iran in the postelection period, he seemed to think that the president himself was the biggest�*s democracy. there think that the president himself was the biggest's democracy.— the biggest's democracy. there are len who the biggest's democracy. there are plenty who take — the biggest's democracy. there are plenty who take issue _ the biggest's democracy. there are plenty who take issue with - the biggest's democracy. there are plenty who take issue with the - plenty who take issue with the actions of phoning an adversary to say we are not going to attack, donald trump says that is treason. is it? ext;n donald trump says that is treason. is it? ~ , ., . . donald trump says that is treason. is it? by accident think why was general milley _ is it? by accident think why was general milley afraid _ is it? by accident think why was general milley afraid that the i general milley afraid that the united states is going to go to war with china? i think that is that to get concerned. the fact that general milley was so worried about instability in the white house that the president might start an unnecessary war with one of america's greatest rivals, to me, is a far bigger where than general
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milley trying to lower tensions to its counterparts. the question still need to be asked, i think they should speak about this publicly and explain exactly what they said in those phone calls, but it is not uncommon throughout american history for senior diplomats are military generals to be in touch at their overseas counterparts to prevent situations from spiralling out of control, to prevent miscommunication and to prevent things from getting explosive when they shouldn't. look at world war i. it's a perfect example of a war that could potentially have been prevented or slowed if they had not been miscommunication. i think that is what general milley was doing, he seems so unstable, he might accidentally or recklessly take us to war and they want to make sure i've got a hot line to one of our adversaries to lower the temperature.— adversaries to lower the temperature. adversaries to lower the temerature. ., ., temperature. that wonder if there were clues — temperature. that wonder if there were clues as _ temperature. that wonder if there were clues as to _ temperature. that wonder if there were clues as to why _ temperature. that wonder if there were clues as to why he _ temperature. that wonder if there were clues as to why he thought l temperature. that wonder if there l were clues as to why he thought the president might go around his national security staff, and indeed, there is because we know already that the president had signed in
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order he had gone the staff, he's gone around the secretary of defence and his chief military officer assigning in order that would've withdrawn all american troops from afghanistan by the 15th of january, before the inauguration, so perhaps the president thought, perhaps the generalfight that the president thought, perhaps the general fight that indeed the president was already going rogue. i'm going to say this and take a step further, several years before that, we were already starting to worry that the guardrails were no longer in place and that the president was very willing to go around his entire team to do something that everyone had universally recommended against. and i will give you an example. there are 2018, trump desperately wanted to pull all us separate —— special price operations out of syria. these are us prices going after isa cells that were actively plotting against our european allies and against the united states. we strongly advise
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the president not to do this, to wait to come and go through a policy process. he ignored his secretary of homeland security from his secretary of defence, his national security adviser and one morning he woke up in the house and tweeted that this is going to happen. he tweeted that he was ordering the pull—out from syria. it ultimately led tojim mattis the secretary of defence's resignation, but we saw it up close and personal. iwas resignation, but we saw it up close and personal. i was sitting in the white house chief of staff office when that happened and none of us knew that the president was about to order us to leave syria. so those concerns are long—standing and i think in the end game here, you saw milley worried that donald trump might order a nuclear strike of some kind without consulting anyone on his team. but kind without consulting anyone on his team. �* .,, i. kind without consulting anyone on his team. �* ., his team. but as you say, whatever has happened _ his team. but as you say, whatever has happened here, _ his team. but as you say, whatever has happened here, we _ his team. but as you say, whatever has happened here, we are - his team. but as you say, whatever has happened here, we are really l has happened here, we are really only going to get to the bottom of that if there is an end to end investigation of that period, particularly that period around january six. we are not going to get that, not an independent one. yes. i think it's very _
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that, not an independent one. yes. i think it's very unfortunate, - think it's very unfortunate, republicans in congress blocked the creation of an independent commission, much like we had after 9/11, and instead forced the house speaker, nancy pelosi to create a commission to look atjanuary six, the events surrounding it. now, look, that may be a distinction upwards to people, but there is a big difference between a 9/11 select committee rather which is what she created an independent commission that can perform these responsibilities. inevitably, the select committee that is investigating january six and capitol hill get accused of being partisan and a lot of the american people will tune out the results. so we still do need an independent look at what happened during this period, people to collect the documents connected to the end to end assessment in the place we should not be first hearing this information is in bob woodward bucks, but unfortunate because congress didn't do theirjob, we have to count on bob woodward to tell us the story about what happened behind the scenes. miles ta lor, happened behind the scenes. miles taylor. very — happened behind the scenes. miles taylor, very grateful— happened behind the scenes. miles taylor, very grateful for _ happened behind the scenes. miles taylor, very grateful for your time. thank you for coming on.—
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taylor, very grateful for your time. thank you for coming on. four us gymnasts testified before the senatejudiciary committee — as part of a hearing about the fbi's handling of the sex abuse investigation, into larry nassar — usa gymnastics former doctor. simone biles, mckayla maroney, maggie nichols and aly raisman have all said publicly, that they were abused by nassar. it follows a damning justice department report, -- severalweeks -- several weeks ago, the department's _ -- several weeks ago, the department's director - -- several weeks ago, the . department's director general release to report that sharply criticised the fbi for making a series of crucial areas. there were more than 70 victims in the case and he was sentenced to life in prison in 2018. the world witnessed her mental struggles at the tokyo olympics. today, simone biles spoke about exactly what had contacted her. i don't want another young gymnast, on the deck athlete or any individual to experience the horror that i and
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hundreds of others have endured. the most successful gymnast of all time, she recalled the abuse she suffered at the hands of her former coach. to at the hands of her former coach. trr be clear, i blame nassar and at the hands of her former coach. trr be clear, i blame nassarand i at the hands of her former coach. trr be clear, i blame nassar and i also blame... an entire system that enabled and perpetrated his abuse. simone pyles and three of her former team—mates appeared in print at the senatejudiciary team—mates appeared in print at the senate judiciary committee team—mates appeared in print at the senatejudiciary committee to testify about the abuse they suffered at the hands of nasser. —— nassar. he is facing a life sentence. the investigation into how the fbi handled the case has already catalogued failures and lies told by agents, none of whom have been prosecuted. michaela maroney was one of the first to report abuse in july of 2015. i of the first to report abuse in july of 2015. ., , ., ., of 2015. i answered all of the questions honestly, - of 2015. i answered all of the questions honestly, clearly, | of 2015. i answered all of the i questions honestly, clearly, and of 2015. i answered all of the - questions honestly, clearly, and i discussed — questions honestly, clearly, and i discussed all of my molestations i had endured by nassar to them in
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extreme _ had endured by nassar to them in extreme detail. she had endured by nassar to them in extreme detail.— extreme detail. she said she felt, even when _ extreme detail. she said she felt, even when she _ extreme detail. she said she felt, even when she had _ extreme detail. she said she felt, even when she had finally - extreme detail. she said she felt, even when she had finally spoken | even when she had finally spoken out, her concerns were being dismissed. out, her concerns were being dismissed-— out, her concerns were being dismissed. �* . . , ., dismissed. began crying at the memory over _ dismissed. began crying at the memory over the _ dismissed. began crying at the memory over the phone - dismissed. began crying at the memory over the phone and i dismissed. began crying at the . memory over the phone and there dismissed. began crying at the - memory over the phone and there was dead silence. i was so shocked at the signs and disregard for my trauma that after that minute of silence he asked, "is that all." it would be more than a year before the fbi investigated the allegations, allowing nassar to continue his contact with children. today, the fbi director who took the top agency job after the case was reported said sorry. job after the case was reported said sor . �* . job after the case was reported said sor. . sorry. and i am especially sorry that there _ sorry. and i am especially sorry that there were _ sorry. and i am especially sorry that there were people - sorry. and i am especially sorry that there were people at - sorry. and i am especially sorry that there were people at the i sorry. and i am especially sorry i that there were people at the fbi who had — that there were people at the fbi who had their own chance to stop this monster back in 2015 and failed — this monster back in 2015 and failed. and that is inexcusable. it never— failed. and that is inexcusable. it never should have happened and we are doing everything in our power to make _ are doing everything in our power to make sure _ are doing everything in our power to make sure it— are doing everything in our power to make sure it never happens again. reports— make sure it never happens again. reports by— make sure it never happens again. reports by the department ofjustice found two fbi officials lied during
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interviews to cover up their errors. the fbi says one of those officials was fired last week. this hearing is the first public questioning of the case, but also one of the last opportunities for the athletes to get justice. opportunities for the athletes to getjustice. they have called on the committee to ensure that was mishandled the case will be held accountable. i'm joined now by marisa kwiatkowski, who was one of the investigative reporters who first broke the story about larry nassar five years ago in indianapolis. the thank you for coming on the programme. what was it that you did that fbi agents didn't?— that fbi agents didn't? that's a tou~h that fbi agents didn't? that's a tough question. _ that fbi agents didn't? that's a tough question. we _ that fbi agents didn't? that's a tough question. we listened i that fbi agents didn't? that's a tough question. we listened is| that fbi agents didn't? that's a i tough question. we listened is the simple answer. we received reports from three different women who accused larry nasser of sexual misconduct and we listen to what they had to say and we reported that out and continue to pursue that
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information.— out and continue to pursue that information. ~ . , , ., ., information. what is exactly what an fbi a . ent information. what is exactly what an fbi agent should _ information. what is exactly what an fbi agent should do, _ information. what is exactly what an fbi agent should do, take _ information. what is exactly what an fbi agent should do, take the i fbi agent should do, take the allegation and then further, correct? i allegation and then further, correct? ., ., , , ., allegation and then further, correct? ., ., ,, ., allegation and then further, correct? ., ., correct? i would assume that as part of their 'ob correct? i would assume that as part of theirjob responsibilities, - correct? i would assume that as part of theirjob responsibilities, yes. i of theirjob responsibilities, yes. and yet these two agents who were identified by the inspector general were still in theirjobs, certainly there was only one of them, i think in effect within the last week. they have been in post throughout. what you make of that?— you make of that? well, wj abbott the head of— you make of that? well, wj abbott the head of the _ you make of that? well, wj abbott the head of the fbi _ you make of that? well, wj abbott the head of the fbi office - you make of that? well, wj abbott the head of the fbi office in - the head of the fbi office in indianapolis i believe is the other person that you are referencing retired in 2018. by that time he had retired, that was three years after, almost, after usa gymnastics had received the first allegations against larry nassar and had reported those to the fbi. we also had reported in 2018 about wj abbott having conversations with former usa
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gymnastics president and ceo about a job with the us olympic and paralympic committee while he was looking into the allegations against nassar. the looking into the allegations against nassar. ,., looking into the allegations against nassar. ., , , nassar. the sad part about this is that it keeps _ nassar. the sad part about this is that it keeps happening, - nassar. the sad part about this is that it keeps happening, doesn'tl that it keeps happening, doesn't take? we have had an inquiry over here for the victims of thejimmy sabol abuse. we have had inquiries for the victims of abuse within the church. the same story repeats again and again, the victims are not listen to you and no one follows the trail. no one follows the abuse. is there anything that could come out of this committee hearing that would change that? ,, ., ., , , , ., committee hearing that would change that? ,, ., , that? sexual abuse is a pervasive community _ that? sexual abuse is a pervasive community issue. _ that? sexual abuse is a pervasive community issue. it's _ that? sexual abuse is a pervasive community issue. it's not - community issue. it's not exclusive to usa gymnastics or the catholic church or the boy scouts or any other organisation. but there are things that could be done by organisations to better ensure the safety of kids involved in those activities. and what we sow if usa gymnastics in the course of our
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investigation is that when they received allegations of sexual abuse involving somebody connected to the organisation, they dismissed fellas as hearsay unless they had been signed by the victim, a victim's parent and an eyewitness to the abuse. my understanding is now, in the wake of our reporting, they had cinched change that policy. but there are certainly power structures that exist in multiple organisations that exist in multiple organisations that continue to allow people who are accused of misconduct to remain involved with activities and remain around children.— involved with activities and remain around children. thank you very much for cominu around children. thank you very much for coming on, thank _ around children. thank you very much for coming on, thank you. _ at the criminal investigation will not be launched into diana princess of wales, scotland yard already set in march that they would not launch criminal proceedings, but added that it would now assess the contents of
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an independent report into the documentary. throughout the anti—doping agency is reviewing whether candidates should be abandoned substance. that was after shikari ratchets and tested positive for the substance injune. the agency says the review will begin next year and that cannabis will remain prohibited in 2022. being sent into orbit. the crew entirely not assess without a professional master not on board. the launch is carried outjust hours after pyongyang fired two ballistic missiles towards the sea of japan. our correspondent explains the significance.
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our correspondent explains the significance-— significance. within 'ust a few hours on this i significance. within 'ust a few hours on this on i significance. within just a few hours on this on korean i significance. within just a few- hours on this on korean peninsula, we have two they flew around 800 km track the sea of japan, they flew around 800 km track the sea ofjapan, also known as the east see here. these are ballistic weapons, so they are banned under un security council resolutions, so there will be international condemnation. as opposed to south korea's launch, which came from a submarine. now, interestingly, this is a mess of that's capable of taking a nuclear weapon, but south korea does not have nuclear weapons. this is a first for south korea. it will become one of only seven nations able to fire a missile from a submarine. it comes as south korea has increased its budget for it defence in recent years. they did he
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say here that it is to counter what is happening in the north. but it also has an added meaning, because he on the peninsula and south korea, 28,000 us troops are based. so south korea more or less relies on the united states for defence. and is called the nuclear umbrella because the us covers this entire region as an ally and is there in terms of defence. south korea has shown increasing steps that it wants to stand on its own two feet. at this budget increase commits decided to build an aircraft carrier, it has bought a whole bunch ofjets, so brand—new military hardware.
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they will circle the earth in space x capsule for three days our science correspondent rick becker remodel has this report. ——their mission has been paid for by billionaire businessman jared isaacman. he says the aim is to raise money for charity, so he has given three other seats on the spacex capsule to people with inspirational stories. sian proctor is a geoscientist who once came close to being selected as a nasa astronaut. and hayley arceneaux overcame bone
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cancer as a child and now works for the hospital that treated her. i remember getting off the phone and my hands were shaking. it was just so exhilarating. this is definitely not something i ever imagined would happen but i think that is what makes it so fun for me. the team has had just six months of training but computers will do most of the work during the flight. none of the crew, though, has been in space before, and no professional astronauts will bejoining them on board. you have got these four people who will be in a very hostile environment in space, trusting their lives on the technology, on the automation and on the knowledge of people in mission control. with the rocket ready to launch in a few hours, the amateur astronauts will spend three days orbiting the earth. the price of the mission has not been disclosed but it is likely to be tens of millions of dollars. for now, flights like these remain the preserve of the super—rich, even if they take a few people along for the ride. rebecca morelle, bbc news.
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let's bring in friend of the programme and retired nasa astronaut, leroy chiao. whenever icd stories, i always think back to the movie apollo 13. what if it goes wrong for these four non—astronauts up there above the earth. non-astronauts up there above the earth. . r' . , non-astronauts up there above the earth. , ., , earth. there is risk in any space fliuht, earth. there is risk in any space flight, lunching on _ earth. there is risk in any space flight, lunching on top - earth. there is risk in any space flight, lunching on top of - earth. there is risk in any space flight, lunching on top of our i flight, lunching on top of our rocket you're going to have to accept the risk. in a high—level committee could argue that maybe there is a little more rest because there is a little more rest because there is a little more rest because there is no manual back—up domino professional astronauts on board who could manually slide to safe craft. however, space facts, i know they have dropped through all of this, they worked throughout the issues. it's fully automated, and the mission control centre at space x can issue commands to the spacecraft, so i think if they are well in hand, the risks have been
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managed and i believe these folks will have a great time. find managed and i believe these folks will have a great time.— managed and i believe these folks will have a great time. and be less than the very _ will have a great time. and be less than the very best. _ will have a great time. and be less than the very best. it _ will have a great time. and be less than the very best. it sets - will have a great time. and be less than the very best. it sets off- than the very best. it sets off at eight o'clock eastern or from eight o'clock eastern, one o'clock local time here in the uk. tell us about this pad that we will be looking at, because this is quite a famous launching pad. because this is quite a famous launching pad-— because this is quite a famous launching pad. sure, this is the launching pad. sure, this is the launch pad _ launching pad. sure, this is the launch pad where _ launching pad. sure, this is the launch pad where apollo - launching pad. sure, this is the launch pad where apollo 11 i launching pad. sure, this is the i launch pad where apollo 11 launched from, the first mission that took astronauts to the moon, incidentally, it was also the launch pad where my first mission launch from a board space shuttle columbia, so i very historic launch pad. it's been carted that you converted to use for a space x, and a very historic launch pad. [30 use for a space x, and a very historic launch pad.— use for a space x, and a very historic launch pad. do you have any concerns about _ historic launch pad. do you have any concerns about the _ historic launch pad. do you have any concerns about the civilian _ historic launch pad. do you have any concerns about the civilian space i concerns about the civilian space missions? we have the us federal aviation administration that is just grounded virgin galactic�*s missions because somehow sir richard branson's space flight went awry. it went off course. is this a sort of thing they will have to put up with?
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are things just going wrong? weill. are things 'ust going wrong? well, ou aet are thingsjust going wrong? well, you get everything _ are thingsjust going wrong? well, you get everything you _ are thingsjust going wrong? well, you get everything you can - are things just going wrong? -ii you get everything you can to keep things from going wrong, and when something does, you have got to take up something does, you have got to take up pies and study it and understand it and take steps to try to keep it from happening again. in the case of space x, they have launched several of the is aircraft with astronauts on board. so they are learning the vehicle, the sun is a big difference to my manualflying capabilities have been taken out of it, however, that shouldn't compromise any of the systems or safety in the vehicle. so i think everything that can be done has been done, and, yeah, it is definitely a first time you are launching four amateurs on board with no professional and no manual back—up, but i think they are going to be well taken care of. for back-up, but i think they are going to be well taken care of.— to be well taken care of. for those of us each — to be well taken care of. for those of us each a _ to be well taken care of. for those of us each a map _ to be well taken care of. for those of us each a map going _ to be well taken care of. for those of us each a map going up - to be well taken care of. for those | of us each a map going up there, it just brings you a little bit closer. i don't think i have the money to actually pull it off. haley arsenal
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is the youngest person who has ever gone into space, i think. she has a medal rod in her leg, so also the first person with a prosthesis to go into space, which is extraordinary. it is. but because space flight process —— participants the requirements for what we would call a payload specialist much lower standards a payload specialist much lower standard . ., , ., ,, ., ., standards and fair professional astronauts _ standards and fair professional astronauts and _ standards and fair professional astronauts and allowed - standards and fair professional astronauts and allowed for- standards and fair professional i astronauts and allowed for things like that, for example, payload specialist that patient had to be correctable to 2020. so when you are not required professional on board, the medical requirements can be relaxed. . the medical requirements can be relaxed. , ., , the medical requirements can be relaxed. , . ., ., relaxed. libre, always great to get our relaxed. libre, always great to get your perspective- _ relaxed. libre, always great to get your perspective. thank _ relaxed. libre, always great to get your perspective. thank you i relaxed. libre, always great to get your perspective. thank you for i your perspective. thank you for coming on again. he never, if you are fascinated by this, you want to ta ke take it off tonight, you need to stay tuned to bbc world. we will have that life oreo around one
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o'clock. we wish all the astronauts going up into space all the best of luck —— nine astronauts. hello, and welcome to a look at weather for the week ahead, where the main concern is the weekend and the detail. but the past 48 hours have had quite a contrast for eastern england. the rain, nearly a month's worth of it on tuesday, followed by the drier, sunnier weather on wednesday. and it felt warm as well, temperatures a little bit above where they should be for this time of year. but what lies ahead ? well, the azores high is building in for thursday. still a few showers from our weather front around, and this next low pressure's looming large out in the atlantic. but ahead of it, it's pulling in the south to south—westerly wind, so again, temperatures through thursday and in eastern areas on friday will be above where they should be. and that's because ourjet stream is buckling to the west of us,
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pushing that main low pressure towards the north. but we may end up with a low pressure just sitting across the uk for the weekend, with the jet stream becoming weaker. but then into next week it strengthens again towards the north—west, driving the main lows across north—western areas, butjust, you can see here, the hint of low pressure close by across france. as for thursday, early fog is going to be an issue for rush hour, because it does linger through the rush hour this time of year. but then we should have a lot of dry and bright weather, perhaps a few showers around from the remnants of that weather front, but for most of us, the warmest day of the week, dry, warm spells of sunshine, but increasing cloud for northern ireland and later western scotland. a few splashes of rain as well, as southerly winds start to strengthen here. that's that next area of low pressure i showed you, which during thursday night and friday starts to get its act together, pushes a little bit further eastwards, but it's a slow process, as you can see. but it will mean a milder night after a cooler start on thursday morning, perhaps again a bit misty and murky first thing friday, as we'll see with that dense fog on thursday morning too. but it looks as if the east will then see more of that
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dry and warm weather, whilst further west we've got that slow—moving band of rain, which could sit across some areas for much of the day — likely northern ireland, western scotland, wales and western england, but the devil is in the detail, and particularly how far and how quickly that pushes eastwards through friday into saturday, taking some showers further east. so at the moment, the weekend doesn't look a wash—out. there will be rather more cloud around with that low pressure system and its weather fronts around, and some showers, as you can see, and they could fall just about anywhere. but still, in between them, it'll feel warm in the sunshine, because again the winds are mainly coming up from the south. still with us as we go into sunday, perhaps pushing a little bit further north and east at times, another weather front hot on its heels. so as i say, difficult to put the detail, pin the detail down on sunday, so if you do have plans, please stay tuned to the forecast. but again, it's one of sunny spells and showers for the most part, and temperatures perhaps a little bit pegged back on late in the week, but still, 17 to 20 is respectable for the time of year.
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so generally speaking as we then move into the new week, those weather systems get squeezed away by high pressure, so weakening affairs, really. the rain gets lighter, the cloud starts to thin, and temperatures will be similar to those of the weekend, 16 to 20 degrees celsius. and that is because we've got potentially high pressure building in, notjust from the azores but from scandinavia. as you saw earlier, it looks like the weather systems will be drawn towards the north and west, which is where we'll see the windiest and wettest weather, but there's always the chance that low pressure could come in from the south as well. so some uncertainty in the forecast for the weekend and beyond, but it does look like we'll see quite a bit of dry weather, bright weather, but with those weather systems close by to the north and west. as ever, we will keep you updated. watch out for that fog.
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tonight at ten — a sweeping government reshuffle — as borisjohnson sets the tone for the years ahead. gavin williamson is sacked as education secretary — widely criticised for his handling of school exams in england. dominic raab is removed from the foreign office — he becomes deputy prime minister and justice secretary. and liz truss becomes only the second woman in british history to take charge of the foreign office. the office. prime minister has put together a the prime minister has put together a strong and united team which is going to deliverfor the uk. we are determined to deliver on the people's priorities. a new pecking order, and a new phase as borisjohnson refreshes his team.

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