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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 18, 2021 1:30pm-2:00pm GMT

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into painful memories. reliving your trauma for a character is maybe not the healthiest thing, but i'm a romantic. i have a romance with this script, a romance with my character, a romance with the cast. it was, i think, in a way, therapeutic in the way that, what he called it was an exorcism. i relived all of this to play her. father, son and house of gucci... you must be very thrilled to again be talked about as a potential best actress oscar nominee this year? you know, it is so, it's so flattering and so kind of everyone to say that and i just want to say that i love artists and i love people so i'm here to celebrate all the great actors, all the great films, and to be talked about in that way is lovely. lady gaga, thank you so much for your time.
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thank you, lizo. time for a look at the weather. here's helen willetts. is going to get a bit more chilly? it certainly is, it is all about the temperature is, quite a contrast, this morning a touch of grass frost in the south and milder in the north and whilst mild air will win out for the next couple of days, taking birmingham as an example for the uk, it is set to get much colder by the end of the weekend with temperatures a bit below average by then. not just by day, it looks like it will be our first sustained period of frost and quite wide as well, it was birmingham city temperatures and we will have frost in the suburbs so it will have frost in the suburbs so it will get colder for everyone. at the moment, we have some milder air this morning rolling in off the atlantic, south of this front which continues to give heavy rain for the north of scotland, the northern isles as well but elsewhere, grizzly and dank, leaden skies whilst in eastern parts
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there is some sunshine. it will gradually fade through the cloud continues to meander eastwards but cloud or sunshine, it's mild, i6 continues to meander eastwards but cloud or sunshine, it's mild, 16 or 17 east every grampians in scotland and the average is more like about 9 degrees by day at this time of year. overnight, a few breaks in the cloud but are unlikely to get as cold as last night and instead it will be filled in by mist and low cloud so a lot of coastal and hill fog, misty and murky and therefore remaining mild and quite dank with more heavy rain continuing in the far north of scotland with the proximity of that weather front both tonight and tomorrow. still a chance of some breaks to the east every grampians and pennines but more cloud around candidates because we start with more cloud. just right rather than prolonged sunshine but still mild, temperatures well above where they should be for this time of year. but over the weekend we see that first drop in temperatures because there is another to come later next week and it is behind this cold weather
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front. as it introduces this blast of arctic air by the end of saturday, early sunday, as it reaches the southern area is quite a keen wind as well. and notjust by day we will notice it but widespread frosts by night. still relatively dry in southern areas and right on saturday when the cloud moves away but behind that front, much brighter and cleanerairso but behind that front, much brighter and cleaner air so brighter sky is not particularly cold on saturday because there is that transition date but more rain in england and wales and through the night, that clears away and temperatures will fall under those clear skies. wintry over the mountains of scotland in the showers and a blast of northerly wind on sunday. in the face of things, a 9 degrees, a big drop and peeling colder with the wind. thank ou ve peeling colder with the wind. thank you very much- _ that's all from the bbc news at one, so it's goodbye from me, and on bbc one we nowjoin the bbc�*s news teams where you are.
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hello, i'mjane dougall with your latest sports news... the government will intervene if the england cricket board do not take strong enough action, following the powerful testimony given to mps by former cricketer azeem rafiq on racism he experienced in the game. the sports minister nigel huddlestone has been speaking at the dcms select committee looking into the racism scandal and says he's getting frustrated at how slowly progress is being made. this has been going on with azeem rafiq formally from about 2017. we have seen the fact that this has been clearly kicks into the long grass for years. that's not appropriate, so i think we need a little bit of time for ecb and patel, who is conducting his review, to think about what actions can be taken but i think we are all impatient here, including myself. meanwhile, somerset county cricket
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club have reprimanded jack brooks over historical tweets he sent which contained racist connotations. the club investigated two tweets, sent in 2012 when brooks played for northamptonshire, as well as calling cheteshwar pujara �*steve' when they were both at yorkshire. brooks has "unreservedly" apologised. england's ashes test against australia in melbourne and next year's australian tennis open will be played in front of full crowds. it's after covid—i9 restrictions were eased in the state of victoria. the mcg cricket ground has a capacity of 100,000, and will stage the traditional boxing day test, which starts at 11.30 pm uk time on christmas day. the fourth and fifth tests in sydney will also be held in front of full crowds, but restrictions mean the grounds in brisbane and adelaide will only be three quarters full. earlier this year, there were limited spectator numbers at the australian open, and there was a five—day snap
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lockdown in the middle of the event, but january's tournement will be open to full crowds. well, it's not clear if the world number one novak djokovic will be there to defend his title at the australian open, as he reiterated his stand about freedom of choice over taking the covid vaccine. the victorian premier daniel andrews says international players who haven't received both doses of the vaccine will be denied entry into the state. djokovic has repeatedly declined to disclose his vaccination status. it doesn't really matter, whether it's vaccination or anything else in life, you should have the freedom to choose, to decide what you want to do. in this particular case, what you want to put in your body. so, i have been a proponent of that and a supporter of freedom of choice and i will be always supporting matt because freedom is essential for a
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happy and prosperous life. man back to football now. the new aston villa head coach steven gerrard has been speaking to the media for the first time since his appointment. he said being closer to his family and being back in the premier league were his reasons for leaving glasgow rangers. but the former liverpool midfielder denied it was in order to eventually get his dream job, of managing his old club. you will never hear me saying it's a stepping _ you will never hear me saying it's a stepping stone. for me, i'm really honoured — stepping stone. for me, i'm really honoured and proud to be in this position — honoured and proud to be in this position. as i say, i'm all in. i will_ position. as i say, i'm all in. i will give — position. as i say, i'm all in. i will give thisjob position. as i say, i'm all in. i will give this job everything position. as i say, i'm all in. i will give thisjob everything but it needs_ will give thisjob everything but it needs to — will give thisjob everything but it needs to be a success. i will be 100% _ needs to be a success. i will be 100% committed to and more and i don't _ 100% committed to and more and i don't think— 100% committed to and more and i don't think there's anything wrong in football— don't think there's anything wrong in football to have dreams and aspirations, but as i say, liverpool have _ aspirations, but as i say, liverpool have got— aspirations, but as i say, liverpool have got a — aspirations, but as i say, liverpool have got a world—class coach that they are — have got a world—class coach that they are very happy with. if he was to sign— they are very happy with. if he was to sign a _ they are very happy with. if he was to sign a lifetime deal right now, i would _ to sign a lifetime deal right now, i
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would be — to sign a lifetime deal right now, i would be very happy for them and him _ in the last few minutes, eddiejones has named his england side to play south africa this weekend at twickenham. courtney lawes will captain the side as owen farrell is injured, sale prop bevan rodd and newcastle hookerjamie blamire both start in a rookie england front row. the full squad is on the bbc sport website. that's bbc.co.uk/sport more now on the transport secretary, grant shapps, confirming the government is scrapping plans for the eastern leg of hs2 to leeds, as part of changes to rail services in the midlands and the north of england. instead, he announced that three high—speed lines would be built, including a service linking warrington to manchester. labour has described the changes as a "betrayal of trust" for people in the north. the prime minister insisted the proposals would bring benefits to passengers much sooner. we are doubling capacity between manchester and leeds. but you are cutting capacity
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on what it would have been? we are travelling capacity between liverpool and manchester, and of course, there are going to be people who always want everything at once. there are a lot of people who say, what we should do is carve huge new railways through virgin territory, smashing through unspoiled countryside and villages and do it all. the problem with that is those extra high lines take decades and they don't deliver the commuter benefits that i'm talking about. we will eventually do them. we are building more than 100 miles... yes, but you are derailing levelling up here, aren't you? yesterday, you said you crashed the car on sleaze and now you are derailing on levelling up by cutting your promises? total rubbish. this is the biggest investment in rail, in the industry for 100 years and it's a fantastic thing. levelling has also been criticised by...
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what it does is it delivers the types of commuter service that people have been expecting and people are entitled to in the south—east of the country and it will deliver that. it will also deliver better services for places that weren't on the original plan — huddersfield, wakefield, leicester. all sorts of places will benefit from what we are doing in ways that haven't been foreseen in the version. in every case, in virtually every case, you will find thatjourney times are shorter and capacity is going up. this is a much better plan. that was the prime minister answering some tough questions there. one of the areas which would have benefited from the expansion of hs2 was bradford, from where the leader of the opposition, sir keir starmer has been giving his reaction to today's announcement. bradford has been betrayed and the north of england have been betrayed because the prime minister
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made two very important promises — hs2 all the way to leeds, a new line. that promise has been ripped up. he also promised the northern powerhouse rail a new line from manchester to leeds and that plan has been ripped up. this was the first test of levelling up and the government has completely failed and let down everybody in the north and you can't believe a word the prime minister says. it says the £96 billion investment is the biggest yet and it will do more quicker than the other plan would have. what you say to that? i see two things about that — you don't have to drill down very long into that £96 million seven to realise that most of that or a good deal of that is money already spent on the bit of the line that comes up into the midlands, so that doesn't hold water. as for the improved speed of times, of course, that's a good thing but if you don't have a new liner, you don't sort out capacity and that is the biggest problem that we have in the north,
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so that is, i'm afraid, just the tactics of trying to ensure that focus isn't on what has really happened here, which is the breaking of two very important promises. if you cannot level up in bradford, then the whole levelling up agenda is seen for what it really is, which is just a slogan. in 2019, you set out a comprehensive plan, do you still stand by that? yes, we out a comprehensive plan for hs2 and for the northern powerhouse rail and that is the difference between us and the government. when we set out promises, we stick to them. the government makes promises and it rips them up and it's exactly what it's done today. and would you guarantee a station in bradford? yes, it's very important. i've just been to the site, you can imagine what that would be like and the investment it would bring for bradford and the north. of course, this is aboutjourney times and capacity, very important,
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but also the jobs and the investment that it brings to bradford and the north of england. all of that is being torn up by the government. lets get more now on the sentencing of if zephaniah mcleod who was sentenced after admitting to a series of knife attacks in birmingham in september last year. zephaniah mcleod must serve a minimum of 21 years after pleading guilty to the manslaughter ofjacob billington, as well as 3 attempted murders and 4 counts of wounding with intent. his father, gave his reaction outside the court. my son and his friends travel to birmingham on the 5th of september 2020 for a night out. jacob sadly never came home, while his friend, michael, sustains life changing injuries. jacob and michael and six other people had the misfortune to encounter a man who attacked them while they were
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enjoying themselves. this man, zephaniah mcleod, brought terror to the streets of birmingham on the night of the 6th of september in a to our orchestrated attack on eight people. finally, we now know after delay upon delay in getting to court that zephaniah mcleod will serve a life sentence with a minimum of 21 years. we have been reassured afterwards that it is highly unlikely that zephaniah mcleod will ever see the light of day again and that gives us a lot of reassurances. we are happy that this dangerous and evil man has been removed from society, and while we continue to grieve forjacob, we must ask the obvious question — why was zephaniah mcleod, known to so many agencies, allowed to be out and about on the 6th of september and supervised, and medicated and not under licence? these are the questions that the
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mental health services, prison services and probation services must answer. we miss jacob every single day but we take this opportunity to thankjacob�*s friends, who are behind me, ourfamily and our friends for the love and support that they have given us. thank you very much. that they have given us. thank you very much-— that they have given us. thank you ve much. ., ., g. . .,, very much. the father there of jacob billinuton. now its time for across the uk... as we've been hearing, the government's unveiled massive spending plans to invest in railways in the east midlands. while hs2 won't be built in full, it will come to the region in the form of a new high speed line from birmingham. building hs2 in full in the future hasn't been ruled out. and the prime minister has told the bbc he will fulfill an election promise and the whole midland mainline which runs through leicester and nottingham will be electrified.
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here's tony roe.. on board with the prime minister, who is pushing the new rail plan as the biggest infrastructure investment for a century, and it doesn't mean the end of hs2. the key thing is, from the east midlands point of view, we are not only upgrading the midlands main line, electrifying midlands main line, which we talked about years ago, you and i, but what we are also doing is building hs2, high—speed trains up on the right—hand leg of the y. high speed two is a game—changer for our rail network. _ we were told the dream of hs2 and told time and again it would be built in full. i think we would be letting down the midlands and the north of the h52 stopped in birmingham. now the government has woken up to the spiralling costs, so the dream stops at east midlands parkway. people keep saying we're not doing hs2, and ijust don't see where that comes from, because we are getting high speed
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line, new line from birmingham to east midlands parkway, 42 miles of track. that's nearly a £10 billion of investment on its own. and the toten transport hub, which is where hs2 was due to stop in the original plan, will still be built, and the hs2 line may still be extended through there in the future. most of the options to go north from here include toten as well. but we are also going to get a package of transport links, road, tram and rail to link toten into places like mansfield and ashfield, as well as nottingham and the surrounding area to access those jobs. and that is absolutely massive for our communities. so now, we know the government rail plan doesn't mean the end of hs2 in the east midlands. and for those living in hs2's path, that means uncertainty will continue. tony roe, bbc east midlands today. a farmer who was impaled by a forklift truck and survived, has been reunited with the medics who saved his life. jonathan willis from wisbech was unloading straw bales when the vehicle rolled into him. he and his wife have raised more than 45 thousand pounds
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for the air ambulance service. helen mulroy reports... it must have pushed things out the way as it went through. this steel prong used to be part of a forklift truck. the last time he saw it, it was protruding from his abdomen after he was impaled in a freak farming accident. figs after he was impaled in a freak farming accident.— after he was impaled in a freak farming accident. as soon as the sike farming accident. as soon as the spike touch _ farming accident. as soon as the spike touch my _ farming accident. as soon as the spike touch my back, _ farming accident. as soon as the spike touch my back, i _ farming accident. as soon as the spike touch my back, ijust - farming accident. as soon as the - spike touch my back, ijust wondered what that and i started twisting around and that's where it went across my body. the around and that's where it went across my body.— around and that's where it went across my body. the farmer was unloading _ across my body. the farmer was unloading straw _ across my body. the farmer was unloading straw bales _ across my body. the farmer was unloading straw bales last - across my body. the farmer was - unloading straw bales last december when the vehicle rolled into him. stunned wife, wendy, was alerted by jonathan's shouts from the yard and she called the ambulance.- she called the ambulance. seeing somebody standing _ she called the ambulance. seeing somebody standing there - she called the ambulance. seeing somebody standing there with - she called the ambulance. seeing somebody standing there with a l she called the ambulance. seeing - somebody standing there with a spike coming _ somebody standing there with a spike coming through their body, anyone would _ coming through their body, anyone would have said there is no way anyone — would have said there is no way anyone can _ would have said there is no way anyone can possibly survive this, and unfortunately, that is howl fell _ and unfortunately, that is howl fell it— and unfortunately, that is howl felt it was— and unfortunately, that is howl felt. it was terrifying. emergency
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services, including _ felt. it was terrifying. emergency services, including the _ felt. it was terrifying. emergency services, including the air - services, including the air ambulance arrived within seven minutes but it took an hour for the teams to cut it from the forklift, with jonathan awake teams to cut it from the forklift, withjonathan awake and standing throughout. it with jonathan awake and standing throu:hout. , ., throughout. it definitely made me -ause throughout. it definitely made me ause as throughout. it definitely made me pause as we _ throughout. it definitely made me pause as we approached - throughout. it definitely made me pause as we approached because | throughout. it definitely made me i pause as we approached because you wouldn't know to look at how jonathan was behaving that he was seriously injured. you hear about the character of the farming community and he is an example of that. g ., ., ., ., , ., , ., that. jonathan was transferred to hos - ital that. jonathan was transferred to ho5pital by _ that. jonathan was transferred to hospital by road _ that. jonathan was transferred to hospital by road ambulance - that. jonathan was transferred to hospital by road ambulance with | hospital by road ambulance with paramedics having to take the weight of the one stone time throughout the one our long journey. they worked on removing it during a seven—hour operation. l removing it during a seven-hour operation-— removing it during a seven-hour o eration. _, �* , operation. i couldn't quite believe what i operation. i couldn't quite believe what i was — operation. i couldn't quite believe what i was hearing, _ operation. i couldn't quite believe what i was hearing, i— operation. i couldn't quite believe what i was hearing, i thought - operation. i couldn't quite believe what i was hearing, i thought i . operation. i couldn't quite believe | what i was hearing, i thought i had misheard — what i was hearing, i thought i had misheard the _ what i was hearing, i thought i had misheard. the spike _ what i was hearing, i thought i had misheard. the spike had _ what i was hearing, i thought i had misheard. the spike had found - what i was hearing, i thought i had| misheard. the spike had found this amazing _ misheard. the spike had found this amazing trajectory, _ misheard. the spike had found this amazing trajectory, i— misheard. the spike had found this amazing trajectory, i would - misheard. the spike had found thisl amazing trajectory, i would describe it as the _ amazing trajectory, i would describe it as the eye — amazing trajectory, i would describe it as the eye of— amazing trajectory, i would describe it as the eye of the _ amazing trajectory, i would describe it as the eye of the needle - it as the eye of the needle trajectory, _ it as the eye of the needle trajectory, and _ it as the eye of the needle trajectory, and yes - it as the eye of the needle trajectory, and yes it - it as the eye of the needle - trajectory, and yes it transfixed a few parts — trajectory, and yes it transfixed a few parts of— trajectory, and yes it transfixed a few parts of the _ trajectory, and yes it transfixed a few parts of the intestines - trajectory, and yes it transfixed a few parts of the intestines but. trajectory, and yes it transfixed a few parts of the intestines but iti few parts of the intestines but it missed — few parts of the intestines but it missed all— few parts of the intestines but it
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missed all of— few parts of the intestines but it missed all of the _ few parts of the intestines but it missed all of the vital— few parts of the intestines but iti missed all of the vital structures, including — missed all of the vital structures, including those _ missed all of the vital structures, including those major— missed all of the vital structures, including those major blood - missed all of the vital structures, i including those major blood vessels. it including those major blood vessels. it was _ including those major blood vessels. it was extraordinary. _ including those major blood vessels. it was extraordinary. everyone - including those major blood vessels. it was extraordinary. everyone who i it was extraordinary. everyone who was there to save jonathan's it was extraordinary. everyone who was there to savejonathan's life, it was amazing. historians say they ve been joining the royal navy at sea since the mid 1600s, but right now the largest intake of chaplains to the service in living history is going through training at britannia royal naval college in dartmouth. six soon—to—be naval chaplains are undergoing their induction before joining the fleet — rebecca ricks reports. reverend doctor louisa pittman is one of six royal navy chaplains in training going through dartmouth at the moment. it's the largest intake of chaplains to the service in living history. doctor pittman will be the navy�*s third female chaplain. chaplains known in the navy as bish, cater for all faiths. this is the biggest intakes of chaplains i've ever known coming through the rnc at any one time
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and we have got three roman catholic priests, three anglicans, we have got a female. i think it's a real sort of symbol of the strength of the chaplains branch. chaplains, known in the navy as bish cater for all faiths. once they go one sunday, they will say, actually, i kind of like that because what they expect, i think, is to sort of be preached out for 30 minutes and told what they are doing wrong and how they need to do better. what they get really from chaplaincy is what they get all the time from chaplaincy which is support, guidance, we are walking alongside you. they have to undergo a chaplaincy here at britannia royal naval college in dartmouth and they do much of the same training as the cadets. there are a few subtle differences. they do not carry weapons, they have different cap badges and unlike the army and raf, navy chaplains hold no rank. we assume the rank of whoever we are talking to. it's a wonderful opportunity
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to break down any barriers that rank might inhibit people being as open and honest in that situation. they can be expected to deploy anywhere in the world, be that on a submarine or in the austere deserts with the royal marines. as a chaplain on board a ship, the ship is your parish. father victor dakwan has recently returned from sea on hms argyll. he is now the bish at hms raleigh, where the navy trains its recruits. the six chaplains are expected to complete their induction by christmas and they can look forward to taking their faith to sea. paloma faith is best known for her hugely successful career as a singer—songwriter that's seen her winning six brit awards and releasing albums that have gone platinum.
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but earlier today, she's been talking to my colleague, victoria derbyshire about something quite different — about being mum to her two daughters and the reality for women — of childbirth and those first few months spent caring for a newborn. basically, our campaign isjust a sort of encouraging women, and i am myself openly talking about how it's not what we are sort of presented with. like, its not the rosy picture. personally, ion my first birth was like 78% of women in the uk completely shocked by what i went through and sort of a bit dismayed that nobody had told me what would happen and it's kind of like quite an isolating feeling. i had 21 hours of labour that resulted in an emergency cesarean with a premature baby. premature rupture of waters and then postpartum, quite a lot of difficulty with mastitis and stuff,
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so frida and i are kind of working together to sort of burst the bubble that we don't have to use in silence about it, but also, there is a lot of help out there and there is a lot of community because i think sometimes it can be quite a lonely time for women, thinking that they are the only person who failed, but it's not a failure because it's amazing. you made a person. what do you think you should have been told before you gave birth? ijust feel like i would have liked, like this campaign is doing, and more realistic preparation, and you know, just this morning, i posted about it on my social media, a real story of mejust after giving birth and ijust didn't look great. i was swollen and exhausted and i feel like all of that stuff is really important because lots of people present and project the opposite and it kind of does other women a disservice in a way.
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you mean other mums having just given birth looking unbelievably well and healthy and non—knackered posting pictures? yes, and i'm sure some of thwm do do that but it's very rare and so to put yourself and other women under that level of expectation i think is quite harrowing, so that's why i really wanted to be involved in this campaign. what was the biggest shock for you, either with your first birth or the second? well, i've now got two and what is the bigger shock for me with two is that they are so different. so, the experience of giving birth was completely different and also the postpartum journey and ifeel like if we are talking about advice to other mums, i would say, you know, people kept saying to me before, happy mum, happy baby and it's like argh! i would say that sleep and food
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are the two most important things and they seem so basic that if you can accept most help you can get to try and have those things then i think it improves your recovery. with my second baby, i definitely had a better and more improved recovery because i was prepared for that, and so it's about preparing first—time mums to fill their freezers and book people in, so they can have a sleep and all that sort of thing. now it's time for a look at the weather with helen willets. good afternoon. we have enjoyed a little sunshine in a few spots today. this is aberystwyth, just a short while ago. but on the whole, for what remains of today, tonight, and tomorrow, it will be predominantly cloudy. that will keep things mild because we are introducing south—westerly winds off the atlantic. quite tightly packed isobars, so quite a lot of wind through the rest of the day across the north, close to gale force, and with it,
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those weather fronts in close proximity, giving some rain, particularly across north—western parts of scotland and up into the northern isles, quite wet. but east of the grampians, some breaks in the cloud still. it is here we are seeing the highest temperatures, 16 or 17 celsius. but really, for most, temperatures are three, four, five celsius above what they should be during the day at this time of year. around about nine or 10 celsius for most. as i say, it's the wind direction. it's coming off the atlantic, it is quite a blustery wind out there today for all. but it should start to ease a little bit as we go through this evening and overnight. as it does so, actually, the cloud in the south of... the holes will be filled in by cloud, misty, low cloud in the south, and it's already quite drizzly around some of the irish sea coast and of course close to our weather front which is still hanging around tonight. so, it should be milder for all parts, even in southern areas overnight tonight. so, less sunshine potentially tomorrow. i think it will be quite misty and grey leaden skies, particularly again close to the irish sea coast where we have got that moisture coming in off
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the sea here and with our weather front starting to intensify later, but still potentially 15 or 16 where the cloud breaks east of the mountains across scotland and across the north—east of england. but that is really it. that is where the mild air stops, because as we get into the weekend, it is turning much colder. so this is the atlantic influence. as we go through saturday into sunday, we get a blast from the north from the arctic, so it will feel much colder, and we will introduce night—time frost as well through the coming weekend. and they will linger into next week. so, this is the culprit. this is the cold weather front, so behind it, cold air coming southwards. it is still quite mild across southern areas on saturday, still quite cloudy and grey at times, but much brighter skies coming to the north behind. as we go into sunday, we will also feel that colder air arrive across southern parts, as well. there is that weather front exiting the south coast, and then these showers coming southwards. over the tops of the mountains in scotland, yes, they could be wintry, but the main change is how it will feel much colder for all.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... ministers confirm the scrapping of a key part of the high speed hs2 rail link between the east midlands and leeds. the government promises faster journies up to ten years earlier than planned. i think this is fantastic, a monumental programme for rail investment for commuters, for passengers in the east midlands, west midlands, the whole of the north of the country. this was the first test of a levelling up on the government has completely failed and let down everyone in the north and you can't believe _ everyone in the north and you can't believe a _ everyone in the north and you can't believe a word the prime minister says _ where is this chinese tennis star?

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